All posts tagged: Miami

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.12.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.12.20

It’s hard to even comment on this bellicose war-loving president and his military industry profiteers all ginning up a war against Iran – except to say, “Fool me once…”. Wait, how does that go again?

This week we take you back to the Wynwood neighborhood in Miami, where Primary Flight started a huge graffiti throwdown in the 2000s, later picked up by Tony Goldman to create Wynwood Walls. The current fare throughout the neighborhood is record-setting: from the sheer number of murals and art installations, to the parade of families and friends coming here to take tours and selfies. Catching a shot of a piece without people in the frame is like trying to run in between raindrops.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week from Miami, and this time featuring 1UP Crew, BK Foxx, BustArt, Cranio, Cush Kan, Dam Crew, Dia5, Komik, Quake, Ripes, Sipros, Starve, Thomas Danbo, and Urban Ruben.

Thomas Dambo. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BK Foxx. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist literally on the street. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cranio. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dam Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dam Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BustArt. Detail. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BustArt. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pez. Urban Ruben, Sipros, 1Up Crew and Golden305. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Miami Style Graffiti. Starve-Ripes-Quake-Ubet-Chnk-Komik-Hiero. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cush Kan. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dia5. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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1UP Crew Represents in  Wynwood, Miami

1UP Crew Represents in Wynwood, Miami

The ever-morphing conglomerate crew called 1UP appears and disappears in cities and countries across the world today, their tag aesthetics drawn from a smorgasbord of styles, rather than just one or two. On the radar, yet skillfully under it, the membership of this large team includes the raw and the polished, the illustrative and the calligraphic.

1UP Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

During Art Basel in December, it appears that a few writers of One United Power were in Miami outputting the simple one-color tags, tight bubbles and sparkling throw-ups, as well as full-blown productions that conjure other worlds and childhood fantasy-scapes.

1UP Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Detail. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Detail. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Detail. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Levitating Lister in Wynwood

Levitating Lister in Wynwood

You ever feel as if you are levitating above the sidewalk when walking through the city? It happens. Maybe you just got Tui-Na in Chinatown and your spinal column is especially stretched and tall. Maybe your girlfriend just told you that you are definitely The One and your head is in the clouds. Maybe you are high on opioids.

Hard to say exactly how we felt when walking in Wynwood, Miami last month when we saw this figure from Anthony Lister on the sidewalk across the street from the new Museum of Graffiti.

Anthony Lister. Wynwood, Miami. December 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We’d seen the big Lister tag that accompanied this on the wall above it, smashed alongside the work of so many other artists up and down the block that have occurred since Director Alan Ket and his amazing team opened the museum during Art Basel Week a month ago.

Maybe because it differentiates itself from the myriad murals around the neighborhood, maybe because his newly abstracted superheroic figure appears to float slightly above the surface, it caught our eye and made an impression – creating a sensation of levitation without heavy optics or heavy hand.

It’s good to know that art on the street can still do that. No surprise it was Lister who pulled it off.

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BSA Images Of The Week: 02.10.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.10.19

BK Foxx celebrates the Chinese New Year and The Year Of The Pig in NYC Chinatown in collaboration with East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Congratulations to everyone celebrating the Lunar New Year this week – It’s Year of the Pig! Ready to stuff yourself with dumplings? Check out BK Foxx’s new mural in Chinatown heralding its arrival. Although truthfully when you look at everyone lining up to the public trough it seems like we’ve had a few consecutive years of the Pig at least. To add insult to insult, you’re probably getting a higher tax bill this year thanks to Trump n Co, because that’s how grifting works kids.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Buff Monster, Case Ma’Claim, Crash, HAKS 180, Invader, Loomit, Madsteez, Space Invader, and Speedy Graphito.

BK Foxx. how do you know what’s real anymore? East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Woody comes to play with Crash and The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Woody comes to play with Crash and The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Madsteez makes waves in the LES with ST.ART Now. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Madsteez makes waves in the LES with ST.ART Now. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Madsteez makes waves in the LES with ST.ART Now. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Case Maclaim in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ninja Invader. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Loomit for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Treez (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HAKS 180 in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Speedy Graphito in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Chinatown, NYC. February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 02.03.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.03.19

“Man, what’s with this cough that never goes away?” you ask your boy Tre, who’s laying on the moss green living room rug by the radiator drawing in his black book with an extra fine tip paint pen, listening to Wu Tang. “Could be January,” he offers. “Or maybe its asbestos from that work they’re doing in the elevator shaft.”

Right. “Never mind, lets watch some Beer Bowl!”

