All posts tagged: Phetus

BSA Images Of The Week: 12.01.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 12.01.19

Welcome December! Welcome final month of the decade!

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week with 1 Up Crew, Bergero, Dirt Cobain, Disturbanity, Goal, Felix Gephart, Konozco, Lego Party, Leonardi, Lik Mi, HOAC, LOL, Phetus, Rice, Traz, TWC Krew, and Yard5 Festival.

Rice (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dirt Cobain . Butterfly Mush (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LOL (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TRAZ (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HOACS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bergero (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TWC KREW (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP CREW (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Goal (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Felix Gephart with Disturbanity for Yard5 Festival at Urban Spree Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Konozco (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lego Party (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lik Mi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Leonardi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 04.28.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.28.19

New York is in bloom still, Jay-Z just re-opened Webster Hall, artist Ross Bleckner is having his first exhibition since gallerist Mary Boone went to the slammer, Jose Parla (don’t call him a Street Artist) opened a new show at Bryce Wolkowitz, Martha Cooper’s documentary opened at Tribeca Thursday, and MANA is opening on a new Rammellzee exhibit this week. In short, New York is poppin’. So are the streets!

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Brujo, Captain Eyeliner, Cash4, Combo-CK, Dain, M*Code, Mike Lee, New Worx City, Phetus, Raf Urban, Reka, Sinned, and Zimer.

Top image: a Conchero altar in Queretero Mexico offers a meditative place full of symbols, metaphors and meanings. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist. Money buy politicians. Money has corrupted our democracy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)buys
Raf Urban (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dain is back on the streets with reissued imagery printed and pasted rather than custom crafted. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zimer (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sinned (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Combo CK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Brujo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Get It Girl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
M*Code (photo © Jaime Rojo)
New Worx (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Spotted on a park bench…poet unknown. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mike Lee. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mike Lee. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cash4 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Reka (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shoe installation by an unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Death and rebirth. Brooklyn, NYC. April 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Tehran To NYC / NYC To Tehran, Curated by Icy & Sot

Tehran To NYC / NYC To Tehran, Curated by Icy & Sot

Iranian Brothers Generate Cultural Exchange Between Two Homes

Icy & Sot, the Iranian Street Artists who have been making their mark on the New York scene for just two years are again making news by curating a gallery show that introduces Iran and the US to one another through the visual vernacular of Street Art.

With two shows running concurrently in Tehran and Brooklyn, the stencil loving spray painters have successfully exposed fans of this genre to the artists in another country with actual examples of art in a gallery setting rather than simply through the Internet. During the South Williamsburg opening on June 13th guests at the TBA temporary space were treated to works by 10 Iranian artists as well as a video projection on the wall of their counterparts  viewing the US artists show at Seyhoun Art gallery, which was recorded only hours earlier.

brooklyn-street-art-ck1-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web-6

Iran’s CK1 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Without diplomatic relations between the two countries, it is a wonder that this exchange could be cultivated, let alone executed. Given the restrictions imposed upon music, film, literature, and art since the revolution of 35 years ago, it added a layer of incredulity for gallery goers to measure the implications while viewing the works by a youth culture that has as its DNA a certain strain of rebellion.

New York sent the work of 35 artists, an impressively sized roster of participants who were each given size restrictions to keep shipping simpler and costs lower. While the brothers were clearly elated to bring new work to both cities, one might have surmised that the more excited feelings were directed toward their recently departed home where about 55% of the population is estimated to be under 30 years old and a youthful cultural evolution is said to be happening in the artist underground.

brooklyn-street-art-ck1-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s CK1 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Work from the Iranians reveals an accurately studious affinity for the pop of Warhol and irony of Banksy alongside polished versions of wildstyle and more modern graffiti lettering and loose splattering. The larger cross section of New Yorkers sampled from that pot as well as the myriad influences on the streets today including illustration, photography, geometric patterning, cartoon, and collage.

BSA spoke with the brothers as they were installing the New York show:

Brooklyn Street Art: So would you say this is primarily about cultural exchange?
Sot: Yeah, I mean the fact that there hasn’t been any relationship between Iran and the US, but this is totally about the relationship between the artists.

brooklyn-street-art-ill-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s Ill in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What do you think that a viewer at the New York show is going to realize when seeing these works?
Icy: First of all they are going to get to know the artists because they are not familiar with their work and haven’t had a chance to know them before. Also they will realize the fact that there are people in Iran doing this kind of art. It is underground, it is just a small scene, but still.
Sot: It’s a good chance for these artists to show their work.

