All posts tagged: Italy

Nevercrew Watch Their Paper Plane “Fade” in Torino

Nevercrew Watch Their Paper Plane “Fade” in Torino

Fresh from Torino, Italy, the Swiss artists Nevercrew did this commissioned piece for a coffee company with the theme of “responsible consumption” – which immediately reminds us that we were planning to switch from using K-cups to drip coffee. The image is abstract and realistic at the same time, a map of some sort folded into an airplane, a portion of it possible torched by a lighter. It looks fragile, yet full of possibility.

Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)

“We decided to work around the concept of carefreeness to evoke both the human responsibility on the production and consumption side,” says Christian Rebecchi, “and the planetary emergency we’re already living.”

The image of a simple childs’ toy is meant to imply a story of two logics, says the other member of the duo, Pablo Togni. “The positive logic of the game and the negative one of the lack of conscience and the unnatural use of resources,” he says.

“There is a care-freeness that’s about acting unaware of the large-scale repercussions of the exploitation of resources, of what precedes and follows every small action and, at the same time, a reference to the lightness of the game, to all that is now put at risk for the generations that will hold the future of the planet.”

Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
Nevercrew. “Fade”. Toward 2030 Project. Torino, Italy. (photo © Nevercrew)
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Alessio Bolognesi and a Whale Swimming in Garbage

Alessio Bolognesi and a Whale Swimming in Garbage

“I chose whales because despite of their size, so many are found on our beaches with the stomach full of plastic,” says Alessio Bolognesi about this new mural for the ST.ART festival in Italy. “It’s a symbol, in my mind, of how even the huge animals are so powerless.”

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

The image of large seafaring creatures washing up on shore starved of nutrition and bloated with plastic is becoming more common as we continue to poison ourselves and the world. Not surprisingly, similar images are also popping up in Street Art in other locations.

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Originally from Ferrara in the north of Italy, the 3D graphic designer also once belonged to a graffiti crew as a kid, and he now balances professional design work with an increasing number of mural painting opportunities. Here in Provincia di Vicenza (Veneto region), he says he chose a whale drowning in plastic for this secondary school façade. But he didn’t want to be completely didactic, preferring to let the viewer make the connections themselves.

“I like to paint murals with a ‘multi-layer’ reading approach,” he explains. “You can look to the mural and just see the obvious image or you can try to go deeper and capture some more meaningful detail.”

Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Alessio Bolognesi. “Whales in the waste“. ST.ART. Vicenza, Italy. (photo courtesy of the artist)
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GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

“THE ANCIENT WAY OF THE NEW CIRCLE”

New from Genoa comes this circular system from Gola Hundun, called “The Ancient Way of the New Circle.” 

It is reassuring to consider the systems of our lives and our world as we regard the passing seasons of the year; revisiting, reliving, remeasuring our progress and regress and aspirations.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Part of a 10 mural program here in the Certosa district, the artist tells us that his painting is meant to “invite people to go back to a circular system.”

“The main character of the wall is Cernunnos,” Gola tells us, “- a mythological creature belonging to the Celtic culture, a symbol of fertility, abundance, manhood and wild nature – painted in the lower part of the wall, highly visible by pedestrians.”

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Gazing upon the natural elements of the composition that include a balance of phytomorphic elements, a tree of life, and a mountain, you can believe that the artist also likes to write poetry when he is in the right mood.

The color scheme may also speak to you as a powerful representation of the natural world, with blue and green being predominant – here surrounded by the harsher city palette of reds, yellows, oranges. Perhaps what hits you the most is a sense of balance that this mural achieves, even if you don’t know why exactly.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
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Nicola Alessandrini Balances Body and Earth Systems Holistically in Santa Croce di Magliano

Nicola Alessandrini Balances Body and Earth Systems Holistically in Santa Croce di Magliano

Painting with a holistic approach to life, the earth, the physical-psycho-social balance of humans in daily life – why not?

Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

talian painter Nicola Alessandrini has produced a somewhat surreal body of drawings and paintings during his relatively short career that appears to be turning the body, the animal world, and the plant world inside out to better understand the core systems that create balance and imbalance. In this new mural he just finished in Santa Croce di Magliano, you can see that again he is creating relationships between our corporeal systems and those of the earth.

“The artwork represents a human body connecting two different forms of life, soil and lymphatic systems,” he says. He tells us that the two plants are embraced by the body and that the woman’s floral dress is a fertile soil that connects the two plants and gives energy and nutrition to the body.

Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)

Completed as a the sixth edition of Premio Antonio Giordano, the artist consulted with public health initiative called AVIS (Association of Voluntary Italian Blood Donors) and hoped to develop a metaphorical way to represent their conversations.

“I like the idea that giving blood is not just something physical,” says Allissandrini,  “but it is also a mental predisposition, a practice of giving and sharing.”

Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
Nicola Alessandrini. Premio Antonio Giordano. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. August 2019. (photo courtesy of Premio Antonio Giordano)
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Giulio Vesprini on the B-Ball Court in Fermo, Italy

Giulio Vesprini on the B-Ball Court in Fermo, Italy

A basketball court in summertime is a proving ground for skill, a place to kill time with friends, and sometimes a launchpad for dreams of going “professional”. Here in Fermo City in Northern Italy, it’s a place for Street Artist Giulio Vesprini to expand his abstract practice to the field of sport.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)

“The shapes, colors and unique elements of botany characterize my work,” he says, and you can see that his palette is carefully chosen, and sophisticated. His new work is in concert with the Fermo Urban Museum (FUM) and took an organic route to completion, with the help of a handful of assistance. It’s many steps away from the inner city work you might normally associate with innercity graffiti; the sound and fury transmuted. Primitive, graphic, and crisply illustrative, this freshly painted court provides a new field of art and nature for players he’ll never meet.

He calls it “Struttura G041”.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)
Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (Video Andrea Amurri-New Media Solution )

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Guerilla Spam and 108 Paint 2 Versions of the “Quarantana”

Guerilla Spam and 108 Paint 2 Versions of the “Quarantana”

The Turin-based illustrator Guerrilla Spam has interpreted the “Quarantana” as a stylized toy extended from the arm of an elegant, almost Egyptian figure in a tall fez. Alessandria-born Street Artist 108 depicts the traditional doll as a unique abstraction merged within a form, not specifically figurative, rather primitive perhaps.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)

Both are interpreting a pagan/Christian traditional ritual next to each other here in Santa Croce di Magliano.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)

“ ‘Quarantana‘ is a doll made of fabric and straw, having the appearance of an old woman; the doll, usually hanged to a rope between the balconies or in front of the windows, stands on a potato with seven feathers attached,” say organizers at the Antonio Giordano Street Art festival. “The ritual, fusing Christian and pagan cultures, expresses the importance of living a life of sobriety and peace.”

An unusual topic to depict and oddly paired artists to create it – you are here able to better appreciate the multiplicity of styles at work on the street today. CLICK HERE to see a number of variations on the Quarantana doll as it is used throughout Santa Croce di Magliano, Southern Italy and the Balkan Region.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
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Giulio Vesprini Lights the Aerosol Smoke for “Pennelli Ribelli”

Giulio Vesprini Lights the Aerosol Smoke for “Pennelli Ribelli”

“Do it with passion or not at all!,” says Giulio Vesprini on this acid red cloud of paint that engulfs a portion of his new mural. The fog effect has become popular in public performance of late, adding a mystery of murk to photoshoots and videos, but not so many Street Artists have found a uniquely intrinsic way to make it work with their painting.

So, fresh from the Pennelli Rebelli Festival in Bologna, here’s his new wall in hot cherry flames.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G044. Pennelli Ribelli Festival. Bologna, Italy. (photo © Giulio Vesprini)
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Mr. Fijodor at “Without Frontiers” in Mantua, Italy

Mr. Fijodor at “Without Frontiers” in Mantua, Italy

It’s the fourth edition of “Without Frontiers”, a festival of urban art in Mantova Italy, organized by Simona Gavioli and Giulia Giliberti. This is the first mural we’ve seen from the 2019 edition, a hail of man-made products falling from the sky called “Plastic Rain” by Street Artist Mr. Fijodor. Here Mr. Fijodor is helping to continue a recently begun public painting tradition in this city with his illustrative scene of humans repairing a robot amid destruction, a storm of plastic bottles falling all around them.

