All posts tagged: Pejac

BSA Film Friday: 06.28.19

BSA Film Friday: 06.28.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Gonzalo Borondo “Merci” Temple des Chartrons
2. ELLE in Allentown
3. Pejac: YIN-YANG
4. “Beyond The Streets” In A New York Minute – By Chop ‘Em Down Films
5. LL Cool J – I’m Bad

BSA Special Feature: Gonzalo Borondo “Merci” Temple des Chartrons, France. 2019

Finally opened, its the spirit of man and nature working in concert in this vast emporium, a transformatorium, of images and pieces of memory from Street Artist Borondo. If you are in Paris before August 18, it is a must see.

ELLE in Allentown

Former tagger and now fulltime muralist, Elle talks about a new work in Allentown, PA, which is trying to kindle a creative arts / high tech reputation after the iron industry left. “The gist of the entire collage is that all of women are more powerful together,” says Elle.

Pejac: YIN-YANG

Spanish Street Artist and studio artist Pejac is back with one of his visual aphorism that addresses climate change ironically.

“Beyond The Streets” In A New York Minute – By Chop ‘Em Down Films

Like we said earlier this week when this video debuted:

“It’s a unique talent to capture the fervor of an opening like “Beyond the Streets” in one minute. The show spreads over two floors and fifty years – the reunions alone were enough for an hour movie. But somehow Zane catches an individual, personal, flavor in a New York minute.”

LL Cool J – I’m Bad

Also, the because it’s Friday and because LL is Bad

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BSA “Images Of The Year” For 2018 Video

BSA “Images Of The Year” For 2018 Video

Here it is! Photographer Jaime Rojo of BSA selects a handful of his favorite images from his travels through 9 countries and around New York this year to present our 2018 BSA Images of the Year.

Seeing the vast expressions of aesthetics and anti-aesthetic behavior has been a unique experience for us. We’re thankful to all of the artists and co-conspirators for their boundless ideas and energy, perspectives and personas.

Once you accept that much of the world is in a semi-permanent chaos you can embrace it, find order in the disorder, love inside the anger, a rhythm to every street.

And yes, beauty. Hope you enjoy BSA Images of the Year 2018.


Here’s a list of the artists featured in the video. Help us out if we missed someone, or if we misspelled someones nom de plume.

1Up Crew, Abe Lincoln Jr., Adam Fujita, Adele Renault, Adrian Wilson, Alex Sena, Arkane, Banksy, Ben Eine, BKFoxx, Bond Truluv, Bordalo II, Bravin Lee, C215, Cane Morto, Charles Williams, Cranio, Crash, Dee Dee, D*Face, Disordered, Egle Zvirblyte, Ernest Zacharevic, Erre, Faith LXVII, Faust, Geronimo, Gloss Black, Guillermo S. Quintana, Ichibantei, InDecline, Indie 184, Invader, Isaac Cordal, Jayson Naylor JR, Kaos, KNS, Lena McCarthy, Caleb Neelon, LET, Anthony Lister, Naomi Rag, Okuda, Os Gemeos, Owen Dippie, Pejac, Pixel Pancho, Pork, Raf Urban, Resistance is Female, Sainer, Senor Schnu, Skewville, Slinkachu, Solus, Squid Licker, Stinkfish, Strayones, Subway Doodle, The Rus Crew, Tristan Eaton, Vegan Flava, Vhils, Viktor Freso, Vinie, Waone, Winston Tseng, Zola

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BSA’s 15 Most Popular Murals of 2018: A “Social” Survey

BSA’s 15 Most Popular Murals of 2018: A “Social” Survey

There’s street cred, and then there’s social media credit. These are 15 of the latter, compiled by BSA by our own rigorous methodology.

Bears lead the pack! A monkey is here as well. Skulls and Biggie Smalls make it in again. Text wisdom also wins along with representations of the natural world like Pejac’s tree and Naomi Rag’s flower. And a rep for Game of Thrones and the horrors of Hitchcock as well – you knew popular culture would represent.

