All posts tagged: Mr. Toll

Earth Day 2019

Earth Day 2019

Rachel Carson died on this day in 1964 – her life awakening man/womankind’s environmental conscience.

Today on Earth Day we remember that corporations hire PR firms to tell us misinformation about the damage they are doing – or as Carson once said, we are “fed little tranquilizing pills of half truth.”

The street, and Street Artists, are these days pulling no punches.  We celebrate that.

Shepard Fairey (photo © Studio Number One)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey (photo © Studio Number One)
Shepard Fairey (photo © Studio Number One)
Shepard Fairey (photo © Studio Number One)

The art works featured here from Studio Number One are available to download for free as posters for printing or squares for Social Media. Click on the link below to download your free poster:

http://www.studionumberone.com/free-downloads?mc_cid=cb0a4a3d34&mc_eid=12fc9da511

For more information and tips about what to do to protect our earth and about climate change click HERE and HERE

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Mr. Toll On The Streets

Mr. Toll On The Streets

Williamsburg streetwalkers have recently discovered a new cluster of Mr. Toll’s hand-painted clay sculptures on the streets of Brooklyn after a prolonged absence. His style has evolved a little, adding more detail and fluidity perhaps, and so have his subjects and interests. Prolific when he’s producing, he’s known to touch on difficult and topical issues such as immigration, environmental degradation, and systemic racism. His work sometimes has the punch of a political cartoon; direct and to the point but with a sense of humor.

Quality, craftsmanship, and a DIY ethos ; its all here with Mr. Toll.

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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New Mural for ConectArte & United Nations World Food Programme in San Salvador

New Mural for ConectArte & United Nations World Food Programme in San Salvador

At its core, the community mural performs a very important role in unifying a neighborhood by focusing attention and coalescing around a common sentiment. Whether social, political, or poetic, they give a public voice to memories, aspirations, philosophies, agendas.

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

By highlighting the dominant sentiments about a particular event or topic, community murals in cities and towns also serve as a physical location where people meet in the public context to discuss weighty matters, to share stories, to pass on history, to trade gossip, to organize, to celebrate or mourn individually and collectively.

The United Nation’s World Food Programme worked again this year with a number of Street Artists in San Salvador to create a mural that scrutinizes the nature of a people’s history and the fundamentals of its social, political, economic strengths.

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

“The mural itself speaks of the market as a place to exchange goods and that creates community and has done so since El Salvador was a country, when it’s people already cultivated the grains and vegetables that continue to be sold at this market today,” says New Jersey based Street Artist and muralist Layqa Nuna Yawar, originally from Ecuador. He painted side by side his homeboy Mata Ruda along with history student Rafael Osorio and local artists Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez for this mural on the facade of Mercado Cuscatlan, a public market and Library complex.

“The murals also show us traditional culture, dresses, games, poets, geography and flora and fauna that all have local meaning and importance to the people of San Salvador,” LNY says. “The mural on the library side speaks of knowing your history in order to grow and move forward to a better future. It does so by depicting a young woman, one of the local artist’s family members, reading a book on history. In this book the same girl is depicted in traditional colonial garb reading a book on national history, meanwhile her mind is filled with imagery of the cosmos.”

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Part of the ConectArte program in cooperation with San Salvador mayor’s office and the United Nation’s World food program, Layqa Nuna Yawar and Street Artist/organizer Jamie Toll say that the collective process that goes into a community mural is necessary to produce a collective narrative. They say they wanted the artists to function as amplifiers for the ideas as well as the aesthetics.

“We spent time developing the design for the mural collectively without having this be a single authored project but a product of actual exchange and conversation with proper credit going to those involved,” says Layqa Nuna Yawar. “This exchange continues as our relationships with these artists grow beyond the project itself.”

