Artists

Gonzalo Borondo: New Images from “Merci”, Part II (teaser videos)

Gonzalo Borondo: New Images from “Merci”, Part II (teaser videos)

The church has been closed for 30 years. If you wait long enough the natural world will overtake this temple, covering it with moss, wrapping it with ivy, filling it with trees.

Borondo. “Merci” Le Temple des Chartrons. Bordeaux, France. June 2019. (photo courtesy of Borondo)

Borondo is already there. “The columns are connected to trees,” he says as he projects a tall thin ghostly forest down the nave to the apse in preparation for his multimedia installation at the summer solstice.

As he researches this environment and the forests and gardens of Bordeaux the Street Artist is studying decay, growth, re-growth, and the dialogue between architecture and the world that preceded us.  

Borondo. “Merci” Le Temple des Chartrons. Bordeaux, France. June 2019. (photo courtesy of Borondo)

As he prepares the paintings, projections, and sounds he looks for the duality of our experiences as well – the fear and the attraction that a holy house can evoke, as well as an immense and thick forest, full of movement and stirring.

Who will fall to their knees here and cry it out to the sky first? “Merci !” “Mercy !”


Borondo. “Merci” Le Temple des Chartrons. Bordeaux, France. June 2019. (photo courtesy of Borondo)
Borondo. “Merci” Le Temple des Chartrons. Bordeaux, France. June 2019. (photo courtesy of Borondo)
Borondo. “Merci” Le Temple des Chartrons. Bordeaux, France. June 2019. (photo courtesy of Borondo)
Borondo. “Merci” Le Temple des Chartrons. Bordeaux, France. June 2019. (photo courtesy of Borondo)

See our first installment on “Merci” by Borondo here on BSA :

Borondo Begins Work in Bordeaux Temple for “MERCI”

Bientôt le temple ouvrira ses portes_Merci_Gonzalo Borondo Exhibition_Chartrons_Bordeaux Credits © Matteo Berardone/IG Bobelgom Graphic designer Oriana Distefano

Bientôt le temple ouvrira ses portes_Merci_Gonzalo Borondo Exhibition_Chartrons_Bordeaux Credits © Matteo Berardone/IG Bobelgom Graphic designer Oriana Distefano

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Fresh from Estonia: “Tartu Street Art”, Zine No 1

Fresh from Estonia: “Tartu Street Art”, Zine No 1

Almost a decade after the Stencibility festival began in Tartu, Estonia, and just in time for the launch of their 2019 program, the first edition zine has been released. Full of images, essays, interviews, and personal experiences of art in the streets in this eastern European city of 93,000, the opening foreword is by co-founder of the festival, who goes by a one name moniker of Sirla, and who serves as editor of the issue along with longtime organizer Kadri Lind.

Championing a pretty straight-forward philosophy toward individual artistic participation in the streets, Stencibility has stayed clear of common commercial pitfalls familiar to festival organizers while espousing a refreshing philosophy of inclusion and participation.

Yes, there are film programs and artists talks, and even tours and “tabling” with educational information, but there is not a discernable “positioning” for sales or branding of those events, keeping them within the realm of social study, urban studies, expression, and possibly self-realization. It helps that Tartu as a city supports the festival, owing as much to its history as a university town as its desire to retain or attract many of the younger population who flooded out of the city in the post-Soviet era.


Aside from Sirla’s reasoned, seasoned and insightful observations and distinctions that help define the Street Art scene locally and trends in international discussions, we’re also excited and intrigued by the ground rules of the Stencilbility manifesto that are printed just inside the zine. It clearly places some civic responsibility squarely on the shoulders of the
artistic intervener:

  1. Public space belongs to everyone who uses it.
  2. It is everyone’s duty to take care of it, like you would your own home
  3. The purpose of street art is to enrich, not deface, public space.
  4. All additions are welcome. If you don’t like it, improve it.
  5. To guarantee ultimate creative freedom, act according to your conscience, not laws and regulations.


