All posts tagged: Stavanger

Jeff Gillette and “Dismayland” Emerge from Nuart Debris

Jeff Gillette and “Dismayland” Emerge from Nuart Debris

NUART-BSA-Banner-740-2016

For the ninth straight year, BSA brings Nuart to our readers – artists, academics, collectors, instructors, curators, fanboys /girls, photographers, organizers, all. Not sure who else has been covering this international Street-Art themed indoor/outdoor festival and forum as early and continuously as we have, but we’re happy to say that this Norwegian pocket of public art continues to hold its own among a suddenly bloated field of new festivals and events globally.

Today we have some process shots of artist Jeff Gillette in preparation for his exhibition at Nuart’s big opening this Saturday at Tou Scene. Tonight his solo show “Dismayland” opens at the inauguration of Nuart Galllery and Project Space with a very special presentation.

“Dismayland” sounds very similar to a magical kingdom that generations of kids grew up dreaming to visit in Orange County, California, where artist Jeff Gillette lives. For Street Art fans it also sounds very similar to the smaller version of that theme park lampooning it called “Dismaland” by the artist Banksy and 50 of his friends last September in Somerset, England. What many don’t realize is that “Dismayland” is the name a show that predates Banksy’s by five years.

brooklyn-street-art-jeff-gillette-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-2

Jeff Gillette, Minsky. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Born partially of his own disappointment at not being able to go to meet Mickey and Minnie as a kid, Gillette created canvasses, sculptures, installations of slums with the pristine blue sky and cavorting characters in animations most closely associated with his childhood memories. Drawing attention to the disparity of wealth and quality of life that exists in the world with millions living in desperate conditions, Gillette also acknowledges that the $99 dollar one-day ticket to Disneyland is an insulting reminder to many that their chances to experience that magic are very slim.

brooklyn-street-art-jeff-gillette-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-3

Jeff Gillette at work on his installation for NUART 2016 Tou Scene indoors exhibition. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: You have been subverting Disney for years and roiling Mickey fans with dystopian and humorous scenes of human settlement that lay bare the rotten state of our folly. Is this installation a redux or continuation of your “Dismayland” – a furtherance of the themes you originally touched on in 2010?

Jeff Gillette: I started my theme of messing with Disney as soon as I moved to Southern California in the early 1990s culminating wth my “Dismayland” show at Copro Gallery in LA. After my involvement with Banksy’s Dismaland, Copro invited me to create the archway of the alternative art aisle at the Los Angeles Art Show. A construction contractor and I created a huge facade of the Disneyland Castle Logo from distressed wood I gathered out in the Mojave Desert.

My invitation to NUART gave me another opportunity to create a Disney Castle, this time from diagrams I found on the Internet. My sculptor wife, Laurie Hassold, and two volunteers built the facade and picked up trash all over the town of Stavenger to create a landfill that it sits on. My future aspiration is to build a life-like Disneyland Castle in a slum. In Indian slums during festivals, it is common for the residents to construct colorful, fantastical, temporary temples that look like castles in their neighborhoods. I’m working with a few artists in India to hopefully realize this project. I’d like to also flood a slum with toy Mickey Mouse dolls, for all the kids to have and play with. It would make for some quite surreal images.

brooklyn-street-art-jeff-gillette-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-4

Jeff Gillette at work on his installation for NUART 2016 Tou Scene indoors exhibition. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: Who is Minsky? How did he get that name?
Jeff Gillette: When creating work for Dismaland, at some point Banksy said ‘ no Mickey Mouses.’ I had to obliterate Mickey, my favorite icon, from some of my paintings ( although in most of them I hid a Mickey elsewhere in the details). I thought up Minksy then and played around with sketches combining Banksy’s Rat with the features of Mickey. The name is a contraction of “Mickey” and “Banksy.”

Before leaving for The UK, I printed a bunch of stickers and placed one in each of the dozen or so (clean and new) porta-potties at Dismaland on the opening day. I found out the artist Nick Walker, whom I later met, thought they were Banksy’s and took one for himself! In the Dharavi Slum in Mumbai, India, I taught my guide, Hashim Abdul who lives there, to paint Minksy stencils wherever he could without getting into trouble. Now Westerners who go on the popular ‘Slum Tours’ will see these characters on some of the walls.

Here in Norway, I’ve taken advantage of Stavanger’s open policy of welcoming street art to paint some stencils of Minksy in the town. It is strange to do this activity and not have to look over your shoulder or be prepared to get accosted.

brooklyn-street-art-jeff-gillette-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-1

Jeff Gillette at work on his installation for NUART 2016 Tou Scene indoors exhibition. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: Last year Nuart featured the work of Bordalo II, who gathered local discarded junk to draw attention to our environmental impact on animal life. Your work appears to be more about the cost of meaningless consumerism to our souls. Is that right?

Jeff Gillette: That sounds good, but I like to think that my work specifically targets the commercial aspirations of Disney to be the “Happiest Place on Earth” mired in the reality of a world that screams out the exact opposite, at least on BBC and CNN. Personally, in my experiences interacting with poor people in slums, they appear surprisingly positive in their plight. What they lack in consumer comforts, they make up for in meaningful relationships with extended families and neighbor’s that the condensed living situation affords them. It still is abhorrent seeing people live in slum landfills, and my paintings try to show this.

brooklyn-street-art-jeff-gillette-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-5

Jeff Gillette at work on his installation for NUART 2016 Tou Scene indoors exhibition. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: To make something beautiful from a situation that is quite ugly – does that require a certain optimism?

Jeff Gillette: An optimism comes from the ability to be objective in experiencing the potential aesthetic quality found in ugly scenery. I travel to third world slums, visit landfills, and study visuals of natural and man-made destruction and find a strange beauty in it all. I struggle to distance myself from the actual toll on humanity and individuals by not including people in my work. The images instead become intricate fields of color and form conveying a feeling of beauty in worst-case-scenarios.

brooklyn-street-art-jeff-gillette-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-6

Jeff Gillette. Process shot. NUART 2016 Tou Scene indoors exhibition. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

 

Jeff Gillette solo show at Nuart Gallery “Dismayland Nord” opens tonight. Click HERE for further information.