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

 

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

Collaborative mural in San Salvador with Layqa Nuna Yawar, Mata Ruda, Rafael Osorio, Lolipop, Cristian Lopez and Issac Martinez. ConectArte / United Nation’s World Food Program. (photo © Courtesy of ConectArte)

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 12.03.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 12.03.17


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While You Were Sleeping is a Korean TV series about a woman who can see the future in her dreams, and a prosecutor who fights to stop these future events from happening. The title also makes us think about the scam of a Tax bill passed while you were sleeping in the middle of the night between Friday and Saturday.

The servants of the rich, these wolves, are facilitating the largest transfer of wealth from the poor and middle class up to their masters for well into the future, and it appears that few are awake to see it. It also pulls health insurance out from underneath 13 million sleeping people. The majority of the country was against this but the servants pushed it through anyway when you weren’t stirring. Good night!

When the US had its largest growing middle class and economic expansion in the 1950s the top tax rate was more than 90%. Did you know that? Reagan lowered it to 39%. This bill lowers the top rate to 20%. Since as a group, hundreds of corporations paid an effective federal income tax rate of just 21.2 percent over a recent eight-year period because they’re working the system, that means many won’t pay any taxes soon, joining GE, Priceline.com, PG&E – who already pay absolutely nothing. Just you will pay the taxes. Congratulations!

Street Art better be dope ya’ll, because that’s where many of us will be living soon – the street.

But we are wide awake for sex scandals, by golly. Powerful men are being accused by past alleged victims from every sector in society right now. We are keeping our fingers crossed that Santa Claus can stay above the fray!

Meanwhile, the tree got lit this week in Rockefeller Center, a lot of people are going to get lit this month at their office holiday party, many NYC art denizens are heading to the Miami Basel Circus this week, and apparently there is supposed to be some Street Art thing happening there too.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring BD White, Daek, Elbi Elem, Elisa Capdevila, Faile, Jason Woodside, Jerkface, Kai, Killjoy, Magda Love, Mazatl, Mr. Toll, Ola Kalnins, Praxis, Timothy Goodman, and Sonni.

Our top image : Timothy Goodman (photo © Jaime Rojo)

B.D. White for The L.I.S.A. Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

B.D. White for The L.I.S.A. Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll. Vanity Project. This piece is visible from the street level in front of Crest Hardware in Williamsburg. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Elisa Capdevila for Contorno Urbano in Sant Feliu de Llobregat. Barcelona. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Elbi Elem for Contorno Urbano in Sant Feliu de Llobregat. Barcelona. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jerkface (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Magda Love and Sonni (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Praxis. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Praxis. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kai (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ola Kalnins (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jason Woodside (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Killjoy collabo with Mazatl in Cholula Puebla for La Linea Street Art. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Lower East Side of Manhattan, NYC. December 02, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.25.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.25.17


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‘Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017’’ it’s called, because “Kill The Poor” was not testing well in focus groups? Luckily, most people will never get sick or old, so this shouldn’t be a problem.

It’s LGBTQ Pride weekend in New York, the home of the original Stonewall Inn where all the colorful queens bashed back at the cops in 1969. All of these years’ celebrations seem more militant in the face of President Pence’s virulent statements and acts against anybody not straight like him and his “mother”.

Also it’s Eid al-Adha today, the end of Ramadan and a big celebration for Muslim New Yorkers, so best wishes to you.

In Street Art news the big story at the moment appears to be that Banksy may actually be Robert Del Naja from Massive Attack, which may explain why so many of his world views and of humanity are rather dismal, see what we did there?

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Bert, Chor Boogie, El Sol 25, Gats, LMNOPI, Mr. Toll, Nepo, Resistance is Female, Sonni, Stik, Sipros, and Such.

Top image: Stik (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chor Boogie for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chor Boogie for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chor Boogie for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pride Train (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Dusty Rebel for #resistanceisfemale. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Dusty Rebel for #resistanceisfemale. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Detail. photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gats for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

NEPO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Such . Bert (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Such . Sipros for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sipros for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

…with some help from Mary… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Brooklyn, NY. June 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.11.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.11.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

“Yes, I’m an infowarrior,” says the African American yelling about how CNN is promoting Sharia Law in downtown Manhattan for the #MarchAgainstSharia and a short distance away someone is wrapping the “Fearless Girl” statue with a black burka. The infowarrior is wearing a red “Make America Free” baseball hat and very much seems like he might be gay. And then your head explodes.

