All posts tagged: Katsu

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.23.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.23.19

Two things come to mind simultaneously as we publish this collection of Street Art and graffiti.
1. All the Rainbow Flag waving means nothing if you are not willing to help protect the dignity of immigrants who are being dragged from their homes and thrown in jail-detention centers in the US, and
2. All white people are immigrants and descendants of immigrants.

We’ve all seen this movie before. Or our parents did. Or our grandparents did. You’re next, baby!

It was great to see/hear/feel Faile and Swizz Beats doing a quick summer dance party this week in Manhattan – flourescent madness ya’ll. Also, it was astounding to see so many graffiti heads and other notables at Beyond the Streets this week – It was a cultural event that blew our minds. Seriously, Corn Bread was actually selling t-shirts on a table at the entrance – and that started the litany. You can see our review published yesterday.

And finally, can we call a moratorium on rain for a few days? The grass and trees are green already.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street (or boardwalk), this time featuring AME 72, Bisco Smith, Emma Apicelli, Feminists in Struggle, IXNAY, Joe Caslin, Katsu, Part Time Artist, Royce Bannon, and Tonk Hawaii.

Joe Caslin. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bisco Smith (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Part Time Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AME 72 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AME 72 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Feminists In Struggle (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Emma Apicelli (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jaye Moon. Calle Me By Your Name. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ms. Moon made this installation using Legos with a message in Braille. The words in the message was taken from the script of the movie “Call Me By Your Name.”

Jaye Moon. Call Me By Your Name. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jaye Moon. Call Me By Your Name. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Street protester (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tonk Hawaii (photo © Jaime Rojo)
IXNAY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. The Last Picture. Brooklyn, NY. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
“Beyond The Streets” Opens in New York : Beyond Labels, With Roots

“Beyond The Streets” Opens in New York : Beyond Labels, With Roots

Look Who’s Back in the Neighborhood

They used to run from the Vandal Squad in this neighborhood. Now people pay to see their art here.

Through the expansive glass wall on the 6th floor you can look down Kent Avenue to see the spot where a monster pickup truck with a heavy chain tied around a FAILE prayer wheel almost jackknifed on the sidewalk, gave up and sped away. Not that many Brooklynites saw that event in the 2000s – nobody walked here and few people drove through Williamsburg then except truckers looking for street walking ladies wearing high heels and spandex. Oh, and a serial killer.

Faile. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Now visitors buy tickets to see a circular colonnade of FAILE prayer wheels here at 25 Kent – including the real estate developers and Wall Street professionals who displaced the community of artists whose work made the neighborhood attractive and “edgy”.

Along with Street Artists in this exhibition like Shepard Fairey, Bast, Swoon, Invader, Aiko, Dan Witz, Katsu, 1UP, and Lister, the FAILE duo put completely illegal artworks on walls under cover of night and threat of arrest in this same neighborhood then – transforming it with many others who are not in this show into an open gallery of the streets, placing Williamsburg on the map as New Yorks’ epicenter of the newly emerging Street Art scene. 

Swoon. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Nature of Graffiti and Street Art

As graffiti and Street Art are migratory and necessarily elusive by nature, this story is only one chapter in a volume of history that serious academics are now reconstructing and analyzing. With each passing year and published white paper, the practices of 20th century public mark-making are being examined in greater detail for archiving and for posterity. Not surprisingly, institutions, patrons, collectors, and brands are increasingly interested in this story as well.

When it comes to the anarchic subculture of illegal street art practice and its influence on society, there are non-stop ironies sprayed en route from verboten to Vuitton, and street culture has supercharged the imagination of the mainstream and high culture throughout history – that’s where the best ideas come from sometimes. Many seminal artworks from “the scene”, as it were, represent much more than what you are seeing at first glance. As art and cultural critic Carlo McCormick has described the iconic Shepard Fairey ‘Hope’ image in Art in America, many graffiti and Street Art works saved are “not a fleeting pop-culture sensation but simply the latest crossover hit in a long line of underground classics.”

The wide-ranging survey that is Beyond the Streets makes sure that you know where the roots are, and who many of the pioneers were. It is impossible to tell a complete story that includes scenes as diverse as west coast Chicano muralism, hobo graffiti, hip-hop commercial design, NY downtown artivism, Japanese low/hi contemporary, skateboard, tattoo, early train writing and a current romance with muralism, but BTS at least gives a serious consideration to each and offers you the opportunity to look further into them.

Martha Cooper with BGirl Rockafelka. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With the help of photography documentation from people like Martha Cooper, Henry Chalfant, Jim Prigoff, Lisa Kahane, Joe Conzo, John Fekner, Bill Daniel, Maripol, and Dash Snow, the crucial importance of this work provides needed interstitial and contextual information that enables myriad stories to be elucidated.

Joe Conzo. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Scale, The History

Exhaustive, no. Exhausting, possibly. Pace yourself.

 “I spent my life surrounded by graffiti and Street Art,” says the shows’ director Roger Gastman “and you could say that I have been obsessed with understanding the culture, its origins, and its evolution. It’s incredible to me how far it has come.”

With 150 artists whose practices span five decades and various (mainly) American subcultures displayed in a maze of new walls in this 100,000 sf, two-floor exhibition, the Beyond the Streets senior curatorial team includes Gastman, filmmaker/ graffiti historian Sacha Jenkins SHR, Juxtapoz Editor in Chief Evan Pricco, and author/ graffiti historian / graffiti writer David CHINO Villorente. Each curator brings core competencies and knowledge of the graffiti scene (Gastman, Jenkins, Villorente) as it has evolved to include the Street Art practice and an eventual move toward contemporary art (Pricco).

“It’s absolutely phenomenal,” says Villorente, who says his history as a graffiti writer compounds the impact for him. “I was glad that the show was coming to New York because I was born and raised in Brooklyn. I couldn’t have imagined it – especially when I think back on when I was writing on the trains and doing illegal graffiti. To have of show of this magnitude is really special.”