 

We wish to extend our most heartfelt thank you to our friend Tor for sharing his photos with us in exclusive for this year’s coverage of NUART 2016.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Jaune and Axel Void on the Streets at Nuart 2016

Jaune and Axel Void on the Streets at Nuart 2016

NUART-BSA-Banner-740-2016

For the ninth straight year, BSA brings Nuart to our readers – artists, academics, collectors, instructors, curators, fanboys /girls, photographers, organizers, all. Not sure who else has been covering this international Street-Art themed indoor/outdoor festival and forum as early and continuously as we have, but we’re happy to say that this Norwegian pocket of public art continues to hold its own among a suddenly bloated field of new festivals and events globally.

Jaune and Axel Void are street practitioners of vastly different scale, yet both are on the streets of Stavanger right now putting up new work. Each have a way of engaging children with their work here, and probably the imaginations and memories of adults as well.

brooklyn-street-art-Jaune-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-6

JAUNE at work on a wall for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Jaune carries a miniature world that he recreates in many cities, and it invariably intersects with the sanitation workers who keep our daily existence so much cleaner. Adept at manipulating 2D and 3D scenarios using stencils, this small grouping of guys at the base of this building are only a small example of the much more expansive worlds he has created. Still you can image what kind of games this plays on the mind of your average 8 year old who discovers it.

brooklyn-street-art-Jaune-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-4

JAUNE at work on a wall for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-Jaune-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-7

JAUNE at work on a wall for NUART 2016 while a “subject” hovers over his shoulder. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-Jaune-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-8

JAUNE. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Likewise your average Stavanger kid may be surprised to see a certain familiar boy on this big wall by Axel Void – a mural which has gone up rapidly over the last couple of days. Based on a portrait of Gabriel, the son of Nuart founder Martyn Reed, this image is an instant emblem of the city and quite appropriate considering its proximity to a nearby playground.

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-1

Axel Void at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-2

Axel Void. Process shot. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-3

Axel Void at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-4

Axel Void. Process shot. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-6

Axel Void at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Check our the little people balancing on the fence to his right. Such Dexterety! Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-void-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-7

Axel Void completed his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

We wish to extend our most heartfelt thank you to our friend Tor for sharing his photos with us in exclusive for this year’s coverage of NUART 2016.

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
ERON and Henrik Uldalen Figuratively: Nuart 2016

ERON and Henrik Uldalen Figuratively: Nuart 2016

NUART-BSA-Banner-740-2016

For the ninth straight year, BSA brings Nuart to our readers – artists, academics, collectors, instructors, curators, fanboys /girls, photographers, organizers, all. Not sure who else has been covering this international Street-Art themed indoor/outdoor festival and forum as early and continuously as we have, but we’re happy to say that this Norwegian pocket of public art continues to hold its own among a suddenly bloated field of new festivals and events globally.

 

Two figurative paintings are taking form on Nuart walls at the moment, each revealing the distinct styles of their creators.

brooklyn-street-art-eron-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-1

ERON at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Italian Eron has a few routes to the form, some solid, others a mist. His themes have often included humanitarian crises and social injustice, most recently immigrants and refugees.

Sometimes his ephemerous forms of fine particulate matter take concrete shape, dimension, and finally lifting off and leaving the wall. In Stavanger for Nuart he is staying in the interstitial realm of almost here. The wading ghost-like female figure gazes on a whale, perhaps spouting a splashing, mired in a coal-hued timbre.

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-3

ERON. Work in progress for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-5

ERON. Detail. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-7

ERON.  NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-1

Henrik Uldalen color palette for his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Norwegian oil painter Henrik Aarrestad Uldalen is classically figurative, owing to the impressionists as much as modern photographers. His people are similarly holding still in a contemplative space; fading in and out of your screen with realist focus and hand-rendered, painterly blur. Here in Nuart it looks like Henrik’s mural will have a photo-real quality reflecting with hint of the formal languidity of Renaissance subjects.

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-5

Henrik Uldalen at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-2

Henrik Uldalen at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-3

Henrik Uldalen at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-4

Henrik Uldalen at work on his mural for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-6

Henrik Uldalen process shot. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-7

Henrik Uldalen process shot. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-henrik-uldalen-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2016-web-8

Henrik Uldalen. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. September 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

We wish to extend our most heartfelt thank you to our friend Tor for sharing his photos with us in exclusive for this year’s coverage of NUART 2016.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Fintan Magee. Nuart 2016

Fintan Magee. Nuart 2016

NUART-BSA-Banner-740-2016

For the ninth straight year, BSA brings Nuart to our readers – artists, academics, collectors, instructors, curators, fanboys /girls, photographers, organizers, all. Not sure who else has been covering this international Street-Art themed indoor/outdoor festival and forum as early and continuously as we have, but we’re happy to say that this Norwegian pocket of public art continues to hold its own among a suddenly bloated field of new festivals and events globally.

Melbournes’ Fintan Magee has just begun his 32 meter high double silos after the fierce rains dissuaded him for a couple of days. After carefully planning out the figure/s he’s gradually bringing them alive here in this coastal Norwegian town – a reminder of the maritime history of the people here, and the rising tides of our modern era.

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-1

Fintan Magee at work on his sketches for the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Ironically an oil economy like Norway’s is implicated in the warming of the atmosphere, so Mr. Magee’s ongoing program of climate-change related murals around the world takes on a special resonance here.  Thanks to an unfailing respect for intellectual independence, Nuart has often featured work that is critical to the fossil fuel economy over the years. Stay tuned for a finished image of Fintan’s towers this week.