Brooklyn Street Art: Would you say that these artists are taking real risks by showing their work like this?
Icy: I mean, for the street artists there everything is risky, putting works in the street… like having the show is stressful but luckily the people there have gotten their permits and stuff.

brooklyn-street-art-cave2-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s Cave 2 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Who did they have to ask for permission and what did they need to see?
Sot: It’s hard to translate the name but it’s an official organization
Icy: They have to check out the work and see it and they have to approve it.
Sot: Yes they have to do that for everything – for music performance or for art exhibits or anything, they have to go through this – but for this show it is at one of the oldest galleries in Iran so.

The guys related some of the exigencies of putting a show like this together and Sot talks about one of the artists who is an old classmate of his who doesn’t use the tools of communication that so many of his peers in the west would. “He doesn’t have a website for his art and he’s not on Facebook,” says Sot, “so I was like Facebook messaging another friend to ask him to call this guy for me and ask him to be in the show, and then to ask him for the status of shipping of his piece or information about the piece.”

brooklyn-street-art-hoshvar-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s Hoshvar in “Tehran to New York”(photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: So with the Superman and the Warholian Marilyn, I like this idea where there is a mixing of the two cultures together quite literally.
Sot: Yeah, for these shows there wasn’t really a theme but some artists, because they knew where they were going to be displayed made specific choices to communicate something. Like Gilf! wanted to write something in farsi so she picked the words “I am You” in farsi.
Icy: And El Sol 25 did the words “Iran So Far Away”, which is inspired by the song. (by Flock of Seagulls)

brooklyn-street-art-mad-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s MAD in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What is one of your favorite pieces here, or rather, which one would you like to talk about?
Icy: I like them when they talk about social issues.
Sot: Like this one with CK1 – it has all these pictures from newspaper with the Shah

Brooklyn Street Art: They look like they may have been around ’81 or ’82…
Icy: Yeah, then the hijab came after the revolution and then the women had to wear the hijab.
Brooklyn Street Art: So before then they didn’t have to wear it?
Sot: No, before that they could choose.
Icy: Then they had no choice.
Sot: And this one with Superman and on his chest it says “love” in farsi and there is Tehran in the background and there is the freedom tower in the background?

Brooklyn Street Art: Is that called “Freedom Tower”?
Sot: Yeah, or Liberty Tower, it’s like the symbol of Tehran. It’s like you have the Statue of Liberty here and that’s the freedom tower in Iran.

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-9

Iran’s CK1 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-FRZ-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s FRZ in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-shb-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

A more traditional piece by sh’b varies from the Street Art theme and displays the artistic influence of distinctly Persian origins. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

“NYC TO TEHRAN”

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-8

Tony De Pew, Sonni, Hellbent and Bishop203 (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-6

Gilf! on the wall with Joe Iurato on the pedestal. (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-2

A screened piece by Chris Stain based on a Martha Cooper photo. (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-4

Buttless Supreme and El Sol 25 on the bottom. (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-7

QRST, Cruz, Phetus (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-3

Enzo and Nio, Russell King  and Gilf! (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-1

Cern and Contemporary Adult Music (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-5

The mood in Tehran (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

The Exhibition NYC to Tehran is currently on view at Seyhoun Art Gallery in Tehran, Iran. Click HERE for more details. The sister exhibition from Tehran to NYC is now closed.

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

 

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

The 2013 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

Here it is! Our 2013 wrap up featuring favorite images of the year by Brooklyn Street Art’s Jaime Rojo.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-2013-Year-In-Images-Jaime-Rojo

Before our video roundup below here is the Street Art photographer’s favorite of the year, snapped one second before he was singled out of a New York crowd, handcuffed, and stuffed into a police car – sort of like the Banksy balloons he was capturing.

“Among all the thousands of photos I took this year there’s one that encapsulates the importance of Street Art in the art world and some of the hysteria that can build up around it,” he says of his final shot on the final day of the one month Better Out Than In artist ‘residency’ in NYC this October. It was a cool day to be a Street Art photographer – but sadly Rojo was camera-less in a case of mistaken identity, if only for a short time.

