All posts tagged: Gola Hundun

Gola Hundun: “Habitat” Series Uses Leaves and Natural Print Aesthetics

Gola Hundun: “Habitat” Series Uses Leaves and Natural Print Aesthetics

As summer sun wanes in the Northern Hemisphere, we are again reminded of our dependence upon nature, the print it leaves upon us.

Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)

Gola Hundun is fascinated at the moment with the marks that nature can make, and presents these new handmade prints for us to look at. A land artist largely, Gola has experimented and observed our complicated relationship with the earth for more than a decade with his work.

“The human world has many examples of neglected buildings whose demolition is always very tricky and may lead to additional damage to nature,” he tells us. “In the meantime, nature immediately starts to reoccupy the land with fern and fauna, naturally and gradually replacing it.”

Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)

With his new series “Habitat”, Gola says he is researching degradation and growth with an aesthetic analysis. “I like mapping it,” he says. “It is a way to witness different cases all over the world and to show it up as a universal phenomenon.”

Here he shows us his prints made with his own version of “eco-printing”, a process that begins with the selection of leaves. Then “I use the leaves to release colors from their tannins and carothens, instead of using chemical inks.”


To learn more about this series, check out his Instagram


Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Gola Hundun. Habitat. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Read more
Gola Hundun Escapes to Ivy-Covered Nature in Japan

Gola Hundun Escapes to Ivy-Covered Nature in Japan

Animals use natural space without transforming it but they seek the space to meet their needs. A cave will provide shelter for a bear. The bear will not paint it, wire it for electricity or install air-conditioning.

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

Safely (somewhat) in Japan right now, the Italian land artist Gola Hundun is studying space again for his self-created ABITARE project.

“It’s my personal research on the border between human functional space and other species’ use of space,” he tells us as we look at this ivy-covered hump of industry that he regales with gold lame. We often imagine New York City’s skyscrapers engulfed in ivy and wildflowers with enormous insects and birds freely roaming about.

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

“I think I want to title it ‘Presence’,” he says, “Because this time I found a space where some dead trees were re-colonized by ivy and vitalba that generate really evocative imaginary shapes,” he says. “Like Readymade sculptures, like giants and strange horse-giraffes.” You can see his eyes alight, the dialogue inside his head full of calculation and intent that turns these ephemeral “sculptures” into abstract beings inhabiting space.

He talks about his relationship with gold, which has reoccurred throughout his multiple ABITARE installation. “Gold and green is the combo color for this project.  I use gold because it is for me  the color of the sun, the color of the soul, of the divine.”

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

And of our current crises of an infectious coronavirus circling the globe and threatening humanity, killing some of us, crippling our lives in many cases; what does this Earth-Star man observe?

“For me, it is a way to critique our modern human behaviors, post-capitalism, post-economic globalization, which is the main reason why we have arrived at this point, at the brink of ecological systemic disaster.
I think this issue with Corona is a good opportunity to meditate about slow down the rhythm.”

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Emilia Romagna, Italy. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Read more
Gola Hundun Follows Kids Art and “The Path” in Napoli

Gola Hundun Follows Kids Art and “The Path” in Napoli

“It is less easy to sensitize people to the respect of nature,” says Italian Street Artist Gola Hundun, and you understand his entire oeuvre during the last decade.

Gola Hundun. “The Path”. Naples, Italy. October 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

With “Sentiero”, his latest ode to pyramidic peaks that soar above the earth in Napoli for the Xenia Community Festival.

Speaking of community, Gola opened up the creative process to school children to aesthetically explore some of the themes he is most influenced by – nature, spirituality, our encounters with both. He is so moved by the collaborative drawing made by two boys named Enrico and Salvatore that he writes today to tell BSA readers about the work and the affect it had on his multi-story mural.

He shares with us the original artwork by them that he chose the sketch among many others because of its inner meaning, which he thinks is very close to own research.

“The path is represented as a thin red line, as the pathway every man should walk to reach the Knowledge shown as a golden mountain. Beside each single man there’s nature, seen as an obstacle, but is actually part of himself,” Gola tells us.

Gola Hundun. “The Path”. Naples, Italy. October 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

“A rich variety of vegetation dominates the lower part of the wall, creating a multi-layer prospective effect. What is very interesting is also the chromatic scale and the way the artist uses it: simple, elementary colors, to let the pure shape of the elements to come out on a very neutral background. Gold means divine value of the nature and so the mountain becomes a golden idol in the middle of the jungle of life. The contrast between the golden mountain and the cold tones of the leaves emphasizes the allegorial message beyond it.