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-2

Fintan Magee sketches for the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-3

Fintan Magee work in progress for the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-4

Fintan Magee’s work washed away by the pesky  Stavanger’s weather. Nuart 2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-5

Fintan Magee at work on the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-6

Fintan Magee work in progress at the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-7

Fintan Magee at work on the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-8

Fintan Magee at work on the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-9

Fintan Magee at work on the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-11

Fintan Magee. Process shot. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-13

Fintan Magee at work on the silos murals for NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-tor-staale-moen-nuart-stavanger-09-2106-web-14

Fintan Magee. NUART 2016. Stavanger, Norway. 09-2016. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

We wish to extend our most heartfelt thank you to our friend Tor for sharing his photos with us in exclusive for this year’s coverage of NUART 2016.

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 03.20.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.20.16

brooklyn-street-art-reed-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

The Street Art world was shaken this week by the announcement and group action by BLU and friends in Bologna buffing/chipping away his street pieces in reaction to the opening of a new show there Friday night that contained BLU works done on a derelict building owned by someone else.

The ironies are rampant when a city chases down vandals, sponsors graffiti/street art clean-up programs, and then heralds the exact same works in a formal museum show with good lighting, cocktails, elegant suits, a press conference, and invited guests. Aside from the various contingencies trying to hi-jack these events to put forth other agendas or establish their opinion as sacrosanct, the psychological and philosophical rifts have been self-evident long before this show and this astounding act of self-destruction.

We’re all wondering what is an amenable solution to interests that are by nature in conflict yet are so intertwined as to appear fused, and the list of questions to consider continues to grow. See our questions from a posting earlier in the week HERE.  Normally the press ignores these stories which we talk about regularly, but BLU mastered the PR game this week (and you know that serious money is involved) so it was in Le Monde, The Guardian, and ArtNet, among others. See some images from the opening and press conference are here.

Meanwhile the street can’t stop, won’t stop.

Here’s our our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Adam Fu, ATOMS, Butt Sup, El Sol 25, Fish With Braids, KEO Xmen, Knon, London Kaye, Nipper, Persue, Reed B More, Sean9Lugo, Scott Marsh, Self-Indulgence, SGNL, Skewville, Tara McPherson, The Yok & Sheryo and Zola.

Our top image: Reed B More. — Finding this handmade wire mobile hanging from electrical wires somewhere in Brooklyn made us very happy this week because; a. mobiles are cool, b. It’s hand made, one of a kind, and c. artists like Skewville and others were doing them at the turn of this century and we haven’t seen many lately. It is fashionable to bash muralism at the moment for usurping the spirit of Street Art, or some other silliness. It’s mucho mas dopetastic to just do good work and put it out there and let the hackneyed non-debate rage without you. We’re keeping our eyes open for small, often hidden, fresh, well placed, unexpected, unpredictable, original, one of a kind, non-derivative, non-hash-tagged pieces. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Speaking of Skewville…these new dogs have suddenly been flying in Brooklyn skies. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-london-kaye-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-2

It’s not just Pi. It’s octopi. London Kaye forever and ad infinitum. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-london-kaye-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-1

London Kaye. Here is our guess with this installation. The graff by Knon was already on the wall and she decided to collaborate. What do you think of the results? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-butt-sup-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Butt Sup under a Pear. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-sgnl-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-2

SGNL (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-KEO-Xmen-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

KEO Xmen on the other side… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tara-mcpherson-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Tara McPherson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-sean9lugo-el-sol25-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Sean9Lugo in collaboration with El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-sean9lugo-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Sean9Lugo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-elsol25-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

El Sol 25. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-sol-25-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-1

Popeye imagery pops up again. El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nipper-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-20-16-web

Nipper in Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-2

Zola. An apt street visual representation of the polarity we’re dealing with today. Although there would probably need to be 98 more of the figure on the left to present a more accurate ratio, and 97 of them would be sleeping or watching reality TV and ESPN. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-1

Zola. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Speaking of celebrity culture, Sydney based muralist Scott Marsh often depicts recognizable music personas like James Brown and Biggie Smalls in his figurative works. This week he completed this intense love scene parody on the street. But this is evidently more than romance, it’s carnal.

“No one can love Kanye quite like Kanye,” says Marsh of the new piece on Zigi’s Wine & Cheese Bar in Teggs Lane, Chippendale. Wonder what music they are listening to?

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-3-Scott-Marsh-740wide_Mar-2016-DSC_0577

New mural of Two Kanyes kissing in Sydney. Detail. Scott Marsh (photo © Scott Marsh)

“I’m a big Kanye fan,” says Marsh. “He’s an incredible artist and a character and I like that. I was contacted by Lush’s manager to help find him a wall in Sydney. He painted a giant Kim Kardashian at the other end. It’s probably the least effort I have put into any mural – I painted it in four hours as a bit of a laugh. The response has been hilarious.”

 

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-2-Scott-Marsh-740wide_Mar-2016-DSC_0577

Two Kanyes kissing in Sydney. Scott Marsh (photo © Scott Marsh)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-Scott-Marsh-740wide_Mar-2016-DSC_0577

Two Kanyes kissing in Sydney. Scott Marsh (photo © Scott Marsh)

brooklyn-street-art-fish-with-braids-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Fish With Braids updates Frida Kahlo on a purple van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-self-indulgence-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Self Indulgence (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-Atoms-Adam-FU-Persue-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

ATOMS. Adam Fu and Persue (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-yok-sheryo-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-5

The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-yok-sheryo-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-4

The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-yok-sheryo-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-3

The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-yok-sheryo-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-2

The Yok & Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-yok-sheryo-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web-1

The Yok & Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-03-20-16-web

Untitled. SOHO. NYC. March 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
NUART Upate: Ella & Pitr & Giant Return for a “Melt Down”

NUART Upate: Ella & Pitr & Giant Return for a “Melt Down”

Taking their inventive humor from St Etienne back up north to Norway this month, the French duo Ella & Pitr found that the weather was not quite as warm and agreeable as last August when they completed the largest outdoor mural to celebrate Nuart’s 15th.

During this visit they made a trip to the beach in Sola to wheatpaste a few illustrations on massive weathered German bunkers from WWII. The pieces give a sense of the enormity of the space, as well as the humorous child-like imaginations of the adventurous couple as they continue marching across the globe.