These are the top murals from 2018 via tabulations of our website, Instagram, Twitter, and two Facebook pages. In a thoroughly unscientific survey that calculates “likes” and “clicks” and “re-Tweets” and “impressions”, and every year we cannot predict which one’s are going to be popular, but sometimes you can guess. We don’t publish a lot of murals of cats, but if we did, they would probably win. Just guessing.

This year we’re drawn to the two written word pieces, likely because they are erudite and witty to some extent – and because it is good to see how smart BSA readers are. Brilliant, we say!

Welcome to your favorite murals of the year:


15 – Banksy.

A tribute. A plea. A denunciation. A well used example of the artist’s platform to bring awareness of the plight of artists who dare to set themselves free with their art. Depicted here is Ms. Zehra Doğan, an editor and journalist from Turkey. She is presently serving time in jail for painting Turkish flags on a painting showing destroyed buildings and posting the painting on Social Media. Marking the time with tick

Banksy. Free Zehra Doğan. NYC. Houston/Bowery Wall. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

14 – Sonny Sundancer.

Sonny Sundancer finishes his final mural for his #totheboneproject , a grizzly titled “Standing Tall” looking out over Greenwich Village.

“Standing Tall” was done in conjunction with The L.I.S.A Project NYC. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

13 – Axe Colours.

Axe Colours goes GOT and the question going into 2019 in many people’s minds is: Will she or won’t she?

The Mother of Dragons on the streets of Barcelona as interpreted by Axe Colours. This photo was taken on November 2017 but shared on Instagram on February of 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

12 – Owen Dippie.

New Zealand artist Owen Dippie is known for pairing pop characters in his realistic large scale work. Here’s an odd couple of film director Hitchcock and Brooklyn rapper Biggie Smalls.

Pigeons, Ravens, Cigars, Mystery and Music on the streets of Brooklyn. September 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

11 – Kobra.

Brazilian artist Kobra gave himself a residency in NYC this year with the goal of painting as many murals as time and available walls would permit him. He succeeded by painting 18 walls throughout NYC – mostly the top level easy to identify icons found on t-shirts, posters and postcards for decades here. One of his portraits of Amy Winehouse proved to be hugely popular.

Kobra. Amy Winehouse. Manhattan, October 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1o – Disordered.

Anxiety rings true when the giveaways to business interests for nearly four decades under both dominant parties have gradually placed folks like these in this neighborhood constantly in fear of missing the rent, the grocery bill, the car payment, the cost of providing for their kids. Disordered is right.

#DISORDERED. Done in Welling Court, Queens for Welling Court 2018. July 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

9 – Kaos.

The KAOS Factory, colloquially named because the German graffiti artist by the same name has slowly taken it over with his work during the last few years, by default converting the former steam factory into his de facto “residency”.

KAOS. The Kaos Factory. Leipzig, Germany. October 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

8 – Naomi Rag.

Not specifically a Street Artist, Naomi Rag crochets her favorite things and puts them up mainly on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. This simple rose on a school yard fence steadily garnered attention throughout the year – and reminded us of this song from the 1960s.

“There is a rose in Spanish Harlem
A red rose up in Spanish Harlem
It is a special one, it’s never seen the sun
It only comes out when the moon is on the run
And all the stars are gleaming
It’s growing in the street right up through the concrete
But soft and sweet and dreaming…”

Jerry Leiber & Phil Spector

Naomi Rag. Red Rose in Spanish Harlem. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

7 – GlossBlack.

New York is a constant source of inspiration for countless artists of all disciplines who have made a home and hopefully a career in this dynamic city of endless serendipity and challenge. GlossBlack hit the mark with this tough and tumble tribute to the city.

GlossBlack in collaboration with Klughaus in Manhattan. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

6 – Bordalo II.

Bordalo II has evolved a spectacular practice of creating street works from our refuse that shock and thrill many a passersby with his ingenuity and evocative image making – while raising our collective consciousness about our responsibility to the earth.

Bordalo II. Lisbon, Portugal. June 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

4 – BKFoxx.

With a commercial eye toward the natural world and larger societal issues BKFoxx chooses subjects for their emotional impact and their ability to translates easily for an image-savvy audience whose endless hours of personal screen entertainment has produced an expectation for a big budget Hollywood and consumer culture slickness with high-production values.

