All posts tagged: Los Angeles

BSA Top Stories 2016 – As Picked by You

BSA Top Stories 2016 – As Picked by You

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Museums, Festivals, and Activism – three of the themes that garnered the most traffic on our published stories on BSA and The Huffington Post this year.

From a scholarly Street Art related exhibition in St. Petersburg to the opening of the Mima Museum in Belgium to the Anti-Banksy exhibition with the Blu controversy in Bologna and the “Magic City” exhibition in Dresden, BSA readers were astutely studying the slow but steady move of Street Art from the street to the museum and the academic canons.

But you also liked the huge multi-player outside exhibitions as well – with stories from Sicily and Northern Spain to Northern Mexico, BSA readers were interested this year in seeing how eclectic locally-organized Street Art festivals and projects are done, and who is doing them.

Finally activism played a big role in what you were re-Tweeting and “liking” and sending to your friends – From Icy & Sot installing anti-radiation work in the Native American desert and then talking about oceans polluted with plastic, to a United Nations food program with kids and artists in El Salvador, to highlighting Indigenous peoples rights with Jetsonorama, to a US cross-country tour to save endangered species by one artist and a Greenpeace show in Barcelona addressing the same issue with 35 artists, it looks like BSA readers are engaged and concerned about socio-politico-environmental issues left and right.

On a side note, we were honored that our El Salvador article was picked up and published in spanish on the UN World Food program website – HERE.

Of course it was good to see that you liked the feature on the notorious graffiti crew 1UP and seeing Nychos slay New York as well. Tasty!

These are the TOP 15 articles on BSA for 2016 from the more than 365 postings we did this year – meaning they all beat at least 350 articles to get here. Congratulations to us all.


No. 15
Borders and Boundaries : A Multi-Disciplinary Exhibit at St. Petersburg’s Street Art Museum

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SpY. Street Art Museum (SAM). St. Petersburg, Russia. May 2016. (photo © Evgeniy Belikov)

Rafael Schacter Takes a More Nuanced Approach to the Migration Crisis

Commerce and technology have been eroding traditional constructs of the borders and boundaries, especially in the age of the Internet, satellites, transnational banking and trade agreements that create governing bodies that openly dismiss national sovereignty, integrity, identity, aspirations. Borders and boundaries are contested, guarded, or disregarded at will; open to international capital, porous to immigration, hardened by armies.

Daily they are in the headlines: Trump’s plans to build a wall along the US-Mexican border, Syrian war refugees immigrating across European borders, Israel and Palestine’s ongoing land and settlement disputes, even maritime territorial claims of China and the Phillipines in the South China Sea that were ruled upon yesterday  – all reveal clues to our historically complicated relationships and geo-political perspectives.

Art to the rescue! continue reading here


No. 14
Icy & Sot Stencil An Enormous Blue Whale in LA

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

“The brothers spent two solid days hand cutting the multi-layer stencil here on Melrose Avenue. How many pieces? “19 pieces,” says Icy. “Its not that big but it has a lot of details” The composite image features an enormous whale emerging from the sea in full view of a coastline packed with industrial forms which presumably are dumping contaminants directly into the waters.

As ever, the brothers crash into each others sentences while talking to us. “Whatever happens in the ocean… it comes back to us,” says Sot. “Whether is trash or plastics or oil..”

Icy jumps in, “The fish eat them and then we eat the animals and we have the plastics inside of us.”

“Yeah, It’s a cycle. We are all making a lot of trash – we are affecting the world. Then it all comes back to us,” says Sot… Continue reading here


No. 13
MIMA Museum: City Lights with Swoon, MOMO, Hayuk, Faile

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Maya Hayuk. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © The Pickles – MIMA Museum)

What is it about Brooklyn Street Art that is so appealing that one would curate the opening exhibition of a museum with it?

Four pillars of the New York Street Art scene are welcoming the first guests of the new Millennium Iconoclast Museum of Art (MIMA), which opened days ago in Brussels. Attacking the cherished institutions that relegate grassroots people’s art movements into the margins, MIMA intends to elevate them all and let them play together. Graphic design, illustration, comic design, tattoo design, graffiti, street art, plastic arts, wheat pasting, sculpture, text, advertising, pop, story-telling, aerosol, brushwork, and naturally, dripping paint.

Obviously street culture has been mixing these influences together in a never-ending lust for experimentation; punk with hip-hop, skateboarding with tattoo, performance art with graffiti – for the past four decades at least. The folk tradition of cutting and pasting predates all our  modern shape-shifting by centuries, but institutional/organizational curating often often has a preference for sorting street culture disciplines into separate piles.

With the inaugural exhibition “City Lights” MOMO, Swoon, Faile, and Maya Hayuk each bring what made their street practice unique, but with an added dimension of maturity and development. Without exception each of these artists have benefitted from the Internet and its ability to find audiences who respond strongly to the work with physical location a secondary consideration. Now as world travelers these four have evolved and refined their practice and MIMA gives them room to expand comfortably…Continue reading here


No. 12
San Salvador, Street Artists, Food Insecurity and “Conect-Arte”

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Vexta.Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

“Six street artists took their social engagement a step further in El Salvador last month and taught youth some serious skillz from the street.

Coming from Brazil, Australia, Ecuador, Mexico, New York, and New Jersey, this international crew took the time to share and teach about painting, art, and how community can be built. The program Conect-Arte is a newly launched initiative by the United Nations World Food Programme, which as the name suggests, also is in the city to address a more core need to battle food insecurity. With Conect-Arte the goal is to also meet youth in some communities and help with positive role models an options with an eye on transforming lives through developing art and related creative skills that can provide income and channel energy in ways productive to community.

Together the artists worked on projects with 45 teens and younger kids over the course of the a week-long workshop in San Salvador, teaching street art techniques like stencil, lettering, mural painting, sculpture, even hot air balloon making. The goals are huge, like reducing violence, food insecurity, increasing access to economic opportunity. The tools here are art, the creative spirit, and strengthening relationships.