Mr. Fijodor. “Plastic Rain” in collaboration with Without Frontiers Festival 2019. Mantova, Italy. (photo © Corn79)

Since 2016 the festival has tried to balance the new muralism of the moment with the history of Mantova (or Mantua in Emilian dialect) sometimes referred to as “the cradle of Renaissance culture”. Truthfully it’s a city known perhaps more for its Gonzaga tapestries than it’s Street Art culture but since 2016 “Without Frontiers” has hosted artists including Bianco-Valente, Boogie Ead, Corn79, Elbi Elem, Ericailcane and Bastardilla, Etnik, Fabio Petani, Mach505, Made514, Molis, Panem and Circenses, Perino and Vele, Peeta, Sebas Velasco, Vesod, Zedz, Joan Aguilò and Joys.

Mr. Fijodor. “Plastic Rain” in collaboration with Without Frontiers Festival 2019. Mantova, Italy. (photo © Corn79)
Mr. Fijodor. “Plastic Rain” in collaboration with Without Frontiers Festival 2019. Mantova, Italy. (photo © Corn79)

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Guided Flight with Gola Hundun: “Torre di Volo” Land Art in Sardinia

Guided Flight with Gola Hundun: “Torre di Volo” Land Art in Sardinia

When the plants and animals take over again there will still be remnants of you, as they transform your achievements and failures organically en route to natural balance.

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

The evidence of this eventuality lies not only in our predilection for self-destruction but on the current existence of the 7,000 tower-fortress structures that still dot this island of Sardinia. Time and elements have not destroyed these structures built over a period of 16 centuries – long before the event of Christ’s birth. Today they are remnants, monuments of that Nuragic civilization, but are also home to birds, four legged creatures, insects, grasses, bushes, and trees.

Italian Street Artist, muralist and land artist Gola Hundun thinks of communications towers and overlays them with references of totemic massings, historical human rituals, geographical coordinates, shamanic journeys, and patterns of aviary flight. For this installation called “Torre di volo” (Flight Tower) he also is thinking about guiding birds through controlled space.

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

“The central element of the installation is inspired by the forms of the flight control towers of the airports,” he says, “a type of architecture that has always fascinated me and had a strong influence on my imagination both aesthetically and poetically.”

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

Participating in an art residency on the property of the Campidate artists residency (near Monastir), the Italian born millennial finds the support he needs to pursue his natural art-making cycle in an environment that is closest to his personal ethos.

He says that he spotted a bird of prey called a Kestrel inside the Campidarte base buildings and became inspired to imagine himself directing the flight of birds, one further degree of interaction with nature he has pursued for most of his life.

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

“The installation stands today on a ridge of that land, in an elevated and strategic position, generally loved by birds of prey,” he tells us.

A continuation of a personal artists’ campaign he calls ABITARE that more than contemplates his work as potential habitat, “Torre di volo” will be complete when Gola sees a winged friend entering the doorway of his central tower. He says the entire creation is based on his “desire to create a form capable of hybridizing my fascination for the ancestral totemic verticality and the desire to create a living space easily accessible to certain species and biological niches.”

“From the tower that I interpreted, I hope that in the near future the flight of a bird of prey will begin, allowing us to observe in reality the idea of flying, going and coming back and making the structure itself come alive,” he says. “The occupation of the tower by a bird is part of the idea of the installation and is indispensable for its completion.”

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

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NeSpoon: Before & After

NeSpoon: Before & After

Favara is a town located in south central Sicily, in Italy. Known for its Medival castle, Favara’s main trade is in agricultural products and mining. Until recently, Favara was in danger of suffering the same fate that has afflicted many of the small towns and villages throughout Italy; The exodus of its young population to larger, metropolitan areas, due to unemployment where they are able to find better opportunities and entertainment. With this exodus comes the lack in tax revenue and the subsequent abandonment of priceless architecture and the neglect of the old part of the town to decay and the ravages of time and weather.