BKFoxx in collaboration with JMZ Walls. Bushwick, Brooklyn. April 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

3 – Terry Urban.

Inspiration to create flows from many rivers and tributaries. Many times that inspiration comes from a fellow artist as is the case here. Art is for everyone, and the street is more than ever a perfect place to see it.

Terry Urban channeling Basquiat in Manhattan. January 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

3 – Egle Zvirblyte.

Egle’s feminism is abundantly clear on her work. A mixture of pop and riddles and unabashedly self assured.

Egle Zvirblyte. A project curated by BSA with the production assistance and wall access from Joe Franquinha / Crest Hardware and paint donated by Montana Cans. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2 – Pejac.

The Spaniard Pejac came for a few weeks to New York this spring and left this piece in Bushwick. The wall is a brick façade typical of many Brooklyn neighborhoods, but this one appears to have grown a tree this week. Perhaps he chose to paint this tree because the promise of spring had inspired him, or because this neighborhood remains industrial and could benefit from some more of nature’s influence. For us it’s all about context so it is good to see that a tree grows in Brooklyn.

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1 – Adrian Wilson

Just in under the wire and straight to number 1, this cleverly turned phrase and hooded ideogram is an ironic amalgam of Banksy and Warhol that hit the nerve of readers who are becoming acutely aware of us all slipping into a surveillance society. Also, it’s funny.

We only published this mural in December but the number of hits and comments across social media indicated that it resonates strongly across a wide demographic. Photographer, videographer, former gallery owner and infrequent Street Artist Adrian Wilson clearly is not shooting for anonymity.

Top image: Adrian Wilson plays with words to reflect our pop culture trolling both Warhol and Banksy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 04.08.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.08.18

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Happy Sunday ya’ll! April is the cruelest month, true. Magnolias today, snowstorm tomorrow.

Great to see the Spanish Pejac here in New York after years of writing about his work elsewhere. It has an extra special quality that plays with perception and that people respond to – especially when he paints blossoming trees at the exact time they are blossoming in our parks, back yards and front stoops. At the other end of the spectrum, the deliberately monstrous and unhinged west coast Neck Face was back for a couple cameos to add some jarring electricity to an increasingly homogenized and candy-covered NYC.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Cogitaro, Kusek, Libre, Lister, Manyoly, Neck Face, Pejac, Praxis VGZ, Skewville, and Stickman.

Top Image: Pejac. Detail. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. Detail. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. Detail. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Neck Face is BETTER THAN THE BEST… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Praxis VGZ (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Libre (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cogitaro (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Manyoly (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist…but YES can always say a prayer for pizza… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lister (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We can’t figure out the signature on this wall…we posted a different wall by the same artist, also in China Town a couple of Images Of The Week ago. Still no idea what the artist’s name. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stickman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Water Is Life (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kusek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A faux store front by Smart Crew. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

NYC Subway busker. Manhattan. April 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pejac: An Illusionary Tree Grows from the Bricks In Brooklyn

Pejac: An Illusionary Tree Grows from the Bricks In Brooklyn

The Spanish Street Art illusionist Pejac is in Brooklyn for a hot minute and he has been knocking back bricks to create a reversed relief that catches the attention of people passing by. The wall is a brick façade typical of many Brooklyn neighborhoods, but this one appears to have grown a tree this week.

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Perhaps he chose this symbol because the promise of spring has inspired him, or because this Bushwick neighborhood remains industrial and would benefit from some more of nature’s influence. For us it’s all about context so it is good to see that a tree grows in Brooklyn.

 

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pejac. The Bushwick Collective. Brooklyn, NYC. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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BSA Film Friday: 01.05.18

BSA Film Friday: 01.05.18

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. ONO’U Tahiti 2017. A video re-cap by Selina Miles
2. Private View: Ian Strange via Nowness
3. Desprestigio by Pejac
4. Bonus Video. What the hell is a “Bomb Cyclone”?

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BSA Special Feature: ONO’U Tahiti 2017. A video re-cap by Selina Miles

There is so much going on that you might miss during a mural festival. Aside from the progress of the artists at different rates in various locations around a city, which is a standard expectation, each festival is so unique in its personality and people that you cannot predict what you are likely to see next.