Indicative of the open-minded atmosphere that brings illegal art-making in the streets is one of the interviews in the zine with artist Kairo. She spends hours painting electrical boxes with various decorative motifs and styles and has coined her own term to describe her technique as “acryliti“, a blending of the word acrylic and graffiti.

So unconcerned is Kairo about transgressing public/private space with her art practice that half of her street gear is paint and the other half is her baby in a stroller. Not a tagger per se, she’s had her share of late night excursions with two or three others, but that cat-and-mouse game that seems to energize vandals in western countries isn’t on display.


“Actually, there haven’t been as many incidents as maybe I’d like,” she says. “That might just exemplify the special friendly atmosphere of Tartu. The police have never talked to me, only driven by. They have startled me, but never engaged with me directly. And people have asked me with a confused look, why do I do this at night? I answered them, ‘I don’t have time during the day.’”






Tartu Street Art Zine No 1

Editors: Sirla, Kadri Lind

Tartu 2018


Stencibility 2019 line-up

Super excited to announce this year’s line-up. 15 badass street artists will conquer Tartu 18-23.06. Stay tuned 😉 #

Posted by Stencibility on Tuesday, May 28, 2019

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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.02.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.02.19

June is Rose month in Brooklyn, and stoops, parks, and back yards are booming with them. Bushwick streets are booming with new murals this weekend with the 8th Annual BUSHWICK COLLECTIVE Block Party. Also New York had 130,000 rat sightings since 2010. Which is still less than the number of artists here, so nice try, rats. See you on the streets!

So here’s our weekly interview with the street (or boardwalk), this time featuring BG 183, Bio, BR163, Crash, George Rose, Indie 184, Love Pusher, Nicer, Nick Walker, NS/CB, PHibs, Remi Rough, Rubin415, Steph Burr, and Tats Cru, yo!

Bio TATS CRU for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Crash . BR163. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NS/CB (photo © Jaime Rojo)
NS/CB (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Phibs . George Rose (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Biggie Smalls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Slick style from Love Pusher. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Nick Walker spills some magic in the Bronx (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tuff Stuff from SacSix (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rubin 415 . Sinxero (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Renks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Solus. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TATS CRU . BG 183 . BIO . Nicer. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Steph Burr. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Indie 184. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. June 2019. The Bronx, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Lucy McLauchlan Unfolds with New Show in Birmingham

Lucy McLauchlan Unfolds with New Show in Birmingham

She’s painted inside a parking garage in Detroit. She’s painted huts in The Gambia. She has painted a Norwegian lighthouse, an abandoned New York subway tunnel, and we watched her paint while balancing on a rickety patchwork of a hot tin roof in Marrakech.

Lucy McLauchlan is intuitive about interpreting her environment, and no two mural pieces are ever completely the same, even though natural rhythms and graphic motifs overlap. Now back in hometown Birmingham, the Street Artist, muralist, and fine artist is preparing for a solo show opening next week called UNFOLD.

Lucy McLauchlan. Three Gilded Sides of Losiny Ostrov. (photo © Lucy McLauchlan)

The title can easily be interpreted as her own creative process, which appears to be illuminating and revelatory to her as much as anyone – a mystery of life unfolding before her as she travels the world.

Lucy McLauchlan. Under Bordesley. (photo © Lucy McLauchlan)

It also reminds us of this tree wrapping process she was doing in the dark woods when we saw her last August in Moscow. She coated the bark of the trees with a non-harmful ink/paint and then literally pressed large canvasses on them. The results were the ultimate “wood-block” print, another example of what she calls her “deep respect for nature”.

The week-long pop-up show will run all week, and will include mixed media used on paper, canvas and will feature Matthew Watkins films running in the space that capture Lucy at work.