Gola Hundun. “The Path”. Naples, Italy. October 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. “The Path”. Naples, Italy. October 2019. (photo © Vincenzo Capasso)
Gola Hundun. “The Path”. Naples, Italy. October 2019. (photo © Vincenzo Capasso)
Read more
GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

GOLA in Genoa, Italy: May the Circle be Unbroken

“THE ANCIENT WAY OF THE NEW CIRCLE”

New from Genoa comes this circular system from Gola Hundun, called “The Ancient Way of the New Circle.” 

It is reassuring to consider the systems of our lives and our world as we regard the passing seasons of the year; revisiting, reliving, remeasuring our progress and regress and aspirations.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Part of a 10 mural program here in the Certosa district, the artist tells us that his painting is meant to “invite people to go back to a circular system.”

“The main character of the wall is Cernunnos,” Gola tells us, “- a mythological creature belonging to the Celtic culture, a symbol of fertility, abundance, manhood and wild nature – painted in the lower part of the wall, highly visible by pedestrians.”

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)

Gazing upon the natural elements of the composition that include a balance of phytomorphic elements, a tree of life, and a mountain, you can believe that the artist also likes to write poetry when he is in the right mood.

The color scheme may also speak to you as a powerful representation of the natural world, with blue and green being predominant – here surrounded by the harsher city palette of reds, yellows, oranges. Perhaps what hits you the most is a sense of balance that this mural achieves, even if you don’t know why exactly.

Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Gola Hundun. “The Ancient Way Of The New Circle” Genoa, Italy. (photo © Matteo Fontana & Luca Briganti)
Read more
Guided Flight with Gola Hundun: “Torre di Volo” Land Art in Sardinia

Guided Flight with Gola Hundun: “Torre di Volo” Land Art in Sardinia

When the plants and animals take over again there will still be remnants of you, as they transform your achievements and failures organically en route to natural balance.

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

The evidence of this eventuality lies not only in our predilection for self-destruction but on the current existence of the 7,000 tower-fortress structures that still dot this island of Sardinia. Time and elements have not destroyed these structures built over a period of 16 centuries – long before the event of Christ’s birth. Today they are remnants, monuments of that Nuragic civilization, but are also home to birds, four legged creatures, insects, grasses, bushes, and trees.

Italian Street Artist, muralist and land artist Gola Hundun thinks of communications towers and overlays them with references of totemic massings, historical human rituals, geographical coordinates, shamanic journeys, and patterns of aviary flight. For this installation called “Torre di volo” (Flight Tower) he also is thinking about guiding birds through controlled space.

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

“The central element of the installation is inspired by the forms of the flight control towers of the airports,” he says, “a type of architecture that has always fascinated me and had a strong influence on my imagination both aesthetically and poetically.”

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

Participating in an art residency on the property of the Campidate artists residency (near Monastir), the Italian born millennial finds the support he needs to pursue his natural art-making cycle in an environment that is closest to his personal ethos.

He says that he spotted a bird of prey called a Kestrel inside the Campidarte base buildings and became inspired to imagine himself directing the flight of birds, one further degree of interaction with nature he has pursued for most of his life.

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)

“The installation stands today on a ridge of that land, in an elevated and strategic position, generally loved by birds of prey,” he tells us.

A continuation of a personal artists’ campaign he calls ABITARE that more than contemplates his work as potential habitat, “Torre di volo” will be complete when Gola sees a winged friend entering the doorway of his central tower. He says the entire creation is based on his “desire to create a form capable of hybridizing my fascination for the ancestral totemic verticality and the desire to create a living space easily accessible to certain species and biological niches.”

“From the tower that I interpreted, I hope that in the near future the flight of a bird of prey will begin, allowing us to observe in reality the idea of flying, going and coming back and making the structure itself come alive,” he says. “The occupation of the tower by a bird is part of the idea of the installation and is indispensable for its completion.”

Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Eleonora Riab)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)
Gola Hundun. Torre di Volo. Campidarte Art Residency. Sardegna, Italy. May 2019. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

For more about Campidarte:

Read more
Gola Hundun Activates on the Precipice of Man and Nature

Gola Hundun Activates on the Precipice of Man and Nature

“Abitare” (To Live In)


Italian Street Artist and urban interventionist Gola Hundun is often thinking about the idea of coexistence and cohabitation between humans and the rest of the natural world. He often looks for that delineation on which to create new art.

Naturally it is performed with a flourish of theatricality.

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Rimini, Italy. 2018. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

“I consider these places to be sort of a temple or a monument that speaks about the frontier between human space and the natural one,” he says of this abandoned industrial carcass that is returning back to the earth somewhere around Rimini, Italy.

