All posts tagged: JC2

Happy New Year 2015 – BSA Readers Choice Top 10

Happy New Year 2015 – BSA Readers Choice Top 10

Happy New Year to All! Thank you for inspiring us to do our best and to those of you who continue to support our personal art project / cultural examination, we extend our gratitude more than ever.

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Begun as an enthusiastic discovery of what was happening in a few neighborhoods in New York, we continued to expand our view into more cities around the world last year and into the history and future of the scene. We also aimed to provide you with a critical platform for examination of the street art/ graffiti / public art/ contemporary art continuum with interviews with artists, curators, collectors, organizers, observers and thinkers in the street, studio, gallery, and museum – trouble makers and taste makers alike.

In the end, it’s your observations and the conversations on the street that are most important. As we begin the year with over 300K fans, friends, and followers on social media platforms and 225 articles on the Huffington Post (thanks HuffPost team!), we feel like we get a valuable good survey of current opinions heading our way daily.

With in-depth interviews, investigative articles, opinion infused examinations, plain celebratory reverie, occasionally silly non-sequitors, and public appearances where we get to meet you, we get a good analytical look at an ever-evolving movement, glittery polish and warts and all.

As the new year begins we take a look back at the top stories chosen by BSA Readers in the last 12 months. Among them are two takeover pop-up shows in soon-to-be demolished buildings, a story about commercial abuse of artist copyrights and the effort to fight back, a street art community’s response to the sudden death of an activist street artist, a Street Art tourist trip, and a few inspirational women, men, and Mexican muralists.  Even though we published at least once a day for the last 365 days, these are the most popular pieces, as chosen by you, Dear BSA Reader.

10. Exploring Lisbon as a Street Art Tourist

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Os Gemeos / Blu (photo © Stephen Kelley)

9. Kara Walker and Her Sugar Sphinx at the Old Domino Factory

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Kara Walker. The artist portrait in profile with her sugary sphinx in the background. (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

8. Women Rock Wynwood Walls at Miami Art Basel 2013

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Fafi (photo © Martha Cooper for Wynwood Walls)

7. A Sudden Secret Street Art House Party in Manhattan

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Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

6. Niels Shoe Meulman Balancing “Unearthly” Paintings

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Niels “Shoe” Meulman. Process shot. (photo © Adele Renault)

5. It’s All the Rage, Street Artists Filing Lawsuits Left and Right

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4. Shok-1 Street Art X-Rays Reveal a Unique Hand at the Can

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Shok-1 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

3. 12 Mexican Street Artists Stray Far from Muralism Tradition In NYC

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Sego (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2. Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

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Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1. Graffiti and Street Art Lock Up “21st Precinct” in New York

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Pixote in action. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

New York’s Street Art and graffiti scene learned this weekend of the passing of one of its artists, Jef Campion, who went by the name of Army of One/ JC2. Jef died at his home in  Yonkers Friday night at the age of 52 and for those who knew him for his physically and personally powerful presence, the news came as a complete surprise.

A New Yorker through and through, Jef was known as a firefighter and first responder to Ground Zero after the 9/11 attacks who spent more than a month in that recovery effort, as a volunteer who gave a great deal of time and energy to working with charity organizations for children who were very ill, and for being a fine artist, a street artist, and an anti-war activist.

Speaking with many who knew him closely over the last few days, we learned that his days were not always light and he sometimes suffered from PTSD and related issues, but that he considered himself an overcomer and gave support and encouragement to his peers in the art world. We always saw him as a person who was determined to use his art and his creativity as a force for good in the world.  He also knew how to walk the talk.

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Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As a Street Artist he was perhaps best known for adapting a photograph by Diane Arbus entitled Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962), and converting it into a sharply graphic anti-war message that he reproduced numerous times in many sizes and mediums to put onto the street. “Army of One” was usually scrawled like a shouting slogan alongside the wheatpaste of the silhouetted image. Sometimes the text was in black and other times it was in a red that matched the dripping red grenade in the boys hand. A startling sight to encounter in a doorway or on a signpost, it was at once a protest and a warning that war is not child’s play.