NeSpoon. Before. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)

Then came Andrea Bartoli and his wife Florinda Saieva. In 2010 they purchased several buildings that were neglected in the old city center and renovated them completely. Once the renovations were done they set up to create a cultural center that involved outdoor art exhibitions, shops, cultural events, screenings and the hosting of international artists to come and create art outdoors. They call it Farm Cultural Park. With this initiative Andrea and Florinda have created the renaissance of their historic city center and have put Favara back on the map. Favara as they happily exclaim is “A Place That Makes You Happy”.

NeSpoon. After. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)

Polish Artist, NeSpoon was invited to participate in this year’s edition of Farm Cultural Park and what an apt visual reference her contribution is to the concept of revival and the before & after.

NeSpoon. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)

NeSpoon is known for her exquisite, lattice-like paintings and sculptures that take inspiration from old crocheted patterns. Here, visitors will be able to have a “sight for sore eyes” moment as they turn the corner and are regaled by the vision of a wall transformed from decay into a monochrome pattern very familiar with all of us.

NeSpoon. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)
NeSpoon. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)

Her use of monochrome helps the building retain its ancient character while at the same time it elevates it to a piece of art.

NeSpoon. Farm Cultural Park. Favara, Sicily. (photo © NeSpoon)
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Duchamp Is Fake News : ELFO

Duchamp Is Fake News : ELFO

The Italian textual conceptualist and urban/suburban public space instigator ELFO has lodged his complaint on a wall against the misinformation that forms our perceptions. The humorous one-off screed caught our attention so we asked him about this low-fi textwork that seems decidedly Duchampian, with a nod to Magritte’s pipe.

Elfo. Verona, Italy. April 2019. (photo © Elfo)

BSA: Duchamp challenged conceptions of the art world with his “readymade” pieces and many a critic called him a fake. Your commentary references the “fake news” meme favored by the right wing news and politicians. How did you make the connection?

ELFO: Currently my work is returning to this message. I want to speak of the world and the history of art in ironic and contemporary way using contemporary terms. I chose Duchamp because his artwork changed the world of art.  Duchamp is perfect because he played with fake identity and the critic system rendered him as a fake. He changed the rules of art, for me and many artists.

BSA: What role should art play in this world of “fake news”?

ELFO: In this world of fake news, art probably is a big fake – if it does not reflect society as a mirror.

BSA:  Do you think art should always reflect our society like a mirror?

ELFO: The problem is not fake news in this world – it’s the human  brain. Art must speak about serious issues like pollution for example. This is the next subject I’ll address since I have been looking at it for a long time.

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Greg Jager Creates Mural for All “Stagioni” (Seasons) in Turin, Italy

Greg Jager Creates Mural for All “Stagioni” (Seasons) in Turin, Italy

“I’ve always been fascinated by the idea of including vegetation in my artwork,” says Italian painter Greg Jager. “This way the work will never be the same. Every day you will notice differences due to the natural life cycle of the trees in front of it”.

Greg Jager “Stagioni” Turi, Itlay. April 2019. (photo © Michele Pasero)

A mural for all seasons it is; A natural collaboration between the Roman graffuturist and the branch spread of this city tree. Usually you can see the reflections, refractions of architecture in the work of this graffiti writer turned commercial/fine artist. Here in Turin the geometry will frame the organic as the tree continues to go through its life cycle.

The project is possible only by invitation, as Jager is one of three artists awarded by “Collegno SI-CURA” presented by the Municipality of Collegno and curated by Contrada Torino Onlus Foundation.

Greg Jager “Stagioni” Turi, Itlay. April 2019. (photo © Michele Pasero)

Through an international open call, three artists were selected: Greg Jager (ITA), Geometric Bang (ITA) and Himed & Reyben (USA / MEX). Each artist was invited to create an urban art painting and to direct a workshop in collaboration with Collegno schools and citizens of Turin.

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