All posts tagged: BSA Images Of The Week

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.16.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.16.24

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is BSA-Images-of-the-Week-2021-900-new.gif

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

There is a lot of activity on the street right now, and despite the rain in Florida and the upcoming Heat Dome we’re promised here in the North East, the graffiti and Street Art don’t ever stop. Here, we mix some pieces from Belfast with Brooklyn. See if you can tell regional differences in style.

Here is our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Veng RWK, Praxia VGZ, Below Key, Fanakapan, Christina Angelina, Reme821, BK Ackler, WRDSMTH, KVLR, Staylo, CHAZ, Visual Graficalia, NEVOC, Voyder, REGOR, AMC, ESTEME, and Rob Hilken.

Fanakapan. Hit The North Festival – 2021 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Christina Angelina. Hit The North Festival – 2015 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Voyder. Hit The North Festival – 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Visual Graficalia. Hit The North Festival – 2018 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KVLR. Hit The North Festival – 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CHAZ (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Veng RWK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Below Key (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Staylo. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
STE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rob Hilken. Hit The North Festival – 2024 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ESTEME. TGE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AMC. Hit The North Festival – 2024 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AMC. Hit The North Festival – 2024 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AMC. Hit The North Festival – 2024 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BK Ackler (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Keep Going (photo © Jaime Rojo)
REME821 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
REGOR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NEVOC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
WRDSMTH (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Balloons. June 2024. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 06.09.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.09.24

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is BSA-Images-of-the-Week-2021-900-new.gif

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

When surveying the current crop of street art here and in other cities around the world, we wonder where the political will has gone – the one that seemed much more confrontational and conflicted in earlier years of the modern movement. The once fiery, in-your-face spirit seems to have mellowed and become pleasant and pleasing. One theory that pops up regularly when surmising why there is a lack of conviction in street messaging, even as wars break out and the wealth gap widens everywhere you look, is that there is no such thing as anonymity as there once was. Privacy has almost completely been allowed by the citizenry to be eroded.

With a default Digital ID following your every movement and transaction, the means for someone to triangulate a particular data point are so sophisticated that if you speak out or actually challenge the status quo, you will probably be traced. Hell, any Twitter storm can produce an army of motivated detective volunteers to doxx someone who has offended social media “norms,” and we use that term loosely.

Your 13-year-old nephew Lucas can easily unearth someone’s personal details without breaking a sweat, and he doesn’t even have a laptop. 20 years ago, a graffiti or street artist could assume some modicum of anonymity, but in practice, the current crop uses the streets as a marketing extension of their Instagram account, an expression of their online personas, studiously and clearly spraying @ tags and websites on their street pieces to make sure you can find them.

So if you are pissed off at the system, you probably think twice before you put it on the streets these days unless it is a screed sprayed with a fire extinguisher that is largely untraceable – or something like that. In the case of whoever sprayed “Rishi Sunak is a Rat-Faced C*nt” on a wall, you may even inspire a punk ditty.* For many right now, activism is not even the point.

Here is our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring David Puck, Shok1, Epic Uno, Par, Kitsune Jolene, Smug One, Trasher, V. Ballentine, Inker, P.T., King57, FUP One, and Cope Doz.

V. Ballentine (photo © Jaime Rojo)
V. Ballentine (photo © Jaime Rojo)
David Puck (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Epic Uno (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SHOK1. Hit The North Festival. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dog with tags. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
INKER. AGAIN JACK. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Smug One. Hit The North Festival. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Smug One. Hit The North Festival. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Smug One. Hit The North Festival. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
P.T. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KING 57 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kitsune. Hit The North Festival. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PAR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Trasher (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unknown photographer. *This raw scrawled sentiment, appearing in a few places now as sort of campaign perhaps, could even inspire the punk-style anthem linked here. Or the other way around. See reference in essay above.
FUP ONE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
COPE DOS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Williamsburg Bridge. Brooklyn, NY. June 2024. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 06.02.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.02.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

How’s your summer been so far? Many people say that Memorial Day unofficially begins Summer, so this week was the first one. Indeed! Baseball, soccer, and kickball are in the park, and movies or cocktails are on the roof. Lifeguards are on the beach, and kids are throwing up on the Cyclone at Coney Island or throwing frisbees on Central Park grass. The air in some neighborhoods smells like lilac bushes, urine, french fries, marijuana, or aerosol paint. Or all of it at once. When it all swirls around you, it is a heady mix. Cute girls in short shorts and cute boys on skateboards may not fall in love given these circumstances, but they might!