Meanwhile on the streets the ideas never stop. We were pretty excited to get up to 167th Street station to see the new mosaics by Brooklyn artist Rico Gatson, who does painting, video, sculpture and installation. These portraits of important contributors to the culture make us all proud. Here are just a handful but there are more and you should go and see them yourself.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Atomik, Captain Eyeliner, Deih XLF, finDAC, Go Vegan, Hoxxoh, Kai, Kevin Ledo, Lefty Out There, Mastrocola, My Dog Sighs, Pez, Rico Gaston, The Revolution Artists, Uninhibited, and What is Adam.

Kai (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Supreme Justice Sonia Sotomayor immortalized by Rico Gatson in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Poet Laureate Maya Angelou immortalized by Rico Gatson in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Singer Celia Cruz immortalized by Rico Gatson in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lefty Out There in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Go Vegan (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Atomik and friends in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
What Is Adam in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pez in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between FinDAC and Kevin Ledo in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Uninhibited in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Revolution Artists in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A collaboration among different artists in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A collaboration among different artists in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A collaboration among different artists in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
My Dog Sighs (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mastrocola in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Wynwood, Miami. December 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 01.20.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.20.19

Brexit deadlock is like a thorn in the side of the UK people this week, Trump is shutting down the US government partially here for almost a month (to celebrate 2 years in the White House?), the ‘Yellow Vests’ are striking through France for the 10th weekend, its going to get very cold tonight in New York, and your cousin Marlene is back from the local Women’s March with fire in her eyes and hope in her heart. As usual, the streets are alive with Street Art and graffiti, and we’re bringing it to you.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring 2501, Add Fuel, BirdCap, BustArt, C3, City Kitty, Cranio, Duster, Edu Danesi, Fafi, Frances Forever, Jaeryaime, Kram, LMNOPI, Mark Jenkins, Neon Savage, Os Boys, Pez, Rx Skulls, Sickid, Tatiana Fazlalizadeh, UFO 907, and Zaira Noir .

Jaeryaime in Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Mark Jenkins installation in Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Mark Jenkins installation in Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Duster (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Never 2501 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Never 2501 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Never 2501 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Edu Danesi. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Os Boys (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LMNOPI x City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Neon Savage x City Kitty x C3 x Rx Skulls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fafi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bird Cap. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Add Fuel. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pez x BustArt x Kram x Zaira Noir. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cranio. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hand painted sign at the NYCLT for #expandtheloftlaw in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sickid with Frances Forever on the right and Tatiana Fazlalizadeh on the left. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Wynwood, Miami. December 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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The Word On The Street. Oh, Word?

The Word On The Street. Oh, Word?

Sometimes we refer to Street Art as part of an ongoing conversation. Who will argue?

Whether it is clever wordplay, a lovelorn cry, a dire warning, or raging rant, artists are addressing us with their written texts in public space.

RERO. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A reflection of our collective state, our worries, our values, our unquenched fires, when you happen upon these words they are as much a part of the public as they are personal.

Somehow, even if we do not know what they mean exactly, they deserve to be seen and heard. Photographer Jaime Rojo shares with BSA readers some of his recent collected missives on the streets.

What do you have to say?

WRDSMTH. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sara Erenthal. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Venom. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SacSix. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Boring N.Y. Co. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Boring N.Y. Co. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Boring N.Y. Co. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

DmirWorld. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

DmirWorld. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Loveism. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Tipsy Gardener. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist (can’t read the tag). Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Timothy Goodman, Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Captain Eyeliner. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Captain Eyeliner. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Captain Eyeliner. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Wordy Rappinghood, by Tom Tom Club (1981)

Words in papers, words in books
Words on TV, words for crooks
Words of comfort, words of peace
Words to make the fighting cease
Words to tell you what to do
Words are working hard for you
Eat your words but don’t go hungry
Words have always nearly hung me.

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BSA Images Of The Week: 01.06.19 – Selections From Wynwood Walls Miami

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.06.19 – Selections From Wynwood Walls Miami

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Tomokazu Matsuyama and Deih killed it this year in Wynwood, no doubt and curator Alan Ket slayed with the solo show by Vhils at the primary gallery on the compound. Art Basel brings the crowds to Miami traditionally but there is no doubt that the magnet of Wynwood’s kid-friendly murals and Street Art as selfie backgrounds wins the day. Everywhere you look you see the families, influencers-in-training, tour guides and gobsmacked gaggles of teens creating pedestrian traffic jams inside Wynwood Walls. These artists and this art may have risen from an outsider marginalised and criminalised culture of illegal vandalism but these crowds are simply enjoying the art and each other.

That foot traffic inside replicates the car and heavy truck traffic jams throughout the neighborhood as new multi-story construction continues apace and the gentrification cycle rapidly courses through the real estate / street culture corpus. Right now this romance between development and art-in-the-streets is still in the heavy petting stage, and there is a lot of star gazing. How long can this tryst continue, you ask? It’s impossible to say what benchmark to measure, but watch for the moment when the sales of mezcal slushies and Moscow Mules are eclipsed by Acai bowls and kale smoothies.