Welcome to the “Disinformation Age.”

But New York is waaaaaay too diverse to even countenance this weird new wave of anti-Islam sentiment and the counter-demonstrators with their signs dwarfed the haters– and being good liberals, they probably invited them to come over for dinner after all that yelling.

Otherwise the weather has been gorgeous and Street Artists have been getting up in New York, when they are not too busy fighting about the David Choe wall and calculating new ways to spray over it. We have brand new mural works from people like Dasic, Cekis, and Case Maclaim, and there is a lot more political content in the new free-range Street Art that we are seeing, with much of it focused on the corruption at the top of the national government, racism, environmental matters, the growing police state.

The Puerto Rican Day Parade is today down 5th Avenue, with people celebrating – and also fighting over the “freedom fighter”/ “Terrorist” Oscar López Rivera, who was going to be the Grand Marshall but whom will now simply be a marcher. And Lucy Sparrow tells us that “Vagisil” and champagne are the two big sellers at her temporary bodega under the Standard Hotel that is 9000 items made entirely of Felt. Our own story on that this week, so there’s something to look forward to, along with 90 degree weather and more brain-frying tweets from 45 in the White House while the Congress is emptying all the cupboards, privatizing everything that used to be the people’s and leaving the back door open for banks.

Other than that, everything is dope!

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adam Fujita, Beast, Blanco, Brandon Garrison, Cekis, Dasic, Dirty Bandits, El Sol 25, FKDL, Jetsonorama, Jerk Face, Joe Iurato, Logan Hicks, Mataruda, Mr. Toll, Myth NYC, Opiemme, S0th1s, and She Wolf.

At the top: Dasic and Cekis collab for The Bushwick Collective Block Party 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dasic in action. The Bushwick Collective Block Party 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

S0th1s (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Joe Iurato and Logan Hicks restored collab for The Bushwick Collective Block just in time for the block party 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

FKDL for The Bushwick Collective Block Party 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Roof top view of The Bushwick Collective Block Party 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

She Wolf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brandon Garrison (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Trainwwg (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adam Fujita and Dirty Bandits. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Blanco has a new piece about prison and police reform, including advocating for the closure of New York’s Rikers Island. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mataruda (left) and Jetsonorama (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth and She Wolf collab. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jerk Face (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Disney Dollars (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Opiemme in and abandoned USA base in Ligure, Italy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beast (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Bushwick, Brooklyn. June 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.04.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.04.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Happy Sunday everybody!

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring: Case Maclaim, Domdirtee, drsc0, Flood, Gregos, Mr. Toll, Pixel Pancho, Resistance is Female, Rodk, Suits Won, and XORS.

Suits Won (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new collaboration with Pixel Pancho and Case Maclaim during the Bushwick Collective Block Party this weekend. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

drscø (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rodk in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

#resistanceisfemale (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Flood and XORS do a collaboration (photo © Jaime Rojo)

XORS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Domdirtee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gregos (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An Unidentified artist in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Lower East Side. NYC. May 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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San Salvador, Street Artists, Food Insecurity and “Conect-Arte”

San Salvador, Street Artists, Food Insecurity and “Conect-Arte”

Six street artists took their social engagement a step further in El Salvador last month and taught youth some serious skillz from the street.

Coming from Brazil, Australia, Ecuador, Mexico, New York, and New Jersey, this international crew took the time to share and teach about painting, art, and how community can be built. The program Conect-Arte is a newly launched initiative by the United Nations World Food Programme, which as the name suggests, also is in the city to address a more core need to battle food insecurity. With Conect-Arte the goal is to also meet youth in some communities and help with positive role models an options with an eye on transforming lives through developing art and related creative skills that can provide income and channel energy in ways productive to community.