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-1

Ella & Pitr. NUART. Sola Beach, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

Later when they returned back to Stavanger and during a two-day snow storm the intrepid duo squished one of their overfed giants uncomfortably into what would otherwise be regarded as a large canvas – a 4 story building. He appears to be hurt as well, not sure what happened. It could have been a tumble down the stairs. They call this piece “La fonte des glaces” (Melt down), and clearly he’s having one.

A local talented photographer Tor Ståle Moen spent a lot of time touring around with Ella & Pitr and he tells us that they are planning to return again in the summer. Our very special thanks to him for sharing these images with BSA readers.

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-2

Ella & Pitr. NUART. Sola Beach, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-6

Ella & Pitr. Detail. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-7

Ella & Pitr. Detail. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-8

Ella & Pitr. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-4

Ella & Pitr. Detail. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-10

Ella & Pitr. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-5

Ella & Pitr. Detail. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-11

Ella & Pitr. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-3

Ella & Pitr. Detail. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-12

Ella & Pitr. Hand tinted wheatpaste. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-14

Ella & Pitr. “La fonte des glaces”. Work in progress. NUART. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

brooklyn-street-art-ella-pitr-tor-nuart-stavanger-03-16-web-13

Ella & Pitr. “La fonte des glaces”. NUART. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © @toris64)

Our sincere thanks to Tor Ståle Moen for sharing these exclusive photos with BSA. Please follow Tor’s Instagram adventures @toris64

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 02.28.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.28.16

brooklyn-street-art-lunge-box-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web-2

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

This simple lollipop paste-up reminds us this week that it may appear to be sweet, but sometimes it is poison. Guess that truism should be obvious to you kids, but it doesn’t hurt to remind each other.

Here’s our our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ECB, Escif, JPS, Kai, London Kaye, Lunge Box, Mogul, Nick Walker, Omen, Tref.no, The J0n, and Shai Dahan.

Our top image: A questionable lollipop on the street. Lunge Box. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lunge-box-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web-1

Lunge Box. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jps-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web-3

TREF in Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jps-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web-2

The J0n in Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jps-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web-4

JPS in Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jps-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web-5

The J0n in Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ecb-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

ECB in Borås, Sweden for No Limit Art Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-omen-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

Omen in Rochester, NY for Wall Therapy Art Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kai-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

Kai (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-shai-dahan-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

Shai Dahan in Borås, Sweden for No Limit Art Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nick-walker-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

Nick Walker in Stavanger, Norway for Nuart Art Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hyuro-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

Escif in Stavanger, Norway for Nuart Art Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mogul-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

Mogul in Borås, Sweden for No Limit Art Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-london-kaye-jaime-rojo-02-28-16-web

A belatedly found piece by Londo Kaye. There’s is never too late for love though… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
NUART 2015 Roundup : A Laboratory on the Street

NUART 2015 Roundup : A Laboratory on the Street

A roundup today for the Nuart street art/ mural festival in Norway with images of the final walls by this years artists. Now celebrating its 15th year, the mid-sized fjord-facing city of Stavanger has played host to a selection of international and local artists directly or indirectly related to the evolving scene we know as Street Art.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-6

Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Again this year the selection of invited participants is varied, potent, and occasionally a smack upside the head – with punk rock graphic designer Jamie Reid leading the way in spirit and on walls. Reid’s inspiration dates to the radical hippie politics and Situationist practices of the 1950s and 60s but he is best known for formation of the Sex Pistols anti-monarchial slash and burn visual identity and for penning their pivotal recording “Anarchy in the UK” – a history discussed in Carlo McCormick’s presentation during the Nuart Plus program.

In tandem with his paste-ups around town and installation at the formal gallery show was the lesser-known street photography of very-well-known graffiti photographer and ethnographer Martha Cooper, who displayed a selection of five decades of children playing on the streets with improvised toys and games – via an automated slide show – as well as an additional one she narrated during our panel on this year’s theme “Play” at Nuart Plus.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-5

Ella & Pitr. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

While neither Reid nor Cooper are thought of as Street Artists per se, their choice as participants gave grounding to the proceedings and is emblematic of director Martyn Reed’s holistic approach to an eclectic programming that mixes up the tributaries and the river in such a way that observers may better have tools to measure the creative flow that we are all witnessing on city walls across the globe today.

As we mark the halfway point of this decade and see the institutional discussions of Street Art taking form while academics try to place it in the canon of art-making and decide upon the nature of its impact, they do it with the knowledge that gallery shows, museum exhibitions, high-profile auctions, individual collecting, lifestyle marketers, and public festivals of many configurations and aspirations are already embracing its relevance. No one can possibly gauge this story in all of its complexity but some will capture its spirit. Being on the street helps.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-7

Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One way to get a pulse on the present is to attend shows like Nuart and witness the diverse stratagems that artists are using to engage their audiences and judge if they are successful at realizing their intentions. With a deliberately mixed bag of thinkers, feelers, documentors, aesthetes, and pranksters culled together for your edification, this show stokes the discussions.

Others may say that the headliners of this year’s Nuart were the French couple Ella & Pitr, whose record-setting 21,000 square meter mural of a young woman in running shorts lying in a semi-fetal position could only be viewed by helicopter across the roofs of a large construction company complex.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You could say that Stavanger streets were commanded with greater effect by the simple addition of Spain’s Isaac Cordal and his handmade concrete (or resin) bald businessmen, fifty or so of which he glued into crevices and upon ledges and structural fissures on buildings throughout town. Their sad existential conundrums are ours, even though we are guilting them with all the corrupt actions we are at least a little complicit in.

Arguably the greatest metamorphosis took place with the collection and assembly of local detritus – broken car pieces, old bicycles, tires, even ship buoys. Before you roll your eyes and think of homey craft-inspired planters on front lawns, the likenesses of animals that Bordalo II can evoke with his sculptures is uncanny and a little spooky.