So here’s our first weekly interview with the street, this time directly from Miami, featuring AShop Crew, Audrey Kawasaki, Bordallo II, Deih, Joe Iurato, JonOne, Martin Watson, Tavar Zawacki, Tomokazu Matsuyama, and Vhils.

AShop Crew. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

AShop Crew. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martin Whatson. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vhils. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vhils. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bordalo II. Wynwood Walls Miami 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Audrey Kawasaki. Wynwood Walls Miami 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Joe Iurato. Wynwood Walls Miami 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Joe Iurato. Wynwood Walls Miami 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Deih. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Deih. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tavar Zawacki. Wynwood Walls Miami 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JonOne. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tomokazu Matsuyama. Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tomokazu Matsuyama . Wynwood Walls Miami 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. December 2018 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot, Razor Wire & Flowers Along a Wall in Miami

Icy & Sot, Razor Wire & Flowers Along a Wall in Miami

By festooning foreboding razor wire with decorative flourishes of welcome, Icy & Sot invert a symbol of exclusion and fear. The effect is shocking in its embrace of joy and color and life; the surreal visual combining  two opposing views of a border that uses their contrast for unusual illumination.

Icy & Sot “Imagine A World Without Borders” Miami, FL. January 2017 (photo © Icy & Sot)

In fact the brothers say this recent intervention in Miami is to address the surreality that we have been plunged into by forces who would divide us as citizens with fear-mongering, the ban on travel from majority Muslim countries and the presentation of a huge barrier wall across the southern boarder as a panacea.

Icy & Sot reliably put their finger into the wound to see how deep it goes. As artists they have also learned that a little truth goes a long way, especially when it’s an ugly truth. Maybe that explains the flowers. They tell us that because the constant flow of bad news about immigration and the government actions they weren’t able to focus and work on their future projects for a couple of days but instead they just wanted to make works in response to those actions.

Icy & Sot “Imagine A World Without Borders” Miami, FL. January 2017 (photo © Icy & Sot)

“This country couldn’t have been great without its immigrants,” they tell us in a statement. As recent immigrants themselves, they feel the topic very personally. “It’s not fair that one persons decision can affect the lives of so many people inside and outside the country – we are some of those people who have been affected. We came here as immigrants and what we have accomplished here we couldn’t have accomplished anywhere else but its sad that we don’t feel the same anymore.”

Of their new art piece, they say, “Barbed wire has long been connected to crimes against humanity. A person trying to pass through or over barbed wire will suffer discomfort and possibly injury,” they say of the razor coil that often entangles a those who attemp to cross it. “In our piece we change the barbed wire into flowers, which is a metaphor for welcoming people at the borders.”

“We wanted to show how beautiful it could be to imagine a world without borders.”

Icy & Sot “Imagine A World Without Borders” Miami, FL. January 2017 (photo © Icy & Sot)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 01.29.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.29.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Able, Alexis Diaz, Bruno Smoky, Case Ma’Claim, Crash, Dan Flavin, Ernest Zacharevic, Inti, Jose Mertz, Kryptick, Logan Hicks, Maya Hayuk, Miro, Pichi & Avo, Santiago Rubino, Shalakattak, and Sipros.

First image above: Alexis Diaz. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Able. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jose Mertz. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sipros. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Miro. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Santiago Rubino. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kryptik. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ernest Zacharevic in collaboration with Martha Cooper. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Inti. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Maya Hayuk. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Case Maclaim. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pichi  & Avo. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Logan Hicks. Wynwood Walls, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bruno Smoky and Shalakattak. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bruno Smoky and Shalakattak. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Dan Flavin. Chelsea, NYC. January 2017 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Two Miami Schools Enveloped in Murals : The RAW Project in Wynwood

Two Miami Schools Enveloped in Murals : The RAW Project in Wynwood

Reimagining Art in Wynwood: The RAW Project.

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) received $148 million in 2016. The war budget, also called the “Defense Budget”, was approved for $582 billion for this year.

For comparison’s sake, that means the “Defense Budget” is 3,900 times the size of the NEA.

Paola Delfin at work on her mural at The Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Arts and artists get very little or no financial or institutional support from the federal, state, or local government in the United States, which is always a shock for Europeans to learn – and many won’t believe it when you tell them. This website, for example, receives no funding or grants from any organization despite publishing daily for almost nine years, and it has remained non-commercial during that entire time.

Paola Delfin with some fans. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

It may be getting even worse for the arts in the US now that the new Trump administration in Washington is proposing cutting all funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Arts and music programs in many American schools have already been eliminated slowly but surely over the last 40 years since the beginning of trickle-down economics in the 1980s.

That is why it is rather astounding that two of Miami’s Wynwood schools, Eneida M. Hartner elementary school and Jose De Diego middle school, are completely covered in murals.