In Tahiti you can expect gorgeous natural beauty, and with ONO’U you can also expect a fashion show, a live projection mapping with the community, a panel discussion, a museum opening, delicious foods, flowers in your hair, and stories about the native people, wildlife, religious customs, colonialism, the value of the currency, and face painting. That’s before the weekend.

Filmmaker Selina Miles takes you up above it and directly streetside, a clear-visioned romantic who sees the beauty and the eclectic nature of our nature. Today we’re pleased to show her wrap up of October’s events in French Polynesia on the islands of Tahiti and Raiatea.

Private View: Ian Strange via Nowness

Continuing the attack on sublime suburbia to gain vengeance on the evil within, former Street Artist Kid Zoom, now Ian Strange, has the funding to do large and elaborate decimations and capture them on film for exhibition. Here is a private view, as it were, of a series of private matters made public.

 

Desprestigio by Pejac

Prestigious indeed.

A riveting bit of documentary storytelling that leads you to his newest artwork, Pejac takes a glocal story and reveals the folly of man. It happened 15 years ago, and is happening every few days all over the globe while the Earth’s economy is still firmly in the grip of the oil industry.

“This piece talks about the tragedy (of Prestige) that covered the coast of my country (and my region) in black 15 years ago, and whose damages to nature are still visible today,” says Pejac.  “I chose this particular case, but want to extend it to all the environmental tragedies that happen on our seas and oceans every few years. Desprestigio works as a dark souvenir of a fact that should not be forgotten: we must, and can, be much better guests on Earth. After all, this work is a message in a bottle.’’

Bonus Video. What the hell is a “Bomb Cyclone”?

We started this week’s Film Friday with Tahiti’s tropical weather and end it with our own Jaime Rojo wading through the snow in New York’s Central Park yesterday for what the news services informed us all was called a “bomb cyclone”. For most of us, it looked like a snowstorm. The blustery wind and the snow and rapidly dropping temperatures meant that many stayed inside and many took the opportunity to see the natural beauty of this whitewashing of the urban environment. Here are a few choice shots Rojo got yesterday for you from right in the middle of Manhattan.

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Pejac is Looking for “Redemption” with Particle Board

Pejac is Looking for “Redemption” with Particle Board

Each of us is looking for redemption, or probably will be.

At least that appears to be the theme for the new series of works by Spanish Street Artist PEJAC, a few shots of which we have today from his work on particle board in the studio.

“Each drawing in this ‘Redemption’ series are a tribute to nature. Any other subject would have been frivolous,’ he says.

Pejac (photo © Pejac)

With this curious wood product that is made of wood pieces pressed together – sort of like that orange cheese product that is made of cheese products – PEJAC finds a canvas. Using pencil and ink to draw forward certain floating elements while pushing back others, perspective is achieved. The small wooden model raises its palm upward as if to say, “why?”.

“These panels have some sort of aesthetic warmth but at the same time a sense of devastation, making it very contradictory, which directly refers to my way of understanding art. Expressing myself on thousands of small pieces of wood feels like “tattooing” on the stripped skins of trees,” he says.

Pejac (photo © Pejac)

Pejac (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac: Refugees, Immigrants, Mothers and Children in Jordan

Pejac: Refugees, Immigrants, Mothers and Children in Jordan

Spanish Street Artist Pejac paints small intimate works in public space that are neither splashy nor enigma. Straightforward in themes, he often balances the sharp flat silhouette with the muddied impressionistic daubing of an earlier romantic period of painting. His work can lie between illusion and reality, and both can seem plausible.

Two new pieces in Jordan – one in the booming metropolis of Amman, another in the Azraq Camp for Syrian refugees an hour and a half away – speak to the status of children in the world today and tomorrow.

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Pejac. “Mothers Artists” Al-Azraq Syrian refugee camp. Jordan. April 2016. (photo © Pejac)

20,338 people live in Azraq Camp right now. 56% are children. A third of them live only with their mother as the head of the family.

The long days here are monotonous, uncertain and unfamiliar as these families once had homes and jobs and lives back in Syria – Aleppo, Dar’a, Homs, rural Damascus. No one knows if they will ever resume a life like the one they had.