Lucy McLauchlan. The Cut. (photo © Lucy McLauchlan)

‘UNFOLD’ at Centrala
Opening: June 7, 2019  7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
158 Fazeley Street, Digbeth Birmingham B5 5RT, United Kingdom

For more information see the UNFOLD Facebook page

Lucy McLauchlan. “Tacit”. Short film by Matthew Watkins

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BSA Film Friday: 05.31.19

BSA Film Friday: 05.31.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. ENCHENTE (FLOOD) Eduardo Srur and Tché Ruggi
2. “LA PARED ES NUESTRA” por ESCIF (spanish)
3. Shepard Fairey. Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent. Part 1
4. Hot Tea. New installation in Asbury Park, NJ for Wooden Walls Project.

BSA Special Feature: ENCHENTE (FLOOD) Eduardo Srur and Tché Ruggi

News from Brazil this month reminds us that annual flooding in São Paulo kills people and destroys homes, thanks to the city being built on one of the largest river basins in the country. Public artists Eduardo Srur and Tché Ruggi combine mural painting and sculpture to address the struggles that people here face – including the displacement of people and homes and destruction of their lives.

The artists say, “With its exponential urban growth, the conflict of space between the water and the city is getting more violent each year. The public art portrayed is an answer to this sad reality of São Paulo. The film put light on this conflict and approaches the relation of the public art with the city and its inhabitants.”

“LA PARED ES NUESTRA” por ESCIF (spanish)

A new retrospective video on the community wall created in response to a people’s history. Inspired by the neighborhood movements of 1970s Spain, specifically the city of Sant Feliu de Llobregat, an open call to paint a central wall was responded to by 300 applicants in 42 countries. The jury selected 12 finalists and in council with local city council, local artists, and local historians and community leaders, an international jury selected Street Artist and ‘artivist” Escif as winner of the residency.

With thanks to the artist, the community, and to Kaligrafics urban art organization and Contorno Urbano Foundation and jury members Jaime Rojo (Brooklyn Street Art, NY), Mónica Campana (Living Walls, ATL), Veronica Werkmeister (IMVG, Vitoria), Fernando Figueroa (Doctor of Art History) and Esteban Marín (President, Fundación Contour Urbano), here is the story.

Shepard Fairey. Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent. Part 1 by Chop ’em Down Films.

For more on this video please see our story Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent”

Hot Tea. New installation in Asbury Park, NJ for Wooden Walls Project.

A public art project now on display – for more info please see our full article and interview “Windswept Public Art at the Beach: Hot Tea’s New Installation in Asbury Park”

Hot Tea. Time-Lapse showing process for the installation above in Asbury Park.

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Buff Monster Pride : New Melty Mural in Manhattan

Buff Monster Pride : New Melty Mural in Manhattan

Just in time New York’s Pride Month events, Street Artist Buff Monster unveils a wash of color and melty characters in lower Manhattan to commemorate the 50 anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village.

Over the next month a number of artists will be painting murals across the city as part of World Pride and we hope that in some way this campaign will reach those across the world who still long to be free but who are restricted by laws, even threatened, persecuted, and killed for being gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, or otherwise queer.

Buff Monster. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We talked to Buff to see what he was thinking when he was painting this mural over 6 days.

“It’s nice to see that NYC is getting involved in what looks to be the biggest pride celebration ever, but there still so many places around the US that are super conservative and unwilling to be inclusive after all these years,” he tells us. “It’s a shame that equality for all is still an issue in 2019, when we have so many other serious issues in the world that need to be addressed. It seems like there are news articles every day about this administrations’ efforts to undermine the progress we’ve made; so there is no better time to paint this mural.”

Buff Monster. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: What are the thematic elements that correspond to Pride and the rights of LGBTQ people?

Buff Monster: The characters have a bunch of mixed emotions, which mirrors the long journey for equality of the LGBTQ community. Putting together a diverse set of my cartoony ice cream characters, filled with the iconic rainbow, seemed like a good way to bring a bit of levity to a very serious issue.