Mike 171. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

“We started writing in ’68 and here we are, fifty-one years later,” says Mike 171 as he gestures toward himself and crew writer SJK 171 when talking about how they began and continued writing their tags on the street in New York City. “This is the history right here,” he says, and you know you are about to be schooled about the plain realities of early graffiti writing. At the opening, you witness each guy tagging in a large dusty window here and realize the love for writing never actually stops.

“We were expressing something that was inside of us,” says SJK 171. “The streets were like ours,” he tells you against a backdrop of their work, Cornbread’s work, and of images full of one color, single line monikers that set the stage for the more colorful, character-driven pieces and burners a decade later, transforming trains into a rolling aesthetic symphony by the mid 1970s.

Cornbread. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo). Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One of the actual “whole car” writers of that period, Lee “LEE” Quinones, here recreates a “Soul Train” car side on a canvas that looks like it could easily wrap an actual MTA #2-line car that he used to slaughter with cans in the middle of the night at the train yard. When describing the new work he said he was intentionally keeping it simple – perhaps owing the style to his earlier practice.

Lee Quinones. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I think this is one of Lee’s most amazing pieces,” says Charlie Ahearn, the director of the seminal 1982 “Wild Style” film that Quinones stars in. Ahearn self-produced that film which became an important distillation of the merging of graffiti with hip-hop culture during a pivotal moment in the history of both. Now also a professor of Hip-Hop, art, design, and documentary film making at Pace University, Ahearn is familiar with many of the artists work here, many relationships reaching back decades. “I told Lee that I liked that it was a one-off, that he painted all the color straight off without the embellishment, texturing, and all that stuff.”

John and Charlie Ahearn. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Charlie’s twin brother John Ahearn is represented here popping out from walls as well, his sculptures serving as authentic portraits of people you may easily have seen on New York streets over the last four decades. Casted directly on top of the people themselves in a technique he has perfected, the placement of the sculptures gives life to the space.

Star Writers, Immersive Environments, Foundations

Dabsmyla. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The individual clusters of work and canvasses by 1970s-80s train painters like Futura, Crash, Lady Pink, Freedom, Carlos Mare, Blade, Haze, and Daze and next gen graphic painters like Doze Green and Rime are complemented by a number of so-called “immersive” spaces here like the Mission Schools’ Barry McGee storefront with smashed window, and the Australian Pop duo Dabs & Myla’s eye candy floral walls with thousands of artificial fauna created in collaboration with Amelia Posada.

Myla. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The high-profile graphic activist Shepard Fairey’s 30 year career overview takes a large area and encompasses all elements of his street and studio practice, and Bill Barminski’s cardboard home is open for you to explore with a wry smile, remembering the security room installation he did at Banksy’s Dismaland a couple years earlier.

Bill Barminski. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You’re also treated to a full rolling wall of Craig Stecyk posters that brings you the sun and surf of California skate culture, sculptures by Mr. Cartoon and Risk, a kid-friendly illustrated room with crafting supplies for young fans on tables from HuskMitNavn, and an astute freight train culture educational display by writer/painter/sculptor Tim Conlon (complete with a mid-sized Southern Pacific freight on train tracks he and friends built), prints/photos by historian Bill Daniel, and original drawings by the man some call the King of Hobo Art, buZ blurr.

John Fekner. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“These are a self portrait as predicated on a first Bozo Texino person and I kind of changed the image around,” says Mr. blurr, a legendary figure in denim overalls, as he patiently describes his classic tag image of a railway cowboy.

“It is a writer motif – the pipe smoke is going up and then it is trailing back to signify movement as the train goes down the track,” he says. “I worked in the train yards and my job was as a brakeman. I had a little free time so I started making drawings. I made my first one on November 11, 1971,” he says as he recalls the state of mind that he was in at the time as he began to tag freights with the image and text that came to him clearly – and may have perplexed other travellers.

buZ blurr. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“They came from a confused state. I was questioning everything. I was putting kind of cryptic messages under my drawings. It was anybody’s guess as to its literal interpretation. I addressed some of them up to specific people but whether they saw them or responded to them, I wouldn’t have any idea.”  

Tim Conlon. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“When it’s shipped in the crate its 550 pounds,” says Conlon as he stands by the 3-foot high freight car re-creation on tracks and ties that is hit with a couple of wild and colorful graffiti burners. “Here I’m going to show you something,” he says as he pulls back the roof to reveal the narrow coffin interior in rusted red. “So I’m going to hide some beer in here during the opening party. This is like the fifth one of these I’ve made,” and he proudly confides that one lives in the house of Robert Downey Jr.

Digging Deep to Take Risks

Not content to rest on laurels and previous formulas of success, the show keeps a freshness by presenting known entities pushing themselves further and taking creative risks; a reflection of that spirit of experimentation we have always prized on the street.

Graffiti writer Earsnot from Irak crew, now known professionally as Kunle Martin, said he had been making work for the gallery containing elements of graffiti, but felt they were too “safe”.

Kunle Martin AKA Earsnot. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Then my friend Dan said ‘you should go back to doing drawings,’” he says as he stands before figurative canvasses in black and white on cardboard. “I said ‘I can’t! It’s too hard! But eventually I began working in my studio five days a week, and I made enough for a show.”

Reflective of the attitude of Gastman toward artists in the community, he told Martin that if he made enough of them, he could place them in this show. “I think he was happy to hear that I was in my studio working. He’s been very supportive of it.”

Kunle Martin. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A fluorescent color-drenched graphic/photographic collage style is featured with plenty of space in large frames from Chicago’s Pose, who says he is letting photography and geometry lead him away from his previous pop collage style that may have reminded many of Lichtenstein. His inspiration here comes from his research into early photos of graffiti writers running from police “I was obsessed with John Naars photos and I have usually Norman Mailer as in inspiration. Some of these photo references are from the Philadelphia Inquirer,” he says.