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Vexta. Process shot. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Jamie Toll)

Together the artists worked on projects with 45 teens and younger kids over the course of the a week-long workshop in San Salvador, teaching street art techniques like stencil, lettering, mural painting, sculpture, even hot air balloon making. The goals are huge, like reducing violence, food insecurity, increasing access to economic opportunity. The tools here are art, the creative spirit, and strengthening relationships.

We bring you some images of the works that were made by the visiting artists and some of their observations and experiences during the Conect-Arte program.

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Vexta. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

For her large mural project, Street Artist Vexta referenced the national bird, the Talapo, but creating two together in “Todos Estamos Conectados”. She says it is a reflection mural of this now endangered species at the entrance of a nascent community center called Teatro Camara Roque Dalton. During her installation she worked with three students and they experimented with abstract painting techniques, washes, spray paint, stencils and colour theory.

Brooklyn Street Art: How can a project like this help people feel connected to their city and their neighbors?
Vexta: This is a great question. In San Salvador there are very physical divisions that are highly visible – tall concrete fences topped with razor wire and the favela type neighborhoods which are often gang controlled territories. So people are really disconnected.

Conect-Arte enabled two groups of young people to come together from two distinct neighborhood areas – The Historic Centre and San Jacinto. The young people in the workshops got to connect with other young people that they wouldn’t have met otherwise, new friends were made and skills shared. This was super beautiful to see.

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Vexta.Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

Its really hard for young people in San Salvador who live in poorer neighborhoods to move about the city. The threat of gang and police violence is very real. My group in particular made plans to stay in touch, to make more art together and start break-dancing together.

Whilst I was painting at Roque Dalton I had quite a few local people come to thank me for creating something beautiful in their neighborhood, and especially within the historic centre which is an area that is quite neglected, rundown and old. I think art in the streets can provide people with something they can feel proud of, a focal point or new memory site that is not an advertisement billboard or an architectural symbol – which is how we usually navigate modern cities.

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Vexta.Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

This time they can say “I live near the twin birds that were painted for me” instead of “I live by the Mister Donut.” I hope my piece can bring a sense of the joy for life in a place struggling to remember what the value of life is. To me when you are seeing people approach the building to spend time taking photos of themselves and their friends and family, actively engaging with the art, is proof of a very real connection occurring between people and their city.

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Vexta.Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

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Vexta. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

LNY (Lunar New Year) says that he and students created a work based upon a poem by Javier Zamora entitled “Instrucciones Para Mi Entierro” (Instructions For My Funeral)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is it difficult to try to represent poetry visually?
LNY: It could be difficult yes but to me it became a matter of reacting to the poetry as opposed to try to represent it literally – which is the same way that I approach making context-sensitive art or murals. The poem was a starting point for our conversation and it helped inspire ideas, images, a mood and an internal narrative for the mural. We reacted to the poem the way dancing is a reaction to music, but we were not bound by a literal representation of the poem.

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LNY. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

Brooklyn Street Art: An average person can encounter a mural or a poem and, without context, have an interpretation that is very different from what the author intended. Do you ever feel like you want to leave an explanation near your artwork so a passerby can understand it better?
LNY: Art has the power and range of a self contained language, one that works just like a written one but benefits from not being attached to a particular official language, nation or culture. See, I find myself traveling to lands where I do not speak the local language, be it literally or the proper vernacular, but by making art I get to bridge that gap and communicate regardless – the universal language of art allows me to communicate beyond English or Spanish or what have you.

So that’s one thing, art can fully explain itself as a visual language. Then you have the problem of interpretation which I, as an artist, will never fully control so let’s not go there. Lastly, and what I think becomes really interesting, is the idea of audience as far as an explanation would go.

My answer was to somehow take an interpretation of a poem and turn it into something new and visual that you can now read as a mural, as its own thing, as an experience with its own language – as a new and self contained visual poem.

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LNY. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

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LNY. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

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LNY. Detail. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

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LNY. Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Lenny Correa)

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LNY. Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Lenny Correa)

In descriptions of the project the subject of safety in San Salvador comes up frequently, with stories of youth and families restricted to safe zones behind walls, fences, barbed wire for fear of violence from gangs and heavy handed authorities. Mexican Street Artist Paola Delfin created her piece entitled Tu eres yo¨/ ¨You are me” in one of these protected neighborhoods.

