All posts tagged: Elle

Community and Street Aesthetics Popping at Jersey City Mural Festival 2021

Community and Street Aesthetics Popping at Jersey City Mural Festival 2021

You know the shy kid at the party who won’t hit the dance floor even if Jesus himself begged him – and then he hears his jam and suddenly starts doing flips, tricks, and power moves?

Woes. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

That’s what it felt like last week when all the funk-tech-floral-social-abstract-steez planets spun together into a powerful 2021 solar system at the Jersey City Mural Festival. How many times did you hear the word community, as if we’ve all been starved of it?

And the aesthetics were solid – you would not have guessed how sweet some of these combinations could be – with just enough curation to let the sparks crackle in the gritty oil-coated zones that are surrounding the MANA Contemporary compound. This most diverse generation is now freely tossing any rules and hierarchies out the window; these inheritors of the winds now gathering speed.

Ron English. The artist added a new detail on top of the right building but it was obsucured with the scaffolding use to complete the piece. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The first annual Jersey City Mural Festival brought together dozens of street artists, mural artists, graffiti writers, photographers, and art lovers to this new New Jersey. This festival in another year would have been a festive event just like any other festival – formulas have been discovered for how to mount public cultural events like these around the world – and we’ve been to many.

But this time, the energy was extra charged by the undeniable fact that we’re all emerging to a familiar yet changed world formed by fear, death, insecurity, and longing. Artists were elated to see their peers once again doing what they love doing most: painting outdoors. There is a recognition from the artists, and everybody around that life is precious and the scars left on us by the Pandemic made this event a jubilant one.

Ron English. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The collection of artworks presented here are only a fraction of all the works painted during the festival. Half a dozen of murals were still not completed when we departed. We hope to bring you the rest soon.

The festival unfolded over several days of painting and rain and an oppressive heatwave on two locations in Jersey City. Both locations are the remnants of Jersey City as an industrial powerhouse. The complex in Newark Ave, Mana Contemporary, is now an art center with several galleries, exhibition spaces, and artists’ studios. The complex on Coles Street still conserves its industrial grit. Still, a storage company has replaced the factories, and empty buildings in the decay process appear ready to be demolished.

The Jersey City Mural Festival was presented by Mana Public Arts and the Jersey City Mural Arts Program with the imprimatur of Jersey City Mayor Steven M. Fulop, the city’s Municipal Council, and the Office of Municipal Affairs.

Ron English. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
L’Amour Supreme. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
L’Amour Supreme. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Imagine 875. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Max Sansing. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raul Santos. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
H. Doyle. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BMike. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jesse Kreuzer. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PAWN. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Krave Art. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eyez. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea on top still at work on her mural. Rorshach in the middle and Jahru on the bottom tier. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea on top still at work on her mural. Rorshach in the middle and Jahru on the bottom tier. Details. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Boy Kong and Kirza Lopez. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Boy Kong and Kirza Lopez. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Waks. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Riiisa Boogie. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jose Mertz. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jose Mertz talks about his mural.

Crash. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Crash. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Overview at Coles Street. Jersey City Mural Festival 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We would like to thank the organizers and production team for all their assistance during the duration of the festival and to Mario at Tost Films for helping man the lift for our final photo session.

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Jersey City Mural Festival Popping this Weekend

Jersey City Mural Festival Popping this Weekend

Aside from a few breaks for afternoon June monsoons and scattered flash flooding on the greasy streets of this historically industrial region, the frantic and focused paintings by artists were setting Jersey City afire with color and character yesterday. By climbing on rooftops and flying on cherry pickers with a slew of aerosol pilots, our photographer Jaime Rojo got some of the best action in this inaugural mural festival.

Ron English. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The MANA Contemporary complex is comprised of an array of buildings – and many are visible from many passing highways and byways. As the melange of cultures here continues to come out to the streets due to lower Covid numbers and higher vaccine rates, the air is thick with expectation. Having a slew of new artworks from across a spectrum of styles and aesthetic sensibility – you will find much the new additions are directly adjacent to the illegal graffiti that started it all – which is as it should be.