Pose. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pose. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

New York’s Eric Haze also dares himself to take a new direction with three canvasses featuring a refracted piecing-together of imagery and memories of this city in monochrome. Based on black and white scenes of the city by photographer and NYC taxi driver Matt Weber, the scenes capture aspects that are culled from imagination and impression. The centerpiece canvas captures an iconic piece of the Williamsburg waterfront that has been removed in the last few years by developers; the signage of the old Domino Sugar factory by the Williamsburg Bridge.

Haze. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Haze said he meant it as a gift and tribute to his wife, actress and longtime resident of the neighborhood, Rosie Perez who used to see it along Kent Avenue as a kid.  “He’s not afraid to take risks. He’s not afraid to go in the studio and express what’s inside of him. When he brought me to the studio, he says, ‘I have a surprise for you’,” she remembers. “I saw the beginnings of the Domino painting and I was stunned into silence and I got teary-eyed.”

Rosie Perez. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beyond Labels

An expanded version of the show that first mounted in Los Angeles last year, the collection is focused a great deal on the American history of graffiti with a balance of East/West coast graffiti history – in a way that may remind you of 2011’s “Art in the Streets” at LA MoCA. That makes sense, considering Gastman co-curated that show as well.

“It’s both a historical and current look at where the culture went and where it started and how widespread it is,” says co-curator Evan Pricco, who perhaps provides a lynchpin view toward the big name Street Artists who continued to push expectations in the 2000’s on streets and in commercial galleries around the world. “With the space spread over two floors it has a way better curatorial sense. I also think it does compete with museums because it shows that this kind of work is on the same level. You kind of have to present it in a way that feels very institutional and archival.”

So is Beyond the Streets a graffiti show or a Street Art show or a contemporary art show? For artist Kenny Scharf, who first gained attention during the heyday of Downtown Manhattan’s art scene that benefitted from an interlude where rents were dirt cheap and Wall Street was on a cocaine high, there is no need to categorize what kind of art this is.

Kenny Scharf. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“You know I never liked labels or titles anyway so even back in the early 80s I was pegged like ‘oh you’re a graffiti artist,’” he says. “People feel the need to title and label so I’ll let them to continue to do that but I don’t fit into any of them and I don’t want to. I want to fit into all of them and none of them.”

Beyond the Streets opened June 21 and continues through the summer.

MADSAKI. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blade and Doze Green. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Katsu. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gajin Fujita. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Faith XLVII. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
John Ahearn. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jane Dickson. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Witz. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew…it’s always a good thing to have your friends near by when you need them the most… Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)ork. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cleon Peterson. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Conor Harrington. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Felipe Pantone. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beastie Boys. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nekst . Risk. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bast . Paul Insect. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Invader. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ron English. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Patrick Martinez. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dust tagger. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Martha Cooper with Freedom. Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
What’s left and soon to be gone of the old Williamsburg’s waterfront right across from Beyond The Streets New York. June 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha Cooper’s work as exhibited at Beyond The Streets New York

Beyond The Streets NYC is now open in Williamsburg, Brooklyn to the general public and will run until August 2019. Click HERE for schedules, tickets and details.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
“Beyond The Streets” Exhibition : Gastman’s Train Pulls In to LA

“Beyond The Streets” Exhibition : Gastman’s Train Pulls In to LA

A steel-wheeled graffiti train with Roger Gastman at the controls roars into LA’s Chinatown for a two-month stay at this station, a 40,000 square foot warehouse that houses “Beyond the Streets.” Originating at the streets and train yards of the 1960s and 70s, this express survey carries with it 100 or so artists and writers from across the last five decades as practitioners of graffiti, Street Art, and mural painting. Somehow, everyone gets represented.

Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Opening night featured many of the names associated with its earliest beginnings of the New York /Philadelphia graffiti scene like Cornbread, Taki183, Futura, Lady Pink, filmmaker Charlie Ahearn, among many others, including photographer Martha Cooper, who in addition to being an artist in the show, shares these photos with BSA readers. She also extensively shares her photos for the accompanying show catalog,  providing documentation from the scene that exist nowhere else.

Retna. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

A diverse and almost overwhelming series of displays present the works in a way that can only hint at the thousands of artists who built this story, necessarily viewed through a wide lens: sculpture, photography, installations, and multi-media all join the canvasses and ephemera and Gastman’s collection of vintage paint cans. Smartly planned for the selfie generation, large pieces are presented almost as backdrop ready to be Instagrammed; a direction coming from the “Photos Encouraged” sign that is next to the wall covered with Retna’s original alphabet near the entrance.

Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Somewhat of a rejoinder to Art in the Streets, the eponymous graffiti and Street Art exhibition in 2011 at LA MoCA, Beyond the Streets takes a focused look at the multitudinous peoples’ art movement from the perspective of one of that first shows’ original curators, Roger Gastman. When arranging the two month exhibition that closes July 6th, Gastman says that his focus was to celebrate those with street cred, in terms of individual practice, and to combine that requirement with a respectable semblance of a studio practice.

Ultimately he looked for artists who have used their particular approach to expand the definition of art in the streets in some way. That definition by now has become quite wide and it’s also a tall order for any curator to find the common themes here and present them in a cohesive manner.

Beyond The Streets, compiled by Roger Gastman.

Both the accompanying catalog and exhibition take a welcome stance toward educating the audience in many ways, helping the viewer to decode this freewheeling graffiti and mark-making history with basic vocabulary terms, historical events, pop culture inflexion points and examination of tools of the trade all adding context. Catalog essays and interviews are incisive and enlightening, including wit, sarcasm and even the occasional admonishment – notably in the essay by author, filmmaker, and curator Sacha Jenkins, who has been documenting the graffiti scene for a least a couple of decades.