She says in the group’s press release ” This wall is inspired by many factors, after finding out a bit about the area where the wall is situated – A neighborhood consider safe in San Salvador. El Salvador is a country that a lot of people think of as a really wild place, but you can also find so many pretty things and beautiful people, this wall for example is the facade of ¨La Casa Tomada¨ a really inspiring place where many young people get together to create and learn from each other about art, music, media and many things.”

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Paola Delfin. Process shot. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

Brooklyn Street Art: Does San Salvador have a particular personality on the street? How does an artist effectively speak to that audience on the street with their work?
Paola Delfin: Unfortunately I didn’t have much time to check out a lot of places around San Salvador, but I felt really related to it. I felt it looks pretty similar to Mexico, and I think the contrasts you can find there are pretty similar as well.

I think not only the Salvadorian audience but a lot of people from nearby countries (even my own) expect to communicate their thoughts and concerns about a lot of situations that are happening. I guess that we as artists have to find the way to share their thoughts and try to focus on the impact that our own thoughts could have on the people who see our work.

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Paola Delfin. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

Street Artist Mr Toll created a number food related sculptural pieces in reference to the food scarcity issue in his work with the youth. Twisting the name of his project, he literally was making “Street Food” (Comida Callejera). He is quoted in the group’s press release saying,

“One of the major concerns in San Salvador is Food Security. This inspired my workshop and subsequent Street Sculpture collaborations with the students. During the workshops we focused on the healthy everyday foods the youth come in contact with, we discussed different issues while preparing the sculptures and then brought them together on the street as food face collages,” obviously injecting a brand of comedy that the kids could appreciate.

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Mr. Toll. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Jamie Toll)

“The opportunity of working directly on the street as a group gave the youth the freedom to play, experiment and feel safe in a public domain which generally they don’t have access too,” he says. “They face many restrictions due to gang activity and a heavy handed police presence in San Salvador. It was important for me to help to bring a little fun and humor in a creative way to their lives in a city faced with many difficulties.”

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Mr. Toll. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Jamie Toll)

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Mr. Toll. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Jamie Toll)

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Mr. Toll. Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Jamie Toll)

Adapted from the original Chinese hot air balloons, artesian balloons have had many cultures artistic influences in the last century. Brazilian Street Artist Claudio Ethos and members of the Sao Paulo based graffiti crew called 14 B.I.S crew (Sao Paulo) had a workshop  promoting the art form by teaching how to make them. Called locally by the name of Globos, the project involved elements of mathematics, physics and geometry as well as a very necessary requirement of collaboration.

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ETHOS. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

Globo Lokos was the project name and working together with the youth was especially rewarding because of the airborne result of their collaborative efforts. “The focus,” says Ethos, “was start to finish object making, where the young people had the opportunity to show their city, where they live, that they can make art and be artists. We helped the youth to make the balloons drawn with art to send their prays and wishes to the sky, Then they launched their works of art into the sky, which is a very powerful action,” according to the press release.

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ETHOS. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

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ETHOS. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

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ETHOS. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © WFP USA Charles Fromm)

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ETHOS. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © WFP USA Charles Fromm)

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Group shot at Casa Tomada. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Jamie Toll)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.01.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.01.16

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BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

“Hooray! Hooray! The first of May. Outdoor f***ing begins today!”

– Or at least that’s what we learned in school. Brooklyn’s hawthorn trees and lilacs are in bloom, as are the cherry trees in the Brooklyn Botanical Garden. High school girls are wearing short skirts and long hair and boys are well, boys; strutting around like peacocks trying to get attention with fun and foolish behavior, and Duke Riley is setting pigeons free after dark till June 12.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring BAT, Billi Kid, Binho, D7606, Damien Mitchell, Enzo Sarto, Freddy Sam, JMZ Walls, Kafka, Maya Hayuk, Modus, Mr. Toll, Otto “Osch” Schade, Pyramid Oracle, Ricky Lee Gordon, Seb Gorey, Weed Dude, and Zeso.