We bring you some images of the works that were made by the visiting artists and some of their observations and experiences during the Conect-Arte program…Continue reading here


No. 11
Discovering a “Magic City” in Dresden, Germany

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“A couple of weeks ago BSA was in Dresden, Germany to help lay plans for a new Street Art show opening there this fall called “Magic City” and naturally we hit the streets with bicycles three days in a row to see the city’s graffiti, Street Art, and murals whenever time would permit. The first day we had the honor of getting a tour from Jens Besser, an artist, author, lecturer, and producer of mural festivals in the city who sped ahead of us through a labyrinth of streets to show us a number of the impressive murals he and partners have brought to the city in the last decade or so…Continue reading here


No. 10

Louis Masai: “The Art Of Beeing” Tour Kicks Off in NYC to Save Endangered Species

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Bog Turtle. Endangered. The Bushwick Collective, Brooklyn. NYC. October  2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Activism and Street Art go hand in hand and some artists are skilled at activating public space for hearts and brains to spark and cogitate. During the last 15 years we’ve documented a number of seriously affecting artworks on the street that use text and/or imagery to address political, social, environmental, and economic issues and opinions by artists as varied as Shepard Fairey, Banksy, John Fekner, Ganzeer, LMNOPI, Myth, Gilf!, Gaia, LNY, Jetsonorama, and any number of one-shot authors. In this election year there are too many Trumps to count, and a few Hillary pieces as well.

Undaunted by commercial interests and able to deliver directly to the passerby, Street Artists know that their visual message isn’t guaranteed acceptance but they take a chance anyway. The ones that reflect the sentiments on the street tend to last longer, aesthetics count, and so does spelling, at least that is our inductive observation.

One London artist who seriously raises awareness about the Earths’ endangered species is Louis Masai, a painter, sculptor, illustrator and Street Artist. Starting this week in New York Masai is beginning a 20 mural tour across the United States to talk about the hard working, honey-making, pretty pollinating bee – and a number of our animals that are in danger of dying off completely…Continue reading here


No. 9
1UP in Berlin : “ ‘All City’ Doesn’t Even Begin to Cover It ”

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1UP. Berlin 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“An amorphous shape-shifting consortium of Berlin-based aerosol hooligans named 1UP is one of those graffiti crews who eventually make the entry into graffiti street lore because of the scope and daring of their travails.

Primarily Berlin based, you’ll find their almost-commercial sounding name on roofs, walls, abandoned factories, and in tunnels in many cities around the globe. Without a clear idea of the exact number in their association nor precise membership these daredevils are most often described as white men in their twenties and early thirties reveling in the athleticism and sport of graffiti, in addition to style. The tag itself appears to be rather “open source” at times, with only insiders able to keep track of the distinct hand styles forming the ubiquitous name on thousands of surfaces…continue reading here


No. 8
A “Cathedral” of Characters in Northern Spain

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RIM. Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

“It’s a cathedral of characters, this abandoned furniture factory forty kilometers outside of Barcelona. Cartoons, illustrations, portraits are everywhere; a curious collection of aerosol spray pieces that highlights the popularity of the animated and exaggerated personalities among graffiti and Street Artists in this region of the world.

The character may be a salty with a haggard stare, or reference a topic with a bit of satire. The scene may be serious, comical, ridiculous or purely sci-fi and horror. You discover the stories and allegories as you walk through the empty manufacturing rooms now flooded with natural light and dust. Expressions and situations here are full of drama that may trigger your empathy, startle your attention, elicit a shiver, or creepily fondle your funny bone…Continue reading here


No. 7
“Art Silos” Rise in the Harbor of Catania, Sicily

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Interesni Kazki. Detail. (photo © VladyArt)

“They’ve been here since the 1950s, these silos for wheat and corn on the harbor of Catania on the east coast of the island of Sicily at the foot of Mount Etna. 28 meters tall and facing the Ionian Sea, they are now some of the largest canvasses in Italy by a small group of international and local Street Artists.

The “Art Silos” project includes works completed during an eight month installation begun in June 2015 as part of Festival “I-ART” organized by “Emergence”, thanks to Angelo Bacchelli, curated by Giuseppe Stagnitta. The artists taking part in the project were Okuda (Spain), ROSH333 (Spain), Microbo (Italy), BO130 (Italy), VladyArt (Italy), Danilo Bucchi (Italy) and the duo Interesni Kaxki (Ukraine), mostly all from the graffiti/Street Art world. A separately organized but related project on the harbor-facing row of eight silos was completed by one artist alone, the Lisbon-based Vhils…continue reading here


No. 6
BLU Allies : A Counter Exhibition to “Banksy & Co.” Launched in Bologna

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Tadlock (photo © @around730)

“An anti-Banksy & Co. Street Art show opened in Bologna Italy the same night as its controversial bank-backed cousin with brand new works by 50 or so Italian and international Street Artists and open admission to their outdoor ‘museum’.

 “It is free and spontaneous, as Street Art should be,” says an organizer and participant named About Ponny as he describes the exuberant and sometimes saucy toned exhibition on the grounds of the sprawling former headquarters of Zincaturificio Bolognese which is destined for future demolition.

“The message we want to convey is that true street art is found where it was born, in the street and not in the paid exhibits,” says Bibbito, who along with two other out-of-town street artists named Jamesboy and Enter/Exit found food and couches during their installations thanks to an association of artists called L’Associazione Serendippo. Together, these artists say, they and other organizers want to send a “strong signal” by creating “one of the largest museums of ephemeral street art ever made”. The new coalition named this project “R.U.S.Co” (Recupero Urbano Spazi Comuni) or (Urban Renewal Common spaces).

The new 16,000 m2 open-air art show may appear as a rather curious development because its method of protest runs completely counter to that of the shows’ most vocal and high-profile critic, BLU, who last week protested the same show by defiantly destroying 20 years of his own public paintings, rather than making new ones…Continue reading here


No. 5
Raising Yellowcake in Grand Canyon: Icy & Sot, Jetsonorama in Arizona

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Icy & Sot. “Nuclear Plant” Navajo Nation. Arizona. June 2017. (photo © Icy & Sot)

“Yellow Cake: A simple sweet dessert confection that gets its signature color from 8 egg yolks and a cup of butter, and is great with either vanilla or chocolate icing.

Yellowcake: A type of uranium concentrate powder obtained from leach solutions, in an intermediate step in the processing of uranium ores. Also, its radioactive. Also, Colin Powell showed off a vial of it at the United Nations to sell the Iraq invasion in 2003 to that body and the world.

Being more knowledgeable about the dessert variety of yellow cake than the desert variety of uranium contamination, we turn to Street Artists Jetsonorama and Icy & Sot to educate us about the active uranium mines that are at the North Rim of The Grand Canyon. The three worked jointly in June to create new public works addressing the topic and we have each of them here for you to see.

