May 2017

Skount Paints “Protection” for Future Amsterdam Street Art/Urban Contemporary Art Museum

Skount Paints “Protection” for Future Amsterdam Street Art/Urban Contemporary Art Museum

Entrepreneur and visionary Peter Ernst Coolen continues afoot with his plans for Amsterdam’s Street Art/Urban Contemporary art museum sometime next year at NDSM Wharf, and a number of artists have been preparing new works for the space and the great occasion.

Today we have a sneak peak at the huge-scale canvas by one of the streets spiritual wizard-like creators, Skount from Spain.

Skount for “Street art / Urban contemporary art museum”. Amsterdam. (photo © Skount)

“A few months ago I painted the wall called “Protection, Natural Cohesion and the Soul’s Messengers”, he says of the new mural inspired by the legends of the X ts’unu’um (Hummingbird in Maya) and the relationship of the human with nature and the celestial.

Skount for “Street art / Urban contemporary art museum”. Amsterdam. (photo © Skount)

“All the cultures that have existed in our history have bequeathed us their most intimate experience through symbolic language,” he says, spoken like a graffiti fan actually. But for Skount this symbolic language is to assist people to relate to the spiritual world, to synthesize a mystical relationship with life through the symbol, facilitating an encounter between the divine and the human.

“In this mural I have illustrated a hand (as a symbol of blessing and protection) with a drawn circle, holding a human entity, since above all the symbolic cosmos, the circle arises, like the wheel of life that spins the whole nature, with its cycles, its rhythms and its eternal movement. It is, therefore, the totality, the integrity and the realization,” he explains. Only when you see the final photo here can one appreciate the scale of the new indoor work, as well as the size of the future museum here in Amsterdam.

Skount for “Street art / Urban contemporary art museum”. Amsterdam. (photo © Skount)

Skount for “Street art / Urban contemporary art museum”. Amsterdam. (photo © Skount)

Skount for “Street art / Urban contemporary art museum”. Amsterdam. (photo © Skount)

Skount for “Street art / Urban contemporary art museum”. Amsterdam. (photo © Skount)

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Eating Plastic with Louis Masai, Whales, Sharks in Cape Cod and L.A.

Eating Plastic with Louis Masai, Whales, Sharks in Cape Cod and L.A.

These Animals Are Eating All the Plastic You are Throwing Away. Yuck.


London Street Artist Louis Masai has just returned to the US to do three murals – one in alliance with the Right Whale Research Association (R.W.R.A) in Cape Cod Massachusetts, and two in Los Angeles where he is currently having a solo show at C.A.V.E. gallery entitled “The Sixth Extinction”.

Louis Masai. Right Whale. Cape Cod, MA. (photo © Lisa Sette)

With his work intrinsically tied to environmentalism and disappearing species, Masai told us at great length about a few people and organizations he worked with when making these new pieces. He also educated us about the DIRECT relationship that you and we have with killing off species and causing their suffering by using plastics. Here are a few excerpts from our conversation to better appreciate the work that Louis is doing right now.

“Cape Cod attracts a continuous flow of summertime tourists to its quaint villages of seafood shacks, lighthouses, beaches and whale watching excursions,” Louis says. “Its economy however, is steeped in a controversial whale hunting history of blood.” He worked with Lisa Sette from R.W.R.A. to create this new mural in the town. He also shared some of Lisa’s statements about the project here:

Louis Masai. Right Whale. Cape Cod, MA. (photo © Lisa Sette)

“I feel like a lot of us in the US are feeling isolated due to the current political climate. What better way to bring the community together than through a mural that highlights the most critically endangered large whale in the Northwest Atlantic that happens to spend winter and spring in our waters.  The mural is bringing people together and allowing for conversations to begin – unexpected conversations.”