Our top image: OSCH for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Seb Gorey. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Seb Gorey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ricky Lee Gordon AKA Freddy Sam for #notacrime campaign in West Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ricky Lee Gordon AKA Freddy Sam for #notacrime campaign in West Harlem. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BAT (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Maya Hayuk. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Maya Hayuk. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Maya Hayuk. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zeso for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Enzo Sarto with Kafka (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Binho for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Billi Kid (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Modus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Damien Mitchell for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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d7606 and The Ramones (currently at the Queens Museum) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Weed Dude (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pyramid Oracle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Brooklyn, NYC. April 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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BSA “Images of the Year” for 2015 : New Video

BSA “Images of the Year” for 2015 : New Video

Was 2015 the “Year of the Mural”?

A lot of people thought so, and the rise of commercial festivals and commissioned public/private mural programs probably brought more artists to more walls than in recent history. Judging from the In Box, 2016 is going to break more records. Enormous, polished, fully realized and presented, murals can hold a special role in a community and transform a neighborhood, even a city.

But they are not the “organic” Street Art that draws us into the dark in-between places in a city, or at its margins.

We keep our eyes open for the small, one-off, idiosyncratic, uncommissioned, weirdo work as well, as it can carry clues about the culture and reveal a sage or silly solo voice.  It also just reinforces the feeling that the street is still home to an autonomous free-for-all of ideas and opinions and wandering passions. For us it is still fascinating to seek out and discover the one-of-a-kind small wheatpastes, stencils, sculptures, ad takeovers, collages, and aerosol sprayed pieces alongside the enormous and detailed paintings that take days to complete.

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The main image above is from a vinyl subway advertisement that was high-jacked and we published it in February of this year on our Images of the Week posting. It’s small, personal, and very effective as you can see someone suspiciously similar to Batman is jumping out of the mouth of someone looking awfully similar to Hedwig of “Angry Inch” fame.

Of the 10,000 or so images photographer Jaime Rojo took in 2015, here are a selection 140+ of the best images from his travels through streets looking for unpermissioned and sanctioned art.

Brooklyn Street Art 2015 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo

 

Brooklyn Street Art 2015 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

365xlos43, Amanda Marie, Andreas Englund, Augustine Kofie, Bisser, Boijeot, Renauld, Bordaloli, Brittany, BunnyM, Case Maclaim, Casg, Cash4, CDRE, Clet, Cost, Curve, Dain, Dal East, Dan Budnik, Dan Witz, David Walker, DeeDee, Dennis McNett, Don Rimx, Ricardo Cabret, LNY, Alex Seel, Mata Ruda, Don’t Fret, Dot Dot Dot, ECB, El Mac, El Sol25, Ella & Pitr, Eric Simmons, Enest Zacharevic, Martha Cooper, Martin Whatson, Ever, Faile, Faith47, Findac, Futura, Gaia, Gilf!, Hanksy, Hellbent, Hot Tea, How & Nosm, Icy and Sot, Inti, Invader, Isaac Cordal, James Bullough, Janet Dickson, Jef Aerosol, Jilly Ballistic, Joe Iurato, John Fekner, Le Diamantaire, Li Hill, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Low Brow, Marina Capdevilla, Miss Van, Mr. Prvrt, Mr. Toll, Myth, Nafir, Nemos, Never Crew, Nick Walker, Nina Pandolofo, Old Broads, Oldy, Ollio, Os Gemeos, Owen Dippie, Paper Skaters, Pet Bird, Kashink, Smells, Cash4, PichiAvo, Pixel Pancho, QRST, ROA, Ron English, Rubin415, Saner, Sean 9 Lugo, Shai Dahan, Shepard Fairey, Sheryo & The Yok, Sinned, Sipros, Skewville, Slikor, Smells, Sweet Toof, Snowden, Edward Snowden, Andrew Tider, Jeff Greenspan, Specter, Stray Ones, Sweet Toof, Swil, Willow, Swoon, The Outings Project, Toney De Pew, Tristan Eaton, Various & Gould, Vermibus, Wane, Wk Interact

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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BSA Images Of The Week: 11.08.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 11.08.15

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Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ADM LOD, Collagism, DAIN, Ernest Zacharevic, Hellbent, Jerk Face, Kremen, La Diamantaire, Martha Cooper, Miss Me, Mr. Toll, ND’A, Norm Kirby, Obey, Pyramid Oracle, Shalom Neuman, Shepard Fairey, Sinned, and Wing .