Mr. June. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Raw Project in Wynwood, Miami is the initiative of Robert De Los Rios, who partnered with private contributors, did fundraising, and asked a coalition of artists to paint the walls of the schools for the kids.

 

Part of its success of course is due to the status of the Wynwood neighborhood as a magnet for graffiti and Street Artists over the last decade or so. Already coming to Wynwood for Art Basel or to partake in a related art event, these artists have given of themselves and their talents to create a completely unique and dynamic environment for students to learn and grow up around.

Zed1. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We captured a number of these walls during successive visits over the last few years and share them with BSA readers today.

Please consider donating to the school organization to continue this program and to refresh or replace murals as they age. http://www.projectwynwood.com/raw/

Martin Whatson. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martin Whatson. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2501. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

INO at work on his mural at The Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

INO. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © INO)

Kevin Ludo at work on his mural at The Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kevin Ludo. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Louis Masai at work on his mural at The Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Louis Masai at work on his mural at The Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Louis Masai. The Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Emil Walker)

Dan Witz. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pip Squeak. Eneida M. Hartner elementary school. Wynwood, Miami. 2016 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Axel Rod. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bik Ismo. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Findac. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

D*Face on the left with Pixel Pancho on the right. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MTO. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Paola Delfin. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Spencer Keeton Cunnigham. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Word To Mother. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pastel. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jose Mertz . Lister. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Looks like the kids at the Jose De Diego middle school are being inspired by the art of Ben Eine. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martin Whatson. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Txemy. Jose De Diego middle school. Wynwood, Miami. 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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BSA Images Of the Week: 01.22.17

BSA Images Of the Week: 01.22.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015Inauguration week was just as bumpy as you could have expected with an incredibly divided country discussing the outgoing president, the incoming president, the foreign interference and weird circumstances around the actual election, the nearly all white all billionaire cabinet nominees, and the Women’s March‘s that vastly overwhelmed Trumps ceremony attendee numbers while “sister” marches took place in nearly 700 cities around the world. This president, more than any one in decades, is galvanizing people to take action and get involved, just not in the way he might have preferred and we’ve been seeing a steady dialogue on the street about him since last fall.

He certainly wasted no time by signing his first executive order within minutes of being sworn in, one that aims to repeal Obamacare and that would deny health care. In the early and mid-2000s there was a lot of anti-Bush/ anti-war street art. At this inauguration George W. looked giddy and relaxed (despite a poncho battle) perhaps because he might not be the most disliked president of the century after all. Trump v. Obama inauguration numbers were pretty stark, and this week Trump’s national approval ratings have tanked, although a fresh war always tends to perk up a presidents approval numbers, so maybe he can start one of those. Not sure if his popularity would go up or down if he triggered a crisis in the financial markets, but it does feel like absolutely anything is possible with this wildcard. You can be sure that Street Art will be probably be there to respond! We’re keep our eyes open.

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adline, City Kitty, D7606, Drsco, El Sol 25, Hek Tad, Homo Riot, Jerk Face, Jose Feliz Perez, Lunge Box, Meguru Yamaguchi, Michael Vasquez, Nimai Keston, Not Art, Shepard Fairey, Sheryo & the Yok, and Vicki Da Silva.

First image above: American Puppet (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vicki Da Silva (photo © Vicki Da Silva)

Yeah, we didn’t know what it meant either so we looked it up. Here’s what Wikipedia says: Kompromat (Russian: компромат; IPA: [kəmprɐˈmat], short for компрометирующий материал, literally “compromising material”) is the Russian term for compromising materials about a politician or other public figure. Such materials can be used to create negative publicity, for blackmail, or for ensuring loyalty.

In other words, light artist Vicki Da Silva is referencing the apparent influence of the Russian government over the presidential election by smearing Clinton publicly with information they had found. Luckily they didn’t find any information to influence Trump in any way.

Nimai Kesten. This is the wheat-pasted mural of Ai Wei Wei before Hebru Brantley added goggles to it. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

DRSCO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jeffrey Gibson with a quote from James Baldwin for #artinadplaces (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Homo Riot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Obey and friends in Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Some writers couldn’t resist the white huge canvas that was the Houston Wall, freshly primed for Pichi & Avo’s turn to paint on it this week. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok & Sheryo in Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

D7606 . City Kitty . Lunge Box collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Meguru Yamaguchi (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Meguru Yamaguchi. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Michael Vasquez . Jose Felix Perez in Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This piece of plywood was tagged several times by different artists at different times. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jerk Face (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Looks like Pepe Le Pew is lurking around for some lovely lady skunk to walk by so he can use his famously suave pickup lines;

“Permit me to introduce myself, I am your new lover.”

“Where are you, my little object of art? I am here to collect you.”

“Is it possible to be too attractive?”

Humans Crossing (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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