The military style metal shelters in the intensely hot northern desert area lack electricity, but there is enough water and food thanks to the Jordanian people and the UN Refugee Agency.

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Pejac took inspiration for his work from this painting from 1908 titled  Playa de Valencia a la luz de la Mañana by the Spanish painter Sorolla.

Pejac took his inspiration from the mothers here who care for their children and create entertainment and stories and fantastical games to occupy them, distracting them from their current situation. He says he recognizes the skills of artists at work “A mother’s creativity is something truly admirable – how they manage to create a special world to protect their child by transforming reality into a better place,” he says.

To symbolize the power of imagination the mother figure here is compared to one in a painting by Spanish post impressionist Sorolla in the early 1900’s Playa de Valencia a la luz de la Mañana (Valencia Beach in the morning light). Here you can see the echoed figures and the mother describing the splashing ocean to her child while bathing her/him in a basin.

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Pejac. “Mothers Artists” Al-Azraq Syrian refugee camp. Jordan. April 2016. (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Mothers Artists” Al-Azraq Syrian refugee camp. Jordan. April 2016. (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Mothers Artists” Al-Azraq Syrian refugee camp. Jordan. April 2016. (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Mothers Artists” Al-Azraq Syrian refugee camp. Jordan. April 2016. (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Mothers Artists” Al-Azraq Syrian refugee camp. Jordan. April 2016. (photo © Pejac)

Elsewhere in Amman there are other new neighbors who are not in camps, living and playing alongside Jordanians. The small piece Pejac has painted next to a children’s playground is called “Rotation” and has two meanings, both of them tributes.

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Pejac. “Rotation” Jabal Al Webdah, Amman. Jordan (photo © Pejac)

“On the one hand I’m talking about Jordan, a country that has a long history of hospitality towards refugees,” he explains. “Today, for example, there are over 1.6 million Syrian refugees and over 2 million Palestine refugees in Jordan.”

Secondly, the spinning globe, much like a basketball being played by kids on the court, has a fate determined by this population with a median age of 22 (compare to US 37, Germany 46). “Without knowing it,” says Pejac, “a big part of Jordan’s population and its future is being determined by, is in the hands of, the kids.”

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Pejac. “Rotation” Jabal Al Webdah, Amman. Jordan (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Rotation” Jabal Al Webdah, Amman. Jordan (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Rotation” Jabal Al Webdah, Amman. Jordan (photo © Pejac)

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Pejac. “Rotation” Jabal Al Webdah, Amman. Jordan (photo © Pejac)

For more information about the refugee center you can read a PDF of the Azraq Fact Sheet APRIL 2016.

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BSA Film Friday: 02.26.16

BSA Film Friday: 02.26.16

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Pejac-Tires-740-Screen-Shot-2016-02-20-at-3.36

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Pejac: Heavy Sea
2. Giulio Vesprini: Promise
3. Rime at the Coliseum

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Pejac: Heavy Sea

Heavy indeed. Street Artist Pejac does the simplest of installations to highlight the sea of refuse we are creating. There isn’t much to say except this tired scene is repeated throughout the “developed” world, including floating in our actual seas.

 

Giulio Vesprini: Promise

PROMISE, a street art intervention by artist Giulio Vesprini. The work has been created between the 5th and the 7th of February in “Piazza della Pace”, a multicultural working-class neighborhood in Terni, Umbria.

 

Rime at the Coliseum

Currently having a show at Jonathan Levine in Manhattan, this is RIME aka Jersey Joe paying tribute to his friend NACE (NACEO) as a memorial to a graffiti innovator of the 1990s. “I felt like this would be a fitting tribute, many years after his passing,” RIME says.

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NUART 2015 Roundup : A Laboratory on the Street

NUART 2015 Roundup : A Laboratory on the Street

A roundup today for the Nuart street art/ mural festival in Norway with images of the final walls by this years artists. Now celebrating its 15th year, the mid-sized fjord-facing city of Stavanger has played host to a selection of international and local artists directly or indirectly related to the evolving scene we know as Street Art.

