All posts tagged: Italy

Bastardilla in Love With Bees and the Taste of Summer in Stornara, Italy

Bastardilla in Love With Bees and the Taste of Summer in Stornara, Italy

Before there were drones, there were bees. They are far more sophisticated still when it comes to their subtleties of collecting pollen on their furry bodies, flying on translucent panels through the heavy sticky air.

Bastardilla. Stornara, Italy. (photo © Bastardilla)

Here in Stornara, Italy, artist Bastardia is thinking of their bodies positively charged with static electricity, nervously excited as they plunder the petals, ready to attract the fine powder dust shaken loose from the flower, alight on the music meanderings of summer.

The artist invites us into this delicate world, imagining further the relationship of the bees and the flowers, playing to one another, with one another, their minds drunk with love.

Bastardilla. Stornara, Italy. (photo © Bastardilla)
Bastardilla. Stornara, Italy. (photo © Bastardilla)
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Vesod in an Oneiric State, Babes and Buildings Afloat in Santa Croce di Magliano

Vesod in an Oneiric State, Babes and Buildings Afloat in Santa Croce di Magliano

The dreams of men; full of adventure, longing, Doritos, cars, robots, babes. Vesod knows this all too well, as his newest wall unmoors them and sets them aflight, afloat, askance, atwitter. Stuck inside our homes, the dreams merge with fears and the need to escape. Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” was said to be in an oneiric state, and the Italian street artist is as well, all tumbly and tittly.

Vesod. Dualismo. For Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

Here in the imagination is “where architectures, female bodies and machines merge together in a futuristic vortex, open to double or multiple interpretations in contrast to each other,” says Vesod as he leaves this vision of dualities, beauties and bounty just outside the window of this teen.

Vesod. Dualismo. For Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

It’s the 7th edition of Antonio Giordano urban art award (Premio Antonio Giordano) in Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy that brings him here with this new façade on a private building in the heart of the village. But the dreams… these are universal.

Vesod. Dualismo. For Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
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Sunny Macabre, Alaniz Paints Covid-19 Dissension in Italy

Sunny Macabre, Alaniz Paints Covid-19 Dissension in Italy

“Instead of cooperation, we have divisions among countries,” reports Alaniz from here in Stornara, Italy. “There are people that still now think the virus is not real.”

Alaniz & Federica in collaboration with Stra Murals Crew. Stornara, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Alarming and true, anti-intellectualism has expanded to new heights during this pandemic – likely resulting in people getting sick and/or dying who didn’t really need to. If it’s any consolation to you, dear reader, history tells us that there were anti-mask naysayers during other mass illnesses too – standing firmly in opposition to public health directives because of feared encroachment on civil liberties, or simply because Jesus told them. Ah well.

The Argentinian born nomadic painter Alaniz says that his new figurative mural with his “new family” in Stonara is a collaboration with his love Federica – and it took 10 days to complete. It features a beleaguered turning figure wearing a facemask, but its final face is macabre, frightening. The presentation is confused, perhaps because of the sun-drenched and cheerfully eye-popping palette.

Detail from a new mural by Alaniz in collaboration with Stra Murals Crew. Stornara, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Overhead is a dove flying with a hypodermic need in its beak, perhaps the elusive vaccine meant to inoculate people against Covid-19. Or, possibly it is carrying a 5G microchip shot from the Bill Gates foundation that will communicate your thoughts to any nearby Alexa speaker. Hard to tell.

“After 10 days of work we present this wall as a representation of the mixed feelings that this lockdown generated in most of us,” says Alanis. “This has been a unique situation that has affected everybody’s lives and that has shown the failures of our actual society.”

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Gola Hundun Escapes to Ivy-Covered Nature in Japan

Gola Hundun Escapes to Ivy-Covered Nature in Japan

Animals use natural space without transforming it but they seek the space to meet their needs. A cave will provide shelter for a bear. The bear will not paint it, wire it for electricity or install air-conditioning.

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

Safely (somewhat) in Japan right now, the Italian land artist Gola Hundun is studying space again for his self-created ABITARE project.

“It’s my personal research on the border between human functional space and other species’ use of space,” he tells us as we look at this ivy-covered hump of industry that he regales with gold lame. We often imagine New York City’s skyscrapers engulfed in ivy and wildflowers with enormous insects and birds freely roaming about.

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

“I think I want to title it ‘Presence’,” he says, “Because this time I found a space where some dead trees were re-colonized by ivy and vitalba that generate really evocative imaginary shapes,” he says. “Like Readymade sculptures, like giants and strange horse-giraffes.” You can see his eyes alight, the dialogue inside his head full of calculation and intent that turns these ephemeral “sculptures” into abstract beings inhabiting space.

He talks about his relationship with gold, which has reoccurred throughout his multiple ABITARE installation. “Gold and green is the combo color for this project.  I use gold because it is for me  the color of the sun, the color of the soul, of the divine.”

