All posts tagged: Hendrik Beikirch

Hendrik Beikirch Traces Lives and Memories in “Siberia”

Hendrik Beikirch Traces Lives and Memories in “Siberia”

A corollary to 2015’s “Tracing Morocco” by German street artist Hendrik Beirkirch (aka ECB), a new book travels to meet the rugged inhabitants of Siberia’s countryside in the Russian Federation. The results are starkly genuine, impressively authentic.

Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018

Again indulging us in the deep crevasses of many a weathered façade, Siberia invites you to meet the people whom he has met in his travel and presumably befriended, given their ease as subjects. A part of the Jardin Rouge stable over the past few years, Beirkirch has followed the lead of founder Jean Louis Haguenauer, the Frenchman who moved to Russia in the early 1980s and found his own odyssey outside the city to be formative to his character, leading him to write the introduction to the handsome tome.

Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018

“The work produced is a testimony, a memoir,” says Haguenauer, “These modern faces that hark back to the past, these women and men immortalized on canvas, ambassadors of their trades and their regions on walls around the world, convey another image of the largest region on the planet and of a sadly little-known country, of which we wish to provide a new vision. It is the everyday women and men, passionately living their trades, who are the heroes of this new project.”

Indeed there are few signs of artifice or romanticism in the sure-footed subjects here, and you are offered a glimpse of their context with some of these new portraits. Seeing them translated to grand scale as murals spanning towers is remarkable, and one can only imagine what impact they have on the people who live in or pass through these neighborhoods.  Scattered through a number of cities, there is a familiar feeling in each of these strangers, perhaps feeling like family to some.

Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Nina. Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018

“Untainted by any attempt at idealization, the faces of  those portrayed tell the story of real life,” says Arne Zyprian in an opening essay. “Paradoxically, these anonymous guises pictured on a vast scale on the sides of buildings offer a break from the overall anonymity of the cities and give them a face.”

Interspersed with canvasses and murals are observations that attempt to examine why we find the singular visages so compelling. There is a temptation to look at a new people in cultures different from our own as the exotic “other”, to simplify their existence by what we can observe on the outside, or to project our own inner dynamics on to the faces that we see.

Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Nina. Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018

One thing is for certain, Beirkirch has found through technique and experience a way for each of these people to become somehow relatable.

“Hendrik pours all of his love for humanity into his portraits,” says Jean Louis. “There is never any aggression or bitterness in these people.” Perhaps that is how most of us would like to be seen as well.

Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Vlasov. Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018
Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Vera. Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018
Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018
Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Aleksandr Pavlovich. Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018
Hendrik Beikirch. “SIBERIA” Tatyana. Editons mare & martin. Paris. 2018
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BSA Film Friday: 05.11.18

BSA Film Friday: 05.11.18

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. RERO, Hendrik Beikirch, Kouka and David Mesguich at Montresso Foundation in Morocco
2. TWOONE: Wall Street Art Festival of Grand Paris Sud / Galerie Mathgoth
3. Low Bros #sweet15s Episode 11 / Miami

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BSA Special Feature: RERO, Hendrik Beikirch, Kouka and David Mesguich.

Jardin Rouge just outside of Marrakech continues to expand its offerings with an exhibition space run by the Montresso Foundation that rivals many museums. You may recall our visit to the compound a little while ago “Jardin Rouge: A Unique Garden For Street Artists To Grow In”.

Here we have an inside look at Street Artists work in, on, and around the laboratory, workshops, and museum space by RERO, Hendrik Beikirch, Kouka and David Mesguich.

 

TWOONE: Wall Street Art Festival of Grand Paris Sud / Galerie Mathgoth

This wall is full of egret.

The Japanese artist TWOONE was in the French town of Lieusaint (Seine et Marne) with Gautier Jourdain and the festival he began last year in Southern Paris called Wall Street Art Festival. The Yokohama born Street Artist has lived in Berlin for a handful of years and takes his realistic dreams of animals and people to frescoes across cities like Hong Kong, Miami, and Bangkok.

…sort of reminds us of a wall ROA did with us in 2010, which also featured an egret.