Studying the move of some artists from street practice to commercial gallery that began in earnest with early NYC train writers transitioning to canvasses in the early 1980s, Jenkins upbraids a disgruntled faction among old-school graffiti writers who he characterizes as perhaps intransigent in their stylistic evolution and unwilling to adapt with the game. Later in his essay he lambasts the overtly pleasant and narcissistic cultural newcomers who he sees as milk-toasting the scene with their adoration of pretty murals and shallow sentiments, obtusely ushering in gentrification and “leading up to hearing about how my mother’s building is going to get bulldozed for a hip residential building that has a hot tub in every apartment.” He also may be the only writer here so openly addressing race and class distinctions present during the evolution of the scene and now.

Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

The selection of artists and writers in the book and exhibition, many of them friends and colleagues with whom Gastman has worked with in the past, offers a rewarding and accessible panoply of styles and views. With some study the visitor understands connections in a widely dispersed multi-player subculture that coalesced and continuously changed its shape and character. But even if they don’t, they still get an amazing amount of eye candy.

The catalog offers extensive sections like those devoted to The History of Spraypaint and Graffiti in Galleries, and offers petite exegesis on influencing factors and benchmarks that shaped the art form’s route like Mobile DJs, The ’77 NYC Blackout, the European graffiti scene and graffiti’s role in gang culture, hip-hop and hardcore music. The compilation aids and supports the fullness of a story that frankly requires many voices to tell it. Gastman even gives forum and exhibition space to activist and defiant guerilla gardener Ron Finley and the holistic urban horticultural oases that he creates in South Central LA, calling it his form of graffiti in empty lots of the city.

Martha Cooper with Taki 183. Beyond The Streets. (photo courtesy of Martha Cooper)

With insightful interviews of artists in the exhibition from talented writers like Caleb Neelon, Caroline Ryder, John Lewis, Alec Banks, Evan Pricco, John Albert, Shelly Leopold, and Gastman himself, there are enough colorful anecdotes and decisive signposts en route to help tell the stories of the artists and their individual approaches to the street.

“The artists do not share a singular style, since they are primarily united by a common element of their personal biographies – the fact that they once made their art in the streets,” says self-described novice to the Street Art / graffiti world, Adam Lerner, the Director and Chief Animator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. “There are, however some threads that run through the works.”

Beyond the Streets will help visitors find some of those threads for themselves and undoubtedly they will forge their own interpretation of art in the streets.

Faile. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Invader. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Slick. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Takashi Murakami with Madsaki, Snipel, Tenga One and Onesker. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Lady Pink. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Charlie Ahearn . Futura . Lady Pink. Crash. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Mr. Cartoon. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Futura. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Futura takes a photo of Haze’s art work. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Niels Shoe Meulman. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Ron Finley’s Gansta Gardener installation. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Corn Bread. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Corn Bread. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

 

Crash . Daze. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Katsu. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Bill Barminski. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Faith XLVII. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Shepard Fairey. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Jenny Holzer, Flashlight (In Collaboration With A-One). Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Blade. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Aiko. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Al Diaz. Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Barry Magee. Beyond The Streets. (photo and video below © Martha Cooper)

 

Beyond The Streets. (photo © Martha Cooper)


For more information please visit https://www.beyondthestreets.com/

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 01.14.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.14.18

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

A celebrated American, the New York poet Langston Hughes, leads off this edition of BSA Images of the Week, with a firebox posting of a portion of his work “Oh Let America Be America Again.” A part of the Harlem Jazz Age that gave birth to a freedom of expression and heralded fame for many black and brown artists across artistic disciplines, it was Hughes that spoke to the depths and sorrows and aspirations of the human experience here with such poetry. We don’t know who brought his words to the street here, but the timing could not be better.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Abe Lincoln Jr., Anthony Lister, Apexer, Borondo, Katsu, Langston Hughes, Paul Kostabi, SacSix, and Willow.

Top Image: A poem by Langston Hughes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Apexer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Lister in Lisbon. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Borondo. Padre Cruz Neighborhood. Lisbon. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Lisbon. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Lisbon. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Abe Lincoln Jr. Phone booth ad takeover. LES, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Abe Lincoln Jr. Phone booth ad takeover. LES, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Abe Lincoln Jr. Phone booth ad takeover. LES, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Willow (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SacSix and FAME. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Paul Kostabi (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. East Rive, NYC. January 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Coney Art Walls : 30 Reasons To Go To Coney Island This Summer

Coney Art Walls : 30 Reasons To Go To Coney Island This Summer

The gates are open to the new public/private art project called Coney Art Walls and today you can have a look at all 30 or so of the new pieces by a respectable range of artists spanning four decades and a helluva lot of New York street culture history. We’ve been lucky to see a lot of the action as it happened over the last five weeks and the range is impressive. These are not casual, incidental choices of players lacking serious resumes or street/gallery cred, but the average observer or unknowing critic may not recognize it.

brooklyn-street-art-how-nosm-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-22-15-web-8

How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

By way of defining terms, none of this is street art. These are murals completed by artists who are street artists, graffiti writers, fine artists, and contemporary artists. In the middle of an amusement park, these are commissioned works that respond in some way to their environment by thirty or so local and international heavy hitters and a few new kids on the block comprising a 40+ year span of expertise.

Open to many strata of the public and fun-seekers who dig Brooklyn’s rich cultural landscape, this outdoor show will surely end up as backgrounds for selfies — while perhaps simultaneously elevating a discourse about the rightful place of graffiti/street art/urban art within the context of contemporary art. Okay, maybe not such loftiness will result, but let’s not rule it out entirely.

 

brooklyn-street-art-how-nosm-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-22-15-web-5

How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

It should come as no surprise that it is the dealer, curator, perennially risk-taking showman Jeffrey Deitch who is the ringmaster of this circus, or that the genesis of this cultural adventure is perplexing to some who have greeted his newest vision with perplexity and derision. His Deitch Projects and related activities in the 2000s regularly presented and promoted the street-inspired D.I.Y. cultural landscape, having done his due diligence and recognizing that new life springs from the various youth movements always afoot. The Jeffrey-conceived “Art Parade” itself was a street-based all-inclusive annual panoply of eye candy and absurdity; inflicting humor, sex, gore, fire, glitter and possibility into the minds of Manhattan sidewalk observers.