Check out some of the new works here by Beau Stanton, Dasic Fernandez, Elle, Eric Karbeling, Erinkco Studios, Jahru, Max Sansing, MSG, Queen Andrea, Raul Santos, and Ron English.

Ron English. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Queen Andrea. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eric Karbeling. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dasic Fernandez. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Max Sansing Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Erinko Studios. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jahru. Detail. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raul Santos. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MSG. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MSG. Jersey City Mural Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

To learn more about the Jersey City Mural Festival click HERE

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BSA Film Friday: 06.04.21

BSA Film Friday: 06.04.21

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Homily to Country by Artist JR
2. Jersey City Artists at Work Painting for the first Mural Festival Here

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BSA Special Feature: Homily to Country by Artist JR

“We must throw off the chains of corporatization to save us all,” is the last statement in this narrative about historical, cultural and natural resources being stolen. His statement could have started with that.

Maybe JR will make a project about fairly taxing the rich next.

Jersey City Artists at Work Painting for the first Mural Festival Here

Two homemade videos below of a handful of the participating artists at work in their murals this week for the inaugural edition of the Jersey City Mural Festival.

See the action with Dragon76, José Mertz, L’Amour Supreme, Boy Kong, and Kirza Lopez in action at Mana Contemporary Complex.

Elle, Queen Andrea and Beau Stanton at the Ice Factory Complex

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BSA Images Of The Week: 01.03.2021

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.03.2021

Welcome to the first BSA Images of the Week of 2021 !

We start our collection this week with an image of Christ crucified on a Facebook logo. If this is the level of subtlety that we can expect from the new year…gurl, we in trubble.

In fact, we have found that much of the organic street art that we find today has become increasingly strident in opinions expressed, especially around themes of social justice and political skullduggery. It’s all mixed in with favorites like pop figures, sports figures, cats. In a way, the artists are ahead of us, so we consider these images as the tea leaves for what is coming.

How will you interpret these messages from the street? Will you become emboldened? Scared? Or will they not have any impact on passersby?

Here is our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring 7 Line Arts Studio, Bastard Bot, Calicho Art, Captain Eyeliner, Calisi Maultra, City Kity, CRKSHNK, David F Barthold, Degrupo, Elle, Jeff Roseking, Joseph Grazi, NohJColey, Poi Everywhere, Sickid, Sticker Maul, and Stikman.

Joseph Grazi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NohJColey made an appearance in 2020 after a long absence from the streets of NYC. This wall hanging was repurposed by a construction crew as a bridge flooring- giving it a new patterned patina. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle in collaboration with The L.I.S.A. Project NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sitkman with a gone over portrait of the Notorious RBG by Captain Eyeliner. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sitkman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
David F Barthold (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captian Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
7 Line Arts Studio (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sickid (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DeGrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DeGrupo. Bezos for Mr. Bezos (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DeGrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Carlisi Maultra (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Poi Everywhere (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Calicho Art with Jeff Roseking (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Calicho Art with Jeff Roseking (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Calicho Art with Jeff Roseking (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Hudson River, NYC. December 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.09.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.09.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week.

If you are not seeing opinions and theories being expressed on social media or raging cable, you can always go to the streets today, as the voice of the people is marching out to grab a soap box and yell their opinion. Faced with a daily firehose of government neglect and corporate disinformation, you and your neighbors are either being tricked into hating each other of divining the truth.

You may not agree with the sentiment of the street artists who are going out right now to paint or wheatpaste their art and perspectives, but somehow you have more empathy and trust for them than the millionaires behind microphones on screens wherever you look.

Shout out this week to a new kid on the block, an artist named Stickermaul who puts out a smart array of messages using collage, hand written text, pasted text, photos, and USPS stickers to convey a number of quick socio/political messages in Manhattan. The new voices right now are informing us of the evolutions/revolutions that are taking place.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Bella Phame, Coby Kennedy, Elle, Live Thoughfully, Lust Sick Puppy, Mad Artist, and Rono.

Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stickermaul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stickermaul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stickermaul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Live Thoughtfully (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentifed artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drugs not hugs. Just being you and us, we always suspected Princess Leia was a dealer. Unidentifed artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mad Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentifed artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lust Sick Puppy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RONO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bella Phame for East Village Walls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentifed artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Elle (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Coby Kennedy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Coby Kennedy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Coby Kennedy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Coby Kennedy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Coby Kennedy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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NRNY Mural Program with “Street Art For Mankind” in  New Rochelle, NY

NRNY Mural Program with “Street Art For Mankind” in New Rochelle, NY

An hour north of New York City in the wealthiest county of the state, a new mural program extends the reach of organizers Audrey and Thibault Decker of Street Art for Mankind. They say that they have produced murals and exhibitions in Larchmont, Mamaroneck, and Midtown with the support of more than 50 international Street Artists in the last few years – all with the goal of raising awareness and funds to stop child trafficking worldwide.

AEC for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The New Rochelle murals that went up this fall and were debuted in November through and organized art walk and other events appear to be more loosely correlated with local pride and history, such as the one by artist Loic Ercolessi featuring local-born musician Don Mclean (“American Pie) and Manhattan-born musician Alicia Keyes (“Empire State of Mind”).

AEC for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An inspiring walk through the city’s downtown neighborhood on a grey and brisk fall day to discover these new murals was warmed by sharing the experience with photographer Martha Cooper, who took the train up from the city with BSA co-founder Jaime Rojo to catch the new works. The program here is called “NRNY Artsy Murals” and a highlight from this day was taking a cherry lift with Ukrainian Street Artist AEC to get a closer look at him while he worked on his new mural of allegorical surrealism.

Famed photographer Martha Cooper shoots AEC at work on his mural for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The quality is obviously high and the program eclectic, including artists such as DanK (GBR), Elle (USA & AUS), JDL (NLD), Loic Ercolessi (USA & FRA), Lula Goce (SPA), Mr Cenz (GBR) and Victor Ash (DEN, FRAand POR). Ash left the city with a new floating astronaut high above the Earth, which may describe some of the uplifting feelings passersby may experience here in New Rochelle.

AEC for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AEC for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AEC for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AEC for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lula Goce for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lula Goce for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lula Goce for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lula Goce for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lula Goce for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo) The Swan and the falcon depicted on the mural are actual residents of New Rochelle. The came and liked what they saw and decided to stay and raise their families there. A fitting real story as New Rochelle is a town where immigrants are welcomed and are an important part of the community.
Victor Ash for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Victor Ash for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Victor Ash pays tribute to Mae Jemison. Ms. Jemison became the first African American woman to travel in space. She is an engineer, a physician, and was an astronaut while she worked at NASA. It was during her time at NASA that she was part of the team aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor when she served as a mission specialist in September 1992. for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ELLE for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Cenz for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JDL for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JDL for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JDL for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LOIC pays tribute to New Rochelle born star singer Don McLean and New York State icon Alicia Keys for NRNY Artsy Murals / Street Art For Mankind. New Rochelle, NY. November 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Film Friday: 06.28.19

BSA Film Friday: 06.28.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Gonzalo Borondo “Merci” Temple des Chartrons
2. ELLE in Allentown
3. Pejac: YIN-YANG
4. “Beyond The Streets” In A New York Minute – By Chop ‘Em Down Films
5. LL Cool J – I’m Bad

BSA Special Feature: Gonzalo Borondo “Merci” Temple des Chartrons, France. 2019

Finally opened, its the spirit of man and nature working in concert in this vast emporium, a transformatorium, of images and pieces of memory from Street Artist Borondo. If you are in Paris before August 18, it is a must see.

ELLE in Allentown

Former tagger and now fulltime muralist, Elle talks about a new work in Allentown, PA, which is trying to kindle a creative arts / high tech reputation after the iron industry left. “The gist of the entire collage is that all of women are more powerful together,” says Elle.

Pejac: YIN-YANG

Spanish Street Artist and studio artist Pejac is back with one of his visual aphorism that addresses climate change ironically.

“Beyond The Streets” In A New York Minute – By Chop ‘Em Down Films

Like we said earlier this week when this video debuted:

“It’s a unique talent to capture the fervor of an opening like “Beyond the Streets” in one minute. The show spreads over two floors and fifty years – the reunions alone were enough for an hour movie. But somehow Zane catches an individual, personal, flavor in a New York minute.”

