All posts tagged: Mana Urban Art Projects

You’ll Need Good Shoes: BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 3

You’ll Need Good Shoes: BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 3

You’ll Need Good Shoes.

That’s what most people will tell you in the Wynwood District of Miami if you want to see everything, especially now that the murals go further north up the grid.

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Tatiana Suarez. Detail. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Artists are participating in singular and group gallery shows, mural shows, special events, DJ parties, installations, dinners, openings, and the occasional garbage can fire with a plastic bag full of beers.

The crowds are going to start hitting these sidewalks and clogging the streets in the next day or two but until then, aaaaaahhh summer!

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Tatiana Suarez signing her wall. Martha Cooper documenting it. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wait, tomorrow’s December. Technically not summer in the Northern Hemisphere.

Brooklyn clearly doesn’t know what to do when he gets to visit these palm treed parts of the country with his southern cousins.

Enjoy some of the action on the street from today.

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Tatiana Suarez. Detail. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tatiana Suarez. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Felipe Pantone. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ken Hiratsuka. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic Fernandez at work on his wall. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic Fernandez at work on his wall. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic Fernandez. Detail. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic Fernandez signing his wall. Martha Cooper documenting it. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic Fernandez. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic Fernandez. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faith 47. Detail. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Audrey Kawasaki at work on her wall at The Hotel in South Beach. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Audrey Kawasaki at work on her wall at The Hotel in South Beach. Wynwood Walls 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey at work on his wall for Mana Urban Art Projects. Wynwood, Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey at work on his wall for Mana Urban Art Projects. Wynwood, Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


This article is the result of a collaborative partnership with BSA and Urban Nation (UN).

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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.30.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.30.16

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We haven’t had such a frightening Halloween in years! – and we know we speak for many readers as well while we all look at the monstrous tabloid TV parade that is scaring the electorate. Boo!

Luckily we found some treats on the street! And a few tricks, but those are for our paid site, wink wink.

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Bifido, Buff Monster, City Kitty, Dee Dee, Disto, Droid, Flood, Myth, Nychos, R2, REVS, RODA, Rusk, See True Fame, Sipros, Smells, Smith, Sweet Toof, and Texas.

Our top image: City Kitty is ready for Halloween(photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster’s Mister Melty playing Narcissus with great aplomb. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster for Mana Urban Arts Project in Jersey City, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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REVS and friends. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Roda . Droid . R2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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RUSK . DROID (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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SMELLS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos for Mana Urban Arts Project in Jersey City, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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See True Fame in Long Island City, Queens. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The more times change, the more they stay exactly the same. Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido has a new work in Dugenta, Italy that alludes to the harsh living conditions for some that creates wealth for certain industries. The name of the work borrows from the Beatles song: “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” (photo © Bifido)

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Sipros gives a ride to Stan for Mana Urban Arts Projects in Jersey City, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Texas. Disto (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Disto. Gane (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sweet Toof (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Flood (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Flood (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Hudson River, NYC. October 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.02.16 : Spotlight on Climate Change

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.02.16 : Spotlight on Climate Change

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Faile. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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He loves me, he loves me not. He loves me, he tells me I’m an idiot because I trust scientists about climate change and that actually it is a hoax created by the Chinese.

Sorry, everything reminds us of Donald J. Trump and his outlandish claim for the presidency. Even when we are looking at the new Faile mural in Greenpoint, Brooklyn called Love Me, Love Me Not.

The Greenest Point is an initiative that wants to raise awareness of Climate Change and three Street Artists have just completed two murals here in Brooklyn to support it. The organization says that they hope to gather “together people from different backgrounds, professions and skill-sets who are bonded by aligned values and a common vision.” By integrating Street Art with technology, film, sound and voice, they hope that we’ll be more capable of piecing together the climate change puzzle as a collective.