Released two hours later after the actual car-jumping trespasser was charged, Rojo was happy to hear the Chief Lieutenant tell his officer “you’ve got the wrong man”, to get his shoelaces back, and to discover this photo was still on his camera. He also gets to tell people at parties that he spent some time in the holding cell with the two guys whom New York watched tugging down the B-A-N-K-S-Y.

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-jaime-rojo-10-31-13-web

What’s everybody looking at? Jaime Rojo’s favorite image of the year at the very end of the Banksy brouhaha. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now, for the Video

When it came to choosing the 112 images for the video that capture the spirit of the Street Art scene in ’13, we were as usual sort of overwhelmed to comb through about ten thousand images and to debate just how many ‘legal’ versus ‘illegal’ pieces made it into the mix. Should we include only images that went up under the cover of the night, unsanctioned, uncensored, uncompromised, unsolicited and uncommissioned? Isn’t that what Street Art is?

Right now there are a growing number of legal pieces going up in cities thanks to a growing fascination with Street Art and artists and it is causing us to reevaluate what the nature of the Street Art scene is, and what it may augur for the future. You can even say that from a content and speech perspective, a sizeable amount of the new stuff is playing it safe – which detracts from the badass rebel quality once associated with the practice.

These works are typically called by their more traditional description – murals. With all the Street Art / graffiti festivals now happening worldwide and the growing willingness of landlords to actually invite ‘vandals’ to paint their buildings to add cache to a neighborhood and not surprisingly benefit from the concomitant increase in real estate values, many fans and watchers have been feeling conflicted in 2013 about the mainstreaming that appears to be taking place before our eyes. But for the purposes of this roundup we decided to skip the debate and let everybody mix and mingle freely.

This is just a year-end rollicking Street Art round-up; A document of the moment that we hope you like.

Ultimately for BSA it has always been about what is fresh and what is celebrating the creative spirit – and what is coming next. “We felt that the pieces in this collection expressed the current vitality of the movement – at least on the streets of New York City,” says photographer and BSA co-founder Rojo. It’s a fusillade of the moment, complete with examples of large murals, small wheat pastes, intricate stencils, simple words made with recycled materials or sprayed on to walls, clay installations, three dimensional sculptures, hand painted canvases, crocheted installations, yarn installations etc… they somehow captured our imaginations, inspired us, made us smile, made us think, gave us impetus to continue doing what we are doing and above all made us love this city even more and the art and the artists who produce it.

Brooklyn Street Art 2013 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

A Dying Breed, Aakash Nihalini, Agostino Iacursi, Amanda Marie, Apolo Torres, Axel Void, Bagman, Bamn, Pixote, Banksy, B.D. White, Betsy, Bishop203, NDA, Blek le Rat, br1, Case Maclaim, Cash For Your Warhol, Cholo, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Billy Mode, Christian Nagel, Cost, ENX, Invader, Crush, Dal East, Damien Mitchell, Dase, Dasic, Keely, Deeker, Don’t Fret, The Droid, ECB, el Seed, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Faile, Faith 47, Five Pointz, Free Humanity, Greg LaMarche, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, Inti, Jilly Ballistic, John Hall, JR, Jose Parla, Judith Supine, Kremen, Kuma, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Love Me, Martha Cooper, Matt Siren, Elle, Mika, Miss Me, Missy, MOMO, Mr. Toll, Nychos, Okuda, Alice Mizrachi, OLEK, Owen Dippie, Paolo Cirio, Paul Insect, Phetus, Phlegm, Revok, Pose, QRST, Rambo, Ramiro Davaro, Reka, Rene Gagnon, ROA, RONES, Rubin, bunny M, Square, Stikki Peaches, Stikman, Swoon, Tristan Eaton, The Lisa Project 2013, UFO 907, Willow, Swill, Zed1, and Zimer.

Read more about Banksy’s last day in New York here and our overview of his residency in the essay “Banksy’s Final Trick” on The Huffington Post.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images Of The Week: 09.01.13

brooklyn-street-art-judith-supine-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web-1

 

September is the perfect time of the year for Street Art in NYC – and shout out to the NYTimes who ran a double spread and video this week with images of Street Art and graffiti you can see here every week – including the great MOMO piece in Dumbo that was commissioned by Two Trees, and walls from the Bushwick Collective, 5 Pointz, Welling Court, Hunts Point, Coney Island and more. Seeing the collection made us think about how much BSA really covers throughout New York and the world every month and that made us happy as Bill DiBlasio, the apparent next mayor of NYC.