This week, 45 was found guilty on 34 counts in court. We New Yorkers, who have known him for years, are unsurprised.

Here is our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Specter, Alice Pasquini, Degrupo, Optimo NYC, Enzo, Nite Owl, Miki Mu, NYC Kush Co., Klonism, Max Grax, Friz, KMG, Agent Decay, Jare, SYE5, Benny Cruz.

Specter. Yusuf Hawkins 1973-1989. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The first time artist Specter painted this memorial for Yusuf Hawkins in Brooklyn was in 2011. He’s restored it and added more to the environment of the mural, two times since then. This is the second restoration that he did in the past few weeks.

Specter. Yusuf Hawkins 1973-1989. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Specter. Yusuf Hawkins 1973-1989. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist with Jare and SYE5 tags. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Optimo NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nite Owl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nite Owl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nite Owl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1984.YO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Agent Decoy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Klonism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Klonism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KMG. Hit The North Festival. 2018 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ENZO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KUSH. DEGRUPO. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Benny Cruz (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Miki Mu (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Alice Pasquini. Hit The North Festival. 2018 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Max Grax (photo © Jaime Rojo)
FRIZ. Hit The North Festival. 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Tulip. Spring 2024. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read more
Images Of The Week: 05.19.24

Images Of The Week: 05.19.24

Welcome to BSA’s Images of the Week.

And welcome to Belfast, Northern Ireland, where history and modernity converge in its mural narratives and lively streets, telling stories of resilience, an evolving culture, and a pensive optimism. As street art observers, our journey through Belfast’s neighborhoods has been eye-opening. The murals here are not just art; they reflect the city’s tumultuous past, vibrant present, and hopeful future. Belfast’s predominantly Victorian architecture is a testament to the city’s industrious heritage, particularly its shipbuilding legacy linked to the RMS Titanic. Still, some of the kids are rocking new attitudes, and a sizeable multi-disciplinary artist community is making new spaces for exploration.

The punk movement, which provided a rebellious soundtrack during the Troubles, has left a lasting mark on the city’s sonic legacy. Today, local musicians, DJs, and electronic artists draw inspiration from traditional instrumentation and this era of lucid experimentation, performing live in clubs and bars. There is an unmistakable convivial, welcoming atmosphere in Belfast’s pubs and a raucous laughter that shakes your ribs in many a cluster of revelers out for the night. We also noticed a gentle generosity – from its bakeries and cheesemongers to checkout clerks and museum provosts and park bench poets.

For an old shipbuilding city wracked by civil strife, this feels like a young city, eager to move forward while honoring the sacrifices made during the Troubles. Some of the murals here encapsulate perhaps a different spirit, blending poignant tributes, more muted political statements, and a willful optimism amidst the general confusion that is now plaguing most of the Western world.

So here’s this week’s interview with the street, featuring ROA, Conor Harrington, BustArt, MTO, Asbestos, Dan Kitchener, Kitsune Jolene, Aches, Evoke, KFIVEMFU, Studio Giftig, and Annatomix.

ROA for Hit The North Festival 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BustArt (left), 2022 Edition. Annatomix (right) 2023 Edition. Hit The North Festival. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BustArt. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Asbestos for Hit The North Festival 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ACHES for Hit The North Festival 2020 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ACHES for Hit The North Festival 2022 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ACHES for Hit The North Festival 2022 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MTO for Hit The North Festival 2016 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Studio Giftig for Hit The North Festival 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Studio Giftig for Hit The North Festival 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kitsune for Hit The North Festival 2022 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
EVOKE. Hit The North Festival 2023 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Conor Harrington. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Conor Harrington. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Conor Harrington Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener is the Artist, as you can see. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Kitchener for Hit The North Festival 2017 Edition. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KFIVEMFU. Belfast, Northern Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2024. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 05.12.24 / Dublin

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.12.24 / Dublin

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week.