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On the left, the original Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962), by Diane Arbus. One right, its adaptation by Street Artist Jef Campion aka Army of One/ JC2 pasted over a collage by Street Artist ShinShin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For Jef it was an effective way to remind us that war invariably damages those who have nothing to do with the fight, some of our most vulnerable and treasured people who suffer from our unspeakable callousness and disregard for life.

When Jef put this work out on the street it wasn’t to get personal fame as much as it was to change minds and hearts. Jef hoped his art could give voice to the voiceless. In recent years his own red-painted hand became as important a symbol of the insanity and brutality of war as any of his work created for the street.

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Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our condolences and thoughts and prayers go out to Jef’s family and friends today on Martin Luther King day and in the difficult days ahead. We also send our hopes that they can take comfort in knowing how much of a positive influence he was on many artists and peers, as well as complete strangers and passersby. Following we share with BSA readers remembrances from five people, but we easily could have presented many more.

GILF!
Street Artist and social, political, cultural advocate.

I met Jef during Art Basel Miami in 2011 at Fountain Art Fair. I had been familiar with his street work but was ultimately introduced to him by Samson Contompasis. He immediately went out of his way to include and befriend me, and with a megawatt smile on his face.

Jef reached out to me for a project about a year ago via email. We met up in person and had a lengthy discussion about war, the children at risk, and our ability to facilitate change for these young lives. He was always so focused on how he could help others. You could tell how passionate he was about the destruction of war with his work through his words and through his actions.

He never gave up, was always trying to do more to help, and feared no one. He did all of that while constantly supporting his friends and lending a hand whenever needed. His smiles and laughs were infectious and you couldn’t help but be happy around him. I will be forever grateful to have known such a righteous and honorable soul. His rebel spirit will continue to inspire me as I find ways of coping with this loss.

Of many we are all an Army of One.

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“This image was taken a day after we met. He was so welcoming and kind. We were instant friends.” (photo © Gilf)

 

Sinxero (SX)
Fine Grafstract artist, designer and gallery/mural curator based in The Bronx

I first met Jef, aka: “Army of One” at the “Street Artists Unite” exhibit at Dorian Grey Gallery where Jef was showing his art, a body of work and presence that commanded your attention. Jef and I shared a vision where artists could make a difference as “Comrades In Art”. Combining our artistic and business related goals, Jef and I formed “The Army Grows,” (TAG), with him as a resident activist. We expanded our mission to encourage both street & graffiti artists to work together and now TAG is also known as “The Art of Grafstract”.

Jef’s plethora of knowledge was priceless. His street & fine art grind was hard and direct, undiluted.

Why was Jef important to me and the Street Art / Graffiti scene? One day I remember showing up early to one of his many exhibits. Upon arriving Jef said, “let’s take a walk, its still early.” As we walked down Orchard Street, Jef took notice of a pair of gentlemen’s boots in a window display and walked in to ask the salesperson for his size. As we sat and waited for the gentleman to come back Jef and I discussed curating murals, owning your moniker and how to reach out to sponsors in order to build your name up. He told me that sometimes it is better to slow down and take notice of all that’s around you and address things one at a time – a better approach than it’s complete opposite.

I am grateful for having met Jef and having been given the opportunity to see life through his eyes. If anyone could walk a mile in Jef’s boots in the way he gave, embraced and loved as a friend, artist and compassionate human being they would be king for a day.

Jef, you were truly an “Army of One.” In your name, “The Army Grows.”

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Jef Campion (Army of One/ JC2) and Sinxero (photo © Sinxero)

Fumero
Street artist and fine artist.

I first noticed Army of One back in 2009 with his use of the Diane Arbus’ photo, ‘Grenade Boy’ and another graphic that followed, ‘The Bride of War’. As I walked the city streets after midnight, I always ‘ran into’ Jef (AoO) everywhere I went. I appreciated the image. It caught my attention because it had a gritty, NYC quality about it.

As a street artist, you usually meet others through their work first and later you actually wind up meeting the artist in person. I met Jef during the summer of 2010 at an upstate New York street art event. The moment we exchanged stickers, we already had a good sense of what the person was about. His message emphasized ‘peace’ and mine was about ‘family’.

Soon after that we met again to put some art after dark up in lower Manhattan and from that point on we became friends. In the years that followed we both participated in the same events here in NY and at Art Basel, Miami. Our greatest collaboration was for the XCIA’s Street Art Project book.