Here he interacts with the ruins – a formerly useful construction of humans that behaved as if it was not part of nature, possibly in an open attack of nature. Now it looks as if he is introducing it back to the ecosystem it stood amongst and apart from.

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Rimini, Italy. 2018. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

“Today it’s clear that human behavior (especially Western humans) that sees us like the dominant species of the world who can manage all resources for our own development and not consider the rest of biosphere – these behaviors have brought the planet on the brink of an Eco-disaster,” he says.

So it is here at the scene of the crime that the forensic detective converts to holy healer, interacting with the ruins and blessing it as it convenes a unique and slow transformation.

This abandoned location is a place where spontaneous growth is happening already,” he tells us. “These places for me are a ready made work of art where I introduce my glorifying theme, trying to bring to light their intrinsic holy aura.”

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Rimini, Italy. 2018. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Rimini, Italy. 2018. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

Gola Hundun. “Abitare”. Rimini, Italy. 2018. (photo © Johanna Invrea)

Read more
Italian Street Artist in Navajo Nation: Gola Hundun Finds the Mountain

Italian Street Artist in Navajo Nation: Gola Hundun Finds the Mountain

Today is #indigenouspeoplesday – but of course we talk about them more often than this. The Native American people of the Southwestern United States are called the Navajo, or the Diné. Italian spiritual-cosmologist-naturist Street Artist Gola Hundun spent three days walking in the desert here recently going to the Navajo National Monument and Monument Valley trying to get in touch with the native folks to better understand the culture and the significance of the land itself.

Gola Hundun. The Painted Desert Project. Arizona. July 2018. (photo © Chip Thomas)

“I tried to combine those two elements with very different weights to generate an united image that would suggest how I feel the heart and the mind of Diné people,” he says as he describes the one story desert mural he ultimately painted with his botanical and natural motifs. Bright and optimistic, the landscape mimics the stunning views that surround and permeate the life here and he says his time here has altered his own vision of reality. The structure itself is classic; a typical abandoned petrol station you’ve probably seen in those road movies.

Gola Hundun. The Painted Desert Project. Arizona. July 2018. (photo © Chip Thomas)

“The piece represents Navajo Mountain that is in the background,” he says, and the spiritual searcher finds a kinship with traditional Navajo stories about the foundational relevance of the land mass.

“This is the head of their main goddess generator for everything of their world. For me it also includes a reinterpretation of the Hózhó in the middle of the mountain at the top – flowing in spiral way. Hózhó is the bedrock of Navajo religion, which, as I understand it, means it is a combination of existing state of balance, harmony, peace and completeness. They call it walk in beauty.”

Gola Hundun. The Painted Desert Project. Arizona. July 2018. (photo © Chip Thomas)

The Painted Desert Project, begun here and regularly refreshed by local Street Artist/activist/doctor  Chip Thomas, continues to invite Street Artists from around the world to paint here. The cross-cultural connections have been a boon to greater understanding – and continue to affect the visual experience of riding through this rich landscape.

“I am so glad and grateful to have had the opportunity to be in the Navajo Nation and to try to share my love and respect to these amazing people,” says Gola.

Gola Hundun. The Painted Desert Project. Arizona. July 2018. (photo © Chip Thomas)

Gola Hundun. The Painted Desert Project. Arizona. July 2018. (photo © Chip Thomas)


Gola Hundun would like to thank his host Chip Thomas @jetsonorama. He would also like to thank @danieljosley and @ballroomdaze for helping him realize this piece and his adventure there. “A special thanks to all the native and non-native people that helped me on this trip and helped me see reality with a different point of view.”

Read more
Gola Hundun Brings Botanicals and Bees to Paris

Gola Hundun Brings Botanicals and Bees to Paris

Now that we have had our longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and Solstice has stirred libidos, plunging us into midnight runs through abandoned lots and local parks and naked splashing in the fountains, we leave our cities for something more botanical. It’s instructive that despite the many wonders of the built urban environment, most city dwellers find life incomplete without grasses, flowers, leaves, honey bees.

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Street Artist Gola Hundun is fully immersed in nature with this 6 story open atrium he has just painted in the Parisian Hôtel Le Belleval and it may set your senses buzzing as well. Carefully planned and executed according to an order that mimics the natural one, these botanicals spring from the Gola well, which runs quite deep, if you are asking.

Not quite outside, and not quite in, the fresco mimics the evolution of previous works by this Italian-born Ambassador for Earth and All Her Creatures and Energies. Hopefully the hotel’s patrons will look up from their screens and glasses of Rosé to see the birds and bees, because without them we are nothing.