“The issue of uranium contamination and nuclear waste is timely as there is an active uranium mine at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon presently and a proposal to start mining at the South Rim,” explains Jetsonorama (Chip Thomas), who is a local artist, a practicing doctor, and a social activist advocating for the people who live on the reservation and the natural environment in general…Continue reading here


No. 4
Nychos Slays in New York : IKONS Revealed as Never Before

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Nychos. “Dissection of Sigmund Freud”. Vienna Therapy. Manhattan, NY. June 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Scientists, psychologists, surgeons…in the end we’re all driven by a similar curiosity.”

This month has been a whirlwind in New York for Austrian Street Artist /fine artist /illustrator named Nychos and he’s made quite the iconic impression. Anchored by a show that opened last weekend of canvasses and illustrations at Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea named “IKON” and assisted by a co-branded sculptural event with the Vienna Tourist Board, the surreal dissectionist didn’t rest there.

In the weeks leading up to and after these events he also managed to hit a number of walls in Coney Island, Bushwick, and Jersey City…oh and he knocked out a box truck as well.

In addition to pulling out an astounding sculpture of Sigmund Freud looming over a couch that drew a crowd to the foot of the (also iconic) Flatiron Building at 23rd and 6th, the afterparty and reception featured Dominic Freud, the great grandson of the founder of psychoanalysis, who surmised that if he were alive today he would definitely have wanted to put Nychos on his couch…Continue reading here


No 3
35 Artists in Barcelona Trying To Save The Arctic with Greenpeace

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La Castillo. Save The Arctic. Barcelona, Spain. April 2016. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

“Yesterday our posting was about artists in London creating works about endangered species and today we go to Barcelona where 35 artists joined with Greenpeace and a local group named RebobinArt on April 9th to create works centered on environmental issues, especially the quickly disappearing polar ice cap.

Only three days later scientists announced that the Greenland “Melt” has happened one month earlier than usual this year, smashing records and causing scientists to reexamine their measuring instruments to make sure they were working correctly.

The art-platform model of RebobinArt is interesting because they are a community organization that manages spaces and issues permits for painting for competitions, festivals, exhibitions, educational programs, and cause-based events like this one.

Under the guidance of Director Marc Garcia, RobobinArt promotes and facilitates a different sort of public painting that is not strictly commercial and yet it is clearly not the freewheeling graffiti/street art based stuff that made Barcelona such a magnet for artists in the early-mid 2000s…Continue reading here


No. 2
Chip Thomas’ New Mural, Indigenous People, and #NoDAPL

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Chip Thomas. The original photograph of JC Morningstar holding her dog on a swing. Indigenous People’s Day at Fort Lewis College. Durango, CO. (photo © Chip Thomas)

“Street Artist and activist Jetsonorama (Chip Thomas) saw his work pull together a number of people in Durango, Colorado on October 10th as the city and the college celebrated their first ever “Indigenous People’s Day”. His photograph of an indigenous youth named JC Morningstar swinging and kissing her dog was chosen by a group of students from Fort Lewis College, where 24% of the population is indigenous.

The unveiling ceremony for the mural began with a traditional pow wow prayer by a drum circle and Chip says “the highlight of the day for me was having JC, her dog and her family travel 4 hours to Durango to attend the unveiling before going to the Tribe Called Red show that evening.”…Continue reading here


No 1
Chihuahua, a Mexican Desert City with a Few “Street Art” Blooms

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Paola Delfin. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Chihuahua is like one big ranch,” says a local reporter who guides you around this desert city known for beef, cheese, sotol, cowboy boots… and a growing middle class – thanks to the hundred plus multinational maquiladoras operating here with a focus on aerospace, medical equipment, and automobile manufacturing.

The “ranch” metaphor is meant to be welcoming, but it also lets you know that this city of nearly a million can still feel like a small town. This is the capital of Mexico’s largest state, which goes by the same name. And yes, the diminutive and scrappy dog originated here – as did Pancho Villa, and you can visit his homestead if you like.

It’s not the typical city where you might expect to find Street Art, yet only a few blocks from the government palace downtown that holds two stories of wall paintings by Mexican muralist Aarón Piña Mora, you will find new paintings in the dusty side streets that indicate a more international flavor is present…Continue reading here

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Louis Masai, Leaping Frogs and Crawling Crayfish in LA : “The Art Of Beeing”

Louis Masai, Leaping Frogs and Crawling Crayfish in LA : “The Art Of Beeing”

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Yellow legged frogs don’t know who the president is.

Either do Shasta Crayfish.

Regardless, both of these species are facing extinction and endangered, respectively. Are you doing anything about this?

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Yellow Legged Frog. 90% have disappeared in the last 100 years. Downtown, LA. November 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

Street Artist Louis Masai is raising the specter of the Extinction Crises we are currently living in with his paintings of animals in cities across the US this fall and early winter.

The tour is called “The Art of Beeing” and here are new images of some walls he hit in Los Angeles.

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Yellow Legged Frog. 90% have disappeared in the last 100 years. Downtown, LA. November 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

“I painted the Shasta crayfish (or as Americans call it; crawfish) in Venice,” Louis says of the stylized patchwork fabric covered animal. The patchwork is a metaphor for the different people who will be needed to protect it – “an endangered species native to northeast California There are only seven remaining populations of the Shasta crayfish left and are found only in Shasta County, California, in the Pit River drainage and two tributary systems, Fall River and Hat Creek drainages,” says the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Louis painted this one on the back of an environmentally aware nature photography gallery, he says, in an instance of what he calls “synchronicity.”

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Yellow Legged Frog. 90% have disappeared in the last 100 years. Downtown, LA. November 2016. (photo © Lmnotree)

And what about that little yellow-legged frog that doesn’t know we are transferring from President Obama to President Trump? This one is in the Korea Town area of LA and in general these amphibians are “threatened by predation by introduced trout, disease, pesticides, environmental changes from drought and global warming, and habitat degradation due to livestock grazing,” says the Center for Biodiversity.

“All in all it was a great week,” says Mr. Masai as he recounts the number of people who offered him walls to paint in this city of angels. “Now we set off for Joshua Tree and slab city before heading out to Phoenix.”

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Yellow Legged Frog. 90% have disappeared in the last 100 years. Downtown, LA. November 2016. (photo © Lmnotree)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Yellow Legged Frog. 90% have disappeared in the last 100 years. Downtown, LA. November 2016. (photo © Lmnotree)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Yellow Legged Frog. 90% have disappeared in the last 100 years. Downtown, LA. November 2016. (photo © Louis Masai)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © Lmnotree)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © Arnelle)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © Lmnotree)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © Louis Masai)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © Louis Masai)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Shasta Crayfish. Critically Endangered. Venice, LA. November 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

 

Click http://louismasai.com/projects/the-art-of-beeing/ to learn more about the project.