LL Cool J – I’m Bad

Also, the because it’s Friday and because LL is Bad

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Elle + Klone. Up North Fest X BSA: Røst, Norway. Dispatch 5

Elle + Klone. Up North Fest X BSA: Røst, Norway. Dispatch 5

This is the third year for Northern Norway’s UPN Festival and this year it’s on an Island called Røst and includes a collection of artists eager to do site-specific and environmental works – one evolutionary development in the mural festivals that blossom throughout the world right now. This week BSA is proud to bring you images and interviews along with Urban Nation this year at UpNorth, where the seagulls never stop calling and the sun never goes down this time of year.


We wind up the week on the island of Røst with almost a mystical sense, perhaps because of the inspirational messages we continued to see within the statements of this year’s artists. Today we see the metaphorical storytelling of Elle at war on the seas and the striking installation by Klone Yourself (or Klone) called “The Songs of the Vikings”
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A surrealist illustrator experimenting with different styles and mediums on Street Art pieces and murals in cities, Klone’s works on walls often feature simplified and distorted forms, figures, and creatures occupying a space that is seemingly suspended in air. An uprooted Ukrainian immigrant now from Tel Aviv, the mid-30s artist is looking at existential matters today in the way you do when you have had to adjust to a radically new environment.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

One examines fundamentals and pillars of a culture, its history, norms and language – and then struggles to find a place within it. For his installation in Norway, the artist studied the location and the history of the region, combined that study with his own history, and constructed “Viking” swords for a site specific piece that takes on many shadings of significance.

“The texts on the swords are coming from various sources: Viking poetry and songs, contemporary references like music and literature we grow up on, and personal remarks and thoughts on life and daily struggles,” says Klone about his striking installation by the sea. “In a way this is a series of protective runes, planted in the ground, like after a big battle, some of the text disappearing, some still exposed. Some of the truth is always gone, and it’s all relative.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: Can you talk about this striking and meaningful installation you did by the sea for UpNorth?
Klone: My main goal for the UpNorth festival was to complete my installation that was planned specifically for it. The installation consists of wooden swords, cut out by me from found wood (mostly wood that was used for building houses on the island), with text written on the swords.

Later those swords got stuck into a hill structure on the island. This installation has and can have so many meanings, to both me and the random viewer, so I’ll explain some of my intention – and anyone else can take it somewhere else, as people already did while I was installing my piece and directly after it was completed.

The sword is a symbol of power through thousands of years. A wooden sword is a toy, meant to play with. In a way it is to prepare us for one day holding a real sword, real power, or at least real representation of it, no matter how prepared or not we are.

On a personal note – my name is Igor, and this is the name my mother gave me when I was born and later explained to me that she gave me a Viking name so I could grow to be a strong man. In a way I hope I did become kind of a Viking. A free man, at least as much as I’d like to think so, somewhat a pirate, and always on the move with deep respect for history and traditions as well as a love for innovation. For me this was a kind of a closure, to bring this installation to a place that felt like it’s meant to be.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

BSA: How would you describe the environment working in Røst?
Klone Yourself: The Røst environment is insane. It feels like another planet over there and with the 24/7 daylight, its easy to feel so.

I think it’s amazing to experience a place so old and yet so wholesome and not destroyed by modern civilizations. Yes they have machines, Internet and restaurants, but it seems like the people just want to live their lives and are not really bothered by what’s happening around them.

BSA: How are you challenging yourself as an artist right now?
Klone Yourself: I’m challenging myself as an artist on a daily basis. My practice is always on a few levels of perception, depending on the time and the place of course. As I work in drawing, painting, installation, video and mural painting, the limits are far to be seen, and there’s so much to try and learn yet.

The most appropriate personal title for the piece is – “Song of the Viking” , as a tribute to songs written by Vikings to their gods, and as a tribute to this land now and then.

Klone. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)


The American experimentalist Elle tries anything once – including fire extinguishers, rollers, aerosol, wheatpastes, silkscreens and bus stop takeovers – legal and illegal. Her illustrative style often centers around a fantastical avatar, a heroic and sensual woman who is exploring new psychological landscapes.

