Artists

Major JR Exhibition Is Coming to the Brooklyn Museum; “The Chronicles of New York City”

Major JR Exhibition Is Coming to the Brooklyn Museum; “The Chronicles of New York City”

The Brooklyn Museum Announces the First Major North American Exhibition of Works by French Street Artist JR

Brooklyn Falls for France this autumn as photographer and Street Artist JR comes to the Brooklyn Museum as part of a cultural season organized by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and FACE Foundation. In a cultural exchange of sorts, BSA is also going to be in Bayonne, France October as part of Points de Vue.

The Chronicles of New York City, a massive new work from JR promises to be one of his most iconic projects as the Brooklyn Museum debuts the first major North American exhibition of works by the French artist. The new mural will cover 20,000 square feet of the Museum’s Great Hall, featuring more than 1,000 people photographed and interviewed in New York last summer.

JR. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Many Street Art fans will be familiar with a number of the artist’s iconic Street Art/photography works that feature every day and specially chosen people from the neighborhood in which they are plastered; from his early photographic projects in Paris like Expo 2 Rue (2001-4) featuring graffiti artists, Portrait of a Generation (2004-6) featuring young people from Les Bosquetsin the  Parisian suburbs, to Women Are Heroes (2008-9, Inside Out (2011-ongoing The Wrinkles of the City (2008-15, and newer projects like and The Gun Chronicles: A Story of America (2018). Many New Yorkers will also remember Portrait of a Generation. Face 2 Face (2007) – which featured images of Israelis and Palestinians pasted on both sides of the separation wall

JR. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Curated by Sharon Matt Atkins, Director of Exhibitions and Strategic Initiatives, and Drew Sawyer, a curator of photography, the show is unprecedented in representing the scale and reach of the artist and promises to be a highlight in a city known for grand gestures. Today we feature a number of images taken by photographer Jaime Rojo of JR’s work on the street over the years.

JR: Chronicles will be on view at The Brooklyn Museum from October 4, 2019, through May 3, 2020.

JR. Wynwood, Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Times Square, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Atlanta, Georgia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Venice Beach, CA. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. The Bronx, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Chelsea, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. SOHO, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Chelsea, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Lincoln Center, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. High Line Park, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR. Houston/Bowery Wall, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.11.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.11.19

Street Art is hot and beautiful in New York this week, and we are cheered by the proliferation of styles and style- and some simply brilliant ideas.

West Side Highway was blocked this weekend by lines of people sitting with arms locked to protest the ICE arrests of poor, powerless, immigrants working menial jobs in the US this week and their treatment in jails set up for them.

Of course, the lines are probably still longer to get into the various rooftop pools that have popped up in New York this summer.

Also this weekend the child sex ring king Jeffrey Epstein was reported to have committed suicide in his jail cell. Also, a herd of unicorns just ran through Central Park. Please read the long list of world leaders he was alleged to have as clients. Check back with us in five years and tell us which of those men are in jail.

For some humorous summer reading ; the white-gloved New York Times took their semi-annual trip on the subway – just to stay in touch with the commoners – and was scandalized by the tawdry state of advertising in the subways, with suggestive phallic shapes and ladies posing in underwear and what not. NYT was not however scandalized by the chronically destitute conditions of subway infrastructure like the enormous pieces of peeling ceiling poised to drop on people at the Chambers station for example. Or the rats. Or the lack of garbage cans, police officers, newsstands, air conditioning or the the $2.75 fare that has outpaced inflation – meaning that the equivalent of a 1987 fare would be about $2.03 if it had stayed with inflation, for example.  That’s hardship on New York’s poor families – but New York Times is not talking about that.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Appleton Pictures, Banksy, City Kitty, Dr. SCO, Early Riser, FAUST, Gianni Lee, Heck Tad, Lambros, M*Code, Neon Savage, Shepard Fairey, and The Postman Art.

Top banner is a photo of a framed Banksy note in a high-end frame shop in Soho. Actually a Banksy? Who knows. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey’s portrait of actor and activist Rosario Dawson on the water tank of a Manhattan building called “Power & Equality. The image celebrates this Lower East Side original who has been a champion activist for girls and women and who stays true to her roots.