As MOCA Los Angeles director Deitch also flipped the script with his “Art In The Streets,” organizing a vast survey of a half-century of the modern grassroots genres including graffiti/street art/urban art/tattoo/punk/hip-hop/skater culture that far surpassed anyone’s predictions for audience attendance and public engagement. Aside from tripping wires and a public misstep here and there, the show earned critical praise, pinched art-school noses, and pushed skeptical institutions and patrons to question their prejudices. It also gave voice to a lot of people.

brooklyn-street-art-daze-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-22-15-web-3

Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Notably, that MOCA exhibit drew a little over 200,000 attendees in four months. Coney Island beach and boardwalk gets about 14 million annually. Even if the Smorgasbord pop-up village food trucks feed a fraction of that number, there will be more folks viewing art and interacting with it here than, say, the Four Seasons dining rooms, which also display street artists and contemporary artists in the restaurants’ artistic programming. Side by side comparisons of Smorgasbord/Four Seasons diners ethnic diversity, income, age, education level, museum board membership or real estate investments were not available at press time. But neither can be fairly described as exploitative to artists or audience without sounding patronizing.

brooklyn-street-art-daze-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-22-15-web-2

Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

These multicolored and monochromatic murals illustrate a wide and balanced smorgasborg of their own; examples of myriad styles are at play with some engaging in activism and local politics and Coney Island history. From original train writer Lady Pink to aerosol drone sprayer Katsu, from eL Seed’s lyrical Arabic calligraffiti to Retna’s secret text language to graffitist-now-collagist Greg Lamarche, from Shepard Fairey’s elegant Brooklyn salute to polluters and blasé consumerism to Tatyana Fazlalizadeh’s spotlight on current Coney Island neighbors, from urban naturalist ROA’s monochrome marginalized city animals to How & Nosm’s eye-punching and precise graphic metaphors, you are getting a dizzying example of the deep command Deitch has of this multi-headed contemporary category that is yet to settle on a moniker to call itself.

brooklyn-street-art-crash-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-22-15-web-3

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Coney Art Walls assembles world travelers from NYC and LA and Miami and internationally; Belgium, Barcelona, Brazil, Paris, Tunisia, London. Some are 80s Downtown NYC alumni, others were train writers in the 70s or big crew graff heads and taggers from the decades after. Some are considered historical originators of a form and cross-genre risk takers pushing beyond their comfort zone. Take a close look and you’ll find names that are in major collections (private, institutional, corporate) and that go to auction.

brooklyn-street-art-crash-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-22-15-web-5

Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Some are regularly showing in galleries and are invited to street art festivals, exhibited in museums and discussed in academia and print. Others have studio practices spanning three decades, are lecturers, panelists, authors, teachers, community advocates, art stars, reality TV personalities, film actors, product endorsers and art product makers working with global brands. One or two may be considered global brands themselves. A handful have been painting on the streets for 40 years. Monolithic they are not.

One more notable aspect occurred to us as we watched this parade making its peregrination to these summer walls – either because of Deitch or the romance or history of Coney or both; When you are looking at the range of ages and ethnicities and family configurations and listening to the variety of accents and opinions expressed and seeing the friendly but tough-stuff attitudes on display — you might guess you were in Brooklyn. You are.

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-5

Futura (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-futura-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-4

Futura (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-shepard-fairey-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-1

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-shepard-fairey-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-3

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jesse-edwards-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-5

Jesse Edwards (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jesse-edwards-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-3

Jesse Edwards (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-irak-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-2

Irak (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lady-pink-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-05-15-web-2

Lady Pink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lady-pink-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Lady Pink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-9

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ben-eine-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-maya-hayuk-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-6

Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-aiko-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Lady Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-aiko-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-5

Lady Aiko  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-miss-van-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-6

Miss Van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-miss-van-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Miss Van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jason-woodside-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Jason Woodside (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jason-woodside-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Jason Woodside (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-4

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ron-english-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-avaf-rage-johnson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

AVAF  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-seed-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

eL Seed (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-seed-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

eL Seed with Martha Cooper (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kenny-scharf-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Kenny Scharf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-cartoon-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Mister Cartoon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-5

Jane Dickson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Jane Dickson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-5

Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-marie-roberts-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Marie Roberts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-marie-roberts-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Marie Roberts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tatyana-fazlalizadeh-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tatyana-fazlalizadeh-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-greg-la-marche-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Greg Lamarche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-greg-la-marche-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Gregg Lamarche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-katsu-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-retna-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Retna (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-4

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-roa-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kashink-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Kashink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kashink-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Kashink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kashink-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Kashink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kaves-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-4

Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kave-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kave-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kaves-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-kaves-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-5

Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lauren-halsey-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Lauren Halsey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our previous weekly updates track the installation period of Coney Art Walls:

Coney Art Walls: First 3 Completed and Summer Begins

DEITCH Masters, Coney Art Walls Part 2 : Coney With a Twist

Eine, Hayuk: A Riot of Color at Coney (Update III)

Coney Art Walls: Gypsies, Stallions, Mermaids, and Pop Optics! Update IV

Coney Art Walls Opens for the Mermaids! Update V

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Huffpost-740-Coney-Art-Walls-Screen-Shot-2015-06-24-at-10.24.20-AM

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Coney Art Walls Opens for the Mermaids! Update V

Coney Art Walls Opens for the Mermaids! Update V

Dude/Dudette, it’s Mermaid Parade Day – part of Coney’s modern pop-carney cultural heritage. Rolling up Surf Avenue, turning right and coming back down the boardwalk, the three decade old event is both a well organized and entirely rag-tag D.I.Y. affair simultaneously. It’s the enthusiasm of the participants and their street performances and costumery that pull in the equally enthusiastic fans, but it is the bedazzled breasts and free-flowing beer that make them seek that illusive and effervescent feeling of abandon.