His “stag” deer is meant as a commentary on the loss of natural habitat of the animals at the hands of what we call “development”. The companion piece of a whale overwhelmed by environmental poisoning in the Tou Scene gallery installation proves equally compelling and tragic.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Harmen de Hoop invited a top economist to perform his installation purely with chalk and a 30-minute lecture on the streets of Stavanger on the subject of option pricing, Dolk bravely experimented with a new abstractionist, reductivist approach that ran counter to the style he is known for, and brothers Icy & Sot were the most currently topical with their portrait of a girl whose distorted visage is that of a refugee boat crammed with people. If Nuart at times feels like a laboratory it may be the perfect analogy for the street experience in cities everywhere.

Have a look at many of the finished walls at Nuart this year. See our essay marking their 15th anniversary HERE.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-3

Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-8

Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-isaac-cordal-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Isaac Cordal. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-isaac-cordal-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-3

Isaac Cordal. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-isaac-cordal-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Isaac Cordal. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-dotdotdot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web

Dotdotdot. Portrait of Sex Pistol’s Johnnie Rotten/John Lydon. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-martin-whatson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Martin Whatson. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-martin-whatson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-3

Martin Whatson. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-martin-whatson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-4

Martin Whatson. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-martin-whatson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Martin Whatson. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-pejac-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web

Pejac did a reinterpretation of “The Scream” by the Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch, using a toy truck tire on a paint roller. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Futura. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. See his indoor installation video here. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Futura. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Sandra Chevrier. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Sandra Chevrier. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-3

Sandra Chevrier. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-nafir-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web

Nafir. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-the-outings-project-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

The Outings Project. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-the-outings-project-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

The Outings Project. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Ernest Zacharevic. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-3

Ernest Zacharevic. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Ernest Zacharevic. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-dolk-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web

Dolk. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Icy & Sot. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

Icy & Sot. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-3

Icy & Sot. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-4

Icy & Sot. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bortusk-leer-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web

Bortusk Leer. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bortusk-leer-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Bortusk Leer. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-1

Bordalo II. The artist preps the wall in the background. Trash collected from near by empty lots sits in the foreground to serve as the raw material for his work. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web-2

The completed wall by Bordalo II. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-harmen-de-hoop-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-15-web

Harmen de Hoop. CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Harmen De Hoop “Permanent Education” from NUART

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Nuart-2015-wrapup-Sept-13-740-Screen-Shot-2015-09-12-at-12.56

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Technology, Festivals, and Murals: 15 Years on the Street Art Scene

Technology, Festivals, and Murals: 15 Years on the Street Art Scene

It’s good to be asked to write an essay once in a while as it makes us take a step back and more fully examine a topic and appreciate it. On the occasion of Nuart’s 15th anniversary and it’s accompanying print publication last week Martyn Reed asked us to look at the street art / urban art / graffiti scene and to give an analysis about how it has changed in the time that the festival has been running. The essay is a long one, so grab a cup of joe and we hope you enjoy. Included are a number of images in and around Stavanger from Jaime Rojo, not all of them part of the festival, including legal and illegal work.

Technology, Festivals, and Murals as Nuart Turns 15

Steven P. Harrington and Jaime Rojo

Nuart is turning 15 this year and like most brilliant teenagers it is alternately asking you challenging questions, finding you somewhat uncool, or is on your tablet ordering a new skateboard with your credit card. Nuart started with mainly music and is now mainly murals; an internationally well-regarded venue for thoughtfully curated urban art programs and erudite academic examination – with an undercurrent of troublemaking at all times. Today Nuart can be relied upon to initiate new conversations that you weren’t expecting and set a standard for thoughtful analysis of Street Art and its discontents.

brooklyn-street-art-dface-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Pøbel (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We are in the thick of it, as it were, this great expansion of a first global grassroots people’s art movement. Give it any title you like, the flood of art in the streets that knocks on BSA’s door daily is unabated. We admit that we often get caught up in the moment and forget to study our forebears, Street Art’s progenitors and contributors – and that we sometimes are unable to appreciate the significance of this incredible time. So we are happy when the Nuart team asked us to take a long view of the last fifteen years and to tell them what we see.

As we mark Nuart’s milestone, we see three important developments on the Street Art scene while it evolves: Technology, Festivals, and Murals.

And just before we discuss these three developments in Street Art we emphasize what has stayed the same; our own sense of wonder and thrill at the creative spirit, however it is expressed; we marvel to see how it can seize someone and flow amidst their innermost, take hold of them, convulse through them, rip them apart and occasionally make them whole.

What has changed is that the practice and acceptance of Street Art, the collecting of the work, it’s move into contemporary art, have each evolved our perceptions of this free-range autonomous descendant of the graffiti practice that took hold of imaginations in the 2000s. At the least it hasn’t stopped gaining converts. At this arbitrary precipice on the timeline we look back and forward to identify three impactful themes that drive what we are seeing today and that will continue to evolve our experience with this shape-shifting public art practice.

 

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Technology

Hands down, a primary genesis for the far flung modern embrace of Street Art/Urban Art/Graffiti/public art lies in the booster rocket that propelled it into nearly everyone’s hands; digital communication and all its sundry technologies. From the early Internet websites and chat rooms accessed from your desktop to digital cameras and photo sharing platforms like Flickr in the early-mid 2000s to ever more sophisticated search technology and its accompanying algorithms, to blogs, micro blogs, and social media platforms, to the first generations of laptops and tablets, iPhones and Android devices; the amazing and democratizing advance of these communicative technologies have allowed more of us to access and share images, videos, experiences and opinion on a scale never before imagined – entirely altering the practice of art in the streets.

Where once there had been insular localized clans of aerosol graffiti writers who followed arcane codes of behavior and physical territoriality known primarily to only them in cities around the world, now new tribes coalesced around hubs of digital image sharing, enabling new shared experiences, sets of rules, and hierarchies of influence – while completely dissolving others.

 

brooklyn-street-art-tilt-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Tilt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As old guards re-invented a place for themselves or disappeared altogether, a new order was being remixed in front our eyes. There were a lot of strangers in the room – but somehow we got used to it. Rather than making street art pieces for your local peers, artists began making new compositions for somebody’s phone screen in London or Honolulu or Shanghai.