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Faile. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We don’t pretend to be scientists, but we trust the ones we have and we decided that this week we would dedicate BSA Images of the Week  just to this new project and this topic. We also know that it is now well-documented that tobacco companies fought us citizens with disinformation and legislative trickery for decades before they finally admitted that smoking was killing us and our families, so there is reason to believe that oil companies and related industries who flood our media and politicians with money are possibly buying time while we’re all heating up the atmosphere.

Here are new images of the two new murals in Greenpoint and Williamsburg, Brooklyn and an interview with the three artists who participated; Vexta, Askew, and long time Greenpoint studio residents, Faile.

BSA: Why do you think art is an important vehicle to highlight climate issues?
Faile: We feel it’s important to create work that can resonate with people on an emotional level. Something that we can live with everyday and that has a place in our lives that brings meaning to our experience. This is how we think people must learn to connect to climate change. It’s not something you can just think about, it’s something that you have to do everyday. It has to become part of you. We hope art has the power to be that wink and nod that you are on the right track. That the little things you do are meaningful and that change starts with you in the most simple of ways.

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Vexta and Askew. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Greenpoint has a history of blue collar communities who worked in factories producing goods for the both the merchant marine and the USA Navy. Those factories are all gone and only a few of the original settlers remain in the neighborhood such as the Polish community. How do you think the murals painted for the festival relate to them?
Vexta: Our collaborative mural hopefully offers a voice to people directly to people who will become a part of the history of Greenpoint and its legacy. We will have QR codes installed that link to video pieces that physically give Askew’s subjects a voice as well as linking to the birds calls and information about their situation.
Faile: We tried to be aware of the history of Greenpoint. The communities that make this neighborhood what it is. We tried to incorporate some nods to them through the work, specifically with the traditional Polish pattern in the socks. Unfortunately, Greenpoint is also home to some of the worst ecological disasters this country has ever experienced, the effects of which are still present. We wanted to bring something positive and something beautiful to the neighborhood that spoke to everyone. There are other historical murals in the neighborhood so it didn’t feel like it required another.

The neighborhood is also quickly changing. It’s home to many young families and has a vibrant creative class, not to mention our studio for the last 12 years. When creating an artwork in a public space, especially a park, there’s always that balance of trying to make something that people can connect with on a visceral, then psychological level in an immediate way–once that connection is made you hope they can dig a little deeper into the more subversive side of the meaning.

BSA: Do you think art and in particular the murals painted for this festival have the power to change the conversation on climate change and positively move and engage the people who either are indifferent to the issue or just refuse to believe that climate change is a real issue caused by humans? 
Faile:Whether you believe it or not there are basic things that people can do in their everyday lives to create a more beautiful environment around them. Picking up trash, recycling, being mindful that our resources are precious – none of these really imply that you have to have an opinion about climate change. Just the fact that we have a green space now in Transmitter Park is progress towards an environment that we can fall in love with.

We think that’s ultimately what the idea of Love Me, Love Me Not is asking. What kind of environment do you want? Do you want renewable green spaces that offer future generations beauty and room to reflect within nature? Or do you want to pave over the toxic soil and oil spills with the risk of repeating the past? If people can even ask themselves that question then we are at least engaging them into the dialogue where the seeds of action can be planted.

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Vexta and Askew. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Why do you think art is an important vehicle to highlight climate issues?
Vexta: For me as an artist it is the means that I have to talk about what I know to be important. Art also stands as this symbolic, most often visual, gesture that can bring people together, ignite debate and shine a light towards a new way of thinking that is perhaps still in the shadows of the mainstream. There is no more pressing issue right now than Climate Change.

There was a famous piece of graffiti up for a long time in my home city of Melbourne that read “No Jobs on a Dead Planet” in a beautiful font running down a power plant chimney. This work spurred my thinking back before I had begun making art professionally. That simple creative action out in public space was powerful and it spoke a simple truth and showed me that you can do a lot with a little. Art and art out in the streets is a great vehicle for talking about issues like climate change, because its a gesture in a shared space, it provides something to meditate on or think about that ultimately is a shared reality, this makes sense to me as climate change is a problem we need to work together to address.