Army of One’s social commentary about needless wars that produce needless bloodshed was the central idea behind his message. I respected that notion and also that this message was everywhere. I admired his passion to spread his art and the enjoyment he received from it. Jef was a serious artist and if you knew him you understood why he was compelled to promote his idea to the public. His left a profound statement for us to never forget that each and every one of us has the freedom to be who and what we want to be and to live life accordingly and although we have different colors of our skin we are all ‘red’ inside and that makes us all the same; human.

I’m thankful to express my words about my friend. He will be missed. He was a force to be reckoned with, he was truly an army of one.

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Fumero and Jef Campion, Army of One/ JC2 (photo © Fumero)

OCMC (Oh Captain My Captain)
Street artist and fine artist.

Jef was an important figure to me personally in the scene, as he was the first street artist I ever met. I had been doing it a while and saw his work everywhere. By a fluke the first art show I appeared in was a benefit show he was also in and we met there. It was exciting to meet someone who did what I did, and even more so because Jef was incredibly gracious and encouraging. It wound up we were from the same neighborhood so we shared a bond over that. From then on we were friends.

For the scene itself, I feel Jef was a very important voice. There is naturally a lot of ego in street art and graffiti. Jef’s art was about the meaning, not the advertising. He felt deeply for his cause and it was loud and clear in his artwork. Loud like that grenade of his.

Many of the posts I have seen since his passing describe him as a “great guy”, and how kind he was… And it’s very much the truth. Jef was a truly great man. His job involved saving peoples lives, his spare time involved helping kids with cancer, and his art involved his deep belief that war is never the answer. He wasn’t just a great voice out in the streets, his was a great voice for the world.

There’s a show coming we were both going to be in, and I am going to miss the way he would light up when he’d see me with an “OCMC!” and the hug that would follow… It always felt great to stand in the light Jef shined on you. But I am hardly unique there, because he made everyone feel like that light. That’s what I’ll remember most.

 

Samson Contompasis
Former gallery owner and artist

I worked with Jef at a few different points to help his studio work reach more people. I found Jef the same way many other people did, by his relentless coverage of the streets. When I met him for the first time the scope of this man expanded exponentially. Upon inviting me to his studio it was apparent that this street artist was much more then that; he was a fine artist of extraordinary measure. Whether it was his handwritten accounts of his life scrawled on vellum, his giant assemblages of nails, raw wood, and pieces of the city strewn about them, or his neon accompanied statements of original sin on charred wood that he tore out of a fire with his bare hands, I felt that his studio was a doorway into his soul and everything was brimming with emotion from the life he led.

One of the most important parts of Jef’s street work was that he had a message. He wasn’t just writing his name on a wall for himself or a crew…he was writing it for a greater purpose. To spread a message of peace. His intention was for that of a better world . There was a moment during a show where a woman was offended by a piece of his…. and I remember that at one point he simply stated, “Walk a mile in my shoes” We can never pretend to know the weight of someone’s soul….but if I was a betting man he would be giving the sun a run for its money.

He spoke to us with full lungs and a determined spirit in everything he did. He did not have the easiest life, having dealt with hard addictions growing up and PTSD later in life but it never kept this man from smiling. He was one of the only people that could effectively hug me back.

Jef, my sorrow is deep, but I know you’ve already been through hell and you will be shaking Gods hand with red paint. You will be always there and forever missed.

 

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“It is my tribute letting him know he is in our hearts and minds, says Samson of this new self portrait.” (photo © Samson Contompasis)

Samson also shares with us a poem that Jef wrote, from an installation named “Sanctuary”.

Atrophy

I’m awake now

I believe in fate
I believe suicide would not have been the answer.
I believe the drugs were not a deterrent but a lesson
a task
a journey

I believe Central Park in late May
Sitting on the bench in East Hampton and watching the ocean

Solitude

Chet Baker on a rainy Sunday afternoon
Beat cultures
Bohemian lifestyles

I believe Miles Davis
And Coltrane
Tom Waits will never die

The human form Vine charcoal and a large canvas
Jose Guadalupe Posada Francis Bacon
Brie

The Hudson River right outside Irvington NY
Baja Mexico Ice cold beer, In the shade of a palm tree
Laguna Beach at 11am Venice beach at 6pm New York City 24/7

Rene’s trust
Mimma’s eyes
Joanne’s soul
My grandparents who without I never survive this mess

I believe in a partner who can love you with every cell in their body.