Low Bros #sweet15s Episode 11 / Miami

Another installment from the Low Bros travelogue – this one from the neighborhood that wishes it was decadent, Wynwood in Miami. The guys are entertaining in their re-enactment of celebrity tropes as they flash you past the excitement of Basel week inland.

 

 

 

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“Tracing Morocco”, Hendrik Beikirch

“Tracing Morocco”, Hendrik Beikirch

Dignity in “Tracing Morrocco” gives pause, requests your consideration.

Last year we wrote about Hendrik Beikirch’s journey to Morocco, The Trades. With the support of the Foundation Montresso he embarked  on a project to paint the portraits of people whose trades might be in danger of becoming obsolete and/or disappearing due to the complexities of the modern world. Tracing Morocco, the book about the project is now out…

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Magical and venerable tree whose roots piece the rock and seal an irrevocable pact with the earth,” says one of the quotes translated into Arabic, French, and English. This is the long view taken by a mature artist of a life lived with dignity, old enough to see that their roots run deep. Each portrait is compelling, a trades person enmeshed in this North African society, performing a role and a service deemed honest and necessary for the interdisciplinary machinery of daily life.

Barber, shepherd, carpenter, public letter-writer, henna artist, boat builder, tool merchant, fisherman: trades and services of Morocco where Beikirch (Street Artist ECB) traced the landscape, the city streets, the faces. Here you find his related studio practice, his gallery canvasses, his walls – all of which speak to the study he has undertaken of these singular figures.

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Mohamed, Barber. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Acrylic, india ink, spray paint – each have their individual character, able to tell tales in their own right, now rendered together in service of capturing a face, a woven straw hat, a printed scarf wrapped over the head.

Elsewhere the artist strikes a modern and smooth James Dean / Chet Baker figure in black and white as he seriously renders, pen in hand, thin brush clenched between teeth. He is looking to his future here and while the faces and trades vary, in each one Beikirch has coaxed, captured, delivered the same thing, a light burning inside the eyes.

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Mohamed, Barber. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The book is well planned, judiciously edited, and warm without sentimentality. Interspersed with cropped images of the completed sketches and canvasses is black and white photography illustrating the tools of the trade, sometimes a practitioner. “Tracing Morrocco” gives credit to the worker for their efforts and their skill and opens the door to so many inquiries, so many stories about the subject and how they have navigated through this life.

Given the successful portrayals here and ECB’s penchant for portraits, one can easily imagine more countries and people may be traced in the future, for you to examine.

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Ahmed, Shepherd. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Ahmed, Shepherd. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Mustapha, Carpenter. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Mustapha, Carpenter. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Lahcen, Public letter-writter. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Lahcen, Public letter-writter. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Fadma, Henna artist. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik Beikirch. Tracing Morocco. Fadma, Henna artist. Montresso Art Foundation. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Hendrik Beikirch’s Tracing Morocco published by and in collaboration with Montresso Art Foundation. November 2016.

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The Trades: Hendrik Beikirch (ECB) Traces Moroccan Faces

The Trades: Hendrik Beikirch (ECB) Traces Moroccan Faces

Street Artist ECB is introducing you to the trades of Morocco by painting the faces of current practitioners whom he has met on the street. By now we are familiar with the storytelling role that artists can fulfill with their portraits of individuals who live in a region, town, or neighborhood and Street Artists such as the Parisian C215, Canadian Fauxreel, and the American desert dweller Jetsonorama come to mind as well as more recent Brooklyn social activists like LMNOPI and Tatiana Fazlilazadeh.

We have been introducing and recounting Street Art stories for years  online and in front of audiences and we find that it never fails to intrigue people to learn that many faces on the street are those of a community.

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Oulad-Bouzid-III, a street barber. The streets of Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

German Street Artist Hendrik Beikirch aka ECB has been known on the scene in recent years for his massive portraits of people – sometimes subjects known to the artist and other times from his imagination. For his new project in Morroco ECB returns to a social/anthropolical ethos – a route he says has energized his work by focusing on occupations and trades of his subjects. In doing so he hopes to preserve something more about their professions and culture; street barbers, shepherds, even the guy who writes a letter for you.