All in all though, I think the colors and the characters create a positive and optimistic image, in line with this year’s Pride celebration and the future of equality. I’m really happy with how it turned out and I think it’s a really nice addition to the neighborhood.

Buff Monster. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Buff Monster. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Buff Monster. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With our thanks to Wayne and Rey at The LISA Project for organizing the artists for this event.

This installation is part of the World Pride Mural Project Initiative. For more information please click here.

For More about Buff Monster and his World Pride Mural please click here.


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Windswept Public Art at the Beach: Hot Tea’s New Installation in Asbury Park

Windswept Public Art at the Beach: Hot Tea’s New Installation in Asbury Park

They designed the Ritz, the Vanderbilt, the Ambassador and the Biltmore hotels in Manhattan, along with townhouses for the Astors, the Yacht Club, and apartment buildings on 5th Ave and Park.

They were also architects on the team for Grand Central Terminal, that Beaux-Arts centerpiece of Gotham with its high marble walls, majestic sculptures, and lofty domed ceiling.

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Also, Whitney Warren & Charles Wetmore designed the Casino Building here in Asbury Park, New Jersey a celebrated historical magnet for thousands of tourists escaping the heat and seeking buffeting breezes. The soaring glass paned windows may remind you of Grand Central, but also of that illustrated postcard on the cover of the Bruce Springsteen album, and of colorful resort town living.

If you had been promenading through this public thoroughfare that connects Ocean Grove to Asbury Park when it was bustling in the middle of last century, you would have seen Skee-Ball machines, bumper cars, games of diversion, and hot dog vendors. Now a cavernous yet sometimes ornate cave from yesteryear, you will feel the soft ocean breezes and hear the call of the seagulls echoing inside the casino throughout the day, and sometimes the night.

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You’ll also see 5,760 pieces of colored yarn hanging from the beams above, forming a shape-shifting brick of radiating color that appears to levitate. The brand new installation by Street Artist Hot Tea is lifted and pulled and choreographed by the ocean air, dancing to the sounds of waves crashing, emulating the currents of the sea. 17 rows define the physical boundaries, but your imagination can go much further with it in a matter of minutes.

“One of the focal parts of this piece is about how people interact with it,” says Hot Tea (Eric Rieger) as he unbundles 153 containers of yarns he prepared in his Minneapolis studio and suspends them above.

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Hopefully they’ll take that idea of interaction and, I know this is a big ask, but maybe they’ll take more time talking to someone face-to-face. That’s the larger idea behind my artwork and that’s why am so passionate about doing work in public spaces because I want to alter peoples experience. I want to create more intimate experiences for people who aren’t expecting it.”

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I love the beauty of this movement of the color next to the decay of this beautiful historic building,” says Jenn Hampton of Parlor Gallery who organized the project after many conversations with the artist in the last few years.

This is the first installation of its kind for the Wooden Walls Project that has brought many Street Artists to paint murals here on the boardwalk since Hampton began it in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. She says that part of her process is working with the artist and partly with the people who live and work in this seaside area who may think of public art as limited to statues or murals.

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“You have to educate a community of people who may not understand installation art,” she says, and while you watch the arduous process of Hot Tea and his assistant overhead for a few days, you’ll have an opportunity to hear a variety of commentaries from people passing by. On one of the sunny May afternoons a tourist from out of town is so enthralled that she returns during the night time to see how it was progressing and befriends the artist with compliments and bromides during the challenging windy passages.

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One gent who identified himself as a Vietnam veteran was sure that the art installation was probably “gay art” because of its rainbow color range. He wondered aloud abrasively to anyone who happened to pass by about gay art and the lamented lack of Straight Pride celebrations, among other observations. A pair of bicyclists stop to engage with him about art in general and this piece in specific but soon appears to withdraw. Before zipping away they take turns yelling up to the artist to say that they like the installation a lot.