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

And of our current crises of an infectious coronavirus circling the globe and threatening humanity, killing some of us, crippling our lives in many cases; what does this Earth-Star man observe?

“For me, it is a way to critique our modern human behaviors, post-capitalism, post-economic globalization, which is the main reason why we have arrived at this point, at the brink of ecological systemic disaster.
I think this issue with Corona is a good opportunity to meditate about slow down the rhythm.”

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
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Nevercrew Watch Their Paper Plane “Fade” in Torino

Nevercrew Watch Their Paper Plane “Fade” in Torino

Fresh from Torino, Italy, the Swiss artists Nevercrew did this commissioned piece for a coffee company with the theme of “responsible consumption” – which immediately reminds us that we were planning to switch from using K-cups to drip coffee. The image is abstract and realistic at the same time, a map of some sort folded into an airplane, a portion of it possible torched by a lighter. It looks fragile, yet full of possibility.

Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)

“We decided to work around the concept of carefreeness to evoke both the human responsibility on the production and consumption side,” says Christian Rebecchi, “and the planetary emergency we’re already living.”

The image of a simple childs’ toy is meant to imply a story of two logics, says the other member of the duo, Pablo Togni. “The positive logic of the game and the negative one of the lack of conscience and the unnatural use of resources,” he says.

“There is a care-freeness that’s about acting unaware of the large-scale repercussions of the exploitation of resources, of what precedes and follows every small action and, at the same time, a reference to the lightness of the game, to all that is now put at risk for the generations that will hold the future of the planet.”

Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
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Alessio Bolognesi and a Whale Swimming in Garbage

Alessio Bolognesi and a Whale Swimming in Garbage

“I chose whales because despite of their size, so many are found on our beaches with the stomach full of plastic,” says Alessio Bolognesi about this new mural for the ST.ART festival in Italy. “It’s a symbol, in my mind, of how even the huge animals are so powerless.”

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

The image of large seafaring creatures washing up on shore starved of nutrition and bloated with plastic is becoming more common as we continue to poison ourselves and the world. Not surprisingly, similar images are also popping up in Street Art in other locations.

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Originally from Ferrara in the north of Italy, the 3D graphic designer also once belonged to a graffiti crew as a kid, and he now balances professional design work with an increasing number of mural painting opportunities. Here in Provincia di Vicenza (Veneto region), he says he chose a whale drowning in plastic for this secondary school façade. But he didn’t want to be completely didactic, preferring to let the viewer make the connections themselves.

“I like to paint murals with a ‘multi-layer’ reading approach,” he explains. “You can look to the mural and just see the obvious image or you can try to go deeper and capture some more meaningful detail.”

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
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GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

“THE ANCIENT WAY OF THE NEW CIRCLE”

New from Genoa comes this circular system from Gola Hundun, called “The Ancient Way of the New Circle.” 

It is reassuring to consider the systems of our lives and our world as we regard the passing seasons of the year; revisiting, reliving, remeasuring our progress and regress and aspirations.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Part of a 10 mural program here in the Certosa district, the artist tells us that his painting is meant to “invite people to go back to a circular system.”

“The main character of the wall is Cernunnos,” Gola tells us, “- a mythological creature belonging to the Celtic culture, a symbol of fertility, abundance, manhood and wild nature – painted in the lower part of the wall, highly visible by pedestrians.”

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Gazing upon the natural elements of the composition that include a balance of phytomorphic elements, a tree of life, and a mountain, you can believe that the artist also likes to write poetry when he is in the right mood.

The color scheme may also speak to you as a powerful representation of the natural world, with blue and green being predominant – here surrounded by the harsher city palette of reds, yellows, oranges. Perhaps what hits you the most is a sense of balance that this mural achieves, even if you don’t know why exactly.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
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Nicola Alessandrini Balances Body and Earth Systems Holistically in Santa Croce di Magliano

Nicola Alessandrini Balances Body and Earth Systems Holistically in Santa Croce di Magliano

Painting with a holistic approach to life, the earth, the physical-psycho-social balance of humans in daily life – why not?

Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

talian painter Nicola Alessandrini has produced a somewhat surreal body of drawings and paintings during his relatively short career that appears to be turning the body, the animal world, and the plant world inside out to better understand the core systems that create balance and imbalance. In this new mural he just finished in Santa Croce di Magliano, you can see that again he is creating relationships between our corporeal systems and those of the earth.

“The artwork represents a human body connecting two different forms of life, soil and lymphatic systems,” he says. He tells us that the two plants are embraced by the body and that the woman’s floral dress is a fertile soil that connects the two plants and gives energy and nutrition to the body.

Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

Completed as a the sixth edition of Premio Antonio Giordano, the artist consulted with public health initiative called AVIS (Association of Voluntary Italian Blood Donors) and hoped to develop a metaphorical way to represent their conversations.