Self inflicted pain is not the answer my friend

You’re going to suffer You’re going to bleed You’re going to fall

You’re going to die

I’m awake

Now.

~ Jef Campion

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Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Correction: An earlier posting listed Campion’s home as the Bronx. It was changed to Yonkers.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

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JC2 “City of Ether”

From Spain Jeice2 has just completed a ghostly painting on the side of an abandoned and damaged building and he sends us some images of it, including a cleverly photoshopped obscuring of himself in the lower corner.  In the face of usually bold and saturated graphic Street Art that one often sees today, this one nearly fades into the mottled and worn facade of the weathered building it is on. The disembodied head looks down, perhaps from a mountain, at the metropolis down below in a valley; a “City of Ether” that is as ephemeral as the painting itself.

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JC2 “City of Ether” Spain. (photo © JC2)

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JC2 “City of Ether” Spain. (photo © JC2)

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JC2 “City of Ether”. Detail. Spain. (photo © JC2)

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JC2 “City of Ether” Spain. (photo © JC2)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Memorials on the Street

The US officially remembers service members who died in wars today. War touches every aspect of our daily lives whether through loss or gain, impacting our individual and group psyche, economy, memory, liberty, history.  Street Artists sometimes grapple with  war and related themes in their work for everyone who passes to see. Here are a few examples.

Gilf! replaces bombs with hearts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

General Howe places bones and other sculptural installations on the street in historical locations where war was waged and life was lost in Brooklyn, particularly during the “Battle of Brooklyn”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JC2 Army of One uses this image from a Diane Arbus photograph to draw attention to the children who are victims of adults wars. (© Jaime Rojo)

Street Artist General Howe placed grave markers in historical locations a few years ago, including this one featuring President Obama and Iraq war veteran Tammy Duckworth. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Artist Ludo creates bio-techno military machines that merge the natural world with the man-made world. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Artist WK Interact created a series of installations with American service personnel called “Bring Me Back” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A piece on the street in Los Angeles (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Fun Friday 10.29.10 BSA Halloween Special

Fun-Friday

Have a great Halloween Weekend Everybody!

Our longest post ever – scarily long. First we start off with a bunch of cool Street Art that is evocative of Halloween.

Then we hear a special Halloween/Election  message from Christine O’Donnell, a look at tonights’ events including Unified Love Movement’s installation across from MOMA, Erik Burke’s Closing Party, and Crest Hardware’s Pumpkin Carving Party (tonight). Also, video of Dan Witz’s disturbing WTF Street Art, and the most popular person to dress up as.

Careful out there, ya’ll.

The ghost of Bedford Ave (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The ghost of Bedford Ave. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Evils (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Evils (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cake pays tribute to Nosferatu (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cake pays tribute to Nosferatu (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

C2 Army of One (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

JC2 Army of One (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dain Sidebusted (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dain Sidebusted (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faro (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faro (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ink (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ink (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dark Shadows (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dark Shadows (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Matt Siren and Royce Bannon (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Matt Siren and Royce Bannon (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Oopsy Daisy (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Oopsy Daisy (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Christian Paine (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Christian Paine (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

General Howe (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Haculla (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Incubator Studio (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sweet Toof (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sweet Toof (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru How, Nosm with Aryz. Detail (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tats Cru How, Nosm with Aryz. Detail (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Elbow Toe (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Elbow Toe (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris RWK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris RWK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unified Love Movement – Alison and Garrison Buxton in Manhattan Tonight

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Garrison and Alison Buxton invite you to come celebrate the unveiling of their Unified Love Movement installation across from the MoMA at 20 West 53rd St. The Buxtons are honored to manifest their latest vision on Halloween weekend via chashama’s “Windows at Donnell” program. The exhibition runs October 29th – November 28th, 2010 and is viewable 24/7. This visual fruit is timely and ripe for viewing.  MORE HERE

Bring Your Carved Pumpkins To Crest Tonight

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FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO THE WEBSITE. FOR THE OFFICIAL RULES LOOK UNDER THE HALLOWEEN TAB ON THE MENU BAR
http://cresthardwareartshow.com

“This Land is My Land” Closing Party Tonight at 17 Frost

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More here

Dan Witz WTF??