 

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BSA Film Friday: 09.16.16

BSA Film Friday: 09.16.16

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. M-City at WL4
2. Faith47 – Who Will Guard The Guards Themselves
3. Henk and Louise Schiffmacher by Rust and Mako Deuza
4. Narcelio Grud: Mattress
5. Nether in Baltimore Philadelphia, Chicago and New York

 

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BSA Special Feature: M-City at WL4

Polish Street Art stencillist, professor, and man-machine, M-City shows us with great dispatch the mechanics of production, with the occasional break for a snort of paint aroma to keep him going.

Also, are those pirates going by on a pirate ship?

Arrrrrr

 

Faith47 – Who Will Guard The Guards Themselves Film by Zane Meyer. Los Angeles 2016

Zane Meyer is killing it with his videos of artists in situ on the the street fighting and dancing with the wall. Faith47 is in her full stride with this herd of galloping wild horses, symbols perhaps of the runaway power we have allowed to take over our banks, military, companies – freed from regulation or governmental (citizen) interference.  It is perhaps thrilling to watch, and then the herd turns toward you.

“This quotation is the embodiment of the philosophical question of how power can be held to account. It refers to the impossibility of enforcing moral behaviour when the enforcers are corruptible, as seen in timeless cases of tyrannical governments, uncontrollably oppressive dictatorships, and police or judicial corruption and overreach. How can we trust authoritative guardians of power when only they are left to guard themselves against themselves? It’s an age-old challenge; the phrase, as it is normally quoted in Latin, comes from the Satires of Juvenal, the 1st/2nd century Roman satirist,” says the text accompanying the video.

Only problem is the video is too short, too brief, not enough. But maybe that’s how Faith wants it.

 

Henk and Louise Schiffmacher by Rust and Mako Deuza

You don’t see stop action videos too much today in the Street Art realm but its nice to have this minute by minute account of the building of the image, complete with artists, friends, passerby, photographers, kids, butchers, bakers, shoemakers. The subjects here are the famed dutch tattoo artist Henk Schiffmacher and his wife Louise, or as the grandiose 90s rock star Anthony Kiedis is reported to have called him, “an absolute rapscallion of Dutch proportions.”

Made in Corsica in the City of Ajaccio, the artists say that the mural “is about a life dedicated to tattoo, art, lovers, inspiration and many things word can’t describe.” Rust made the portrait of Henk schiffmacher and Mako Deuza the portrait of Louise – all with cans.

 

Narcelio Grud: Mattress

Mr. Grud recycles foam mattresses and creates new public artworks from dreams. His inventiveness never ceases to amaze, his resourcefulness without end.

 

Nether in Baltimore Philadelphia, Chicago and New York

A lot has happened in our lives over the last couple of years and muralist Nether from Baltimore captures his street work from ’15 and ’16 here in his reel. A messenger to the streets as much as a reflection of it, Nether calls out the strife and the violence that people are marching in the streets about in cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia, Chicago and New York.

 

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Swoon: “Pearly’s Beauty Shop” in LA Helps You Be a Glamorous Philanthropist

Swoon: “Pearly’s Beauty Shop” in LA Helps You Be a Glamorous Philanthropist

SWOON and “Pearly’s Beauty Shop” are back!
Heliotrope Benefit!
Buy your TIX for Saturday 5/21 in Los Angeles HERE!

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BSA was an early and fervent supporter of the very first Pearly’s Beauty Shop nearly four years ago in Long Island City, New York: Swoon herself was there painting nails and the brand-new Braddock Tile architectural model was on display amongst all the lace-paper cut constructions, hair dressers, stylists, costumers, swirling lights and DJs.

This Saturday in downtown Los Angeles the 2016 Artist-Run Soiree named “Pearly’s” will dwarf that first one in star power, sponsors, co-hosts, DJs, guest curators, performance artists, hair dioramas, costumes, glitter, and rouge.brooklyn-street-art-swoon-pearlys-beauty-shop-superchief-gallery-web-1

Hosted by Superchief Gallery and benefitting Swoon’s Heliotrope Foundation, you are invited to re-imagine fantastically your personal aesthetics with a bevy of talented professionals at the ready to help make dreams come true – and to fund Heliotrope so it can help communities to heal after natural disasters, economic blight, and other urgent social crisis.

Juxtapoz’s Evan Pricco has curated a list of cool artists for an exclusive Pearly’s 2016 print release, Shepard Fairey will be at the wheels of steel, and Brooklyn babe now Hollywood bombshell Marsea Goldberg is curating a special exhibition called “Vanity”. Also, an auction curated by Raina Mehler and Andrew Lockhart.

Also, surprises. That’s all we can say.

West Coast Represent!!

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SWOON invites you to Pearly’s Beauty Shop
Saturday, May 21, 2016
7 pm to 1 am
Superchief Gallery
739 Kohler St, Los Angeles, California 90021

TICKETS: Tickets start at $50 and can be purchased at bit.ly/pearlys2016
DRESS CODE: Come as you are

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PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS BY CLICKING ON THIS LINK: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pearlys-beauty-shop-tickets-24667609484

  • HOST COMMITTEE: Swizz Beatz • Jane Golden • Sallyann Kluz • Andrew Lockhart • Karmimadeebora McMillan • Sandra Powell • Zahra Sherzad • Anthony Spiegel • Ryan Nuckel • KT Tierney • Natalie Kates • Bill Dunleavy • Edward Zipco • Marsea Goldberg • Als Kenny • Ryland Behrens • Tamara Goldstein • Lisa Shimamura • Andrew Edward Brown • Liat Cohen • JL Sirisuk • Raina Mehler • Alex Fanning • Afrodet Zuri • Andrea Fiona Pagliai Londoño • Siovan Hope Ross • Adam Lehrer • Kristin Sancken • Charlotte Reed • Kurt McVey

Pearly’s Beauty Shop 2016 thanks Jefferson Projects; Juxtapoz Magazine; Lagunitas Brewing Company; Stolen Rum; Gary Lichtenstein Editions at Mana; Art Report; ArtLeadHER; and Red Flower for their generous support. Pearly’s is pleased to partner with LAMP Community, a Skid Row-based organization seeking to end homelessness and foster self-sufficiency among those living with severe mental illness.