This week, BSA visited Dublin to see the city, talk to people, and check out the local street art scene, and we’ve brought you a few images to share what we discovered. Dublin is a polished and technologically advanced city, home to the European headquarters of major corporations like Google, Meta, and LinkedIn. The Grand Canal Docks area, often referred to as “Silicon Docks,” is known for its concentration of multinational tech companies and financial institutions, and there appears to be a rapacious appetite for new buildings, with cranes gliding slowly above head in a silent skyline dance. Dublin also appears as fertile ground for political discourse, erudition, and civic engagement. It often hosts debates, protests, and rallies on issues from ‘The Troubles’, an influx of immigration, and greater global concerns. Upon our arrival from Belfast, we were immediately struck by a six-story-high banner along the canal proclaiming “Ceasefire now” on Liberty Hall in bold, clear lettering.

Los Asbestos. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Similarly, Ireland’s most prestigious university, Trinity College, has been the focus of intense and sustained protests by its student body over its financial ties with Israel. On Wednesday, the university announced its decision to divest fully in response to the ongoing decimation of Gaza. In the realm of street art and graffiti, these political sentiments often permeate the works displayed in street art pieces, although graffiti writers typically reserve their most impressive efforts to create sick burners of high quality – and you’ll want to check out places like  Smithfield and Richmond Streets.

Los Asbestos. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dublin is clean, green, and cosmopolitan, albeit not unnecessarily flashy. Even so, there were some sketchy moments in a couple of neighborhoods that boasted casinos and more than average shares of people who appeared to struggle with addiction. The city boasts a strong café and pub culture and has a genuinely diverse population, with Spanish, Arabic, Hindi, Romanian, and Polish commonly heard on the streets and in the lush parks full of lovers, players, statues, and magpies. Literary giants like James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, and W.B. Yeats are frequently depicted on banners and backpacks on university campuses and outside museums. The music scene appears to lean toward the big names and sounds on the global stage, distinguished by a strong respect for traditional Irish music and folk music, no doubt shaped and formed in the storytelling by groups like the Chieftains and of course, the Dubliners.

Los Asbestos and Neto Vettorello. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We also had the opportunity to visit Francis Bacon’s studio, thanks to a tip from Hooked Blog’s Mark Rigney. This visit to see and listen to recordings of interviews with him at Hugh Lane Gallery reaffirmed that there is no unanimity in the holy space called the artists’ studio. While some artists thrive in chaos and clutter, others prefer a nearly clinical sense of order. Here, we got a greater sense of how Bacon’s Irish heritage and formative years in Dublin influenced his bold, emotionally raw imagery and unique embrace of distortion.

As a balancing act, while we explored the streets, we viewed impressive works by the Dublin-based street artist Asbestos, known for his sharp critiques of social policy and politics. Seeing Asbestos’s work firsthand underscored his art’s scale and emotional depth, reflecting his introspective approach during these times of widespread uncertainty and change.

Los Asbestos and Neto Vettorello. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Los Asbestos and Neto Vettorello. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Magdalena Karol. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
REYK. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Finger Print. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Finger Print. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
EVOKE. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
At the Hugh Lane Gallery exhibition on Francis Bacon: Brian Bourke (b. 1936) “Self-Portrait in Blue Hat”
1965
Oil on canvas, 127 x 114.4 cm
Purchased, 1982
“This is one a series of self-mocking portraits in which Bourke depicts himself wearing incongruous headwear. The modeling of his naked body is in stark contrast to the abstract background, heightening the definition of the figure. There are parallels with Francis Bacon’s work in the placement of the figure in an unidentifiable spatial setting and the way the figure is built up with thicker applications of paint.”
KONE. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ICN KONE. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
KONE. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
At the Hugh Lane Gallery exhibition on Francis Bacon: Isobel Gloag (1865 – 1917) “The Woman with the Puppets” c. 1915
Oil on canvas. 64.5 x 82.5 cm
Donated by M. R. Gloag

“Gloag depicts a woman lying naked on a bed with a puppet in one hand, and another four cast aside. The puppets are all suited male figures. When this painting was shown in 2016, art critic Cristín Leach described it as “an incontrovertible statement of ownership of space and of self. There is no shame,
only freedom – in every cell… Gloag’s depiction is of a woman as a self-sufficient individual, woman as person not object, woman as an active player not a symbol.”
PCC. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AKEN. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Neto Vettorello. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Neto Vettorello. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ASIK. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PENS. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BOBBY130. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eraquario. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#greyareaproject Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shane Sutton. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shane Sutton. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BOBBY144. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BLAME. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SYSER. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JBT. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ESTENISMO. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ANSEA. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Irwin. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Ferns. Spring 2024. Dublin, Ireland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 04.28.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.28.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Spring is astoundingly colorful on the street in New York this year, with many new graffiti writers and street artists joining the existing throng and bringing their skills to a wall near you. At times, it appears now that we have as many artists as tourists in New York, but if they roll a suitcase, it is probably full of cans.