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Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Again this year the selection of invited participants is varied, potent, and occasionally a smack upside the head – with punk rock graphic designer Jamie Reid leading the way in spirit and on walls. Reid’s inspiration dates to the radical hippie politics and Situationist practices of the 1950s and 60s but he is best known for formation of the Sex Pistols anti-monarchial slash and burn visual identity and for penning their pivotal recording “Anarchy in the UK” – a history discussed in Carlo McCormick’s presentation during the Nuart Plus program.

In tandem with his paste-ups around town and installation at the formal gallery show was the lesser-known street photography of very-well-known graffiti photographer and ethnographer Martha Cooper, who displayed a selection of five decades of children playing on the streets with improvised toys and games – via an automated slide show – as well as an additional one she narrated during our panel on this year’s theme “Play” at Nuart Plus.

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Ella & Pitr. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

While neither Reid nor Cooper are thought of as Street Artists per se, their choice as participants gave grounding to the proceedings and is emblematic of director Martyn Reed’s holistic approach to an eclectic programming that mixes up the tributaries and the river in such a way that observers may better have tools to measure the creative flow that we are all witnessing on city walls across the globe today.

As we mark the halfway point of this decade and see the institutional discussions of Street Art taking form while academics try to place it in the canon of art-making and decide upon the nature of its impact, they do it with the knowledge that gallery shows, museum exhibitions, high-profile auctions, individual collecting, lifestyle marketers, and public festivals of many configurations and aspirations are already embracing its relevance. No one can possibly gauge this story in all of its complexity but some will capture its spirit. Being on the street helps.

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Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One way to get a pulse on the present is to attend shows like Nuart and witness the diverse stratagems that artists are using to engage their audiences and judge if they are successful at realizing their intentions. With a deliberately mixed bag of thinkers, feelers, documentors, aesthetes, and pranksters culled together for your edification, this show stokes the discussions.

Others may say that the headliners of this year’s Nuart were the French couple Ella & Pitr, whose record-setting 21,000 square meter mural of a young woman in running shorts lying in a semi-fetal position could only be viewed by helicopter across the roofs of a large construction company complex.

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Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You could say that Stavanger streets were commanded with greater effect by the simple addition of Spain’s Isaac Cordal and his handmade concrete (or resin) bald businessmen, fifty or so of which he glued into crevices and upon ledges and structural fissures on buildings throughout town. Their sad existential conundrums are ours, even though we are guilting them with all the corrupt actions we are at least a little complicit in.

Arguably the greatest metamorphosis took place with the collection and assembly of local detritus – broken car pieces, old bicycles, tires, even ship buoys. Before you roll your eyes and think of homey craft-inspired planters on front lawns, the likenesses of animals that Bordalo II can evoke with his sculptures is uncanny and a little spooky.

His “stag” deer is meant as a commentary on the loss of natural habitat of the animals at the hands of what we call “development”. The companion piece of a whale overwhelmed by environmental poisoning in the Tou Scene gallery installation proves equally compelling and tragic.

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Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Harmen de Hoop invited a top economist to perform his installation purely with chalk and a 30-minute lecture on the streets of Stavanger on the subject of option pricing, Dolk bravely experimented with a new abstractionist, reductivist approach that ran counter to the style he is known for, and brothers Icy & Sot were the most currently topical with their portrait of a girl whose distorted visage is that of a refugee boat crammed with people. If Nuart at times feels like a laboratory it may be the perfect analogy for the street experience in cities everywhere.

Have a look at many of the finished walls at Nuart this year. See our essay marking their 15th anniversary HERE.

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Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ella & Pitr. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Isaac Cordal. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Isaac Cordal. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Isaac Cordal. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dotdotdot. Portrait of Sex Pistol’s Johnnie Rotten/John Lydon. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Martin Whatson. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Martin Whatson. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Martin Whatson. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Martin Whatson. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pejac did a reinterpretation of “The Scream” by the Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch, using a toy truck tire on a paint roller. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Futura. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. See his indoor installation video here. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Futura. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sandra Chevrier. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sandra Chevrier. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sandra Chevrier. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nafir. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Outings Project. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Outings Project. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ernest Zacharevic. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ernest Zacharevic. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ernest Zacharevic. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dolk. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot. Detail. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bortusk Leer. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bortusk Leer. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bordalo II. The artist preps the wall in the background. Trash collected from near by empty lots sits in the foreground to serve as the raw material for his work. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The completed wall by Bordalo II. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Harmen de Hoop. CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE. Nuart 2015. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Harmen De Hoop “Permanent Education” from NUART

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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Pejac In Hong Kong and Small Acts of Art

Pejac In Hong Kong and Small Acts of Art

When it comes to art in public space it is not always about the enormous mural. Sometimes small acts of art are powerful as well.