Askew: I think that in particular art in the public space can be a very powerful way to put messaging on issues that matter right out in front of people who may not otherwise engage with it. Also an artist has the freedom to make the image captivating in a way that perhaps other platforms for speaking about serious issues don’t. People get bombarded with so much conflicting information every day especially via the mainstream media, art can put people in the contemplative space to engage differently.

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Vexta and Askew. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: You have participated in at least one other art festival whose principal mission is to highlight the well being of our ecology and our planet. What would you say is unique characteristic of The Greenest Point that differentiates it from other festivals with equal goals?
Askew: Well I think this is different because it’s so focused on a specific place whereas the scope of other events I’ve painted look more generally at global issues. I think it’s great for communities to narrow their focus to directly around them to tackle very tangible local change. If every neighborhood did that globally, imagine the impact.
Vexta: I agree with Askew, What is special about The Greenest Point is that it’s very locally based yet has a global focus. The Greenest Point has brought so many different parts of our local community together, from creatives to government to business. It has shown us that people in our neighborhood really care about Climate Change.

BSA: Your collaborative mural with Askew represents the current and future generations of children. What do you think is the principal message to send to the children so they are more aware of the problems facing our planet?
Vexta: My mural with Askew represents a coming together of numerous ideas. The future belongs to the youth and the world’s children will be the ones most impacted by Climate Change. I think they are really aware of this problem and it’s a very scary prospect. Our mural brought together not only representations of young people but also birds found in the NY state area that are currently climate threatened & endangered (according to Audubon’s Birds and Climate Change Report) as well as icebergs made of my shapes that represent the particles that make up all matter.

I would hope that we can inspire them to feel empowered to make small changes that they see as being possible whilst also acknowledging that all the other parts of our world – the birds, animals, water, air and land are just as important as they are. We are all in this together.

Askew: For me personally, celebrating young local people who are giving their time to make change in Greenpoint around sustainability and community-building issues is immediately inspiring to other young people.

BSA: Do you think art and in particular the murals painted for this festival have the power to change the conversation on climate change and positively move and engage the people who either are indifferent to the issue or just refuse to believe that climate change is a real issue caused by humans? 
Askew: Everything we do has impact, positive and negative – that’s the duality we deal with inhabiting this space. It’s a closed system, resources are finite and so we must respect them and do our best to live in harmony with this earth that supports us and live peacefully amongst each other and the various other creatures we share this planet with. No one thing is going to make pivotal change but everyone being mindful and keeping the conversation and action going is what will make a difference.

Our special thanks to the team at The Greenest Point and to the artists for sharing their time and talent with BSA readers.

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One image from this week by Street Artist Sipros depicts Climate-Change-denying Donald Trump as the character The Joker, from the Batman movies. A frightening piece of political satire, or perhaps propaganda, depending on who you talk to. Mana Urban Art Projects. Jersey City, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Lincoln Street Art Park. Detroit, Michigan. Septiembre 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.18.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.18.16

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We debated whether or not to open today’s edition of BSA Images Of The Week on a political note with new Donald Trump related art or with an uplifting image of an almost universally recognized sweet little bird: The Sparrow.

The Sparrow won.

Who hasn’t seen them enjoying a good old dust bath or just happily munching on whatever crumbs fall from the public while eating al fresco. They have natural predators in the city and country and have been featured in songs, poems, books for centuries. More recently Chairman Mao Zedong ordered them to be killed The Kill a Sparrow Campaign in 1958 – where millions of them were killed by citizens, unleashing an environmental disaster of locusts destroying food crops, and people starving.

We prefer to think of these little birds in terms of the gospel hymn “His Eye Is On the Sparrow”

“I sing because I’m happy
I sing because I’m free
For His eye is on the sparrow,
And I know He watches over me.”

This week two street pieces we discovered feature this finely feathered friend by LMNOPI and Elbow-Toe aka Brian Adam Douglas.

So, here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Brian Adam Douglas, Dirty Bandits, Indecline, Joe Caslin, Leon Keer, LMNOPI, MSK, SacSix, Swoon, The Flying Dutchman, Vexta, and WK Interact.