Cut free from soil and social station, now garden variety hoodlums and brilliant aesthetes were commingling with opportuning art collectors, curious gallerists, unctuous opinionators, punctilious photographers and fans… along with product makers, promoters, art-school students, trend watchers, brand managers, lifestyle marketers, criminologists, sociologists, journalists, muckrakers, academics, philosophers, housewives, and makers of public policy. By virtue of climbing onto the Net everyone was caught in it, now experiencing the great leveling forces of early era digital communications that decimated old systems of privilege and gate keeping or demarcations of geography.

Looking forward we are about to be shaken again by technology that makes life even weirder in the Internet of Everything. Drone cams capture art and create art, body cams will surveil our activity and interactions, and augmented reality is merging with GPS location mapping. You may expect new forms of anonymous art bombing done from your basement, guerilla image projecting, electronic sign jamming, and perhaps you’ll be attending virtual reality tours of street art with 30 other people who are also sitting on their couches with Oculus Rifts on. Just watch.

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-david-choe-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Swoon and David Choe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Festivals

Thanks to the success of festivals like Nuart, myriad imitators and approximaters have mushroomed in cities everywhere. Conceived of philosophically as a series of stages for the exhibition of artistic chops with the proviso that a cultural dialogue is enriched and moved forward, not all festivals reach those goals.

In fact, we have no reason to expect that there is one set of goals whatsoever and the results are predictably variable; ranging from focused, coherent and resonant contributions to a city to dispersed, unmanageable parades of muddy mediocrity slammed with corporate logos and problematic patronage.

brooklyn-street-art-mcity-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

MCity (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Some festivals are truly grassroots and managed by volunteers like Living Walls in Atlanta or MAUI in Fanzara, Spain. Others are privately funded by real estate interests like Miami’s Wynwood Walls or business improvement district initiatives like the L.I.S.A. Project and LoMan Festival in Manhattan, or are the vision of one man who has an interest in Street Artists, like the now-discontinued FAME festival in the small town of Grottaglie, Italy and the 140 artist takeover of a town in Tunisia called Djerbahood that is organized by an art dealer.

In some ways these examples are supplanting the work of public art committees and city planners who historically determined what kind of art would be beneficial to community and a public space. Detractors advance an opinion that festivals and personal initiatives like this are clever ways of circumventing the vox populi or that they are the deliberate/ accidental tools of gentrification.

We’ve written previously about the charges of cultural imperialism that these festivals sometimes bring as well where a presumed gratitude for new works by international painting superstars actually devolves into charges of hubris and disconnection with the local population who will live with the artwork for months and years after the artist catches a plane home.

brooklyn-street-art-dot-masters-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dotmasters (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nonetheless, far from Street Arts transgressive and vandalous roots, the sheer number of Street Art/Urban Art/Mural Art festivals that have popped up – either freestanding or as adjuncts to multi-discipline “arts” festivals – is having the effect of creating a wider dialogue for art in the public sphere.

As artists are invited and hosted and scissor lifts are rented and art-making materials are purchased, one quickly realizes that there are real costs associated with these big shows and the need for funding is equally genuine. Depending on the festival this funding may be private, public, institutional, corporate, or an equation that includes them all.

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Faith47 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As you may expect, the encroachment of commercial interests is nearly exhaustive in some of these newer festivals, so eager are the merchants to harvest a scene they had little or no hand in planting. Conceived of as vehicles for corporate messaging, they custom-build responsive websites, interactive Apps, clouds of clever #hashtags, company logos, Instagram handles, branded events and viral lifestyle videos with logos sprinkled throughout the “content”.

You may recognize these to be the leeching from an organic subculture, but in the case of this amorphous and still growing “Street Art Scene” no one yet knows what lasting scars this lifestyle packaging will leave on the Body Artistic, let alone civic life.

 

brooklyn-street-art-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stylistically these festivals can be a grab bag as well with curatorial rigor often taking a back seat to availability, accessibility, and the number of interested parties making nominations. While some festivals are clearly leaning toward more traditional graffiti schools, others are a hodgepodge of every discernable style from the past fifty years, sometimes producing an unpleasant sense of nausea or even tears over regrettable missed opportunity.

Clearly the quality is often uneven but, at the danger of sounding flip or callous, it’s nothing that is not easily remedied by a few coats of paint in the months afterward, and you’ll see plenty of that. Most art critics understand that the metrics used for measuring festival art are not meant to be the same as for a gallery or museum show. Perhaps because of the entirely un-curated nature of the organic Street Art scene from which these festivals evolved in some part, where no one asks for permission (and none is actually granted), we are at ease with a sense of happenstance and an uneven or lackluster presentation but are thrilled when concept, composition, and execution are seated firmly in a brilliant context.

 

brooklyn-street-art-tuk-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

TUK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Murals

Finally, murals have become big not just in size but popularity. Every week a street artist is exclaiming that this mural is the biggest they have every made. It is a newfound love, a heady honeymoon, a true resurgence of muralism. Even though you can’t rightly call this legal and sanctioned work true Street Art, many former and current Street Artists are making murals.

Un-civically minded urban art rebels have inferred that Street Art has softened, perhaps capitulated to more mainstream tastes. As Dan Witz recently observed, “Murals are not a schism with Street Art as much as a natural outgrowth from it.” We agree and add that these cheek-by-jowl displays of one mural after another are emulating the graffiti jams that have been taking place for years in large cities both organic and organized.

brooklyn-street-art-jps-mizo-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

JPS . Mizo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

From illustration to abstraction to figurative to surreal and even letter-based, this eclectic injection of styles won’t bring to mind what one may typically associate with the homegrown community mural. Aside from the aforementioned festivals that are festooning neighborhoods, the growth in mural-making may be attributable to a trend of appreciation for Do It Yourself ( D.I.Y.) approaches and the ‘makers’ movements, or a desire to add a personal aspect to an urban environment that feels unresponsive and disconnected.