“You know it’s interesting with my artwork,” Hot Tea says during a break from the installation. “I have noticed that people of all ages and from all different ethnicities have some sort of say when it comes to my work. Like when I did the piece in the Williamsburg Bridge called “Rituals” it was anyone from little kids who were four or five years olds just immediately responding to the work – just a gasp or a shouted word.”

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“They could be young adults or adults on their commute and they were slowing down on their way and that was what I was experiencing with this piece. The kids were gasping and pointing and telling their parents to look up. And then there were young adults who were saying that it was calming and relaxing them and then these older people who stop and say that they’re having an experience with this. They say that this is making them think of the space in a new way.”

“Hot Tea’s piece brings me an immediate feeling of peace and presence,” says Angie Sugrim, a producer with Parlor Gallery and the Wooden Walls Project. Her loyalty to Asbury Park is palpable while you speak with her and it is clear that this installation has affected her meaningfully. “I love how it changes according to the way I choose to interact with it. It’s like a river, though it is constant, it is always changing. I like the feeling of connecting with the piece as it undulates, and following its movement as though it was connected to my own psyche and consciousness.”

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Hot Tea has taken this journey with me for the last five years and I cannot say enough about how wonderful he is to work with,” says Hampton. “Watching how driven he is in his process has been amazing.”

He talks to us about the logistics of unveiling his idea to the public. “I’ve tried it where I just drop the whole bundle and try to separate it with my hands but there’s no way to get the yarn to drop individually and it just looks a lot cleaner if you drop it one by one,” he says, “It’s more time-consuming but the end result is much cleaner. All in all from conception to execution I would say it was about three weeks to execute this.”

The Casino Building. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With roots as a graffiti writer, Hot Tea has created his own niche on the street with yarn – surprising many peers while he is designing and mounting these space-altering large installations for large and small clients around the world, particularly in the last half-decade.

He says that this one in Asbury Park has been unique because of its proximity to the ocean and the impact of the natural elements on the movement of his piece. He says the effect has also affected him aesthetically and emotionally –  and he hopes passersby will similarly be moved.

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I think when you are looking up from the bottom you can appreciate the mechanics of it and during the day the yarns are flowing with the wind and more attention is drawn to the color because the wind is moving it.

It’s more of a kinetic experience I think; That’s how I experience it and this whole thing is more about just the experience. Color is a huge part with my work but a lot of it is about creating a lasting memory that people will subconsciously remember when this piece is gone. I hope that happens”

Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hot Tea. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Process / Time-lapse

Completed – Day time

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“Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent” – New Video Celebrates Shepard’s 30th on the Street.

“Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent” – New Video Celebrates Shepard’s 30th on the Street.

“Questioning the giant monolithic forces that we are all subjected to” – Shepard Fairey

“It all began with an absurd sticker of Andre The Giant that was a happy accident,” says Street Artist Shepard Fairey about his first foray as an artist on the streets back in ’89. “So there’s a giant in the original sticker which evolved into an exploration of control, questioning control, questioning the giant monolithic forces that we are all subjected to,” he says.

You didn’t doubt that Shepard had an anti-demagogue, anti authoritarian, anti-propaganda stance even then; his methods for skewering were cheekily challenging, often employing propaganda methodology of his own to get the point across. Good design, good satire, and grand targets.

As Fairey begins his multi-pronged celebration of three decades of questioning self-appointed authority and the agents of dis-information, the folks at Chop ‘em Down Films have produced the opening salvo here – and we’re sure you’d like to see it.

“Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent” for the OBEY GIANT 30th body of work – reflecting on 30 years of his art in the streets… and everywhere else”.

Facing the Giant: Three Decades of Dissent. Video by Chop ’em Down Films

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Remi Rough Painting Pride Abstractly in The Bronx

Remi Rough Painting Pride Abstractly in The Bronx

“This one goes out to the whole LGBTQ community!” says Street Artist Remi Rough as he finishes his first of two brightly abstract and geometric installations here in NYC over the last couple of days.

Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The South London artist started in graffiti, which makes this wallss’ connection with Crash and Wallworks in the Bronx especially meaningful to him. He and other practitioners sometimes call themselves “graffuturists”, owing to the roots of graffiti and the complete deconstruction of the traditional letterform which leads to modernist aestheticism now expressed on the street.

Over the last fifteen years Mr. Rough’s work and practice successfully moved into formal gallery work along with his Street Art murals in cities like Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, Paris…we’ve even saw him in Marrakesh a few years ago.

Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This particular wall is at the invitation of Wayne Rada and Rey Rosa of New York’s L.I.S.A. Project NYC, a business improvement initiative begun in the Little Italy neighborhood that has worked with many Street Artists over nearly a decade. They have selected and organized a significant number of local and international artists from the Street Art scene to install murals celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riot that turned back at the police to fight for the rights of gays, trans, and lesbians – a fight that eventually expanded to be more inclusive. 

Starting now and right through June (often called Pride Month) we’ll be bringing you many of these murals by some of the best Street Art and graffiti artists on the scene today.

Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Remi Rough. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Bronx, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This installation is part of the World Pride Mural Project Initiative. For more information please click here.


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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.26.19 – Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ*

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.26.19 – Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ*

Happy Memorial Day Weekend! – we are smack in the middle of it today.

Colloquially thought of as the first weekend of summer in the US, it is also the first weekend when there are lifeguards at the beach. Since New Yorkers love to head to the Jersey Shore (no offense Coney Island) we thought we’d regale you with some fresh shots this week of cool murals on the boardwalk in Asbury Park, New Jersey.

Most of these are part of the “Wooden Walls” a program created by Jenn Hampton, co-director of Parlor Gallery, who tells us that it was inspired by the destruction of a hurricane here that pulled up so much of the wooden boardwalk that is iconic to the shore experience here.

Haculla . Mike Shine . Porkchop. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I started doing it after Hurricane Sandy because they were all these boards up from the devastation,” she explains. “It kind of reminded me of when you go into an artists’ studio and there are little excerpts of paintings that the artist is working on. Some may feel sad because they see unfinished  paintings – but for people who are creative it creates excitement because it is about ‘what’s to come.’”

Haculla . Mike Shine. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

She’s always trying to bring art to the public space, so this devastation prompted her to write proposals to start the program and it worked. “It’s weird that it took a natural disaster for me to get funding for an art project!” she laughs. Five years of steadily growing the list of artists, the project now includes local, national, and internationally recognized street artists.

Wooden Walls producer Angie Sugrim says that this project is as personal as it is public. “Jenn and I both feel a deep sense of stewardship in our community and this project and all it entails are our way of giving back and helping to grow what we love about our town. We both are eternal believers in the power of art and seeing it help to transform Asbury Park.”

Haculla . Porkchop. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I try to curate it from the eyes of a six-year-old and a 20-year-old and a 80 year-old – because we get such a diverse crowd on the boardwalk,” says Hampton. “I just want to make sure that there is art in that spirit of creation next to the ocean. I think that there is something really poetic about.”

Time and the elements have begun to fade and weather the walls, but she thinks it just adds character.

“I think people get too attached to public art,” she says. “The impermanence of it makes it really special and you have to see it and engage with it – Mother Nature will take it back when it wants!”

Ann Lewis AKA Gilf!. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

So here’s our weekly interview with the street (or boardwalk), this time featuring Ann Lewis, Art of Pau, Beau Stanton, Dee Dee, Fanakapan, Haculla, Hellbent, Indie 184, James Vance, Jessy Nite, Joe Iurato, Lauren Napolitano, Lauren YS, Logan Hicks, London Kaye, Porkchop, RC Hagans, Rubin 415, and Shepard Fairey.