Also it was cool this week to step back and see everybody at the “Wild Style” 30th Anniversary free show in the park by the East River – to see so many people including Lee Quinones, both Ahearn brothers, Cold Crush brothers, Lady Pink, Fab Five Freddy, Futura, Mare 139, Jane Dickson, Lisa Lee, Patti Astor, Joe Conzo, Martha Cooper, among others – and Busy B, who reminded us that the early days of hip-hop were about “peace, love, unity, and having fun”. Yeah, we’re on board for more of that.

Stay tuned this month for exclusive BSA coverage of Nuart ’13 in Stavanger, Urban Forms in Lodz, Faile at the Dallas Contemporary, a number of new gallery shows with the new crop of artists on display, and even a chance for BSA to meet you in Bushwick at a special event on the 19th, wink wink.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week including Amanda Wong, Bunny M, Case Maclaim, Dede, Droid 907, Freddie 111 Street, Gilf!, Josh McCutchen, Judith Supine, Meer sau, Phetus, Phlegm, PRVRT, r1, Reme821, SARZTKG, and Vexta.

Top image is by Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo).

brooklyn-street-art-judith-supine-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web-2

Judith Supine. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-prvrt-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

PRVRT (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-vexta-gilf-kuma-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Vexta, Gilf! and the Boyz. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-phlegm-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web-1

Phlegm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-phlegm-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web-2

Phlegm. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-r1-Johannesburg-01-09-13-web-1

r1. Johannesburg, South Africa.  (photo © r1.)

“The piece is made of reclaimed plastic bottles that were assembled in a large wire mesh,” says South African installation artist r1, who created this piece in a way that reminded us of the El Anatsui show this year at the Brooklyn Museum and on the Highline.  “Community and street art seems to work well together,” r1 says when recalling the spontaneously posing kids who arrived to get in the picture.

brooklyn-street-art-r1-Johannesburg-01-09-13-web-2

r1. Johannesburg, South Africa.  (photo © r1.)

brooklyn-street-art-rime-phetus-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Phetus . Reme821  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dede-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web-1

DEDE  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Artist Unknown  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-meer-sau-01-09-13-austria-web

Meer Sau. Translation: “Damn, looking good today!” Salzburg, Austria. (photo © Meer Sau)

Meer Sau shares these smiles with BSA readers this week, where a crosswalk is emblazoned with some words of encouragement. He did the installation and then stood around waiting to see what expressions he could capture. “Everybody wants compliments,” Sau explains.

brooklyn-street-art-josh-mclutviwz-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Josh McCutchen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-freddie-111street-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Freddie 111 Street.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-case-maclaim-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Case Maclaim (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-droid907-amanda-wong-sarzTKG-Atlanta-01-09-13-web

Droid907, Amanda Wong and SARZ TKG in Atlanta. (photo © SARZ TKG)

brooklyn-street-art-magnet-wall-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

Magnet Wall in Chelsea with some regulars and new additions.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bunny-m-jaime-rojo-01-09-13-web

bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-nyc-2012-web

Untitled. Lower East Side, Manhattan, NYC. 2012  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Bushwick Is Hot Now. Hurry!

Bushwick Open Studios is Paved With Street Art

Brooklyn’s already percolating artists neighborhood called Bushwick continues to thrive despite the circling of real estate agents, lifestyle brands and celebrity chefs. Born in the mid-late 2000s as it’s older sister Williamsburg to the West began to professionalize, this noisily industrial and dirty artists haven got a reprieve from gentrifying forces when the deep recession slowed the rise of rents for artist spaces, which remained still relatively cheap by Manhattan’s standards. Today the area boasts a diverse influx of artists, students, cultural workers, and entrepreneurs who are experimenting and collaborating on projects and shows.

Spagnola (photo © Jaime Rojo)

That radical economic downturn probably also nurtured the nascent Street Art scene here, which was one of the early outliers of a cultural influx as artists and explorers began to skateboard to the local delis and stare at laptops for hours in the one or two cafes that offered  Wi-Fi. Outcroppings of this new art movement combined with old-school graffiti to pop up on selected concrete and corrugated walls, signposts, and deteriorated blocks where the authorities were disinterested and the neighbors only partially curious in their activities.