Here is our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Ron English, Homesick, Basquiat, Huetek, Biggie Smalls, Hops Art, Akira Toriyama, Blanca Romero, 2DX, Nike Kasio, Gouch NKC, Theme KED, Maximilian Romero, EA EO, Browine, Sintez One, FSG Park, and Jaek El Diablo.

Ron English. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hops Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jaek El Diablo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jaek El Diablo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jaek El Diablo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SEBAR. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SEBAR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sintez One at FSG Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sintez One at FSG Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sintez One at FSG Park (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BROWNIE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
EA EO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maximilian Bagnasco for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maximilian Bagnasco for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maximilian Bagnasco for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maximilian Bagnasco for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bianca Romero (photo © Jaime Rojo)
THEME KED (photo © Jaime Rojo)
GOUCH NKC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HUETEK 2DX. Tribute to Akira Toriyama. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HUETEK 2DX. Tribute to Akira Toriyama. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HUETEK 2DX. Tribute to Akira Toriyama. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HUETEK 2DX. Tribute to Akira Toriyama. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HOMESICK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nike Kasio (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2024. Brooklyn, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 04.21.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.21.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

“It’s the only time of the year when New York City smells good,” says your cranky Uncle Jaime about the flowers and blossoms everywhere as he stretches on the couch with his second cup of coffee and gazes out the window at the sky. Outside, there is a battle between the diverse vocal repertoires and mimicry of mockingbirds singing from branches, utility poles, and wires – and the little league fans squealing, exhorting, and shouting with joy from the bleachers every time a smartly uniformed child whacks a ball with the wooden bat and trundles up the path to first base.

We are constantly amazed by the new street art that is popping up in the boroughs – on construction fencing around empty lots, on doorways in industrial zones, on chain-link fences under bridges, on old telephone booths, lamp posts, crumbling brick facades, and the backs of street signs. With the New York spring, there are tulips popping up from the grassy patches everywhere – even those random 3-foot-long rectangles surrounded by concrete and piled with dog poop.

There are blooms on the trees – the Kwanzan and Yoshino cherry trees are in bloom at the Brooklyn and Bronx Botanical Gardens, in Central Park in Manhattan, in Flushing Meadows Park in Queens, in the New York Chinese Scholar’s Garden at Snug Harbor in Staten Island. Spring also brings us a new crop of fresh aerosol missives, wheat-pasted characters, stenciled witticisms, radical opinions, and secret yearnings. Together with the weathered and the worn street art from previous seasons, it’s an ongoing visual cacophony.

In New York news, a two-sided painting by the eclectic painter and collector Martin Wong and graffiti writers Sharp and Delta2 is featured in MoMA show “In the Shadow of the American Dream”, a man set himself on fire publicly near the Trump hush-money trial this week, similar to the US soldier who self-immolated to protest Israel’s actions in Gaza and US support for it a few weeks ago, former Mayor Guliani’s son appears to follow in his father’s footsteps, Passover is in full effect with convoys on streets in Brooklyn, Pro-Palestine marchers vow more action on campuses following this week’s demonstrations at Columbia, and a guy was arrested for writing ‘ceasefire/free Palestine’ with a Sharpie on a subway.

And now, here are images from our ongoing conversation with the street, this week, including: Captain Eyeliner, Tats Cru, Stikki Peaches, Eternal Possessions, Jappy Agoncillo, One Rad Latina, Tom Bob NYC, Travis, BBW.BUND.COP, Lunar YCP, NAY 381, and Kristian Boyum (visiting from Norway).

Tom Bob NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kristian Boyum (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NAY 381 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captian Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captin Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikki Peaches (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jappy Agoncillo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tats Cru (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lunar YCP (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kristian Boyum (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TRAVIS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eternal Possessions (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sucki (photo © Jaime Rojo)
One Rad Latina (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BBW.BUND.COP (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2024. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 07.07.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.07.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

To BSA’s Muslim brothers and sisters, we hope your Ramadan has been fulfilling as it draws to a close this Tuesday. Amid the spiritual calm, Friday’s earthquake and its aftershocks have certainly rattled us in New York and across the Northeast—a rare tremor that would barely raise an eyebrow in LA, given their familiarity with the earth’s whims. But for us, a 4.8 is no small shake! Adding to our week of natural spectacles, Monday brings an eclipse, inviting us all to don those dope glasses and gaze skyward as a celestial dance sweeps across the continent. It’s been quite a lineup: an earthquake to kick off the weekend, a celestial blackout to start the week. What’s next on the cosmic agenda? A swarm of locusts? Let’s hope the universe has checked off its list of surprises for now.