Here in Røst the heroine of a shipwreck casts a wide eye at you as she climbs through a tumultuous and harrowing sea storm. The metaphors are many and so is the range of Elles ever-increasing skills.

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

ELLE. Up North Fest 2017. Røst, Norway. (photo © Tor Ståle Moen)

Our thanks to our partner Urban Nation (UN) and to photographer Tor Ståle Moen for his talents.


See our Up North roundup piece on The Huffington Post

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Slap It! Slick Stickers Spread Across City Surfaces Speak and Surprise

Slap It! Slick Stickers Spread Across City Surfaces Speak and Surprise

Stickers, or slaps, are small but formidable graphic and text messages, especially when massed together on a doorway or light pole. They are also fast and surreptitiously placed, as simple as a gesture, undetectable in their ease of application.

A board covered with stickers at Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Begun exclusively perhaps as vehicles for handwritten or hand drawn missives, usually the tag of an artist, today they are often mass produced and designed on a screen, commercially printed on stock that is weatherproof, yet crumbles into pieces when you try to remove it. Personal and political are often on display, as well as that eternal graffiti impulse to simply spread your name.

Phil (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stickers and their creation, distribution, and collection are a culture unto themselves, with fans mounting massive sticker shows and books tracing historical roots and telling stories. On the street, just one sticker can alter your day. Because you know it is made and placed by an individual and not a corporation, it feels like a personal message. Because it is small enough for you to get close to, it becomes intimate.

Here is a selection of recent images of stickers caught by our editor of photography, Jaime Rojo, for BSA readers to get up close to.

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Above (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Elle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cash4 and Smells with friends in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El sol25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Where is He? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist…YES!!! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

45 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Fonki World (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dceve . Croma . Above . J0eg (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Detail of the fridge door at Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.16.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.16.16

 

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It’s been a spectacular amber and golden and green autumn week when you’re able to ride your bike around and see a lot of great new and old Street Art and not break a sweat because the air is fresh and cool and the sun is spectacular.

And the streets are alive!

We found a new REVS, a new JJ Veronis and a big full-poster Clint Mario. Given the fact that two of the pieces are beautifully crafted metal sculptures and one is an ad take over in the subway, that gives you an indication that artists are active right now – and public space is being engaged. Get on your boots and take a hike, take your imagination and a sweatshirt in case you’re in the shade, and Street Art is out there waiting for you.

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Bies, City Kitty, Clint Mario, Downtown DaVinci, Elle, Gaia, Hooker, InDecline, JJ Veronis, REVS, RWK, Sable Elise Smith, and Sean 9 Lugo.

 

Our top image: REVS (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JJ Veronis (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clint Mario. Subway ad take over. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Downtown DaVinci (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hooker at Welling Court. Queens. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City Kitty at Welling Court, Queens. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Elle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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GAIA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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GAIA. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sean 9 Lugo at Welling Court, Queens. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Robots will skate! Sean 9 Lugo collaboration with RWK at Welling Court, Queens. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Indecline (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bies (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist. This piece is signed but we couldn’t read the signature. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sable Elise Smith (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Berlin. March 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 07.24.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.24.16

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Vote for the one candidate who does not need this job,” intoned one of the many speakers who are receiving a trust fund from DJ Trump this week at the RNC convention. That’s convincing, isn’t it?

Blonde Women’s Lives Matter. Make America Salem Again. I am the Law.

The Donald didn’t let us down again this week – and for those of you who think we’re being partisan, we’re not. This dork has been doing this stuff in New York since the 80s – and we are all used to his grandiose claims and mid-speech reversals.  But this week the RNC looked like it was going to devolve into Lord of the Flies crossed with the Salem Witch trials.  No wonder the Street Art we keep seeing is approximately 10 to 1 against him – and still he’s like a gushing geyser of humor, comedy gold! Except for the violent parts.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Alexandre Keto, Astro, Coloquix, Cyrcle, Dee Dee, Elle, Funquest, Lapiz, Leipzig, OverUnder, Patch Whisky, Uncut Tart, and You Go Girl!.