It’s an age-old New York story by now; a neglected or winding down post industrial neighborhood reacts to the incoming and odd-looking artists with a sort of bemused affection, happy that at least the block is getting some attention for a change. Puzzlement eventually leads to familiarity and then buying you a sandwich – and then asking you to paint a mural inside his foyer. While national and international Street Artists were already making Bushwick a stopping point thanks to some of the earliest galleries like Ad Hoc and Factory Fresh, the scene recently got newly shot in the arm by a local resident who is facilitating much desired legal wall space to a crowd of artists who otherwise would be hunting and hitting up less-than-legal spots.  Not to worry, there are plenty of aerosol renegades and ruffians scaling walls at night too; this is New York after all, yo.

Zimad (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But for now the Bushwick Collective, as it is newly christened by wall-man Joe Ficalora, has infused an adrenaline rush of creativity inside and outside the area that is roughly bordered by Flushing Avenue, Starr Street, Knickerbocker Avenue and Cypress Avenue.  The Collective has guidelines on content (nudity, politics, profanity) so the works are not completely unfettered in the true spirit of Street Art/graffiti, but most artists are happy for the luxury of time to complete their work and not look over their shoulder. With a selection of murals that are densely gathered and easy to walk through, the new collection has attracted attention from media folks (and tour guides) on the main island brave enough to venture into the gritty wilds of Brooklyn for a Street Art safari.

As Bushwick hosts its 7th annual open studios cultural event this weekend, intrepid pedestrians who march through opening parties, rooftop DJ jams, dance performances, live bands, transcendent costumery, sidewalk barbecues, open fire hydrants and more than 600 open artist studios will also be buffeted by a visual feast on the streets themselves. As long as the L Train is running (fingers crossed) you can just get off at the Morgan stop. From there it should be pretty easy for any curious art-in-the-street fan to be regaled with big and small works of graffiti, Street Art, tags, wheat-pastes, stencils, rollers, murals, and ad hoc installations all day and night.

Trek Matthews (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A shout out to Arts In Bushwick, an all volunteer organization that has steadily grown and fostered an open sense of community inclusiveness each year for Bushwick Open Studios and to the many volunteers who have contributed greatly to the success of many of the cultural workers here.  Without an open studios event many of these shy and quirky artists and performers would simply have stayed unknown and unknowable.

So far Bushwick still has the unbridled imperfect D.I.Y. enthusiasm of an experiment where anything can happen, but grey ladies with kooky bright colored spectacles have already begun to flip it over to inspect it with one hand while pinching their nose with the other, so savor this authentic moment.  Ethereal by nature, you know the Street Art scene is never guaranteed to you tomorrow – neither is the mythical artists bohemian hamlet of New York’s yesteryear.  For now we’re hopping on our bikes to catch a golden age of Bushwick before it’s repackaged and sold back to us at a price we can’t afford.

The first series of images are walls from the Bushwick Collective, followed by a series of walls that you may also see in the neighborhood.

MOMO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Alice Pasquini (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toofly and Col Wallnuts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stik (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Billy Mode and Chris Stain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nard (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Overunder and LNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pixel Pancho (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo and The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here are a series of walls not related to Bushwick Collective.

ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A portion of a wall by the 907 Crew, Sadue. Don Pablo Pedro, Smells, Cash4, and Keely (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Peeta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BR1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Apolo Torres (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris, Veng, RWK and ECB (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cruz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KUMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free Humanity (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Keely and Deeker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kremen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For a full list of activities, studios, schedules and directions for Bushwick Open Studios 2013 click HERE.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

“Latido Americano” Part II, la Segunda Parte

From “Latido Americano” in Lima, Peru comes Part Two of our photo survey of a Street Art / Graffiti event that blasts vibrant color all over your keyboard and onto your desk. No amount of pollution and traffic congestion in this crowded city can get these Street Artists and their color palettes down, even as the metropolis itself can seem like it’s often enveloped in grey. Entes y Pesimo obviously have a sincere love for their city and the fortitude that it takes to get such a large group of walls and artists and resources organized to make this a success, and our hats are off to them.