Top image above >>> Hellbent in New Jersey beaming in the autumn sunshine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sinned (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ernest Zacharevic’s fourth collaboration with Martha Cooper. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic has completed his fourth collaboration with a photograph by Martha Cooper. Well executed in this New York location, Ernest is drawing inspiration from Ms. Cooper’s photographs of children at play on New York’s Lower East Side of Manhattan in the 1970s.

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The original photograph of kids climbing a fence in an abandoned lot in NYC (photo © Martha Cooper)

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Ernest Zacharevic’s fourth collaboration with Martha Cooper. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ernest Zacharevic’s fourth collaboration with Martha Cooper. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Wing (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kremen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Parisian Street Artist La Diamantaire visiting and adding a bit of glitter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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La Diamantaire (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A typical New York apartment with a somewhat packed roommate situation. Mr. Toll three D metaphor for life in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Me. Someone is not taking responsibility? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rent increase? Racist Donald Trump on SNL? iPhone OS update? ADM LOD (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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OBEY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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OBEY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Where is my passport? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Prague artist DIAN with the Life is Porno Crew.  Bullshit elephant. The GOP icons were added later and weren’t part of the original concept. The Bullshit sign was installed by fusion artist Shalom Neuman. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pyramid Oracle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Norm Kirby (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Norm Kirby (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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NDA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jerk Face (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Collagism (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Brooklyn, NYC. November, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.30.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.30.15

brooklyn-street-art-ernest-zacharevic-cost-jaime-rojo-08-30-15-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Dude, Dudette, this is the moment to make the most of Summer before it in subsumed into crazy New York fall. There is so much art on the streets you may not even want to go inside. Actually, if you haven’t seen the China: Through the Looking Glass at the Metropolitan Museum, you have to go – it could blow your mind with all the video and costume and power and history and modern western interpretations of it, sho nuff.

If you wonder what we’ve been up to and what on the near horizon- check out yesterdays posting “Round Up! BSA at NUART, Borås, Coney, BKM, and ON Brooklyn Streets”

Right now Street Artists are beginning to take into account a large pimple on the butt of the US, Mr. Donald Trump. Of course the streets always render opinions in such clever and pointed ways – helping us to cope with a corporate media infotainment machine that can’t help but chase a fire and pour gasoline on it for ratings. Actually NemO’s new mural of a man caught inside a TV-as-guillotine is also apropo.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Adam Cost, Aiko, Clint Mario, DRE, Ernest Zacharevic, Foxx Faces, Hanksy, Hunt, Indie184, Ivanorama, LUDO, Mr. Toll, NemO’s, Overunder, Phlegm, Raphail, She Wolf, Sure We Can, Thiago Goms, and Zed1.

Top image above >>> Ernest Zacharevic sidebusts COST. Overunder looms close by. Please help ID the tags. You may recognize the scene depicted from a very familiar promotional image for Nuart 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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NEMO’S “Stocks – Pillory” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hanksy. Clint Mario doesn’t seem to mind the stench from the sack of shit on the street. Not the same with the pedestrian going by. He is covering his nose. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hunt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ivanorama (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Thiago Goms in Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

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LUDO for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LUDO for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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DRE – The Secret Society of Super Villain Artists (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Raphail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stikki Peaches and a pinch of Dain for taste. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indie184 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sure We Can (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sure We Can (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Foxx Faces (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Aiko for The Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Phlegm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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She Wolf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zed1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zed1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zed1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Times Square. Manhattan, NY. August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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