And Finally, The Halloween Costume Report:

Lady GaGa Costumes Are All the Rage This Year. You can blow 50 bucks on one of these, or just visit your local hardware store and glue-gun stuff to your swimsuit.

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Images of the Week 07.25.10

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Our weekly interview with the street; this week featuring Andy Kessler Foundation, ASVP, Bishop203, Brummel, Clown Soldier, Imminent Disaster, JC2, JJ Veronis, Mr. DiMaggio, QRST, Shin Shin, Special Graffiti Unit, Zako, Zhe155

This summer has the floodgates open for all manner of oddities and agendas evident on the walls in NYC. While there is beauty and skill of varying degrees, more often you’ll also encounter themes better categorized as anxiety-ridden. Don’t look to our street artists to shield us from the rawness of messy life that is lurking under the cosmopolish of a world city. The conversations on the street continue to contemplate war and violence, render social and political critique, create memorials, offer blunt opinion and propose existential questions.  Conversations among street artists also continue before our eyes, making for progressive theater and on-the-fly “collaboration”.

We start off with something more along the lines of graff, framed by July’s succulent green.

Goya

Goya (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zako. Girls Girls Girls!

These bikini babes are not simply oogle worthy eye candy; their fourth member poses more profound topics. Zako.  (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

oBishop 203
Brooklyn’s Angels have fallen to the street. Bishop 203 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artistic Tile BP
As the environmental ecological disaster pushes the oil economy to the forefront of our minds, this artist includes the logo of the corporation whose very charter is being questioned. Artist WING (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Imminent Disaster

A new Imminent Disaster stares frankly and quizzically at you as you pass by. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

JJ Veronis (Andy Kessler Foundation)

A sculpture honoring the memory of a skateboarder and friend. JJ Veronis (Andy Kessler Foundation) (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Soldier Games

Soldier games are afoot amongst Fumero’s family and Shin Shin’s fruit offerings (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

ASVP, JC 2, Clown Soldier

A splash of red colors everything. ASVP, JC 2, Clown Soldier (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pampers the Cow

Pampers the Cow. Brummel (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

QRST

QRST is evidently embattled (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Special Grafitti Unit. Wall Hoarders

Special Grafitti Unit receives a criticism for taking up too much space in Chelsea.  (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Clown

Even the clowns are ready to deck you. Ninja Clown (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Radioactive Monkey

Radioactive Monkey Police. Brummel (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zhe 155

A Roger Waters advertisement posing as street art looks almost a part of the portrait by Zhe 155 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shin Shin

Yep, watermelon wins every time. Shin Shin  (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

JJ Veronis (Andy Kessler Foundation)

JJ Veronis (Andy Kessler Foundation) (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Dimaggio (Photo © Luca)

Mr. Dimaggio sits at the base of the heavily vandalized Shepard Fairey mural. Not sure if it is direct commentary or a general philosophical axiom. (Photo © Luca)

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Images of the Week 01.17.10

Images of the Week 01.17.10

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Our weekly interview with the streets

Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani's new green piece (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JC2
JC2 has taken the image originally wheat-pasted and turned it into a sign post.  Don’t recall seeing something this large bolted before, do you? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris RWK
The Blues Robot Brothers (Chris RWK) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Clown Soldier
Clown Soldier makes his first entry on the New York Top Forty this week at number 32, with “The Gentle Clown from Verona” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

EMA
EMA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gaia  and Deeker on top
Gaia and Deeker (or is that GoreB?) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sam McCurdy
Sam McCurdy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Trusto Corp
Trusto Corp (photo ©Jaime Rojo)

Graffitti Soup
It’s easy as ABC (Graffitti Soup) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

KId Acne
Oh, where where, has my little kid gone?  (Kid Acne) (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pet Bird
Pet Bird has found a nice nesting spot inside this dumpster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Year In Images 2009 from Jaime Rojo

Street Art photographer Jaime Rojo captured a few thousand images in 2009 to help document the wildly growing Street Art scene in New York.

