All posts tagged: Italy

Bifido on the Futility of Meaningless Work in Northern Italy

Bifido on the Futility of Meaningless Work in Northern Italy

Suffer from migraines? Troubled love life? Unhappy with how your children turned out?

Bifido understands.

Bifido. “Hell is round the corner”. Bosco Urban Project. Gambettola, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

The Italian street artist has created this new old guy on the wall of an abandoned tobacco factory here in the small village of Gambettola in the north of the country. He’s pensive and possibly despairing for sure, possibly because he worked at this factory for decades, Bifido surmises.

“A life at work, a life without life. Life in your free time, spent being entertained in some refreshing recreational activity,” he says.

Bifido. “Hell is round the corner”. Bosco Urban Project. Gambettola, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

“I often think of the concept of free time. I hate free time. It is the charity of a society that wants us to be slaves. full with a sweat that exhausts us, without giving joy. Making a work on the concept of work for me meant expressing all my dissent against this absurd idea that work (as mere sustenance) gives meaning to our life.”

Surely there is something redeeming to be said of a lifetime of work in a tobacco factory, but Bifido was not feeling cheerful today. Well, at least he feels more positive about his own work, he tells us. “Making art is my job and I love it.”

Bifido. “Hell is round the corner”. Bosco Urban Project. Gambettola, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

This work is part of the Bosco Urban Project.

Read more about the project HERE.

Bifido. “Hell is round the corner”. Bosco Urban Project. Gambettola, Italy. (photo © Bifido)
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Golden Rivers from Gola Hundun Mark Landslides in Stigliano, Italy

Golden Rivers from Gola Hundun Mark Landslides in Stigliano, Italy

A Land Art Installation Dedicated to the Dichotomous Power of Water.

Here in Stigliano, Italy, the area and the people have been seriously impacted, often in negative ways, by several landslides over the last 50 years – including the second largest canyon landslide in Europe in 2014. Events like these can cause casualties, heartbreak, property damage, and severe economic loss.

A new golden installation by street artist/land artist Gola Hundun studies the natural flow and recreates it – drawing attention to the role of water, rains, and the hand of man diverting and distorting natural systems.

Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)

According to the Natural Hazards and Earth Systems Sciences newsletter, “In Italy, landslides are caused primarily by rainfall. Depending on meteorological and physiographical conditions, individual rainfall events can cause slope failures in areas of limited extent or in large regions.

As is common for Hundun’s artworks and installations, this one looks at the relationship of conflict between humans and the planet – as well as the dichotomy of water; giving us life and being an enormous destructive force at the same time.

Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Italo Massari)

Hundun tells us that this new work attempts to reconcile the life-giving and the life-destroying qualities of water. Referring to a Japanese tradition called Kintsugi, he says, this work “sublimates the fracture and highlights the element of reconciliation.”

Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)

“Kintsugi consists of 480 square meters of golden satin, sewn by the seamstresses of Stigliano following the artist’s instructions, which recall the shape of a stream of a river that stands out inside the canyon and creeps up to the ruins of the architectural structure most affected by the landslide, emblem of the hand of man forcibly inserted into the natural context.”

Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)
Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)
Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)
Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)
Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)
Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)
Gola Hundun. “KINTSUGI”. In collaboration with AppARTEngo Festival 2021. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Chiara Ventola)

GOLA HUNDUN
“KINTSUGI”
Gola Hundun at AppARTEngo Festival 2021
Stigliano (IT)

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Dourone Mark 3rd Anniversary of Genoa Bridge Collapse

Dourone Mark 3rd Anniversary of Genoa Bridge Collapse

To commemorate the third anniversary of the collapse of a 210 meter section of the Ponte Morandi on August 14, 2018, today we share Dourone’s newest mural in Genoa, Italy. The bridge collapsed during a torrential rainstorm, crossing the Polcevera river and an industrial area of Sampierdarena. The bridge was gradually replaced, but for many in the city, the events of that day are still very fresh.

“The mural is an homage to the 43 victims of the tragedy,” the mural duo says, “which is why we have used 43 colors for these portraits.”

Dourone. Morandi Bridge. Genoa, Italy. (photo courtesy of Dourone)
Dourone. Morandi Bridge. Genoa, Italy. (photo courtesy of Dourone)
Dourone. Morandi Bridge. Genoa, Italy. (photo courtesy of Dourone)
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Motorefisico Bring Op, Kinetic, and Tape Art Stencilling to Santa Croce di Magliano

Motorefisico Bring Op, Kinetic, and Tape Art Stencilling to Santa Croce di Magliano

It’s impossible to imagine the contemporary built environment without considering the impact of street art and graffiti has had on not only city dwellers but our city’s designers and architects. While previous generations may have dismissed incorporating painting techniques beyond traditional frescoes or murals, the new generation considers it their birthright to bring modern art movement influences, including Optical Art, Kinetic Art, and straight-up tape art often used on the street.