See our Part 1 here: From The Streets of Lima, “Latido Americano”, A Latin Heart Beat

Entes y Pesimo. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Entes y Pesimo. Detail. “Latido Americano” Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Entes y Pesimo. Detail. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Twis . Soten “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Toxicomano. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Steep. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Soten . Twis . Yuinhnz “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Soten . Twis . Yuinhnz. Detail. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Sego. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

OZ. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Cuore. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Saner. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Saner. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Phetus . Ket “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Pau. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Pau. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Meki. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Ket. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Jade. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Inti. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Hes . Fisek “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Hes . Fisek. Detail. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Guache. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Guache. Detail. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

DA2C Crew. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

DA2C Crew. Detail.. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

El Dem . Fog “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

El Dem . Fog. Detail. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

DMJC Crew. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Charquipunk. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Bien. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Bien. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Benas. “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

Benas. Detail “Latido Americano’ Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Estudio)

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more

From The Streets of Lima, “Latido Americano”, A Latin Heart Beat

From the 4th to the 15th of March in Lima “Latido Americano” took place courtesy of organizers and home-town artists Entes y Pesimo. Successfully putting it together for a second year, E&P are well respected among their peers as artists and social activists and they placed an international assortment of invited graff and Street Art people around the City of Kings, as it is called. With artists from Denmark and Mexico, Australia and Chile, “Latido Americano” exposed a number of cultures to one another in many neighborhoods in this city of immigrants and indigenous people where the sky is almost always grey and fried guinea pig is sold in the street markets.

Bien . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

During the event a number of process shots and finished pics were collected by Alqa Studio, and we gather them together here to give BSA readers an overview of the action. Our special thanks to Entes y Pesimo for their hard work and their contributions to BSA.

Included in the list of international and local artists participating in “Latido Americano”:

Benas (Mexico), Bien (Mexico), Charqui Punk (Chile), Cuore (Argentina), Fisek (Chile), Fog (Peru), Guache (Colombia), Hes (Chile), Inti (Chile), Jade (Peru), Jeanvi (Ecuador), KET (USA)Meki (Peru), Oz Montania (Paraguay), Pau (Chile/Germany), Phetus (USA)Saile (Ecuador), Saner (Mexico), Sego (Mexico), Soten (Denmark), Steep (Ecuador), Super (Peru/Germany), Tiws (Denmark), Toxicomano (Mexico), and Yuin (Australia), among others.

Steep . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Ket . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Phetus . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Fisek . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Entes y Pesimo . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Toxicomano . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Saner . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Sego from Mexico is well framed at Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Denmarks Soten and Tiws with Australian Yuin at Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Paraguay’s Os Montania in progress at Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Jade . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Hes . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Guache . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Benas . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

da2c . Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Fogdem tracing out the contours. Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

Daoe . Kars . Supermusik. Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

A Chilean in Lima; Inti at Latido Americano in Lima, Peru. (photo © Alqa Studio)

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images of the Week 09.16.12

 

Here is our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Cern, Dain, El Sol 25, ETAM, Hef, Ka TVT, Kosbe, Lae, Lucx, Meks, Never, Nice-One, Phetus, Pilot, Reyes, Rez, RONE, Sebs, Skewville, Such, Vers, Victor Reyes, and Yes One.

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Reyes. Click here for details on Reyes and Steel current show at Klughaus Gallery.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nice One and Lucx Collaboration in Chicago (photo © Nice One)

HEF. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Yes One, Hef, Ka TVT, Never, Phetus. Detail.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Yes One, Hef, Ka TVT, Never, Phetus, Vers, Such, Lae, Rez, Cern, Pilot, Such, Meks, Sebs Summer wall collab. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Etam painting in Vienna. (photo © Inoperable Gallery for BSA)

Etam in Vienna. (photo © Inoperable Gallery for BSA)

El Sol 25 new Ransom Letters Series. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 new Ransom Letters Series. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 new Ransom Letters Series. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artists Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

RONE in San Francisco. Click here for details on RONE current show at the White Walls Gallery (photo © White Walls Gallery for BSA)

RONE in San Francisco. (photo © White Walls Gallery for BSA)

RONE in San Francisco. (photo © White Walls Gallery for BSA)

Vintage Skewville in a bit of urban archeology in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more