A veteran of 10 years shooting the streets of New York, Rojo has amassed a collection of images that capture the scene with the appreciation of an artist. To celebrate the creative spirit that is alive and well on the streets of New York, this slide video gives a taste of what happened in ‘09, without pretending to present the whole scene or all the artists, known and anonymous, who add to the ongoing conversation.

Included in this collection of images (in no particular order) are pieces by Skewville, Specter, The Dude Company, Judith Supine, C215, WK Interact, Anthony Lister, Miss Bugs, Bast, Chris from Robots Will Kill (RWK), Os Gemeos, Cake, Celso, Imminent Disaster, Mark Cavalho, NohJ Coley, Elbow Toe, Feral, Poster Boy, Bishop203, Jon Burgerman, Royce Bannon, Damon Ginandes, Conor Harrington, Gaia, JC2, Logan Hicks, Chris Stain, Armsrock, Veng from Robots Will Kill (RWK), Noah Sparkes, Robots Will Kill, Heracut, Billy Mode, Revs, Skullphone, Spazmat, Mint and Serf, Roa, Aakash Nihilani, Broken Crow, Peru Ana Ana Peru, & Cern

All images © Jaime Rojo

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NYC Street Artists Collaborate! Reason No. 31 to love New York

NYC Street Artists Collaborate! Reason No. 31 to love New York

According to the new issue of New York Magazine , whose cover story “Reasons to Love New York” is on newsstands today, Reason Number 31 is because our street art is collaborative.

click to enlarge and see all the names they helpfully tracked down

Street Artists have a greater spirit of collaboration than you might imagine

Billi Kid provided pictures that document the ongoing conversation of street artists in one part of the city.  And it’s pretty rare to hear about “Beef”, something that was a mainstay of graff culture back in the daze.

According to the article, “In gallery-rich Chelsea, a brick wall on West 22nd Street became, over the past year, an ephemeral showroom for international street art. The canvas changed appearance almost daily, as artists (some identified here) overlaid new pieces over the work of their predecessors.”

When reached by BSA for comment, street artist Billi Kid was big-hearted and magnanimous, full of Holiday Spirit, “It’s all about community. It’s all about collaboration. It’s all about joy. HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE!”

That just makes me want to say “Ho-Ho-Ho!” or, as we used to say at Christmas when I worked at a mega-club on West 29th Street, “Whore-Whore-Whore!”

Now it is probably inpolitik to say such a thing, but “Sex Worker-Sex Worker-Sex Worker” just doesn’t have a Christmas ring to it.

VIEW THE NEW YORK MAG Street Art Slideshow here:

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Images of the Week 11.01.09

Brooklyn-Street-Art-IMAGES-OF-THE-WEEK_1009Our Weekly Interview with the Street

C Damage
C Damage Bear Guy (photo Jaime Rojo)

Avoid Pi
Avoid Pi is taking a new approach with this framed triad of photos.  If you can name them send us an email! (photo Jaime Rojo)

Cake
Blue-eyed Cake (photo Jaime Rojo)

"Army of One' JC2
“Army of One” by JC2 (photo Jaime Rojo)

Imminent Disaster
Half disaster (Imminent Disaster) (photo Jaime Rojo)

MBW
American jazz saint and snappy dresser Louis “Sachmo” Armstrong is back in New York, courtesy of MBW. Born poor in New Oleans, he ended up in the borough of Queens. (Jaime Rojo)

Pimax
Transformer viking warrior dude is just so frustrated and verbally constipated that he resorts to giving the finger. (Pimax) (photo Jaime Rojo)

QRST
Gimme Shelter (QRST) (photo Jaime Rojo)

The Dude Company and A Later Collaborator
Stupendous collage and stencil work. Definitely the Dude Company – but who is the collaborator? (photo Jaime Rojo)

The Dude Company (Detail)
The Dude Company (Detail) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Revs
Revs is also doing collaborations more (photo Jaime Rojo)

Specter
“Eat Fruit and Die” (Specter) (photo Jaime Rojo)

MBW
You must be my Lucky Star (MBW) (photo Jaime Rojo)

Pimax
A new Marilyn and a Red Velvet Underground banana (Pimax) (photo Jaime Rojo)

From that classic New York underground album referenced above, Femme Fatale

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