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Oulad-Bouzid-III on the streets of Brooklyn. (photo © Leanna Valente)

“I am seeking to capture their ‘aura’ in this work series,” he tells us, “with the goal of making these people immortal in the process.” Calling his series “Trades – Tracing Morocco” he explains that he has made the trip 10 times or more from his home in Koblenz, Germany to this one in the Maghreb region of North Africa to meet locals and speak with them. As he captures their image and shares it on streets he says he hopes to preserve and elevate the stories of a people in trades that are disappearing.

“I want to transform people from the anonymous to the iconic, while paying tribute to trades that might be gone in the near future.”

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Oulad-Bouzid-III on the streets of Brooklyn. ECB documenting his work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

During his initial visit to Jardin Rouge/Marrakech in the summer of 2014, “I was immediately fascinated by the diversity of this country, its rich history and the contrasts in peoples faces that are somehow created by the environment they live in.”

Supported by the Foundation Montresso/ Jardin Rouge, Hendrik says that he strives to impart a humanity of the people he has met that passerby can connect to through his paintings. “It is a country with hard working people, many of whom are living a tough life, but with so much pride and happiness.”

Right now ECB is working on creating an exhibition in October with the foundation and he will be publishing a book focusing on the “Trades” series on Éditions Eyrolles.

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Oulad-Bouzid-III at the studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Nils-Muller)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Fadma Tafza a traditional tattooist for women faces. The streets of Arce, Italy. (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Fadma Tafza on the streets of Arce, Italy. (photo © Dante Corsetti)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Fadma Tafza at the studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Ahmed-Kartawa a shepherd. The studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Detail of Ahmed-Kartawa’s portrait at the studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch at work at the studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Nils-Muller)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch.  “Trades” Portrait of Mohamed-Bouhir. A writer/reader for those who are not literate. The studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Elhachemi-Kartawa a pushcart trucker. Studio in Jardin Rouge. Marrakesh (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” working on Oulad-Bouzid-III portrait at the studio in Jardin Rouge/Marrakesh. (photo © Nils-Muller)

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Hendrik ecb Beikirch. “Trades” Portrait of Rakouch-Timallizene, a traditional potter workshop. Germany. (photo © Hendrik Beikirch)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

 

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BSA Film Friday: 01.09.15

BSA Film Friday: 01.09.15

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. ROME in the Street and the Gallery by Dioniso Punk
2. Hendrik Beikirch (ECB): East Harbor in the Netherlands
3. Michael Beerens – “Master”
4. “Art As A Weapon” Trailer

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BSA Special Feature: ROME in the Street and the Gallery by Dioniso Punk

The punk rock connection to graffiti is as strong as any subculture’s – or of any people who feel marginalized in effect or practice by the dominant culture preventing their voice. The narrative that graffiti belongs exclusively to Hip Hop has been posited and disproved over time; as Jesus said, “Graffitti belongs to everyone.” *

Modern French academics and intellectuals have celebrated graffiti and Street Art by way of political protest at least since the late 1960s and early 70s, first with the Situationists and later with the aesthetics and artistry of people like Ernest Pignon-Ernest and Gérard Zlotykamien.

In “Street & Gallery” we see that the need for expression, illegal and otherwise, is as urgent as ever in the Street Art scene in Rome today and for many it is a means to express opinions and philosophies that they hope will in turn push greater society forward in some way. For others it is simply to fight the stagnation.

Billed as an “unofficial video” by Dioniso Punk, the short documentary takes you into the kitchen and studio and gallery and street as a variety of artists, academics, vegetable vendors and philosophers narrate the pragmatic and the existential. Call it activism, call it a yearning for freedom, call it being generally pissed off at institutional inertia – the spirit of graffiti and it’s multiple urban art corollaries will not die. Either will arena rock and roll, despite early punk’s best wishes.

Interesting to note that the globalization of capital has not globalized all banks accounts and has thrust the xenophobia of the Italian middle class into a harsh light here, as it has elsewhere in so-called developed countries. Here we see a modern Italy struggling with ideological self-beliefs about justice and equality and wondering how they apply to a new immigrant class who has no interest in their cogitations. Moving from the educated class studio environment, the trained artist suddenly finds a social/political role, and for the first time perhaps contemplates it. Meanwhile, many in the street have never seen the inside of a studio and have a slightly different take on the state of things. Let the conversation continue.