We start this week’s collection with a new text piece of unknown origin but one that strikes at the heart of life here in 2024 for many. Could this be an advertisement for the new album by Future and Metro Boomin? A spectrum of emotions and styles, the new collection is from two guys whose collaborative efforts have been making significant waves in the music industry for a half decade. Debuting at number 1, as an album “We Don’t Trust You” has been described as a monumental success, showcasing the synergy between Future’s distinctive rap style and Metro Boomin’s innovative production. The out of context graffiti message, “We Don’t Trust You,” captures a poignant irony: while distrust might seem like a safeguard, history shows that a society where trust is deeply eroded becomes fertile ground for manipulation by autocrats and tyrants.

And now, here are images from our ongoing conversation with the street, this week, including: Praxis, Homesick, Lexi Bella, Modomatic, Danielle Mastrion, Mort Art, Claw Money, Jorit, Isabelle Ewing, Paolo Tolentino, JG, Marthalicia Matarrita, Gia, and 1RL.

(photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art and Paolo Tolentino (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HOMESICK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HOMESICK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1RL (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jorit (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JG (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wheres The Water (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Marthalicia Matarrita. My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lexi Bella. My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
GIA. My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Danielle Matrion. My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Claw Money. My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isabelle Ewing. My Body My Voice Murals (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Magnolia. Spring 2024. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 03.31.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.31.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Happy Easter to all the Christians today, and we hope all the kids get a chocolate bunny in their basket and go on an egg hunt in this new green grass Mother Nature has brought to the park for everyone to enjoy. It has been such an entertaining and rewarding hunt this week looking for new works popping up like daffodils on the street in NYC. We hope you enjoy some of these new works, a boon to the creative spirit that is running the streets in all five boroughs, no matter the season.

And now, here are images from our ongoing conversation with the street, this week, including: Praxis, Sara Lynne Leo, UFO 907, Aneko, Sluto, Viler, QUAZAR, Bones, Luch, Deluxe, WaliC, Suka, Ring, and TCONE.

Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SLUTO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ANEKO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
VILER (photo © Jaime Rojo)
QUAZAR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Luch (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Luch (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Luch (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DELUXE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
WALI C (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SUKA RING(photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BONES TCONE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2024. Brooklyn, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 03.24.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.24.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Spring officially arrived this week, along with torrential rains and sometimes flooding. Happy Nowruz to all our Persian friends, and Happy Purim to the youngsters in costumes going to parties this weekend. The city’s walls reflect a new blossoming of talents joining with those more established in the visual arts, a usual mismatch of styles, coded messages, and obvious imagery. If you love New York, it is with the ongoing expectation of eclecticism mixed with the expected, and as it pertains to graffiti and street art, its a crowded party of all sorts of guests all speaking at once, each hoping to be heard in the din.

And now, here are images from our ongoing conversation with the street, this week, including: Turtle Caps, She Posse, Kosuke James, IAC, Ratrockster, Solo, Merg, Erat, SenOne Original, COSA.V, and Sen1.

Turtle Caps (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kosuke James (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kosuke James (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kosuke James (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kosuke James (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sen1 Original. Cosa.V. Tribute to Grandmaster Flash. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
IAC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
ERAT (photo © Jaime Rojo)
She Posse (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified prankster explains the contours of the BORE program. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ratrockster(photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ratrockster (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ratrockster (photo © Jaime Rojo)
It Is Mike King (photo © Jaime Rojo)
We can’t read the artist’s signature??? (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2024. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 03.17.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.17.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Happy St. Patricks Day to all our Irish brethren and sisteren (?) — unless you are unlucky to be a gaylesbitrans Irish resident of Staten Island: their official Saint Patty parade bans all of those other types. Our 5th borough always complains that it doesn’t get enough attention because Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx and Queens hog the spotlight. So bigotry, because why not? But Manhattan shouldn’t bray too loudly; we’re old enough to remember the LGBT bans by The Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH) at the beery 5th Avenue parades for decades.