After last October’s headlines from Hong Kong filled world press outlets with images of daily marches in the streets by youth, many wondered if this generation would be the one to advance the country toward a more democratic future. Marchers spoke openly of being dissatisfied with what they perceived as the intransigence and impermeability of political structures and a lack of social mobility among other issues.

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Pejac. The Re-Thinker. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

Many in the West were surprised by the throngs of youth clogging major arteries for days and nights, even setting up camp and conversing with police in a place where dissent is typically silenced swiftly. Along with other types of speech, street art and graffiti are sharply watched according to some artists, and this February the United Nations Inter Press Service reported the results of a study naming China as the most dangerous country for artists in 2014. From this news it is safe to say that Hong Kong is not exactly the best spot to catch an aerosol tag these days, and certainly not a piece with political critique.

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Pejac. The Re-Thinker. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

That’s why we were interested to see the means of expression Spanish Street and Fine Artist Pejac might employ when he told us he had just made a trip to Hong Kong. He says he thought a lot about his choices. As any Street Art watcher will tell you, context is a major criterion along with placement, and these few small interventions give you an appreciation for how Pejac perceived the tense environment, as well as how pertinent and very personal his messages were.

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Pejac. The Re-Thinker. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

The Re-Thinker

A small piece made on a window in his hotel bathroom, Pejac says he chose Rodin’s Thinker as inspiration because he felt that locals are not being allowed to think for themselves. He is not sure why he had the impression; perhaps because of the rush on the street and the lack of time and space and the rhythm of the city. He calls the small piece The Re-Thinker.

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Pejac. The Re-Thinker. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

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Pejac. The Re-Thinker. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

Tagger

“This piece is located in Hong Kong Central, precisely on Hollywood Road 97,” says Pejac. The use of a blow torch as an art-making tool is pretty impressive, as is the dragon, a well known symbol of strength and power. The difference here is how Pejac interprets the hot-breathed tagger in a docile and pleasing fashion. “This ferocious mythical animal that can cause hurricanes and floods,” he says, “here becomes a domesticated pet.”

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Pejac. Tagger. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

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Pejac. Tagger. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

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Pejac. Tagger. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

Oppression

Pejac’s last small but potent intervention was placed in front of the Central Government Complex of Hong Kong, he says, where last years ‘Umbrella Revolution’ protests were focused.

“The piece features the MSN Hotmail Butterfly trapped in a glass jar,” he says. “It works as a metaphor of the imprisonment of free speech and communication in Chinese peoples’ lives .
The butterfly is not killed but trapped, being able to see and feel, but left to slowly die.”

No word about what happened to the jar.

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Pejac. Oppression. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

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Pejac. Oppression. Hong Kong. May, 2015. (photo © @pejac_art)

Last year BSA talked to Pejac about his work and about his tribute piece to Monet, which he painted on the hulk of an abandoned ship on the coast of Canabria in the North of Spain.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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Monet Rising: Spanish Street Artist Pejac Impressionist Tribute on Ship

Monet Rising: Spanish Street Artist Pejac Impressionist Tribute on Ship

The clusters of barnacles on the corroded hull of the old ship form the rocky shoreline in this impressionistic tribute to Monet by the Spanish street artist Pejac. Here on the shores of Canabria in northern Spain, he bobs in the low tide while recreating a scene from a hundred forty or so years earlier over the harbor of Le Havre, France.

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

He says the tide alternately hides and reveals the work to passing vessels depending on the day. The original Monet work, ‘Impression, Sunrise” was the inspiration for the very term Impressionism that was eventually applied to an entire movement of French painters who eschewed the rigidity of realism in favor of intuitional readings of light and movement in the material world.