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gianni Lee (photo © Jaime Rojo)
There has been a back and forth on this wall with Gianni Lee’s work and the graffiti artist’s work. We have been documenting the “dialogue” on BSA HERE, and HERE. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Postman Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stay Ugly (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Go Girl! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Faust (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (the side-bust Donald Duck is by Heck Tad) (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (the side-bust Donald Duck is by Heck Tad) (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty . M*Code . Dr. SC0 . Neon Savage (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty . Lambros (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We have been documenting this artist’s work for years now. His message is about diabetes/diabetic awareness and its causes, our addiction with sugar and the food industry relentless habit of adding sugary ingredients on almost all prepared foods…that and the innordinate sugar amounts on soft drinks of course. So it was a big surprise to have caught the artist in action while putting work on his usual spot on the magnet wall in Chelsea.

Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
We know this is Appleton Pictures mascot and MUSE but we don’t know this handsome dog’s name. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Stickers Vol. 2: More Stuck-Up Crap from DB Burkeman

Stickers Vol. 2: More Stuck-Up Crap from DB Burkeman

In the Street Art continuum that presents itself to the passerby on city streets, the early practice of hand-drawn tags on stolen postal stickers eventually morphed into mass-produced slick runs of personal branding and large scale one-off hand rendered/cut paper pieces wheat-pasted with a brush. This story, ever-evolving, is more inclusive than some may think of when you talk generically about “slaps” on a door or on the base of a streetlamp in the city’s visual dialogue. For the book Stickers Vol 2, author DB Burkeman takes a wider survey of the practice, however, and in his second compendium, he goes where BSA has always followed the creative spirit; wherever it leads.

DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.

In practice, there are few strictly “sticker artists”. More often there are artists and taggers who also use stickers as part of their public practice which may include painting, aerosol tagging, freehand marker tagging, printing, wheat pasting, sculpture. By adapting the techniques and language of advertising, propaganda, and branding, artists have seized the opportunity to have a voice in the public sphere that is more often only reserved for commercial interests.

Street Artists’ practices of self-promotion are indistinguishable from those of commercial or political interests – and why not? The public space has always been used as a battleground for ideas, a marketplace for attention, a proving ground of identity and power, a theater for capturing imagination, a Socraterial classroom for presenting and probing ideas and the examination of our assumptions about them.

DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.

In a fiercely democratic way, with a very low admission price, all motivations are presented here, and all of them are flawed, and all of them are perfect.

Burkeman’s sophisticated examinations of sticking practices are equally wide in his survey – his own full immersion into art, music, performance, consumer psychology, pop culture, and advertising giving him a comprehension and appreciation of its seeming seamlessness. 

DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.

Burkeman’s introductory essay addresses topics ranging from billboard busting, culture jamming, market forces and Warhols’ bananas – admitting that his baseline appreciation has not waned even as his own study lead him ever deeper and deeper into an ocean he still hasn’t fully fathomed since launching his first sticker volume, Stickers: Stuck-Up Piece of Crap: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art.

“Even after ten years of having this adhesive monkey on my back, I’m surprised that I can still get a kick out of the conversation that happens on the street when someone puts up a sticker,” he says. “It’s like a radiating signal to have others put their own stickers up next to it, as if to say, ‘hey, what’s up?’ The result is a cluster of paper and vinyl personalities.”

DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.

Keeping it contemporary, he also calls in experts from this idiosyncratic world of expressions to further your appreciation for the sticking practice as a reflection of society and a catalyst for it – from the Street Artist Invader to the blue-chip curator/innovator Jeffrey Deitch to fans/visionaries like Stretch Armstrong, C.R. Stecyk III, Dante Ross, and The Super Sucklord.

Using his first book as calling card, many doors have opened to Burkeman, enabling access to collections and rarities, deep dives into the crates, selections of unknowns that you would otherwise not have access to – let alone the opportunity to appreciate. You also get a selection of stickers for your own collection by serious names, including Bast, Lister, Shepard Fairey, Skullphone, Futura, Ron English, and Neckface.

“Cheap, immediate, and unapologetically in your face, the sticker remains the go-to, lo-fi expression for many a band, brand, and fan,” says Don Letts, a founding member of Big Audio Dynamite, among other things. Clearly, the images and messages sent and received using this method have been a boon to those looking to have a voice, and the sticker practice will continue apace. Undoubtedly, DB Burkeman has it covered.

DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.
DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.
DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.
DB Burkeman. Stickers Vol. 2: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art. (aka More Stuck-Up Crap) Rizzoli, NYC, 2019.
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BSA Film Friday: 08.09.19

BSA Film Friday: 08.09.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Bordalo II “A Life of Waste” A short film by Trevor Whelan & Rua Meegan
2. One Day With Lady K in Paris
3. The London Police Dogumentary, by Wayne Horse

BSA Special Feature: Bordalo II “A Life of Waste”

Bordalo II “A Life of Waste” A short film by Trevor Whelan & Rua Meegan

Spending a lot of time and effort clawing your way to the top of the pile, braying loudly about your achievements and kicking the people behind you back down the hill? Look where you are standing. It’s a mountain of garbage. And you don’t really care for the others up here.

Bordallo II has been examining our culture of waste. And making sculpture from it. “The artwork is really a reflection of what we are,” he says. “I always had my conscience.”

One Day With Lady K in Paris

Two decades into the game on her own and with Parisian graffiti crews 156 and CKW, Lady K tours the streets in a beret and a silk scarf with can of dark magenta aerosol in her purse, tagging concrete, marble, and ceramic tile on the streets as she goes. The interview shows one reason for her staying power – she’s an omnivore of style and technique, unwilling to limit herself to color or chrome, roller or extinguisher, vandal or Street Artist. Such distinctions are of little interest to her as she openly challenges your comfort zone, and presumably those of the police as well.

The London Police Dogumentary, by Wayne Horse

You may think of the Beastie Boys in wigs parodying the exaggerated male characters of 1970s detective shows, but you won’t see it done with such saucy panache as Chaz and Bob of the London Police – and Chinny Bond, the Darryl Jones of the crew.

“I got this vision from God that said, ‘Go out and help the dogs of the world,’ ”says Chaz with a misty gaze at the camera. Clearly, dog songs have really brought their practice up a level, vastly expanding their artistic practice in three-part harmony, causing their core Street Art fans to howl with delight.

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Lapiz Compares Religious Devotion to Addiction in Munich

Lapiz Compares Religious Devotion to Addiction in Munich

Lapiz quotes Karl Marx; “Die Religion … ist das Opium des Volkes” when he talks about the new ‘Opium Den’ stencil he has completed on a street in Munich, Germany.

“Religion is the opium of the people” is a close translation, and here he refers to the recently burned Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. With it he questions the priorities of people and what they do with their money.

“Notre Dame caught fire and within a few weeks 800 million euros were donated to rebuild it,” he says. “It was more than a church – it was a symbol for Western Society. But just imagine what social projects you could have supported with this kind of money.”

Lapiz. Munich, Germany. (photo © Lapiz)
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Asbestos Behind a Mask in Cork, Ireland

Asbestos Behind a Mask in Cork, Ireland

The symbolism of the “L” repeated many times, the expression in the eyes peering nervously  through them, the appearance of this piece in Cork – it’s all a coded secret for the typical passerby here in Ireland. This is not unusual for Street Art or graffiti because much of it can be so woven into the personal history of the artist that it may require and extensive conversation with them to understand it- or a look at their diary.

Asbestos. Left Hand. Cork, Ireland. July 2019. (photo © Asbestos)

Asbestos is from Dublin but he make this new mural as part of a graffiti jam organized by Crack. He says it is a critique of his own hand skills when he is surrounded by Masters of the aerosol can. In fact he feels like he is all left hands – thus the “L” symbol creating a mask for him to hide behind.

“I like to explore an innocent and naive version of my own character called ‘Left Hand’ that sees the world in a different way to me,” he tells us. “Here he’s giving me learner ‘L’ signs because I’m a street artist painting with a bunch of graff artists. His honesty exposes my own frailties and insecurities and my fear that I’d mess the mural up in front of artists I respect.”

Asbestos. Left Hand. Cork, Ireland. July 2019. (photo © Asbestos)

When we get to know an artist better it is not a surprise to find how much of their personal history and psychology enters into their practice. The Dublin-based Asbestos is quite literal in explorations of self on the street; splitting himself into a ‘live’ version and a ‘dead’ version.