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Gola Hundun. “The Bee”. Paris, France. June 2018. (photo © Lucas Barioulette)

Read more
Gola: Fresh Canvasses from “7.6 BILLION AND STILL GROWING”

Gola: Fresh Canvasses from “7.6 BILLION AND STILL GROWING”

 

Back in February we gave you a sneak peak at Gola Hundun’s preparations for his new show inspired by Earth’s population and our individual and industrial impact on the balance of the environment.

Gola Hundun. “Anthropocene” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Today we have the completed canvasses, which you can see in person should you find yourself lost in Queensland, Australia. Entitled “7.6 Billion and Still Growing”, the show features organic fern and form, an ample layering of motifs and washes in an almost decorative vein, each an emotional distillation of larger systemic challenges. His own balance appears to be achieved by the gathering of these systems within geometric groupings, the riddles and solutions wrapped colorfully within.

Gola Hundun. “Beginning of Sedentary” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Why people want to plunder the Earth for financial gain is not precisely baffling, everyone agrees. But why we can’t have and enforce laws to protect it for everyone is.

Gola’s organic forms and splendiferous color choices are shouting about the beauty and magic of the natural world and he says he took the opportunity to preach to assembled guests at his opening last week.

Gola Hundun. “Col-ono-izing” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

“It was a blast!!!  I also made a speech to the audience telling them about the story behind the canvases,” he says, “and making some active propaganda about how much every one of us can do for the world, like becoming vegan, minimizing use of plastic and refusing to buy from several brands and corporations.”

Gola Hundun. “Fading Away” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Gola Hundun. “Fall of Macrofauna” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Gola Hundun. “From Irrigation to Ocean” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Gola Hundun. “Indonesia” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Gola Hundun. “Moving After the Herds” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)

Gola Hundun. “Obsolete Conception” 19 Karen Gallery. Queensland, Australia. (photo © Tommaso Campana)


Looking summer reading? Gola recommends Climate Change. A Defining Issue of Our Generation written by Antxon Olabe Egaña.

Click HERE for more information on the exhibition.

Read more
A Peek At Gola Hundun: 7.6 Billion & Still Growing

A Peek At Gola Hundun: 7.6 Billion & Still Growing

Italian Street Artist and fine artist Gola Hundun begins the conversation with the raw statistic of how many humans are living on the earth and takes you on a visual journey from there.

His alarm at the developments of industry and extraction and destruction are here, certainly, as is his call for our dedication to take greater responsibility for our Earth and our resources.

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

More likely though, you will see the substantive glory of his abstraction, his generous layerings of leaves and plants and organic forms, his wending and blending of color and washes in a lush wonderland rather than the barren stripped and burned dystopia one might think of.

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

As he makes the final preparations for his new show in Australia just south of Brisbane along a golden coast that is concentrated with the wealth of captains of industry, it is worth considering what part each of us play in a system that heals or destroys. Natural beauty is compelling and life giving and yet our history tells us we will continue to horde it to ourselves, leaving the destruction to others with great avarice.

“This body of work is a consideration of the impact Homo Sapiens have on the environment throughout time. From the agricultural revolution to colonization and to globalization, I track an environmental journey through different stages of human history,” says Hundun in his artist statement.

As Enriqueta Arias observes in her show essay, the artist proposes to review the current relationship of the human species with the planet, as well as the impact and consequences of what appears to be its last phase of expansion.

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

Gola Hundun. “7.6 Billion & Still Growing” 19 Karen Gallery. Qld, Australia. (photo courtesy of Gola Hundun)

For more information about Gola’s solo exhibition click HERE


Read more
“Sprout And Ruler”: Gola Hundun Nude In Abandoned Masonic Temple (VIDEO)

“Sprout And Ruler”: Gola Hundun Nude In Abandoned Masonic Temple (VIDEO)

Street Artist Gola Hudun likes to get naked and frolic around abandoned old buildings making art. But then, who doesn’t?

Gola Hundun for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Mario Delgado)

Here in San Pedro de Macoris in the Dominican Republic the Italian natural science alchemist was transfixed by the image of this abandoned Masonic Temple, with its vines and trees popping from windows and wrapping around its walls. To him, it symbolizes the inextricable connection of nature and the man made, with each alternately dancing with one another, and then trying to overpower the other. For those of you trying to prognosticate the outcome of that rivalry, we’ll venture a theory that in the end nature wins.

Gola Hundun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Sookie Gully Art)

Inspired by the leafy takeover of this man-made temple of worship, Gola wanted to add leaves of his own. “For me this piece represent the dichotomy between the creative chaos of nature and the necessity of human beings to define the laws of the Universe. These are both part of nature.”