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-7

Skewville at work on their piece…while some folks go against gravity above…(photo © Jaime Rojo)

Meanwhile more walls were being painted at Coney Art Walls this week by another impressive cross section of talents from points local and international. The Skewville twins completed their free-standing monster boom box, El Seed brought his lyrical Arabic inspired calligraffiti, fine artist Jane Dickson applies her eye to the symbols of the carnival footprint and turns amusements into colorful cakes, Katsu spreads wider with his investigations into drone painting that are looking impressionistic, Mr. Cartoon enlivens a Vandal/Copper chase with a grim reaper and a selfie-snapping angel, former graffiti outlaw Gregg LaMarche slams his collaged font explosion with color, Coney-Island artist icon Marie Roberts invokes ghosts and her own family’s deep roots in this place’s history, Miami’s Rage Johnson of Inkheads Crew brings crisp psychadeliac forms with AVAF (Assume Vivid Astro Focus), Sheryo and The Yok use a new palette to depict a beach inspired hotdog caper, and Tatiana Fazlalizadeh creates warm black and white portraits of local current neighbors who live in these environs here year round.

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

The Twins Skewville at work on their piece…yes the other one showed up for photo op… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Briefly, a snafu in the proceedings popped up when Cope2 suddenly did one of his eponymous bubble tags smack on the center of a freshly finished Retna wall Friday. Shortly thereafter Retna’s assistant was seen buffing the tag. Sources tell us that Cope’s participation in the project wasn’t originally scheduled and while some permissions had been secured, not all parties were in agreement before work commenced. The affair spurred speculation about who gave permission and who denied it in a flurry of social media postings, but the matter has been resolved. No doubt rumors on the street and online will be profligate – it is the nature of these aerosol Olympic games. Let’s see how the buffed section of Retna’s wall is addressed now that fin-fested visitors are schooling through the concrete complex chomping on cotton candy and sausages.

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Skewville at work with the help of an assistant. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But don’t let this petit drama overshadow the talent and effort and storied history of the two dozen other artists whose work is on display. A more diverse collection of artists from the past four decades from across this spectrum is rarely assembled in one location – a mini reprise of Mr. Deitch’s Art in the Streets, minus the ceiling. It’s not street art, urban art, or graffiti so none of those labels rightly apply to this amusement park exhibit. To the visiting crowds this is primarily background for selfies but fans of these artists will attach a much greater significance to some of these brand new works, as they should. Stay tuned for our final roundup of all the walls next Wednesday on a screen near you.

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Skewville… for a dollar we’ll show you the rest… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-4

Skewville practicing an abundance of caution while at work …  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skewville-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-5

Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-seed-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

El Seed (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-seed-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

El Seed with Martha Cooper. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-seed-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

El Seed (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Jane Dickson’s work in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Jane Dickson at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Jane Dickson at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-4

Jane Dickson work in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jane-dickson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-5

Jane Dickson  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-katsu-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Katsu tried his hand at Impressionism with a drone. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-cartoon-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Mr. Cartoon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-greg-la-marche-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Gregg Lamarche at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-greg-la-marche-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Gregg Lamarche at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-greg-la-marche-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Gregg Lamarche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-marie-roberts-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Marie Roberts at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-marie-roberts-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Marie Roberts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-marie-roberts-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Marie Roberts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-avaf-rage-johnson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Rage Johnson of Inkheads Crew working on the piece designed by Brazilian AVAF (Assume Vivid Astro Focus). (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-avaf-rage-johnson-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

AVAF executed by Rage Johnson of Inkheads Crew. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-sheryo-the-yok-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web

Sheryo and The Yok (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tatyana-fazlalizadeh-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-2

Tatiana Fazlalizadeh at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tatyana-fazlalizadeh-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-1

Tatiana Fazlalizadeh at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tatyana-fazlalizadeh-jaime-rojo-coney-art-walls-06-15-web-3

Tatiana Fazlalizadeh…”The Day Before Easter And The Day After Labor Day – People Still Live Here. People Die Here. People Love Here” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Skulls, Death and “Memento Mori” on the Street Art Scene

Skulls, Death and “Memento Mori” on the Street Art Scene

Oh death, the world simply brims with it.

Naturally so do the streets.

We’ve been able to cheat it, cavort and dance with it, even bargain with it but so far we have been unable to win the fight. Everyone succumbs.

“Remember you shall die”, or Memento mori, is the medieval Latin theory that we come face to face with, or skull to skull.

brooklyn-street-art-olek-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Olek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artists have been doing the danse macabre for centuries and one cerebral motif appears throughout every medium: the skull. From traditional African masks with skull faces to Shakespeare’s exhumed Yorick in Hamlet to 16th and 17th century European paintings featuring the skull as a motif in portraiture. The Mexicans make sugar candy with skulls, Warhol did multiples with them, Bowie sang to one, Tattoo culture covers skins with them, Damien Hirst encrusts them with diamonds, Game of Thrones has the Lord of Bones, they’re featured at the Museum of Morbid Anatomy, and Korean rapper Jay Park is styled as one on his video.