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Icy & Sot Stencil An Enormous Blue Whale in LA

Icy & Sot Stencil An Enormous Blue Whale in LA

Street Artists Icy & Sot are thinking about the ocean. More specifically they’re thinking about its largest resident, the blue whale.

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

Up to 110 feet long and 330,000 pounds, the blue whale literally can go 1,600 feet deep below the surface and hold its breath for 10 to 20 minutes.

This brand new mural is the brothers’ first stencil to address endangered species and it took a lot of blade wielding in their Brooklyn studio this month to cut the maritime scene before flying to Los Angeles to spray it out. Their work often speaks of social and political ills such as homelessness, war, arms proliferation, immigration. This is their very first that gives voice to those whose habitats are regularly contaminated and polluted by industry and individuals.

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

“We wanted to use a species that lives in water,” says Sot as they discuss the special project with the Justseeds Cooperative for the Center for Biological Diversity.

“California has suffered a lot recently with their lack of clean water and now the oceans are often polluted as well,” says Sot.

“There is so much plastic pollution in the ocean too,” Icy continues. “What it does to the animals is really bad. I was reading this article and turtles eat jellyfish for their diet. But then people throw plastic bags in the ocean and the turtle thinks they are jellyfish and they eat the plastic. A lot of sea creatures have plastic bags inside of their bodies – they find them when the animals are caught.”

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

The brothers spent two solid days hand cutting the multi-layer stencil here on Melrose Avenue. How many pieces? “19 pieces,” says Icy. “Its not that big but it has a lot of details” The composite image features an enormous whale emerging from the sea in full view of a coastline packed with industrial forms which presumably are dumping contaminants directly into the waters.

As ever, the brothers crash into each others sentences while talking to us. “Whatever happens in the ocean… it comes back to us,” says Sot. “Whether is trash or plastics or oil..”

Icy jumps in, “The fish eat them and then we eat the animals and we have the plastics inside of us.”

“Yeah, It’s a cycle. We are all making a lot of trash – we are affecting the world. Then it all comes back to us,” says Sot.

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

In coordination with scientist Noah Greenwald and Roger Peet, an artist who has been painting murals for this endangered species initiative, Icy & Sot are contributing their skill to help raise awareness about our direct impact on the ocean and animal life.

“The goal is to paint murals about endangered species in communities around the country, near to where those species are found, trying to increase awareness of and connection between communities and their ecologies. We’ve done four so far,” says Peet, and he sights locations in Idaho, Montana, Minnesota, and Alabama.

From the mission statement of the project:
“Everywhere on the earth is special, and has qualities that distinguish it from other places both nearby and far away. One of those qualities is the biodiversity of a place, the plants and animals that call that place home and that maybe aren’t found anywhere else. Those plants and animals embody the history of a place and its future, and contribute to what makes a place special. Many of them are, unfortunately, endangered.”

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

 

Recent news headlines:

21,000 Gallons of Oil Leak Into Ocean Off California …

Fracking Waste is Being Dumped Into the Ocean Off California’s Coast 

Legal Petition Urges EPA to Ban Dumping of Offshore Fracking Chemicals Into California’s Ocean

3 Billion Gallons of Highly-Toxic Fracking Waste Dumped

Millions of Tons of Trash Dumped Into World’s Oceans

 

Our special thanks to photographer and artist Jess X. Chen for sharing these images with BSA readers.

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

 

Here is the link of the project’s site for more information and to find out how you can help or/and get involved: http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/about/creative_media/endangered_species_mural_project/index.html

Thank you to artist Roger Peet for his assistance with this article. More on Roger’s work here: toosphexy.com.

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Esteban Del Valle is “Displacing Waves” in Los Angeles

Esteban Del Valle is “Displacing Waves” in Los Angeles

Consider for a moment the irony of attending a gallery for an art show that confronts gentrification. Currently some critical philosophies born of urban studies and a fascination with the impact of a “creative class” will point to the art gallery as a central lever for converting a neighborhood from industrial/lower/working class to an attractive target for real estate development. Compound the irony with canvasses by an artist who also paints on the street, and you have a potential magnet for outraged anti-gentrificationists. Let’s discuss this over a slow-drip latte at the corner café.

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(click to enlarge)

Chicago born, Brooklyn-based street artist/fine artist Esteban del Valle is in LA for his first west coast solo show, “Displacing Waves,” and he tells us he is referring to the swelling, cresting, and breaking forces of gentrification that displace communities across the country – and he’s conflicted about it. Most of us think it’s a local story, confined to our own city, but as the middle class is hollowed out and collapsed in the US, del Valle tells us its national and his study of the topic has fueled these “painterly vignettes of contemporary colonialism”.

A student of history, sociology, and anthropology, it is his politically sharpened sense that slices beautifully, an exacting sarcasm that leaves hypocrisy freshly fanned out among the filleted meat selections displayed on canvas.

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Esteban del Valle. Process shot working on a large piece for his show “Displacing Waves” (photo © courtesy of Esteban Del Valle)

He says the show’s theme evolved after “a culmination of seven months of traveling throughout the United States, from rural Alaska to New York, Miami, and Los Angeles”. The figures are rich, the dynamic styling and tensions ready to be read into.

His techniques of drawing, painting, ink, and wash are amply intermingled, giving layers of emotion and verve to the compositions, pushing personalities to sharp definition. The wet-into-wet wash watercolors and inks reveal layers of character and circumstance, the pladdling and blotting brushes of oil trigger associations, building volume and movement. This is multi-discipline, with a fair margin for rumination and discovery.

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Esteban del Valle. Process shot working on a large piece for his show “Displacing Waves” (photo © courtesy of Esteban Del Valle)

Will these waves of del Valle creates displace the apathy of your average gentrifier? We spoke to him as he prepares for the opening of “Displacing Waves.”

Brooklyn Street Art: “Creative Class” has evolved into a loaded term of late; can you talk about how you are seeing it through a critical lens?

Esteban del Valle: I have been looking at the “creative class” as a group of creatively fluent individuals actively and willingly participating in a post industrial economy with the same capitalistic motivations connected to colonialist notions of “progress”. As much as I hate to admit it, I am a part of this problem; I am a formally educated artist with an advanced degree and I have consistently worked creative jobs using my skills to service the capitalist ambition of upward mobility. However, I am driven by the idea that creativity is at the core of consciousness and the impulse to acknowledge and question the presence of another. I feel like one of the consequences of contemporary “progress” is a tendency to strip creativity of its mystical powers and to view it as a space for material and technological innovation.