Hellbent. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
James Vance. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rubin 415. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lauren Napolitano. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lauren YS. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jessy Nite. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dee Dee. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fanakapan. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fanakapan. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Art of Pau. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Art of Pau. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Iurato. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Iurato. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Indie 184. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Logan Hicks. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
London Kaye. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RC Hagans. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RC Hagans. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RC Hagans. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

*The classic 1973 album from Bruce Springstein, “Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ” – more HERE

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SEPE in Quezon City, Philippines Reflects the Streets Darkly

SEPE in Quezon City, Philippines Reflects the Streets Darkly

Beautifully disfigured, on the mottled edge of grotesques, Sepe’s portraits admire and recoil from humanity and its foibles. Here in the Phillipines in monochrome, his newest public works reflect the intensity of the streets where near martial law or actual martial law locks down society.

Sepe. “Bago Ulit” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)

The Polish Street Artist/ fine artist has traveled to many cities around the world in the last decade painting on the streets and on canvasses, but these four months have been unlike the others. Here we see his rough-hewn painterly style complimented by the schematic illustration style of an architect, the tension between emotional and rational in harmony.

Sepe. “Bawal Umihi Dito” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)

An observer of social and political phenomenon, you may see the state of life reflected here as he surely has formed a view – one that appears to look for a sense of balance. Eyes are fatigued, identities are obscured, clouds may contain troubled thoughts and struggles, yet figures are elegant and dignified.

“Poverty is huge here and probably some parts of the country are very dangerous,” he tells us, “however I was lucky to meet only good and open people.”

Sepe. “Bawal Umihi Dito” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)
Sepe. “Bawal Umihi Dito” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)
Sepe. “No Future / No Past” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)
Sepe. “No Future / No Past” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)
Sepe. “No Future / No Past” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)
Sepe. “One Day O” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)
Sepe. “One Day O” Quezon City, Philippines. 2019. (photo © Sepe)

SEPE"One Day O"Manila / Phillipines 2019

Posted by Wręga Michał on Sunday, March 31, 2019
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BSA Film Friday: 05.24.19

BSA Film Friday: 05.24.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “Nuart Aberdeen 3” by Fifth Wall TV
2. “The Green and Pleasant Land” by Max Colson
3. Jorge Rodriguez-Gerarda in NYC for Street Art For Mankind
4. 0h10m1ke live drawing at the opening of Wastedland 2 in Manhattan.

BSA Special Feature: “Nuart Aberdeen 3” by Fifth Wall TV

Mural art as a cultural catalyst and promotional campaign for the reinvigoration of cities has proved successful in recent years for tourism and business development initiatives eager to re-engage people in the public square – luring peoples’ attention away from their phones, or perhaps inviting them to bring with.

The Nuart brand from Norway continues to build on and amplify its success for templating a skillful mix of community events, street tours, painting, talks, and screenings for enthusiastic local folks to the walk the streets of Aberdeen. It also helps that the Scottish city happens to be blessed with a growing economy, soaring granite gothic architecture, sweeping vistas by the sea, and a rich history. This year’s installations by a diverse group of artists reach a variety of demographics (including graffiti grannies), making the story appear quite rich, especially as told by Fifth Wall TV.

“The Green and Pleasant Land” by Max Colson

As a tearful Theresa May resigns today, we reflect upon the fact that everything is an invention, including the concept of nationality. We turn to the animation of Max Colson, who allows us to pretend that creating a new world from scratch is realistic. It is a series of experiments at the computer using 3D software, attempt to reimagine the tangible UK as digital, its complexity reduced, its natural open spaces expanded. No hurry, just play.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerarda in NYC for Street Art For Mankind

Silently he paints. Some up close footage from Jaime Rojo of Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada in NYC painting his mural for Street Art for Mankind. More about the project here: Fighting Child Labor With NYC Murals

0h10m1ke live drawing at the opening of Wastedland 2 in Manhattan.

Ohio Mike makes your portrait in a minute or two, despite the milling crowd and excitement that surrounds. Last week at a group show hosted by Russel Murphy and Lou August on Broome street that pulled together a true New York graff/street art crowd of fans, this artist wowed attendees with his on-point talent.

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