Lisa Sette continues, “Of course when in company of biologists, advocates and real life eco-warriors, it’s impossible to not become even more inspired by the impacts that a species like the right whale faces. The North Atlantic right whale is a baleen whale, they are listed as a rapidly decreasing, critically endangered species, with only a few over 500 left. Baleen whales feed on zooplankton and krill; they take large gulps of water and then filter out their tiny prey using baleen plates. During feeding season, usually from spring to fall, right whales may eat more than 2,600 pounds of zooplankton per day, and of course today that also includes a huge amount of plastics.”

Louis Masai. Right Whale. Cape Cod, MA. (photo © Louis Masai)

Laura Ludwig, of the Center for Coastal Studies, often gives presentations about plastics in the environment.

“Once you’ve seen the images of whales’ stomachs packed solid with plastic bags; or of albatrosses who’ve died after ingesting a diet of nothing but bottle caps; or of an osprey chick who entangled itself in a balloon string used as nesting material — once you’ve seen familiar plastic items as the instrument of death for innocent animals, the path reveals itself.”

100% of the ocean is now infected with plastic, says Laura. What can WE do to try and help rectify this issue? These are Laura’s top three tips.

  • Over 300,000,000 straws are used every day in the US alone: swear off plastic straws and bring your own metal, glass or rubber straw if you like to use them.

  • BYORB: there are over 5 trillion plastic bags used every year around the world — 160,000 per second, if you break it down per capita. Bring Your Own Reusable Bag and refuse thin film plastic bags.

  • Bottle water is a scam: over 50 billion bottles of water are sold in the US alone annually, and only 20% of them are “recycled”. Stop buying water in plastic bottles — BYOB, again!

Louis Masai. Right Whale. Cape Cod, MA. (photo © Louis Masai)

Louis tells us that when in Cape Cod he took one of those famous whale-watching trips. To say he was excited is an understatement. He also may be exagerating a little.

“It literally blew my eyes out of their sockets – I saw Right Whales, Fin Back Whales, Sei Whales, Humpback Whales, and Dolphins too. Naturally, he made like-minded friends there and caught up with Charles Mayo better known as Stormy, the director of the Right Whale Ecology Program, who told him how big whales also get caught up in plastic nets and other crap we throw away – trapped!

We don’t have space here to recount a rescue mission he did with a whale named Ibis, we can will tell you this part of the story. “After several hours Ibis tired from dragging floats and stopped swimming. It was only then that we were able to cut the nets and ropes from around her. We had freed her,” says Charles. “This rescue mission evolved to us creating specialized tools and a system for freeing entangled whales and we still use floats, buoys and boats to slow the whales to this day.”

Louis Masai. Right Whale. Cape Cod, MA. (photo © Lisa Sette)

It may seem obvious, but the real solution is for you and us to stop throwing this crap away to begin with. It doesn’t magically disappear.

Louis says that he learned that rescuers “are only able to save about 50% of entangled right whales, and 80% of humpbacks, the majority of them are struggling out at sea and never reported to the rescue team. Rescuing them is only a stopgap measure and the real work needs to be done in stopping them getting entangled in the first place.”

Louis Masai. Right Whale. Cape Cod, MA. (photo © Louis Masai)

“I hope that my mural will raise some thoughts amongst the thousands of tourists visiting Cape Cod. Perhaps they might even think twice about using the straws, plastic bags and water bottles still available in Cape Cod.”

When he got to L.A. for his show ‘Sixth Extinction’ with C.A.V.E Gallery he painted a finback whale, which is a visitor to the waters of L.A, “Another baleen whale suffering the same punishment of plastics in the ocean. I read that a ridiculous 10 metric tones of plastic enter the L.A Ocean per day, which is comparative to more than the weight of a London bus. The result of this painting was a challenge to the owner of the wall, “The Lyric Hyperion’. They are now on a route towards eliminating the use of plastics in their service.”

Louis Masai. Finback Whale. Silver Lake, CA. (photo © Ari Sturm)

Louis’ last painting for this trip was of a big-eyed Thresher shark, another ocean species that is suffering an apparent decline in population in Californian waters. In addition to a vulnerable life-history characteristic, these sharks are suffering from a continued fishing pressure from pelagic fleets which has the species listed as vulnerable.