Our top image: Elle for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in East Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Elle for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in East Harlem. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Thankfully there IS a light at the other end of the tunnel. Astro for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in East Harlem. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Specter took over a billboard to great effect (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Coloquix (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Alexandre Keto for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in West Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Alexandre Keto for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in West Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Alexandre Keto for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in West Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Patch Whisky for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in West Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lapiz for Urban Art Festival Leipzig, Germany. (photo © Lapiz)

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You Go Girl! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Overunder (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Overunder for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in East Harlem. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Funqest (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rabi of Cyrcle (and friends) for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in East Harlem. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Uncut Tart remembers the power and style of Run DMC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Uncut Tart. Michael Jackson. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Uncut Tart. Notorious BIG. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Uncut Tart. Bob Marley (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Marina Zumi for #NotACrime in collaboration with Street Art Anarchy in East Harlem. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Unidentified Artist. Something about freedom of religion restricted under communism? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. East River. Brooklyn, NYC. July 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 04.17.16

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.17.16

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Hillary Clinton announced in Brooklyn this week that she supports raising the minimum wage to $250,000 a speech while Bernie Sanders scoped around the showroom of a Danish furniture designer in the Brooklyn Navy Yard to order a new blond wood desk and chair for the Oval Office. The two sparred live on national TV from Brooklyn Thursday but you couldn’t tell they were in the BK because the CNN logos engulfed the screen and candidates and the actual citizens were reduced to a babbling rabble who hooted and hollered like sports fans somewhere in the dark. Wonder how long CNN intends to have their brand new warehouse-sized logo beaming across the river at Manhattan.

Meanwhile, on the streets here it is pretty evident who many New Yorkers favor and the majority of new Street Art pieces and graffiti pieces are feeling the Bern. It’s true, we tend to hang out with artists, creatives, punks, hippies, and assorted wild-eyed weirdos – so its not exactly a true cross-section, but Clinton fans are not making much art on the streets. Possibly that is because level-headed reasonable people don’t feel the need to express their support for her so loudly and visibly. It will be interesting to see if Big Media predictions of a 17% Clinton lead are true by Wednesday morning. The Wall Street Journal seems to be banking on it.

Trump is #1 in NYC for the Republicans, presumably because of “New York values”.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Caratoes, Elle, Ever Siempre, Faust, Flood, Icy & Sot, Lola Jiblazee, Lora Zombie, Nafir, Shantell Martin, Stuart Ringholt, Thiago Goms, Thievin’ Stephen, Thomas Allen, TriHumph, Vandal Expressionism, Vanesa Longchamp, Vexta, You Go Girl!, and Zabou.

Our top image: Nafir for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nafir for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot . Nafir for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Thomas Allen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Flood (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vandal Expressionism (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Thievin’ Stephen in Rochester, NY. (photo © Thievin’ Stephen)

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Lola Jiblazee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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TriHumph styles Bernie as Bowie. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EverSiempre in Ostend, Belgium for Crystal Ship Fest 2016. (photo © EverSiempre)

“Homage to the Past and Future”

The city of Oostende began its great reforms in 1883. King Leopold II earned the nickname the “constructor” for his contribution to public works. These reforms were possible thanks to the large profits that were made from the king’s colony, an area sixty times larger than Belguim: the Congo. In the Congo, rubber was a resource that became precious because of its use in the automotive and bicycle industries. The king imposed high quotas on rubber production in the Congo and forced the indigenous population to comply using coercive methods and extreme violence. It is estimated that during Leopold’s years of domination about ten million natives were killed in the Congo.

“Homage to the Past and Future” is a work that talks about the heavy legacy of the past, about how societies live with the consequences of those that came before and how they build their current reality to be better. The mural is located at the urban entrance to the city, a work that perhaps Leopoldo II had not imagined at the gates of the resort town. Today, the reality is different; diversity flourishes in the city and the image is of a resident of Oostende. Humans learn from their mistakes and the future will always be better if our present remembers and pays homage to the real heroes.”

-Ever

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Faust. Shantell Martin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zabou for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Caratoes for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stuart Ringholt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stuart Ringholt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stuart Ringholt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stuart Ringholt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stuart Ringholt (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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You Go Girl (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Elle for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vexta for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lora Zombie for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Vanesa Longchamp for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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GOMS for Urban Nation Museum Of Urban Contemporary Art in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. SOHO, NYC. Spring 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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