“I like the idea that giving blood is not just something physical,” says Allissandrini,  “but it is also a mental predisposition, a practice of giving and sharing.”

Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
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Giulio Vesprini on the B-Ball Court in Fermo, Italy

Giulio Vesprini on the B-Ball Court in Fermo, Italy

A basketball court in summertime is a proving ground for skill, a place to kill time with friends, and sometimes a launchpad for dreams of going “professional”. Here in Fermo City in Northern Italy, it’s a place for Street Artist Giulio Vesprini to expand his abstract practice to the field of sport.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)

“The shapes, colors and unique elements of botany characterize my work,” he says, and you can see that his palette is carefully chosen, and sophisticated. His new work is in concert with the Fermo Urban Museum (FUM) and took an organic route to completion, with the help of a handful of assistance. It’s many steps away from the inner city work you might normally associate with innercity graffiti; the sound and fury transmuted. Primitive, graphic, and crisply illustrative, this freshly painted court provides a new field of art and nature for players he’ll never meet.

He calls it “Struttura G041”.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)
Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (Video Andrea Amurri-New Media Solution )

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Guerilla Spam and 108 Paint 2 Versions of the “Quarantana”

Guerilla Spam and 108 Paint 2 Versions of the “Quarantana”

The Turin-based illustrator Guerrilla Spam has interpreted the “Quarantana” as a stylized toy extended from the arm of an elegant, almost Egyptian figure in a tall fez. Alessandria-born Street Artist 108 depicts the traditional doll as a unique abstraction merged within a form, not specifically figurative, rather primitive perhaps.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)

Both are interpreting a pagan/Christian traditional ritual next to each other here in Santa Croce di Magliano.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)

“ ‘Quarantana‘ is a doll made of fabric and straw, having the appearance of an old woman; the doll, usually hanged to a rope between the balconies or in front of the windows, stands on a potato with seven feathers attached,” say organizers at the Antonio Giordano Street Art festival. “The ritual, fusing Christian and pagan cultures, expresses the importance of living a life of sobriety and peace.”

An unusual topic to depict and oddly paired artists to create it – you are here able to better appreciate the multiplicity of styles at work on the street today. CLICK HERE to see a number of variations on the Quarantana doll as it is used throughout Santa Croce di Magliano, Southern Italy and the Balkan Region.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
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Giulio Vesprini Lights the Aerosol Smoke for “Pennelli Ribelli”

Giulio Vesprini Lights the Aerosol Smoke for “Pennelli Ribelli”

“Do it with passion or not at all!,” says Giulio Vesprini on this acid red cloud of paint that engulfs a portion of his new mural. The fog effect has become popular in public performance of late, adding a mystery of murk to photoshoots and videos, but not so many Street Artists have found a uniquely intrinsic way to make it work with their painting.

So, fresh from the Pennelli Rebelli Festival in Bologna, here’s his new wall in hot cherry flames.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G044. Pennelli Ribelli Festival. Bologna, Italy. (photo © Giulio Vesprini)
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Mr. Fijodor at “Without Frontiers” in Mantua, Italy

Mr. Fijodor at “Without Frontiers” in Mantua, Italy

It’s the fourth edition of “Without Frontiers”, a festival of urban art in Mantova Italy, organized by Simona Gavioli and Giulia Giliberti. This is the first mural we’ve seen from the 2019 edition, a hail of man-made products falling from the sky called “Plastic Rain” by Street Artist Mr. Fijodor. Here Mr. Fijodor is helping to continue a recently begun public painting tradition in this city with his illustrative scene of humans repairing a robot amid destruction, a storm of plastic bottles falling all around them.

Mr. Fijodor. “Plastic Rain” in collaboration with Without Frontiers Festival 2019. Mantova, Italy. (photo © Corn79)

Since 2016 the festival has tried to balance the new muralism of the moment with the history of Mantova (or Mantua in Emilian dialect) sometimes referred to as “the cradle of Renaissance culture”. Truthfully it’s a city known perhaps more for its Gonzaga tapestries than it’s Street Art culture but since 2016 “Without Frontiers” has hosted artists including Bianco-Valente, Boogie Ead, Corn79, Elbi Elem, Ericailcane and Bastardilla, Etnik, Fabio Petani, Mach505, Made514, Molis, Panem and Circenses, Perino and Vele, Peeta, Sebas Velasco, Vesod, Zedz, Joan Aguilò and Joys.

Mr. Fijodor. “Plastic Rain” in collaboration with Without Frontiers Festival 2019. Mantova, Italy. (photo © Corn79)
Mr. Fijodor. “Plastic Rain” in collaboration with Without Frontiers Festival 2019. Mantova, Italy. (photo © Corn79)

Without Borders Festival

Mr. Fijodor on Instagram

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