Philadelphia has dedicated 30 years to their Mural Arts Program and relies on a time-tested method of community involvement for finalization of designs and most municipal murals have a certain tameness that pleases so many constituencies that no one particularly cares for them.

brooklyn-street-art-herakut-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Herakut (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The New Muralism, as we have been calling it, that is popping up is often more autonomous and spirited in nature than community mural initiatives of the past with their ties to the socio-political or to historical figures and events. Here there are few middlemen and fewer debates. Artists and their advocates approach building owners directly, a conversation happens, and a mural goes up.

In the case of upstart community programs like the Bushwick Collective in Brooklyn, one trusted local person is ambassador to a neighborhood, insuring that community norms about nudity or politics are respected but otherwise acts purely as facilitator and remains hands-off about the content.

brooklyn-street-art-jps-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web-1

JPS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

On that topic, effectively a form of censoring often takes place with murals – another distinguishing characteristic from Street Art. Given the opportunity to fully realize an elaborate composition, normally wild-eyed and ornery aerosol rebels bend their vision to not offend. Sometimes an artist can have more latitude and you may find a mural may clearly advocate a political or social point of view, as in recent murals addressing police brutality, racism, and inequality in many US cities, anti-corruption sentiments in Mexico, and pro-marriage equality in France and Ireland.

This new romance with the mural is undoubtedly helping artists who would like to further explore their abilities in more labor-intensive, time absorbing works without having to look over their shoulder for an approaching officer of the law. It is a given that what they gain in polished presentation they may sacrifice as confrontational, radical, contraventional, even experimental. The resulting images are at times stunning and even revelatory, consistent with the work of highly skilled visionaries, as if a new generation of painters is maturing before our eyes in public space where we are all witness.

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Moving Forward

Despite the rise in festivals and mural programs and the growing volume and sophistication of technology for sharing of the images, Street Art is still found in unexpected places and the decay of neglected spaces. As before and well into the future these self ordained ministers of mayhem will be showing their stuff in the margins, sometimes identified, sometimes anonymous, communicating with the individual who just happens to walk by and witness the work. The works will impart political or social messages, other times a simple declaration that says, “I’m here.”

Whatever its form, we will be looking for it.

brooklyn-street-art-isaac-cordal-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Isaac Cordal (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-Niels-Shoe-Meulman-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Niels Show Meulman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nafir-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Nafir (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-john-fekner-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

John Fekner (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-blek-le-rat-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Blek le Rat (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dan-witz-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dan Witz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-blu-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Site of an old piece by BLU (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dieche-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dieche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hush-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

HUSH (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dolk-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Dolk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-strok-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

Strok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-pleghm-jaime-rojo-nuart-stavanger-norway-09-15-web

The remnants of a Phlegm piece from a previous edition of Nuart. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Nuart Day 5: Flying High in the Norwegian Sky

Nuart Day 5: Flying High in the Norwegian Sky

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Nuart-banner-2015-Day-5-image-Steven_p-harrington

Live from Nuart as it’s happening folks, and the festival is proving to be a rather impressive small beast at this point – one with multiple heads and legs and hands waving paint brushes, aerosol cans, saws, drills, stencils, spot lights, fans, ship buoys, shovels, ladders, helicopter blades….. What?

brooklyn-street-martyn-reed-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Friday began with an helicopter ride to take the full scope of the giant Ella & Pitr roof top mural. Here we see Martyn saying good bye to all of us earthlings. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Yes, Martyn Reed gave a healthy scare to a number of guests by inviting them to view the massive Ella & Pitr piece from a helicopter hovering about on Friday in conjunction with a formal dedication ceremony. It’s the only way to truly see it, darling, and that is not simply a clever manner of expression – it is a literal one.

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Ella & Pitr. Detail of their roof top mural. More to come. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ground-based mortals may also see these painted red nails on giant hand inside the public art exhibition planned for Saturday night as the French couple have coupled their installation with the radically smaller scaled sculptures of Isaac Cordel, whose balding concrete curmudgeons lurk and mope and sink into the soil around the perimeter.

All three artists were in the audience at BSA Film Friday LIVE at the cinema downtown, which made us feel relieved because their videos were also featured in our show about PLAY. Thanks to everyone who came, including those sitting in the aisles and on the steps: think we need a bigger theater next time!

brooklyn-street-ella-pitr-isaac-cordal-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Detail of Isaac Cordal and Ella & Pitr collaboration in the Tou Scene tunnels. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Elsewhere the Outings Project liberated a number of museum pieces on walls here and there around the neighborhood, their unsung regal figures set loose yet rigidly posed on concrete blocks in empty lots. Some malformed and miscreant monsters have also popped up, seemingly over night, on pieces of printed news. They look rather similar to the installation of Bortusk Leer in the beer halls of Tou Scene, but not much like the realistic children on cut-out wood in Ernest Zacharevic’s installation nor Pixel Pancho’s three dimensional robot – a symbol used in many of his large scale murals appearing in cities around the world.

Stay tuned for more images, as we are a bit buried under a wealth of them right now but feel compelled to run outside and gather more while the sun is shining and the paint is still wet.

brooklyn-street-tor-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Tor channels Banksy with Ella & Pitr collaboration.(photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-the-outings-project-bortusk-leer-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

The Outings Project brings the masters outside onto the walls and Bortusk Leer’s monsters take an art history lesson. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-martin-whatson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Sandra Chevrier at work inside the Tou Scene tunnels at work on her collaboration with Martin Whatson. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Bordalo II at work inside the Tou Scene tunnels. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Futura at work on a new outside wall project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bortusk-leer-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Bortusk Leer. Detail of his installation inside the Tou Scene tunnels. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web

Ernest Zacharevic work in progress inside the Tou Scene tunnels. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-pixel-pancho-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

Pixel Pancho work in progress inside the Tou Scene tunnels. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-web

The tractor moving in on the chopper with Martyn on board . (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Film Friday: NUART2015 Live From Stavanger, Norway

BSA Film Friday: NUART2015 Live From Stavanger, Norway

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-stavanger-film-friday-web-4

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. NUART 2015 Special: FUTURA In Action in the Tunnels of Tou Scene

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: FUTURA in the The Tunnels at Tou Scene by Jaime Rojo

Straight from Nuart 2015 to you, this rare opportunity to be one-on-one with New York/world graffiti and fine artist Futura, a cat who defined a new space for many who came after him on the graffiti and Street Art scene. By embracing the spirit of play, exploration, and experimentation this guy helped transform our expectations about what a graffiti artist can do and he made space for many others to do some exploring and experimenting on their own.