 

Support was also provided by Maam – Museo dell’Altro e dell’Altrove di Metropoliz, Dorothy Circus Gallery, M.U.Ro. – Museo Urban di Roma, Sacripante Gallery, SMAC – Segni Mutanti.
 
A nod to the artists whose work is shown in the video, including Nicola “Nic” Alessandrini, Jim Avignon, Gary Baseman, Mister Thoms, Eduardo Kobra, David “Diavù” Vecchiato, Veronica Montanino, Stefania Fabrizi, Danilo Bucchi, Mauro Maugliani, Ron English, Beau Stanton, Mr. Klevra, Finbarr “Fin” DAC, Omino71, David Pompili, Ray Caesar, Afarin Sajedi, Kathie Olivas, Pablo Mesa Capella e Gonzalo Orquìn, Massimo Attardi, Gian Maria Tosatti, Malo Farfan, Franco Losvizzero, Davide Dormino, Alessandro Ferraro, Mauro Cuppone, Leonardo “Leo” Morichetti, Mauro Sgarbi, Gio Pistone, Zelda Bomba, Micaela Lattanzio, HOPNN, Massimo Iezzi, Sabrina Dan, Jago, Giovanna Ranaldi, Santino Drago, Alessandro Sardella, Fabio Mariani, Marco Casolino, Veks Van Hillik, Hogre, Dilkabear, Lucamaleonte, Diamond, Alice Pasquini, Paolo Petrangeli.

Hendrik Beikirch: East Harbor in the Netherlands

Hendrik Beikirch traveled to Heerlen in the Netherlands to paint a new mural over three and a half days. Organized by Heerlen Murals, the wizened, troubled subject adds to the series of images ECB has been creating across many walls in the last handful of years.

 

Michael Beerens – “Master”

 Last summer the Frenchman Beerens took a trip out into the mountains and created a piece on a a small abandoned building. Ah, summer, come thou near…

 

“Art As A Weapon” Trailer

From Breadtruck Films, the new documentary focuses on a school in Myanmar (Burma) that teaches street art as a form of non-violent struggle. Street Artists Shepard Fairey and JR figure into the story, as does the military, art as a weapon, and art as a tool for revolution.

 

* Quote from Jesus Cordero, aerosol sales associate at Near Miss Hardware store in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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First Monograph by Germany’s ECB is “Blurring Boundaries”

First Monograph by Germany’s ECB is “Blurring Boundaries”

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

A respectable and rich first monograph by German Street Artist Hendrik Beikirch, known on the street as ECB, Blurring Boundaries aptly explains the area between his graffiti roots and photo-realist portraiture that makes room for emotion. Discovering the hip-hop world in the late 1980s as so many metropolitan youth around the world did thanks to the cultural export of video, vinyl, books and cassette tapes, Beikirch first began his own exploration in graffiti that mimicked the influence of cities like New York interpreted through the local teen culture of Kassel where he was born.

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

The intervening twenty years put him on a singular route to develop his own style of using acrylic, emulsion paint, and aerosol in an integrated seamless monochromatic palette technique.  His massive portraits of anonymous men (primarily) with creased faces and cryptic maxims have grown onto and into street scenes, evoking emotion in the viewer, and the rare of empathy from a stranger.  Now installing his works around the world on ever larger facades in cities like Sao Paulo, Seoul, Delhi, Miami, Kazan, Brooklyn, and throughout Germany, ECB makes an additional looming space for the face of one more wanderer.

Rather than attaching a distinct storyline, ECB gives his sitters a narrative that stretches and ambulates beyond location, sometimes following the passerby to their next appointment.  If your imagination was in slumber, an unexpected ECB portrait can awaken it and create the story. At the very least you are introduced to a stranger whom you hadn’t realized could become a confidant, a familiar face in the cacophony of the city.

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

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Hendrik ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundaries” (photo of book spread by Jaime Rojo)

 

 

Hendrick ECB Beikirch “Blurring Boundries” Publikat Publishing

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