Even current Street Artists have a fascination with skulls, with Swoon in a show called Memento Mori and the Italian Street Artist Borondo’s named his new book after it. Today we wander out into the street with your hand in ours to look at death, as interpreted by artists of the street right now.

brooklyn-street-art-sweet-toof-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Sweet Toof (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-vexta-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Vexta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-nick-walker-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Nick Walker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-toll-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-zach-meyer-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Zach Meyer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-qrst-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

QRST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dee-dee-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-daek-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Daek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-alexis-diaz-jaime-rojo-05-10-15-web

Alexis Diaz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-katsu-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-dennis-mcnett-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Dennis McNett (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-nino-de-las-pinturas-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

El Niño de las Pinturas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-eurotrash-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Eurotrash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bunnym-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-buff-monster-jaime-rojo-10-30-13-web

Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-balu-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Balu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-code-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Code (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-sol-25-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-damon-jaime-rojo-05-15-web

Damon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-toll-jaime-rojo-05-15-web-2

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

This article is also published on The Huffington Post.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Huffpost-Memento-Mori-740-Screen-Shot-2015-05-21-at-10.33.53-AM

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Film Friday: 05.16.14

BSA Film Friday: 05.16.14

Brooklyn-Street-Art-KATSU-Drone-painting-Screen-Shot-2014-05-16-at-12.08

BSA-Video-Friday3-Jan2014-b

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. KATSU’s Drone Painting
2. Brandalism 2014
3. Pow! Wow! Hawaii 2014
4. Mural Festival 2014. (teaser for Montreal)
5. Herakut: Colors of Resilience

BSA Special Feature: KATSU’s Drone Painting

Bombing, spying, delivering Amazon packages. Gosh, what CAN’T you do with a drone? With an ominous soundtrack peppered with occasional blips and lots of, uh, droning, this video appears to show Katsu in a white hazmat suit diving and bobbing while driving his remote control spraying device.

Aside from the novelty and associated cool factor, it appears that the contraption may be even more unwieldy than a fire extinguisher – something Katsu knows something about. It’s all a big experiment at this point, something that happens often with art on the street, but only occasionally are the changes fueled by new technology.

Who knows what the practical applications will be for this technique of painting? Actually we all will eventually.

BRANDALISM 2014

It all looks so clean and efficient, this culture-jamming / media-jamming that just took place in Europe. Now apparently christened brandalism, this hi-jack of the ad message continues to gather fans an practitioners as people question both the message and messenger in public space.

This very large scale project replaced hundreds of paid advertisements with art, and probably some subvertising as well. The soundtrack makes it all seem sort of breezy.

POW! WOW! HAWAII 2014…

Yes, we know they are sneaking those Red Bull ads into this video – it’s called sponsored content and marketing industry reports say that ya’ll don’t mind. And why would you mind when the walls and scenery in Hawaii are so gorgeous?

Also, dang but what about all these wide hovering camera shots courtesy of ……wait for it………drones.  (See first video up top).

So Pow! Wow! Hawaii! is wrapped for this year — Now prepare ourselves for Pow! Pow! TAIWAN!, just announced.

BTW, this jingle will make you tingle – like black pepper ice cream.

Mural Festival 2014. Teaser

Meanwhile, north of the US border, Montreal is preparing for another go at MURAL, with mostly French and Canadian street artists and an attached series of cultural activities. See the lineup near the end of the video.

 

Herakut: Colors of Resilience

In solidarity with the March 15, 2011 Syrian uprising, the resulting deaths and refugees, Street Artists Herakut created this video and this project. Well done.

“Street art by Herakut as part of a an AptART project with children in the Syrian Refugee Camp Zaatari and children in North Jordan, in partnership with ACTED, supported by ECHO and UNICEF. March 2014.

Videography by MESSRS., Film Concept and Edit by HERAKUT, Music by Marbert Rocel.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Images Of The Week: 02.02.14

Images Of The Week: 02.02.14

brooklyn-street-art-el-sol-25-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2014

Welcome to New York! Apparently there is some sort of sporting event happening today here. Or is in New Jersey? So hard to tell. Something to do with tobogganing or something. Winter Olympics maybe?

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Chor Boogie, Chromo, Dain, Deived, El Sol 25, Jesse James, Katsu, Luut, Mr. Toll, Reve, Sen2, The Orion, UNO.

Top Image >> El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-aime-rojo-02-02-14-web

A special message made of corporate logos from fine eating establishments on a new sticker that has been spotted around town. Can you identify them all? Artist Unknown with a Chromo tag. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-luut-sen2-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web

Division of painting labor helpfully illustrated by Luut and Sen2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-deived-tijuana-mexico-02-02-14-web

Deived. Tijuana, Mexico. January 2014 (photo © Deived)

brooklyn-street-art-katsu-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web

Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-UNO-Bologna-italy-web-1

UNO walking a pig in Bologna, Italy. 2014 (photo © UNO)

brooklyn-street-art-UNO-Bologna-italy-web-2

UNO. Bologna, Italy. January 2014 (photo © UNO)

brooklyn-street-art-dain-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-chor-boogie-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web

Chor Boogie. Detail of his Michael Jackson tribute in progress in Times Square. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-chor-boogie-steven-p-harrington-02-02-14-web

Chor Boogie getting ready to paint Madonna next to Michael Jackson. Yes, he does look like Hellboy for some reason. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

brooklyn-street-art-the-orion-02-02-14-web

The Orion in Romania pays tribute to Soviet Union era cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin (photo © The Orion)

brooklyn-street-art-reve-02-02-14-web

REVE in Italy (photo © REVE)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-toll-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web-2

Mr. Toll (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-toll-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web-1

Mr. Toll spilling his BK control advice. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jesse-james-02-02-14-web

Jesse James in Miami. (photo © Jesse James)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-02-02-14-web

Untitled. Times Square, NYC. January 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Images of the Week: 05.19.13

Here’s our weekly interview of the street, this week featuring Andreco, Athens, Col Wallnuts, CrispyT, eL Seed, En Masse, Faile, Faust, Greg LaMarche, Henry Darger, James Rubio, JJ Veronis, Jon Hall, Katsu, Mr. Toll Phetus88, Rae BK, Reme821, Sure, and Toofly.