Even 35 years after first making a break from NYC trains for the studio practice and gallery scene, Futura continues to try new ideas and techniques of expression. Somehow no matter how high he flies Futura also keeps it down to earth – so much so that he allowed photographer Jaime Rojo to try some experimenting of his own – Here is Jaime trying his hand at video-making on the scene in Stavanger this week.

Enjoy seeing the man in action as he prepares his brand new piece for the big opening this weekend at Nuart 2015.

 

FUTURA: NUART 2015. The Tunnels at Tou Scene. By Jaime Rojo/BrooklynStreetArt.com

 

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-stavanger-film-friday-web-1

Futura. Nuart 2015. Tou Scene. Nuart Art Festival. Stavanger, Norway. September 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-stavanger-film-friday-web-3

Futura. Nuart 2015. Tou Scene. Nuart Art Festival. Stavanger, Norway. September 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-stavanger-film-friday-web-2

Futura. Nuart 2015. Tou Scene. Nuart Art Festival. Stavanger, Norway. September 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

<<><><><><><><

If you are in Stavanger please join us tonight for BSA FILM FRIDAY LIVE at the cinema downtown where we will be talking about “Play in the Street”.

FB-BSA-Film-Friday-Live-Nuart-2015-v2

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Nuart Day 3 : Picking Up Pace and Sandra Chevrier’s Dramatic Eyes

Nuart Day 3 : Picking Up Pace and Sandra Chevrier’s Dramatic Eyes

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Nuart-Day-3-banner-2015-Day-1-image-Steven_p-harrington

A fever pitch is possibly overstating the tempo but not by much as Day 3 at Nuart continued to be wet and gray and at times a little windy (not typically good for stencil work by the way). A couple of people have gotten a cold – possibly due to painting in the rain for hours on end, possible due to drinking back at the hotel late into the evening, one cannot be quick to surmise. Regardless, the artists are full of industry and the results are appearing right here before your dramatic and alluring eyes.

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-3

Sandra Chevrier. Work in progress. Detail. Aftenblad Wall. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy and Sot moved to smaller figurative works in site-specific locations while arriving artists like Pixel Pancho and Martha Cooper began their prospective projects, his ivy covered mural awaiting a robot of some sort and hers a projection of her child’s play photography from the streets that will be on display at the Tou Scene opening. We’re eager to see what museum quality works will be appearing suddenly on Stavanger walls from Julien de Casabianca of the Outings Project, who’s just arrived with a number of figures who are itching to get outside.

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-2

Sandra Chevrier. Work in progress. Detail. Aftenbladet Wall. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sandra Chevier and her assistant labored with brushes for about 10 hours to complete her new Aftenblad wall despite winds from off the bay – just in time for Thursday’s dedication by the local newspaper, Stavanger’s largest. Bortusk Leer gradually filled his tunnel installation with sculptural and flat childlike/cheerful renderings of people and monsters and Ernest is projecting kids on the walls to begin his similarly juvenile-themed play scene.

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-5

Sandra Chevrier. Work in progress. Detail. Aftenblad Wall. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Futura completed his very large installation and allowed us to shoot some live video of it in process – which we’ll gladly post tomorrow on Film Friday – speaking of which we’re pretty excited about our program tomorrow BSA Film Friday LIVE at the cinema downtown as part of the Nuart PLUS programming where we’ll show video pieces related to this years theme of “Play” under categories of Exploring, Experimenting, and Inventing.

Martin Whatson has been creating a new winged creature and Bodalo II is bringing a horned one to life as the garbage has begun climbing the back walls of the former beer factory and assembling itself into a deer head.

Peering through the garbage bag tree “leaves” is Icy as he attaches the last pieces of green foliage and Isaac Cordal tells us he attached seven new little men on balconies throughout the neighborhood, including a couple on a nearby gas station/carpark overhang – evoking the oil businessmen who are briskly walking through streets here even as the shrinking economy adjusts to lower world oil prices.

brooklyn-street-sandra-chevrier-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Sandra Chevrier… Meanwhile at Tou Scene… Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thursday starts to really pick up the pace with Nuart Plus programming kicked off by Carlo McCormick, Evan Pricco (Juxtapoz), Harmen de Koop, and Bortusk Leer squaring off for a lively debate (“Should Art Have a Deeper Meaning?”) starting at beer-o’clock sharp (21:30) at a local pub – just after Harmen’s performance/mural “Permanent Education” on the street with Jan Uboe, a Mathematics and Statistics Professor from the Norwegian School of Economics.

After we tally up the numbers we’ll give you a full account.

brooklyn-street-nafir-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-2

Nafir. Work in progress. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-nafir-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Nafir. Work in progress. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-martin-watson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Martin Watson. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-martin-watson-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-2

Martin Watson. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-pixel-pancho-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Pixel Pancho. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Bordalo II. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-2

Bordalo II. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-3

Bordalo II. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bordalo-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-5

Bordalo II. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bortusk-leer-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-2

Bortusk Leer. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-bortusk-leer-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Bortusk Leer. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

Ernest Zacharevic. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-2

Ernest Zacharevic. Work in progress. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-5

Ernest Zacharevic. Work in progress. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-6

Ernest Zacharevic. Work in progress. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-ernest-zacharevic-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-4

Ernest Zacharevic has created a work on the wall that mimics a nearby statue “Johanne og Broremann” (Johanne and her little brother) made by Svein Magnus Håvarstein in 1993. Work in progress. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-4

Icy & Sot. Work in progress. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-5

Icy & Sot. Work in progress. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web-1

The light appears as the sun peering through the tree at Icy while he works on the installation he is doing with Sot. Tou Scene. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-jaime-rojo-nuart2015-09-02-web

A local Stavanger resident watches the action from a secured vantage point. Untitled. Stavanger, Norway. August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more