Through educational institutions and  America’s career-centric culture, we have reserved creative energy for advancements in organizing and storage of measurable information. This has distanced us from the possibility of being open to something different, an expansion of the soul. The cruel twist is that while funding from the arts are being cut in schools, businesses are desperately looking for creative thinkers to help them enter the next phase of the economy. The desire for measurable outcomes is so strong that it bullies any form of thought into a predetermined container, a vessel labeled “progress”.

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Esteban del Valle. Process shot working on a large piece for his show “Displacing Waves” (photo © courtesy of Esteban Del Valle)

This whole body of work really grew organically out of my travels. But the funny thing is, as much as I was seeing these issues of displacement everywhere I went from Alaska to Miami, the main thing that kept repeating was my anxiety about returning home to Brooklyn. I found myself looking to more affordable areas of Queens and I felt the conversation happening all over again. The conversation that was happening in Bed-Stuy when I first moved to New York and into a live/work art space near the Marcy Houses. I started to think about how my arrival in a neighborhood could be a reflection of the same gentrification that I found so upsetting. This went hand in hand with my feelings about certain practices in the Street Art movement that were not sitting right with me, such as being used by developers to set the groundwork for displacement.

I began to think about how murals function over time, like how a WPA mural changes in its function and meaning as we move into and increasingly technological economy with out-sourced labor. It occurred to me that I could create my own paintings with a sense of historical distance. So an image of a young man drinking coffee could become a loaded subject when placed in a larger context. This correlation interested me because it reflects my relationship to the seemingly innocent acts of the creative class itself when it is engaged in “progress”. David Foster Wallace once described it as us viewing ourselves as emperors of our own skull sized kingdom. We begin to view the world as an extension of ourselves, while seeing our objective of personal fulfillment and entertainment as seemingly innocent and unrelated to larger injustices.

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Esteban del Valle. Process shot working on a large piece for his show “Displacing Waves” (photo © courtesy of Esteban Del Valle)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the variety of personalities that you capture with your line-work? Are you rendering an opinion of the individuals or are you capturing them dispassionately?

Esteban del Valle: This show is the first stage of my reaction to the issues. I think it’s a mixture of anger and a sense of futility as a self-assigned voyeur. There are only a few pieces that outright attack the issues violently, most can be glossed over as attractive with a tinge of irony. I recently heard the saying, “irony is the song of a bird that has come to love its cage.” I think that’s what I felt implicated in. I wanted to show how an image can seem innocent and even glamorous. The beautiful renovations, improvements in the neighborhood, the bustling shops, all seem to be an image of “progress”. So my goal was to couple that surface interaction with hints of conflict and place them next to blatant conflict. This tension between the “attractive” and the “difficult” is the main interest behind my color choice as well. I cannot separate myself from the accountability, which is one reason why several of the pieces are portraits of friends or direct criticism of my self as an artist.

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Esteban del Valle. Process shot working on a large piece for his show “Displacing Waves” (photo © courtesy of Esteban Del Valle)

Brooklyn Street Art: For your selections of techniques – staining, masking, washes, dry-brush, granulation – how do you decide what comes next? Does the composition tell you? Do you discover it? Are you using a cognitive process or an emotional one?

Esteban del Valle: I begin with an abstract base and I draw on top of it, but I have always viewed my process as a sort of call and response, an exchange between painting and drawing. Illustration is historically a communicative medium while painting has evolved to abstract communication. But the evolution of both seems to be the rooted in the same intention. Abstraction seems to aim at abandoning spoken language to create a mood and maximize its audience.

That being said, we have found ways to categorize and contextualize arbitrary marks, record them in a historical perspective, and create an information-based language, which is the foundation of many institutions. Illustration has often served the purpose of conveying literal information as it priority with the same goal of maximizing its audience. My personal project has been to dance between these two spaces.  At the moment, I don’t feel like I am discovering as much as learning from the problems each painting creates, both in regards to form and content.  In that way I think it is both cognitive and emotional.

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Esteban del Valle. Process shot working on a large piece for his show “Displacing Waves” (photo © courtesy of Esteban Del Valle)

 

Brooklyn Street Art: These people are often in groupings. How important are the relationships between them?

Esteban del Valle: Very important. The figures provide tension between each other and different elements of their respective narrative. They are used to depict a moment of a story which hopefully leads to questions from the viewer as to what, how, and why they ended up in this space.

Brooklyn Street Art: Would you give us a little background on the theme of “Displacing Waves” – are these political waves, energetic waves, historical/cyclical ebbs and flows?

Esteban del Valle: All of the above. It began as a thought regarding the pushing and pulling of gestures between the backgrounds and foregrounds of my paintings, allowing the abstraction to impose itself back on top of the illustration. I found that when this happened, I couldn’t help but read the arbitrary gestures as having a narrative function. They became clouds, fire, waves, etc. This reflected my feelings regarding the content as I tried to understand my role in it all. What did it mean to be displaced and/or being an agent of displacement, which sometimes occurs simultaneously. I began to think about oppression as a byproduct of power grabs, like ripples from a splash. It struck me as a terrifyingly poetic image, something like a person trying to use force to posses a single wave in an ocean.

Brooklyn Street Art: You’ve painted outside and in studio a number of times over the last year. How is your work affected by the presence of an audience as contrasted with the solitude of the studio?

Esteban del Valle: I think I carry the “public” audience with me even in the studio, almost like a phantom limb left over from painting outdoors. But I will say that when I am alone in the studio, I try to push myself to find something new and uncomfortable. I take risks and see where they lead me, but I often do so with the idea that I am preparing the next stage of my work for public space. I think it’s important for artists to find time away from an audience to try to find the closest thing to their intuition, a voice less bothered by the suggestions and opinion of others. Then you reveal it to the world as a way of destroying it, leaving you to start all over and rediscover your differences.

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Esteban del Valle Displacing Waves will open this Saturday, January 9th at Superchief Gallery in Los Angeles. Click HERE for more details.

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Owen Dippie is Dangerous in LA

Owen Dippie is Dangerous in LA

Finishing up his bi-coastal tour of the US, Owen Dippie gave Los Angeles a dangerous mural before heading back to New Zealand. Complete with an official unveiling, the draping of US, Mexican, and New Zealand flags, and a re-enactment of the zombie scene from Thriller, Dippie needed only to show Michael Jackson’s eyes to evoke the memory of the larger-than-life superstar performer. It may be the detail or it may be the scale of the mural he is calling “Dangerous” in Downtown LA but anyone who passes by gets caught in Michael’s gaze for a moment.