Our top image: LMNOPI.  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Brian Adams Douglas. Detail. Speaking of sparrows. They make and appearance on this portrait. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Brian Adams Douglas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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SWOON. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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SWOON (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indecline. Mana Urban Arts Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In New Jersey on a rooftop the passing car traffic is now able to catch a glimpse of a nude statue of Donald Trump. The anonymous artists collective Indecline has done of number of recent installations addressing political topics in the New York area. This one has garnered national coverage in the media. There’s not much that we can say that hasn’t already been addressed elsewhere.

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Indecline . Mana Urban Arts Project. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indecline . Mana Urban Arts Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indecline . Mana Urban Arts Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indecline. MSK . Mana Urban Arts Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indecline . Mana Urban Arts Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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SacSix (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Leon Keer. Aruba Art Fair. Aruba. (photo © Leon Keer)

Title: ‘Niets aan te geven / Nothing to declare’. The 3D painting depicts the story on the crisis of critical shortages of food and medicine in Venezuela and the effect it has on the nearby island of Aruba. The location were the painting was made is behind the former customs office in San Nicolas. -LK
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VEXTA . Dirty Bandits (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Joe Caslin. Waterford Walls International Street Art Festival (photo © Joe Caslin)

A new mural in Waterford, Ireland by artist Joe Caslin speaks to the topic of mental health and our awareness of it. On the façade of an abandoned hotel that overlooks the city, Caslin created this figure, quiet and troubled, as part of a mural festival there. The wheatpasted drawing by Caslin is entitled ‘Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireann na daoine’, which translates as ‘we live protected under each other’s shadow’.

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Flying Dutch Man (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Flying Dutch Man (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Jersey City, New Jersey. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week 06.19.16

BSA Images Of The Week 06.19.16

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No we’re not worried about Donald Trump falling from grace, as in the new piece by Ron English leading the show this week. That’s not the point, people. It’s that we have fallen so far that a guy like this can get so close to the White House.

By the way, Nychos is killing it in New York right now. Pieces in Coney Island, Bushwick, a truck side, a Freud sculpture at the Flat Iron, a new show at Jonathan Levine this week, a couple other walls planned including one at MANA.  He’s very impressive in technique and work ethic. A shout out to the fellas who are capturing the action at Chop’em Down films. Top notch!

Meanwhile, we have a LOT of summer to enjoy. Get going!!!

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 18ism, AskewOne, Balu, CDRE, Dabs & Myla, GIZ, KAS, City Kitty, Myth, Nekst, Nychos, OG23, Rime MSK, Ron English, and Vik.

Our top image: Ron English brings Donald Trump as Humpty Dumpty on a wall – in collaboration with The Bushwick Collective and Mana Urban Art Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Giz and Bart kick it with the Smurf next door for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dabs & Myla for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vik for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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AskewOne MSK for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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RIME MSK for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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OG23 for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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18ism for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indelible Funk  for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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AskewOne. Nekst tribute for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos “Translucent Heart Attack” for The Bushwick Collective and Mana Urban Art Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos. Dissection Of Sigmund Freud Flatiron Plaza. NYC. Vienna Therapy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos. Dissection Of Sigmund Freud Flatiron Plaza. NYC. Vienna Therapy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nychos. Dissection Of Sigmund Freud Flatiron Plaza. NYC. Vienna Therapy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kitty City with Balu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CDRE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CDRE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CDRE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kas. Brussels, Belgium. June 2016. (photo © KAS)

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Untitled. Manhattan. June 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Remixing Deep Cuts in “Inventory”

Augustine Kofie Remixing Deep Cuts in “Inventory”

Newly re-mixed and sampled soulful works by Augustine Kofie are featured in the “Inventory” show that just opened here in New York at Jonathan Levine this weekend. No, he’s not looking through his storeroom of canvasses and clearing out old year-end inventory, the name refers to the “controlled hoarding” Kofie goes through to amass the muscles and skin of his 45 degree compartmentalized grid pieces.