Grocery stores, big box stores, and McDonald’s are converting customer service to self-service, so why not law enforcement in Brooklyn? On the subway, this dude takes a gun from his attacker so he can shoot him, after another passenger stabbed him in the back. You used to call this vigilante justice, but now it’s just called DIY policing.

And now images from our ongoing conversation Specter, Cern, Homesick, Peter Phobia, Dzel, REW, Folk, Appear 37, BRK. Nover NYC, GUS, Hand of Tess, 1krlOs, Pirdb!, Kool Hand, Croke, Regae, Nova44, and Spyee.

Specter (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hand of Tess (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Homesick (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Folk (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PIRDB! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
FOLK. HOMESICK. PRDB! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Kool Hand (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CROKE (photo © Jaime Rojo)
REGAE NOVA 44 BRK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SPYEE REGAE BRK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
APPEAR37 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Peterphobia (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Junkmen (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nover (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nover (photo © Jaime Rojo)
GUS DZEL REW (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1krl0s (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Spring 2024. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 03.10.24

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.10.24

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week! Set your clocks forward an hour!

Guess you can’t bite a graffiti artist and expect to make bank – without getting bitten. This new Nekst campaign on the Manhattan streets appears to have Claudia Schiffer and Anna Nicole Smith putting their best face forward, aside from the streams of wrinkles caused by the wet wheat paste. Time is a cruel mistress, even as our nostalgic memories of the 90s are suddenly aflame when seeing these large-scale posters and images on the catwalk named New York.

This takes the fashion labels’ accused theft of Nekst’s tag to a new level – and back to the street, where the best fashion houses traditionally find creative inspiration. The deceased graffiti writer was bold in his command of high-profile spots, and his output was profligate, giving him a reputation that current writers still pay homage to a decade after his passing. With the fashion label Guess, Inc. publicly traded, one wonders if this restyling of their brand in a fashion capital will hit them in the ticker, especially when it appears they directly ripped their style from a self-made artist/vandal and took it to the cash register.

This act highlights the ongoing debate about the street’s raw, authentic creativity and the fashion industry’s appropriation tactics. The situation questions the consequences for a major brand like Guess, primarily when the originality in question stems from the underground art world.

As Daniel Cassady from ARTNEWS and Deborah Belgum from WWD illuminate, the recent uproar in the street art/graffiti community is not merely about the misuse of street credibility but a deeper infringement on street artists’ intellectual and cultural property. Cassady discusses the blatant replication of Nekst’s signature by Guess, bringing to the forefront the fashion industry’s recurrent pilferage from street art’s raw, unfiltered energy without due homage or consent. Meanwhile, Belgum adds a familial and emotional layer, highlighting the distress caused to Nekst’s family by the unauthorized commercialization of his legacy, an act they describe as “horrifying.”

In a city where the lines of art, fashion, and identity blur, these incidents prompt us to question the ethics of inspiration versus theft. As we showcase these charged visuals, we invite our readers to ponder the fine line between tribute and exploitation in the ever-evolving narrative of street art. This is not merely about images on a wall or polished cotton; it’s a testament to the indelible impact of artists like Nekst on the fabric of urban culture and the complexities of their posthumous relationships with the commercial world.

Read more about this fight by clicking these links:
ArtNews, WWD, Hyperallergic

And please enjoy images from our ongoing conversation with the street, this week featuring Stikman, Captain Eyeliner, Bunny M, Homesick, Solus, Nekst, Muebon, Dirt Cobain, Jappy Agoncillo, Outer Source, Samo©, Isabelle Ewing, Lady JDay, John Draw Volta, Toy, Girls Just Wanna Have Funds, Butterfly Mush, and Ash Saint.

NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NEKST (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Guess t-shirt featuring what appear to be tags by graffiti writer Nekst for sale on www.iqueens.com (©iqueens)
Ash Saint (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ash Saint (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JhonDrawVolta rocks the street with boundless imagination. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)
bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)
bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isabelle Ewing. Girls Just Wanna Have Funds. Butterfly Mush. Lady Jday. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HOMESICK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jappy Agoncillo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Samo© (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dirt Cobain. Outer Source. Muebon. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TOY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. SOHO, NYC. March 2024. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Read more