Motorefisico/Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo. “The Slash”. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courresy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

Rome-based architect/designers Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo consider themselves a street art duo as well – creating under the moniker Motorefisico. Working on city walls for them is simply an extension of their interior/exterior design interests along with video art and installation art as well. In their recent façade-painting project in Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy, Motoresfisico says they employed stencil techniques sometimes used by street artists to create exacting lines and illusionist effects to enhance the architectural feature of this building with two facades.

Motorefisico/Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo. “The Slash”. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courresy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

“We developed our geometric composition directly on the surface by creating a huge stencil with tape,” they say, “This allowed us to create shapes perfectly adapted.” Monochromatic and modernist, the composition pops with a kinetic three-dimensional effect. Suddenly a white box boasts a pedestrian-stopping display of intelligent design, something that is not always apparent on city streets and even less often has it been achieved with simple stencil technique.

Naming their architectural installation “The Slash”, the artistic duo completed it in conjunction with the 8th edition of the Antonio Giordano urban art award (Premio Antonio Giordano).

Motorefisico/Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo. “The Slash”. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courresy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Motorefisico/Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo. “The Slash”. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courresy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Motorefisico/Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo. “The Slash”. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courresy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Motorefisico/Lorenzo Pagliara and Gianmaria Zonfrillo. “The Slash”. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courresy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
MOTOREFISICO live-taping during a previous event at  Via dei Cappellari. (© Motorefisico)
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Giulio Vesprini Says Yes to “No Comply” and Painting a Skatepark in Italy.

Giulio Vesprini Says Yes to “No Comply” and Painting a Skatepark in Italy.

Giulio Vesprini is expanding his niche from flat planes of basketball to take on the multi-surface skate park here in Civitanova Marche, Italy. The opportunities for expression in such a dynamic space are rather endless and he says for him it is “a meeting point between culture, sport and nature.” With a big skating community here in this city on the Adriatic sea, you can imagine that Vesprini is headed toward skatepark design stardom. For him, it is just another opportunity to put his work in public space, and then watch people interact with it.

Title: “N O C O M P L Y” / Struttura G055.

Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Complay” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Daniele “Cuk” Graziani)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Daniele “Cuk” Graziani)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Daniele “Cuk” Graziani)
Giulio Vesprini. “No Comply” / Struttura G055. Civitanova, Marche. Italy. (photo © Daniele “Cuk” Graziani)


Credits:

Street Artist: Giulio Vesprini

Artistic assistant: Andrea Cimadamore, Alessio Beato, Roberto Monti and, Alessandro Pizzuti

Video e Photo Drone: Daniele “Cuk” Graziani

Photo W.i.p.: Andrea Rotili e Alessio Beato

Technical assistance: Cluana Color

Sponsor: Dashed Skate For Food ®
Many thanks to:City Hall of Civitanova Marche city Mayor: Fabrizio Ciarrapica. Assessor: Giuseppe Cognigni

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Gola Hundun, Anthropic Space, Natural Space, and His Newest Installation in Milan

Gola Hundun, Anthropic Space, Natural Space, and His Newest Installation in Milan

Italian land artist/street muralist Gola Hundun has divided his creative projects in the last few years into two distinct but related practices.

Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

The first is to investigate buildings that are being reclaimed by nature and develop site-specific installations that work in harmony with the history of the relationship between architecture and nature. The second, of which we have an example for you today, is a mural installation on active buildings within cities, perhaps invoking a more integrated ecology of symbols and natural systems around it. These two lines of inquiry comprise his project “HABITAT”, a sincere stream of research that lies on the border between anthropic space and natural space

Here in Milan, the school façade will now display Gola’s dedication to life and its movements – called “Convective Motions”. While the mural composition begins from a central element of cosmic energy, a solar force that unravels centrifugally outward, he also has plans to do plantings around the mural and the property in September to extend the reach of the painted portion of his installation.

Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

“Leaves are painted as if they were part of a fire explosion, following and growing the movement,” he tells us, “generates new ones – involving celestial bodies upon contiguous facades, symbolically returning toward the central sun in a perpetual cyclical movement.”

Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

When completed and grown, Mr. Hundun says the entire composition will include endemic plants grass, bushes, hornbeam trees, dogwood trees, hazel trees, hawthorns, and an English oak placed on an axis with the tree painted on the wall.

“The idea is to create a simulacrum of the wood that is used to dress this municipality of Vimodrone – all spread before the building,” he says. “The tree of life here is the same kind you’ll find monotheistic or pagan religions. The two trees will be set in two movements: the painted one will be crystallized, whereas the real tree will grow inexorably.”

Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Convective Motions”. Inneschi Festival. Milano, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)


This project is organized by
industri scenica –  INNESCHI festival in partnership with VIMODRONE City Hall sustained by Fondazione di Comunità Milano Onlus
Consultancy about nests by LIPU MILANO
Pics
iranacredi

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Elfo’s Neo-Dada Butchering Diagram in Turin

Elfo’s Neo-Dada Butchering Diagram in Turin

Elfo’s furtive and artful wanderings can veer off into the neo-Dadaist fields at times, sometimes wittily so, and textually. The Italian graffiti writer and street artist uses the simplest of devices to capture attention, a reductive and deliberate strategy born of careful consideration girded by impulses to broadcast his view, to be seen and heard.

Elfo. “I’m a Vegetarian”. Inspired by the work of G. A. Cavellini. Torino, Italy. (photo © Elfo)

Here in Turin (Torino) the artist diagrams the messages in a butcherly way – a triangulation of views on class structures, the street-to-gallery continuum, and the tensions separating carnivores and herbivores. Oink!  

He says it is “a new ironic artwork” and pays tribute to the late Italian artist and art collector G.A. Cavellini.

Elfo. “I’m a Vegetarian”. Inspired by the work of G. A. Cavellini. Torino, Italy. (photo © Elfo)
Guglielmo Achille Cavellini. Informazione. n.d. Cavellini artist file, MoMA Library

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Selections From Poli Urban Colors 2021 in Milan

Selections From Poli Urban Colors 2021 in Milan

20 students took part in painting at the 2nd edition of Poli Urban Colors last month in Milan, which is appropriate since its mounted hand in hand with a university. The rich diversity of styles combined with a few big names illustrates the wisdom of involving local talents and the community in a street art festival.

Peeta. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)

Curated by Luca Mayr with the support of Politecnico of Milan, the self-described urban design festival invited 45 Urban Artists in all, each following their individual style and technique, whether formally or self-trained. As many students of Politecnico have gone on to pursue careers as designers, engineers, architects, and illustrators, you get a real sense of the level of appreciation here for the work of the artists on the street.

Peeta. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)

Among the works most talked about, perhaps, was the mural of the graffiti writer from Veneto named Peeta, who disobeyed laws of perception once again with the artist’s command of spray can and brushes; effectively removing the wall and creating a new sculptural construction entirely. At a university of two campuses dedicated separately to design and industrial engineering, it is easy to see how Peeta nailed the top spot with his intervention. Known for his brain-fooling paintings, the Italian wizard with a solid foundation in graffiti is able to play with dimensions and hold them on a leash. 

Sorte. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)

Poli Urban Colors 21 organizers say they wanted to present viewers with a healthy survey of the Italian and worldwide Graffiti Writing movement – and they did. With the range of talents and styles on display, they gave the nod to the roots of modern graffiti history here as well as a strong representation of where it continues to take us in public space.

Krep & Tmps at work. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
KayOne, Fly Cat, Teso, Krep and Tmps. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Emans. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Strex WIP. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Caribes. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Caribes, Strex. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Fosk. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Fosk, Prosa, Tawa and Dada. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Marco Teatro. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
Rancy. Poli Urban Colors Festival 2021. Milan, Italy. (photo © Luca Rancy)
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“Botanica Resistente” : Etnik and “a constant struggle for survival” in Rome.

“Botanica Resistente” : Etnik and “a constant struggle for survival” in Rome.

Italian street artist Etnik has created a new “Botanica Resistente” in Rome to commemorate “Liberation Day” in Italy, which marks April 25th as the end of the Nazi’s occupation and the liberation from Fascism.

Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)

He calls the colorful and abstractly organic 4-story work “Botanica Resistente”, which he says may have multiple readings. Mostly, it is “A direct reference to the toponymy that characterizes the whole district of Centocelle – with its streets named after plants, trees, and flowers.”

As a story of overcoming great obstacles and thriving in adversity, he also posits that “in the mural concrete blocks, asphalt and artificial works succumb to natural elements, giving life to a slow but gradual reconquest of spaces taken from nature.”

Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)

“The work is representative of familiar urban corners, on the border, where between asphalt and concrete, spontaneous plants are in a constant struggle for survival.”

Etnik
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)

Completed in conjunction with the help and guidance of Mirko Pierri, curator of urban art for the a.DNA association, Etnik took about 5 days to transform this facade of the Liceo Scientifico Statale Francesco D’Assisi, between via Castore Durante e Viale Palmiro Togliatti.

Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
Etnik. “Botanica Resistente”. Centocelle, Rome. Italy 2021. (photo © Mirko Pierri)
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Ceramic Faile: A New Collection With StudioCromie in Grottaglie, Italy

Ceramic Faile: A New Collection With StudioCromie in Grottaglie, Italy

Angelo Milano, the founder of Studiocromie and FAME Festival, has been courting Brooklyn artist duo Faile for more than a decade, and they finally created a series of ceramics together for his studio art business in Grottaglie under the tutelage and traditional expertise of the centuries-old Ceramiche Nicola Fasano’s workshop.

Faile. Large Vases. Stenciled and Glazed Terracotta. (photo courtesy of Faile)

The model of hosting artists for a variable length of time and offering them cooperation with local artisans to create commercial products was part of the original concept of FAME, in addition to the well-curated placement of stunning murals on walls by artists including Erica Il Cane, Vhils, Interesni Kazki, Conor Harrington, Cyop & Kaf, Momo, Lucy McLauchlan, Bastardilla, and Ted Moneyless. Since the mural festivals’ dissolution by Milano a half dozen years ago, he’s hosted a growing list of talents mirroring his eclectic fine eye for quality, and devil-may-care philosophical stance – the solo show and rap album with the Italian trio Canemorto both come to mind, for example.

“Exploring a mix of our stencil processes and combining it with a variety of their methodologies,” says Faile (Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller), “we created a small collection of unique ceramic plates and vases.”

Faile. Multilayered Large Plate Collection. Stenciled and Glazed Terracotta Plate. (photo courtesy of Faile)

The pieces incorporate the familiar pop and pulp imagery and visual vocabulary of canvasses, collaged media, wheat-pasted posters, and street art stencils on a plate. Now you can enjoy your Friselle bread and tomato salad with your favorite stenciled skateboard girl in pink while looking at a vase that may recall prayer wheels.

Faile. Small Plate Collection in Blue. Stenciled and Glazed Terracotta Plate. ( Photo courtesy of Faile)

Faile. Small Plate Collection in Red. Stenciled and Glazed Terracotta Plate. ( Photo courtesy of Faile)

Collection available now via the StudioCromie Shop. Click HERE to see more.

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Mrfijodor and Corn79 Paint the Museum A Come Ambiente (MAcA), Turin

Mrfijodor and Corn79 Paint the Museum A Come Ambiente (MAcA), Turin

We are seeing more municipalities and institutions settle upon aspirational messages about the Earth and environmental issues every month now – a very common theme with murals in cities worldwide.

Mrfijodor and Corn79.Turin, Italy. January 2021 (photo courtesy of the artists)

This new collaboration combines the skills of two former graffiti artists, Mrfijodor and Corn79, in Turin, Italy. The two murals interplay Mrfijodors illustration-inspired figurative elements and Corn79’s elegant language of abstraction to adorn the façade of the Museum A Come Ambiente (MAcA).

“The focus is on the balance between man and nature,” says Mrfijodor, “a balance that needs to be re-established.”

Mrfijodor and Corn79.Turin, Italy. January 2021 (photo courtesy of the artists)
Mrfijodor and Corn79.Turin, Italy. January 2021 (photo courtesy of the artists)
Mrfijodor and Corn79.Turin, Italy. January 2021 (photo courtesy of the artists)
Mrfijodor and Corn79.Turin, Italy. January 2021 (photo courtesy of the artists)
Mrfijodor and Corn79.Turin, Italy. January 2021 (photo courtesy of the artists)

The project is possible thanks to the contribution of the City of Turin, Area Giovani e Pari Opportunità – Torino Creativa, and the Museum A come Ambiente – MAcA.

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INTI “Stardust” in Naples

INTI “Stardust” in Naples

A new secular icon today from Naples, and while this fresco is not quite Vesuvian, its sovereign purple and sunkissed golden tones and draped fabrics make it quite at home here in this historic city of classical antiquity.

INTI. “Polvera Di Stelle”. Naples, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Chilean street muralist INTI bespoke this vision in the Barra neighborhood, which its Wiki page says “has suffered much the same fate of urban decay as the rest of the eastern periphery of Naples, a fate that includes drugs and entrenched organized crime.”

And yet here rises the Polvera di Stelle (Stardust), a nurturing, protective maternal figure – though perhaps more Greta Thunberg than Sophia Loren – surrounded by mysticism and ancient-future symbolism.

INTI. “Polvera Di Stelle”. Naples, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

“Look with the naked eye, without placebos or metaphysical aspirins.” INTI tells BSA. “Look without dogma, without wanting to rest on great truths. Look without easy answers that calm doubts, prevents us from seeing poetry in the uncertain and in the minuteness of our place in nature.”

The new mural is in collaboration with the Campania region and Jorit Foundation, says the artist.

INTI. “Polvera Di Stelle”. Naples, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
INTI. “Polvera Di Stelle”. Naples, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
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