Top image > Toofly and Col Wallnuts at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sure . Faust (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Reme821. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Andreco. Athens, Grece. (photo © Andreco)

Mr. Toll. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jon Hall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

James Rubio and CrispyT pay homage to the reclusive American artist Henry Darger. (1892-1973)  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

En Masse and Friends (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JJ Veronis (photo © Jaime Rojo)

eL Seed in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

eL Seed (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rae BK . EKG (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile in progress. Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faile in progress. Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Phetus88 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Greg Lamarche. Detail (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. 2013 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Katsu Around Town

“Tap on it with your teeth, that’s how you know if it’s real solid gold,” says Pernell on 47th street in the diamond district as he holds out a handful of necklaces. In the Chelsea art gallery district, it’s harder to tell what is the real solid thing and what’s just for show – especially now that Katsu took a fire extinguisher full of gold paint to the facade of Eyebeam this week to promote their new show.

KATSU (photo © Jaime Rojo)

He’s good at catching your eye; combining the unbridled outlaw qualities of a graff aerosol/sticker artist with the on-point sizzle and repetition of an advertising campaign – or subvertising as the case may be. And while a variety of graff peeps have climbed on and ridden the unwieldy extinguisher horse on big walls in Brooklyn and elsewhere for a handful of years now, nobody has done a façade with such a staged splash of glimmering aurelian while many photographers looked on, capturing the action in broad daylight.

As we were looking at the new stuff we thought we’d take a minute to dig through some recent pics to familiarize BSA readers with some of Katsu’s stuff on the street in the last couple of years.

KATSU. Phone booth take over a few years ago to promote his show with Destroy and Rebuild at Powerhouse put on by Mighty Tanaka Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KATSU. Phone booth take over (shown here with Destroy and Rebuild) enlists the unwilling co-branding of MoMA and Guggenheim. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KATSU multiples on a hydrant. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KATSU and the skull reprised via extinguisher. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KATSU. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KATSU. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KATSU (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new campaign of posters by KATSU features multiples of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg – something he calls “Status Update”. In interviews he is quoted saying he is concerned about data security and personal privacy issues. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The new Eyebeam facade by KATSU (photo © Jaime Rojo)

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more

Fun Friday 12.09.11

1. Last Day to Enter “BSA Holiday Giveaway”
2. “Tokyo Tattoo 1970” Martha Cooper and Aiko in Brooklyn
3.  Robots Will Kill & Friends Tonight in Brooklyn
4.  Photographer Birdman Show tonight in Los Angeles
5.  C215 at Shooting Gallery (SF)
6.  Geoff Hargadon “Dealers Protected” (Boston)
7. GAIA Saturday @ Irvine Contemporary (DC)
8. “Home For The Holidays”  group show at Klughaus Gallery
9. DD$ show “Everything Popular is Wrong” at Lab Art
10. Nick Walker’s Large Mural, “See No Evil”, in Bristol (VIDEO)
11. The Installation of David Byrne’s Giant Globe under the High Line in NYC (VIDEO)

Last Day to Enter “BSA Holiday Giveaway”

Folks today is the last day we are accepting submissions for our Holiday Giveaway Contest “12 Wishes for 2012”. Hurry! The prizes are great plus you can be featured on BSA along some great artists working today on the streets.

“Tokyo Tattoo 1970” Martha Cooper and Aiko in Brooklyn

Tonight at Urban Folk Art Gallery/Brooklyn Tattoo, a dual show of photographer and artist and friends.

Urban Folk Art© Gallery is pleased to present the the art installation and book release celebration for Martha Cooper’s latest book ‘Tokyo Tattoo 1970’ by Dokument Press.

Martha Cooper will be exhibiting photos from her book, and Aiko, internationally renowned stencil artist will be displaying work inspired by Martha’s work directly related to the book.

For Further information regarding this show click here

Robots Will Kill & Friends Tonight in Brooklyn

Mighty Tanaka ‘s new show “ROBOTS WILL KILL & FRIENDS” brings together an eclectic group of artist from different disciplines. The gallery is also celebrating 2 years.

Veng, Chris of RWK shown here with Overunder, (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here

Photographer Birdman Show tonight in Los Angeles

In Los Angeles, esteemed photographer and BSA collaborator Bryan Mier AKA Birdman’s show “Wish You Were Here” opens today at Novel Cafe. Wish we were there!

Dabs and Myla in LA (photo © Birdman)

Birdman’s exhibition, “Wish You Were Here,” will feature his adventures in the art world. Including shots on roof tops, night sessions and rare images of artists up close working on murals.

For further information regarding this show click here

C215 at Shooting Gallery (SF)

French Artist C215 new solo show “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” opens on Saturday at the Shooting Gallery in San Francisco.

C215 at his studio (photo © C215)

Christian Guémy, also known as C215, is a Parisian street artist known for his intensely emotive stencil portraits. C215 began painting six years ago, and has since brought his work all over the world, from New Dehli to Istanbul.

For further information regarding this show click here

Geoff Hargadon “Dealers Protected” (Boston)

Geoff Hargadon invites you to the reception of his solo show “Dealers Protected” on Saturday at the Gallery Kayafas in Boston.

 

Geoff Hargadon. CFYW Miami 2010 (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

For further information regarding this show click here

GAIA Saturday @ Irvine Contemporary (DC)

Gaia’s “Urban Interventions” solo show with the Irvine Contemporary Gallery in Washington, DC opens on December 10.

Gaia (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For further information regarding this show click here

Also Happening this weekend:

“Home For The Holidays” A group show that includes works by Faust, Moody and Katsu among other artists at the Klughaus Gallery in Manhattan. Click here for more details.

DD$ show “Everything Popular is Wrong” at Lab Art in Los Angeles. Click here for more details.

Nick Walker’s Large Mural, “See No Evil”, in Bristol (VIDEO)

 

The Installation of David Byrne’s Giant Globe under the High Line in NYC (VIDEO)

 

Mc Fitti – Strap on Traumschiff (VIDEO)

Have no idea what he is rapping about but there are some sick tricks here.

Please follow and like us:
Read more