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Owen Dippie (photo © Courtesy of the artist)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Courtesy of the artist)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Courtesy of the artist)

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Owen Dippie. CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE. (photo © Courtesy of the artist)

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Owen Dippie. Thriller. (photo © Courtesy of the artist)

 

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OverUnder in LA and Vegas ; Faith, Family, and Gambling

OverUnder in LA and Vegas ; Faith, Family, and Gambling

OverUnder recently traveled to Las Vegas and LA to do some mural commissions for a large brand and he tells us he was having a bit of guilt for selling his soul to the devil to pay the bills. That was eased by the coolness of the employees he worked with, he says.

But regardless of what he is doing, OverUnder says he always brings extra art work with him to put up in a city – usually on the sketchy side of town – so he feels like he has covered his bets by doing  “the sanctioned and the uncontrollable.” He attributes this unique yin/yang philosophy of balancing his artist output to the fact that he grew up in Nevada which gave him a gambling nature, always straddling the line between sanctioned and unsanctioned art.

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Overunder (photo © Overunder)

And speaking of gambling, not only did he hit the neglected, run-down, ignored parts of town – standard fare for Street Artists – but he also waded into the LA River (currently not a river), a verboten area of some profile that raises the hackles of many a politician and taxpayer as it became a showplace for record-setting graffiti tags that were enormously expensive and difficult to remove. Yeah, this is a small wheat-paste that will melt in the rain over a short period of time, but still.

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Overunder (photo © Overunder and Cass)

We asked OverUnder about these new images and an ever-evolving street work practice that at the moment seems to be influenced by home-life and possibly spirituality.

Brooklyn Street Art: The LA river is a famed and contested location for graffiti writers traditionally and not known too much for street artists. Can you talk about your experience – what significance it is to you as a visitor?
OverUnder: Since I was in LA with only a limited amount of pieces I knew one piece had to be reserved for the LA River. As a toy writer in the 90’s I deeply looked up to kings like Saber who influenced graffiti with his massive LA River piece. I was able to see it once in it’s glory but the LA River today is an endless sea of grey buff marks. I definitely see what you mean about the LA River traditionally being a famed graffiti spot and not known too much for street artists but I think as places change their roles also change. Or better yet, maybe Street Artists need to explore their roles in cities further.

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Overunder (photo © Overunder)

I made my way down to the River mid-day to a mix of car photo-shoots, bums cleaning their makeshift houses, and bored BMX kids cruising the banks. I staked my claim and prepared my wheat paste from the river itself – I love to make the paste from the place I’m working. Against common sense and the opinions of passersby, I took off my socks and shoes, walked into the questionably clear water and traversed to the target. A few of the BMX kids came over to ask questions and one of the guys named Cass snapped the shot of me working. The interaction was really pure and as their jaws were dropping a bit it reminded me of how I was so enamored of early writers like Saber for putting in work. After all, the action is the whole point of it.

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Overunder (photo © Overunder)

Brooklyn Street Art: These new figurative blue pieces look as if they are inspired by people. How did you arrive at these images?
OverUnder: The pieces as of late are not necessarily a blue period. I source 200-yard long rolls of paper at a time so that creates around 80 pieces. As I work my way through various colors I’ve come across a few favorites. Something about blue just seems right so I’ve probably hit the 1000th yard mark with it now. It doesn’t necessarily have a deeper meaning I just wanted to get away from colors associated with other figurative artists and the blue always seems to pop on your typical background of grey, cream, or beige.

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Overunder (photo © Overunder)

Brooklyn Street Art: How did you find a dilapidated facade for the mother and child image?
OverUnder: I found the building for the “mother and child” piece while cruising around Oakland. I was down there meeting with Athen B Gallery to plan a solo show for this November. That particular building jumped out to me for its proximity to public transit and its dilapidated nature. I also really like how the upper window was tilted in the same manner as the interaction between the mother and child. I like subtle things like that so maybe when the piece gets waxed there is still a hint of it left behind.

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Overunder. Oakland, CA (photo © Overunder)

Brooklyn Street Art: A praying, kneeling figure… mother and child… is this the faith and family tour?
OverUnder: Ha, I see what you mean about the overtly Christian themes. While I do like the idea of a faith and family tour I wouldn’t say it is that explicit. With the addition of my daughter to my family I have definitely been delving into some new territory. Don’t be surprised if everything I make from now on has a puppydog face on it.

But seriously, I think it’s amazing being a dad and I want to put my life into my work as much as possible. It seems especially important to me when a lot of the places I find myself putting these pieces up in are comprised of fatherless children. I lost my father 6 years ago. I can’t imagine growing up without a father, or having them locked up, or even dead. I want to remind the kids I run into that there is an outlet. It may not be pasting pictures on walls but hey, that might be a good start.

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Overunder. Oakland, CA (photo © Overunder)

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Overunder. Oakland, CA (photo © Overunder)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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BSA Images Of The Week: 02.15.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.15.15

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Winter has been beating New York with a stick this week, but there’s still new Street Art going up – you just might miss it because you are rushing home to get warm. Also we have a smattering of shots from other cities this week to give you an idea of what’s up.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Bifido, Bradley Theodore, BustArt, Claudio Ethos, Clet, Gore-B, GumShoe, Jilly Ballistic, Li-Hill, Mark Samsonovich, Mr. One Teas, Paul Insect and SeeTf.

Top Image >> Mark Samsonovich with an acute observation on this Valentine’s weekend. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mark Samsonovich (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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This GoreB may be 10 years old, but we just saw it for the first time. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Li-Hill has a new mural in Los Angeles, CA. Detail. (photo © Li-Hill)

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Li-Hill. Los Angeles. CA. (photo © Li-Hill)

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Paul Insect (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bust Art at work on his new installation in Paris. (photo © BustArt)

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BustArt completed installation in Paris. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This time Winnie the Pooh is taking his crew to the streets and claim a new graffiti area” says the artist.