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

He may be a crate-digging cultural magpie when collecting packaging and office supplies and jazz records and science journals that span a half century, but when he lays it down in shades of ochre and rust, golden rod and walnut, steel grey and maple, stuttering birch and enameled persimmon the rational leafing of text and texture all makes reassuring orderly, nostalgically spun and sampled sense.

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

And then there is the patch of seafoam sky, the deciduous limbic form that is not strictly geometric, the shock of hot tomato cheeks… the speckled face of a cat-eyed Doe sunnily perched in her modest bathing suit, or the closely-shorn dome of a white glove architect bending lithely toward his tilted graphite rendering. These are the human elements that anchor the shifting planes, grounding the piece, adding warmth, with good reason.

“I’m making beats,” he says as he rests with a short glass of amber spirits on Levine’s modernist office couch as the first guests flow into the gallery out front, “and those are records I’m pulling samples from.”

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Like a studied and somatic DJ and collagist, Kofie’s segue is not limited to the auditory, and he continues to spin the metaphor when describing the visual building process for his vintage futurism. “When you are using a drum machine people are saying that it is without a soul – but I’m trying to make this electronic beat music using samples. The way I’m manipulating and maneuvering the curation of certain things – some are very focused but the majority of it is very serendipitous, off the cuff. A lot of things that I begin to do end of being covered up for of the sake of the design.”

We’ve hit on something: a cocktail of Coltrane, Marvin Gaye, Cypress Hill, Kandinsky, Eames, mid-century modernism, rusty rocket ships, Edward Murrow, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cornel West, and Bill Nye the Science Guy and suddenly the West Coast mixologist is at the controls. “You have to go into the process like a hoarder who ultimately knows that you will have to let things go,” he says of the sharply natural math at hand.

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“The thing looks very technical and very precise but there is a lot of fun, soulful play happening in the beginning. In order to get it on there I do have to cut up these shapes and forty-five degree angles so I can get everything in – and then see what comes up.”

“I like throwing in some of the graphical elements; portrait and people’s faces – that happens when I use the thinner paper. For this collection I’m using mostly pressed-board and packaging, which doesn’t have that many portrait graphics unless it’s a record cover I found. Literally I have a box of things and I’m sifting through. I’m like “I need this horn!”… Or Herbie Mann might have a flute that I need instead. There is a lot of picking and going through it. I enjoy that crate-digging kind of process. What ends up popping up is mostly kind of serendipity.”

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The exhibition allows you to see a miniature version of his workshop in LA that gives stage to the inventory of found objects, ephemera, and texture, and you get a sense of the purposeful tranquil stirrings that are always at play. In tandem with the gallery show of paintings and collage he has done his first big New York wall – actually in New Jersey with Mana Contemporary.

No matter the scale, Kofie’s work is close-up and personal and he sits easily with you peering at the details. “Large wall- small collage; It’s intimate in both sizes. It’s just the approach of it, the thinking that goes behind it.”

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Again he is creating in the moment. “For the wall in Jersey I had an initial idea before it but when I came to the wall and saw it, saw the space, looked around and I even put my back to the wall and took a look out and around and saw… Also the colors, working next to Shepard’s piece – I didn’t want it to look misplaced.”

“So I had to change everything up. Sometimes you have to go in a little blindly.”

He talks about time constraints, malfunctioning tools, and recalibrating his approach to fit the new environment. Luckily, his first decade as a serious LA graffiti writer came in handy.”Yeah a lot of the old can control tricks came out on this wall. There are some tape points, and I’ll use twine – I mean I could have brought a laser thing, I’ve done that before. I didn’t want to deal with it and I didn’t want to project the piece. I really liked the spray.”

Give him the tools and the right inventory and there will be music.

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie Inventory. Jonathan Levine Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Augustine Kofie mural in Jersey City, NJ for Mana Urban Arts Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

For more information about Augustine Kofie Inventory at Jonathan Levine Gallery, click HERE.

 

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This article is also published in The Huffington Post

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