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

‘Impression Sunrise’ is an image that has always amazed me,” says the artist as he describes how he worked with the mottled surface to produce additional effects of movement and light in Santander. “The first time I saw the Monet painting I was surprised by the title as I thought it was actually a sunset.”

According to historians, many viewers thought so at the time as well, and for a while, a debate raged about the time of day Monet painted it.  Interestingly, the exact time of this sunrise was announced just over a month ago by Physicist Donald Olson of Texas State University, who has calculated the painting to have originated Nov. 13, 1872, right around 7:35 a.m. local time.

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

But it’s the site specificity of this sea-vessel wall that makes this tribute so meaningful to Pejac. “I think that the rusted metallic hull of this semi-sunk ship gives life to the image. With the daily sea tides of the Cantabric ocean the work is constantly above and below water,” he says, and because of it “The sea acts as a theater curtain.”

In his studio work Pejac tenders illustration style scenes of slightly askew possibility: clever visual metaphors that repurpose everyday events and objects and venture into the fantastic and possibly treacherous world of the imagination populated with aspiration, adventure, fears and other subterraneal musings. As a street artist Pejac looks for the rips and tears in the physical world and fuses those musings with a weathered wall or a storm drain, for example, and re-imagines them as passages or windows into other imagined scenarios. Here in the sea, his impressionist tribute takes on characteristics he can’t claim authorship of, but he relishes them nonetheless.

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

BSA had an opportunity to speak with Pejac and ask him about his practice on the street and how context factors into the process.

Brooklyn Street Art: How long have you been painting on the street?
Pejac: I started working in the streets in 2000 while I was living in Milan, Italy. But after leaving that great city this urge for public transgression kind of disappeared until about five years ago.

Brooklyn Street Art: Would you consider yourself a street artist, muralist, or a fine artist?
Pejac: A mix of all three actually. I just do not see that much of a difference; It’s just a matter of where you paint. Never the less I am very moved by working in the public space as it is the ultimate form of giving art to people who might have never stepped into a museum or gallery. Sometimes art is seen as something only meant and understood by elite society. By making street art in certain kinds of neighborhoods you are aiming to break up this dumb preconception.

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

Brooklyn Street Art: Most of your outdoor installations are designed within the context of what already exists and by adopting the existing environments and merging them with your art one can say that your installations are site specific. Do you enjoy altering the viewer’s perception with these installations?
Pejac: When doing a street work I always adapt to the very colors, textures and dimensions of the wall or whatever surface I’m working on. But as important as this is, it is also the visual and social context. Despite the fact that we live in a globalized and shrinking world where the artistic language breaks a lot of barriers.. there are still a huge variety of points of view from which to see our lives. Hence one work can have very different readings depending on the context and each work functions according to its location.

Brooklyn Street Art: Which is more difficult? Making a simple presentation, or a complex one?
Pejac: Making a work look simple is quite complex.

Brooklyn Street Art: Whose work on the street do you admire today?
Pejac: There are a few, but for example the work of the French artist Dran always makes me smile. I also find the work of the Spanish artist Aryz very different and stimulating.

 

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‘Impression, Sunrise” (Impression, soleil levant), 1872, Oil on canvas, Musée Marmottan, Paris, Monet, Claude-Oscar | 1840-1926

Brooklyn Street Art: Are these illusionary pieces simply to entertain, or do you sometimes have a larger philosophical meaning?
Pejac: I definitely do not see my work as simply entertaining. I’m interested in making people’s brains turn, to think! It’s like I would like my work to produce the same result as when you whisper into someone’s ear. Gentle and discrete – but right into the brain… a whisper in the form of a question.

Brooklyn Street Art: What is the most challenging part of creating pieces on the street?
Pejac: First: Having the freedom of choosing where, how and when to do it. Second: Having a straight-forward communication with the public. Third: Contrary to the work done in studio, this one will never be for sale.

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

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Pejac. “Impression (Sunset)” Santander, Spain. Summer 2014. (photo © Maximiliano Ruiz)

To see more of Pejac’s work click HERE

 

 

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