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BustArt. Detail. Paris. (photo © BustArt)

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Mr. One Teas and Mickey are painting McDonalds with a wide brush (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Oops, my hat! Dang this wind! Claudio Ethos new piece in Rio De Janeiro, Brasil. (photo © ETHOS)

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CLET (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CLET (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jilly Ballistic got the guillotine treatment. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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What do you want to be when you grow up. There are number of options. Bifido’s new installation in Rome, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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Bradley Theodore (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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This hot busty blond aerosol piece by SeeTf is melting the snow. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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GumShoe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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“My Calvins” Manhattan, NYC. February 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

 

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DOT DOT DOT in LA Goes for a Gentle Laugh

DOT DOT DOT in LA Goes for a Gentle Laugh

Norwegian street artist DOT DOT DOT is one of the artists from the mid 2000s who was quite influenced by the stencil work and sarcastic tone of Banksy and who faithfully stays true to the aesthetics and situational placement of his pieces, even though his roots are from the graffiti scene of Oslo. Not married to any one style, he looks for opportunity to be ironic, and perhaps cause the viewer to be puzzled, or to illicit an inside-joke smile.

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DOT DOT DOT. “Chanel Dogs” Malibu, Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

Crisp, painstaking, and understated, the style of work from DOT DOT DOT sometimes comes across as benign even if the ultimate message is shocking. Take the dogs fighting over the Chanel purse in a chic neighborhood in Malibu, for example. You make first think the playful tug-of-war is cute before you ever realize it is an insult to status-hungry consumerism.

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DOT DOT DOT. “Radioactive Sea” Venice Beach, Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

His signs posted on California beaches warning against radioactive material in the water in Japanese may be mistaken as genuine although his intent is to shake you out of your awe at the magestic ocean view.  “Fukushima continues to contaminate over 400 tons of water daily, most of which is let out to sea,” says the artist.  To this date the plant has produced over 500,000 tons, and they have already found radioactive contamination all along the California coast as well as Hawaii.” To drive the point home he leaves a stencil of men in hazmat suits spraying down a boy whose been playing at the beach.

Here we give you some images from DOT DOT DOT’s recent trip to the west coast of the US, and a few of his interventions.

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DOT DOT DOT. “Radioactive Wash” Venice Beach, Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

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DOT DOT DOT. A collaboration with a Stikki Peaches piece. LA, Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

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DOT DOT DOT. “404 Not Found” is an ironic physical reference to the digital error message. Downtown, LA. Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

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DOT DOT DOT. Work in progress. Nedada. Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

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DOT DOT DOT. “Rothko” Nevada, Nov. 2014. (photo © DOT DOT DOT)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.22.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.22.14

 

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It’s not all going to the dogs, peeps – it just looks like it sometimes. We start this week with a ferocious one from Zimer, and follow it by a chihuahua that it could probably eat for lunch. Dog eat dog, yo.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring ACNE, City Kitty, Crummy Gummy, EC13, Ema, FAS, Hitnes, Insurgency Inc., Irony and Boe, Kid Acne, Lajaxx, Myth, Not Art, Ozmo, Peter Kirill, Specter, and Zimer.

Top Image >> Zimer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Irony and Boe Collaboration in East London, UK. June 2014 (photo © Gary Hunter)

Commentary from Gary Hunter, who sent this big dog from London:

“The chihuahua is partly a comment on changing demographic due to development overspilling from the spreading consumerism of nearby financial district Canary Wharf. Located just north of the Isle of ‘Dogs’ in East London the piece is facing ‘Barking’ a town in Essex, just by the A13 a main road in and out of London.

There also used to be a very big Spratt’s (a manufacturer originally from Cincinnati, Ohio) dog biscuit factory nearby, now warehouse apartment conversions. I photographed the ‘model’ (coincidentally called Hunter and owned by London artist Cate Halpin) in great detail in my studio on a very high end Hasselblad digital camera, to bring out every aspect. Irony and Boe then transposed it brick by brick for their painted artwork.

This work is part of ‘Changing Spaces’ a a community cohesion project in east London’s Tower Hamlet’s district, one of the city’s most deprived, yet diverse boroughs – facilitating understanding of the immediate environment, important history, trade and migration.” – GH

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FAS. Please help ID the rest of the tags. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Not Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pete Kirill tribute to the great Sophia Loren. (photo © Cesar Miesses)

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Artists Unknown. Save the elephants! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Specter and Ozmo collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lajaxx (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Insurgency Inc (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crummy Gummy. In Los Angeles, CA. “I’m a big fan of H.R. Giger and this piece actually made me a little sad. But I thought it was a cool way to reference his passing” Lisa V (photo © Lisa V)

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ACNE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hitnes wanted to create the perfect shade of color to highlight the eye of the bunny for the piece he did on a roof top in East Williasmburg this week. Here is how it all began…this plus a little water. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hitnes. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EC13 New tile installation in Granada, Spain. June 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kid Acne (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kid Acne and Ema are from England and they are visiting NYC and wasting no time on the streets. At the same time they have been showing a very poor judgment with the placing of their pieces by going over many writer’s tags. We like them both but are surprised by their selection of places to wheat paste their art since they are not new to the streets of New York, indeed we might say that they are even veterans of the streets of NYC given this we think they should know better.

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Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ema (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Summer 2014, Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Tag & Buff Duet: SABER and Zes Capture the Tension in LA (VIDEO)

Tag & Buff Duet: SABER and Zes Capture the Tension in LA (VIDEO)

When you live in certain cities you are accustomed to the sort of cat and mouse game that municipalities play with graffiti taggers/writers with the cancelling out of one another’s work with paint. Today we take a look at a legal mural by Saber and Zes in Los Angeles that aims to capture the action between the untamed madness and wild markings of the writer and the blocky beige paint blobs that redact those markings from the visual cityscape, a practice many refer to as “the buff”.

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

“This particular style is an homage to this visual conflict that we see everyday on our city’s walls,” Saber tells us of this mural painted on a new art supply store that just opened in downtown LA. He says that the tension between the two forces is what gave energy to the project that used tools like a fire extinguisher, a bug sprayer, and that nice buff color, along with a fair number of fatcaps. Saber says it was a bit of an experiment.

Explaining the approach, Saber tells us they kept their state of mind loose while testing the uncontrolled quality of the substance applicators they were employing. “Usually these tools are used for bombing so the idea that we kept in mind was that there are no mistakes,” he says. “Any mark made on the wall only adds to the layers creating the tension between tagging, color and the beige of buff. Our goal was to capture samples of this conflict that takes place in the urban environment between tagging, handstyles and the relentless buff. Eventually the buffing took on a life of it’s own, almost turning into clouds that were weaving in and out of the scrawls.”

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

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Saber . Zes . MSK collaboration in Los Angeles. (photo © Jordan Ahern)

 

CREDITS:

Saber Zes MSK
Branded Arts
Photos by Jordan Ahern @dopevinyl
@theseventhLetter
Artists and Craftsman Supply LA

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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