He said he’s been working on “a series of mask portraits that explore my identity. Each mask portrays two versions of myself, one alive and one dead. The dead version is a fictional character that represents me, if I’d been killed in a car bomb,” he reveals. The ‘bomb’ he refers to was a real one, he sayd. “It went off in Dublin 46 days before I was born, 5 minutes after my mother walked past it,” he says.

“I’ve always been fascinated about the fact that I may never have existed.”

Asbestos. Left Hand. Cork, Ireland. July 2019. (photo © Asbestos)
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Giulio Vesprini on the B-Ball Court in Fermo, Italy

Giulio Vesprini on the B-Ball Court in Fermo, Italy

A basketball court in summertime is a proving ground for skill, a place to kill time with friends, and sometimes a launchpad for dreams of going “professional”. Here in Fermo City in Northern Italy, it’s a place for Street Artist Giulio Vesprini to expand his abstract practice to the field of sport.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)

“The shapes, colors and unique elements of botany characterize my work,” he says, and you can see that his palette is carefully chosen, and sophisticated. His new work is in concert with the Fermo Urban Museum (FUM) and took an organic route to completion, with the help of a handful of assistance. It’s many steps away from the inner city work you might normally associate with innercity graffiti; the sound and fury transmuted. Primitive, graphic, and crisply illustrative, this freshly painted court provides a new field of art and nature for players he’ll never meet.

He calls it “Struttura G041”.

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)
Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (photo © Luca Antonelli-Andrea Amurri)

Giulio Vesprini. Struttura G041. FUM Festival. Fermo, Italy. 2019. (Video Andrea Amurri-New Media Solution )

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Steve ESPO Powers in Syracuse

Steve ESPO Powers in Syracuse

Graffiti writer, Street Artist, and muralist Steve Powers (aka ESPO) has created cryptic poetry in bold, nostalgia formed fonts on city walls including Brooklyn, Dublin, and his hometown Philadelphia.

Steve ESPO Powers. Syracuse, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In Syracuse, a city in mid-New York State, he has left his inside-joke humor outside on many bridges. We just happened to driving through this weekend and caught a few of his pieces from the last few years that suddenly cross your path – often as you are descending through an underpass.

Steve ESPO Powers. Syracuse, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Steve ESPO Powers. Syracuse, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Steve ESPO Powers. Syracuse, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Steve ESPO Powers. Syracuse, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 07.08.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.08.19

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring BRCEDU, Captain Eyeliner, Damon, Dark Clouds,Fhake, Ghake, Jerk Face, Mad Villian, Mattew Hyte, MurOne, Praxis, R Burns Wilder, Shepard Fairey, Sinned, Stikman, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Thomas Allen, and Vy.

Thomas Allen in collaboration with Ethan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tatyana Fazlalizadeh. This piece has been vandalized. The original artwork included a bouquet of flowers and text that read: “LET BLACK MEN BE SOFT”. They both have been buffed by an unknown person. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BRCEDU…damn right! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mad Vaillian (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fhake (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Damon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Damon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dark Clouds (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mattew Hyte (photo © Jaime Rojo)
This piece by an unidentified artist has been restored. The tag and posters have been removed. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Chapeter 23 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Chapeter 23 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
R Burns Wilder x Sinned (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MurOne (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jerke Face (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Judith Supine Stars in  MANLBDRO: The Cowboy Series

Judith Supine Stars in MANLBDRO: The Cowboy Series

A quick shout out to the new collaged gender fuckery Judith Supine uses that openly plays with the man. The Marlboro man that is; the ubiquitous cowboy that appeared in advertisements for thirty-five years, thanks to Philip Morris and Leo Burnett. Enveloped in mythology and archetypes of masculinity, countless men died of cancer emulating this hunky wind-whipped hero of the imaginary west, including at least four of the original actors who portrayed the fictional character, according to the LA Times.

Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Not to get sidetracked from Supine’s intensely playful machinations with the knife and magazine. The Street Artist has successfully redirected his studio and street practice in recent years, stripping back the fluorescence many of his 2000s-2010’s pieces were known for. Here he is choosing to focus instead on his unexpected recombinants of limbs, features, and proportions to present otherworldly figures who are just human enough to disturb your subconscious, and make you laugh.

Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

By playing with the same magnetic images that drew millions to the messages in glossy magazines of the 60s-90s, Judith winks flirtatiously at you with clever bait and switching. Pulling apart our instincts and letting them lay next to, or sit upon, or lick, or pop out of one another, Supine daily plays with fantasy and fiction, and very possibly fear.

Muddguts in Williamsburg hosts Manlbdro right now, where they say “The Cowboy series is a continuation of the artist’s pursuit of placing art between the worlds of abstraction and representation.”

Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shots from the future on Judith’s Instagram

The collages featured on the show are the original images that were used for the posters on his bus shelters ad take over around NYC city streets. We have published the ad take over installations HERE and HERE

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BSA Film Friday 07.02.19

BSA Film Friday 07.02.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Facing The Giant: Three Decades of Dissent Part Two – Shepard Fairey
2. Stephanie Boyce: If You Know Me Is To Love Me.
3. Dotmasters: Why Is That Shovel There?

BSA Special Feature: Facing The Giant: Three Decades of Dissent Part Two – Shepard Fairey

The sky is on fire! And it’s not just because of the gorgeous sunset.

Shepard Fairey has been respectfully smacking us in the head for 30 years with his earnestly alarmist art in the streets. Challenging a narrative pushed by the corporate state via smiling blond newsreaders fronting a well funded armature of skullduggery, this perpetual dissenter has found ways to deliver the poison pill with ever-more sophisticated graphic design and plain spoken diatribe.

“I was trying to encourage people to just be more analytical and to come to their own conclusions,” he says as he describes his work during the steady hail of disinformation called “The War on Terror”. Bless his heart.

He says he was looking for a more honest manifestation of his work and how he represented the observations and opinions he had based on his own research.

“I felt like I had the courage to become myself what I had emulated in a lot of my heroes.” Faced with a hostile political environment from the corporatized media machine and the dazed inertia response from a significant portion of his intended audience, it is surely maddening at times. Regardless, as an artist, catalyzer and a citizen, Fairey continues to challenge himself, and us.   

Stephanie Boyce: If You Know Me Is To Love Me.

Brooklyn Artist Stephanie Boyce has been drawing all her life and takes you on a tour of her neighborhood and the Muddguts Gallery that represents her.

“It’s difficult to tell my story in a ten minute movie,” she says, but you get a good idea of the ups and downs that she has faced through her art, their symbolisms, and of course her own words.

Special props go out to Director Nicolas Heller for this insightful and well-balanced storytelling.

Dotmasters: Why Is That Shovel There? Nuart Aberdeen. By MZM Projects

Dotmasters also takes you on a tour in his new video, and even instructs you how his technique is done. Mostly, it’s a relaxed conversation about his history and his approach.

“Oh that’s just a silkscreen process with a spraycan,” he said of his initial realization of how certain pieces on the street were done when seeing stencillists like Blek Le Rat in the 80s. “And I thought, ‘Wow, that’s a good way of invading public space’.”

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Guerilla Spam and 108 Paint 2 Versions of the “Quarantana”

Guerilla Spam and 108 Paint 2 Versions of the “Quarantana”

The Turin-based illustrator Guerrilla Spam has interpreted the “Quarantana” as a stylized toy extended from the arm of an elegant, almost Egyptian figure in a tall fez. Alessandria-born Street Artist 108 depicts the traditional doll as a unique abstraction merged within a form, not specifically figurative, rather primitive perhaps.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)

Both are interpreting a pagan/Christian traditional ritual next to each other here in Santa Croce di Magliano.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)

“ ‘Quarantana‘ is a doll made of fabric and straw, having the appearance of an old woman; the doll, usually hanged to a rope between the balconies or in front of the windows, stands on a potato with seven feathers attached,” say organizers at the Antonio Giordano Street Art festival. “The ritual, fusing Christian and pagan cultures, expresses the importance of living a life of sobriety and peace.”

An unusual topic to depict and oddly paired artists to create it – you are here able to better appreciate the multiplicity of styles at work on the street today. CLICK HERE to see a number of variations on the Quarantana doll as it is used throughout Santa Croce di Magliano, Southern Italy and the Balkan Region.

Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
Guerrilla Spam x 108. Premio Antonio Giordano Festival. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. July 2019. (photo courtesy of the festival)
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