His latest installation is part of the Artesano Project, and Gola considers himself as a facilitator, a conduit of what is a pre-ordained takeover of this space by natural design.

Gola Hundun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Sookie Gully Art)

“The Mother Goddess take back the space of the temple of the Great Architect of the Universe,” he explains as he strips down to his birthday suit to pose among the ruins and with his piece called “Sprout and Ruler.”

“The insertion of a human element is a way to bring inside the scene the Masonic rituals of a passing grade,” he says. “The nudity is a symbol for nature and paganism.”

Gola Hundun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Sookie Gully Art)

Gola Hundun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (screenshot from video below)

Gola Hundun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Sookie Gully Art)

Gola Hundun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Sookie Gully Art)

Gola Hundun for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Mario Delgado)

Gola Hundun for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (photo © Mario Delgado)

Gola Hudun at work on his piece for Artesano Project 2016 in The Dominican Republic. (screenshot from video below)

Read more
Gola Hundun Creates a “Tree of Life” for “Land-Shape Festival” in Denmark

Gola Hundun Creates a “Tree of Life” for “Land-Shape Festival” in Denmark

Virtually every human culture has an allegorical image that illustrates the Tree of Life. Street Artist Gola Hundun is growing his own in Denmark on the Jutland peninsula – one that he has named the Yggrdasil Crómlech.

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-8

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

The Land-Shape festival in Vrå, a railway town of 2,500 people in the Hjørring municipality of Denmark, is inspired by the American Land Art movement that some trace back to 1960s minimalism and the growth of “installation art”. For many, this geological art hybrid is still a curiosity and Denmark is taking advantage of its rich coastal countryside by opening the land here to 50 or so artists such as street art culture-jammer/rural land portraitist Jorge Rodriguez Gerada, the performance/installation artist Sandro Masai and the color-mapping stone artist Maja Gade Christensen.

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-1

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

The Italian Mr. Hundun has been creating earth science and pagan tradition-inspired hybrids of his own with murals, installations, and sculpture in the last decade and here he takes inspiration from the Norse mythology and its stories that were once more often told in this part of the world.

By combining the symbols of the Yggdrasil, a common name for the tree of life that you may see today in full-back or arm tattoos, and the Crómlech, a concentric circle typically made of standing stones, Gola creates the Yggdrasil Cromlech. In this case, the cromlech is more of a moat than a wall.

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-3

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

Quite opposite of the Street Artist’s common expectation of ephemerality, Gola expects his new piece to grow into something magnificent over the next decades. “Yggdrasil Cromlech is a living piece, which every year will look different,” he tells us.

“In 3 to 5 years the climbing plants that I planted on the main structure will grow on all of the element, and in about 30-50 years the young trees will start to look like a column. The central part will be completely transformed by vegetation. It will be interesting to go and check the process from time to time. I promise myself to go and visit it every 5 years.”

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-4

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

The current shape of the installation is already arresting, and you are invited to step inside the enclosure to experience the energy – you may not be alone however. “The underlying idea that inspires this project is to create a sustainable sanctuary for Jutland’s wildlife with a permaculture approach,” he says. “The installation’s goal is to increase resources for local fauna, especially during winter time but also in the summer season, providing food sources and opportunity for refuge.”

Inspired by Norse mythology and his own study of various designs of the Yggdrasil throughout history to design and construct the new and unique holy place/ art installation.

“The Yggdrasill is an immense tree that is central in Norse cosmology and it functions in connection to nine worlds which constitute the entire universe. My structure also has nine branches that symbolize these worlds.”

die_eiche_yggdrasil_by_friedrich_wilhelm_heine

“The Ash Yggdrasil” (1886) by Friedrich Wilhelm Heine

He speaks of the many depictions and variations of the Yggdrasil in history and cultures, and describes the one he is inspired by for this work.

“The Yggdrasill is populated by and related to the many animals that protect it, take life from it and menace it. On Yggdrasill’s top an eagle with a hawk perch inside his eyes, four deer between its branches, a squirrel moving up and down its trunk and a snake on its bottom.,” he explains. “In my piece Yggdrasil is the core of the Installation, and the audience can reach it by jumping on two step stones on the water ring that hug the structure. The structure has a small door that invites anyone who wants to get inside it, to find some isolation or a relaxing atmosphere.”

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-5

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-2

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-6

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-7

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)

brooklyn-street-art-gola-hundun-vra-denmark-10-2016-web-9

Gola Hundun “Yggdrasil Crómlech” Land Shape Festival. Vrå, Højeskole. Denmark. October 2016. (photo © Gola Hundun & Emil Schildt)


 

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

Read more