“Most of the species I highlight, if not all, are in danger of their lives due to evidential climate change, I’m back in London now and realizing that my trips to and from the states have many, many more endangered species to lift a light for.”

This means we still have a lot to learn from the art of Louis Masai.

Louis Masai. Finback Whale. Silver Lake, CA. (photo © Louis Masai)

Louis Masai. Finback Whale. Silver Lake, CA. (photo © Louis Masai)

Louis Masai. Thresher Shark. Venice, CA. (photo © Lmnotree)

Louis Masai. Thresher Shark. Venice, CA. (photo © Lmnotree)

Louis Masai. Thresher Shark. Venice, CA. (photo © Louis Masai)

Louis Masai. Thresher Shark. Venice, CA. (photo © Lmnotree)


For more information on Louis Masai’s show “The Sixth Extinction” at C.A.V.E. Gallery, please click HERE:


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Bien Urbain 2017: Ericailcane and His New Barbed-Wire Story

Bien Urbain 2017: Ericailcane and His New Barbed-Wire Story

Just in time for his exhibition opening at musée du temps de Besançon, Italian Street Artist Ericailcane has just finished his latest wall with the Bien Urbane festival and the story it tells is troubling.

Ericailcane. Detail. Bien Urbain Festival 2017. Besançon, France. May 2017. (photo © Elisa Murcia Artengo)

The Bologna native whose animal world personifies the behavioral traits of humans – sometimes with alarming accuracy – brings this cuddly pairing to a large wall at 8 rue des Chaprais in Northeastern French town.

But are they so cuddly? Standing on either side of a fenceline and with armaments all around on the ground by one of the sheep, his neighbor is capable of freeing the him from his barbed wire conundrum, but the tool of liberty remains secreted behind his back.

The indoor museum exhibition explores the ages of life, the perception of the world as children and adults. As it turns out, so does the outdoor exhibition.

Ericailcane. Bien Urbain Festival 2017. Besançon, France. May 2017. (photo © Elisa Murcia Artengo)

Ericailcane. Bien Urbain Festival 2017. Besançon, France. May 2017. (photo © Elisa Murcia Artengo)

Ericailcane. Bien Urbain Festival 2017. Besançon, France. May 2017. (photo © Elisa Murcia Artengo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.28.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.28.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Trump thought he could lift his poll numbers or legitimacy or at least his personal wealth by taking a world tour this week where he sold $100 billion in arms to Saudia Arabia, scored $100 million for his daughters brand new women’s fund, appeared to curtsy to the king, stuffed an electoral map in the Western Wall, volunteered that Israel did not give him intelligence that he gave to Russians in the Oval Office, depressed the Pope, irked his wife, shoved the leader of Montenegro to get to the head of the line, was ambush handshook by the new president of France, told the Germans they were very very bad…. can he please stop now? This drip, drip, drip of rotten embarrassing news is driving everyone crazy. Please please don’t start a war. Now his son-in-law is being invited for some interviews with the FBI?

Meanwhile, New York is getting clobbered by rain and new Street Art and murals and is electrified with the excitement of the beginning of summer. Coney Island, Bushwick, Little Italy are hot for new stuff going up again, David Choe is at the Houston Wall this week, the Bushwick Collective Block Party is June 3, and Ad Hoc’s Welling Court begins June 10.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring: Alice Pasquini, Baron Von Fancy, Blanco, City Kitty, Crash, Drsc0, Erosie, Jim Drain, Jorit Agoch, kaNO, Martin Whatson, Nick Walker, Pear, Rocket 01, Serge Lowrider, and Tod Seelie.

Top image: Kano. Detail. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kano for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jim Drain for Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Jorit Agoch portrait of Brazilian twins and artists Os Gemeos. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist on the streets of Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist on the streets of Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Serge Lowrider for Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporar Art. PM/12 “What In The World” Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Serge Lowrider for Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporar Art. PM/12 “What In The World” Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist on the streets of Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nick Walker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist on the streets of Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rocket 01 for Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art “One Wall Project” in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Blanco (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Blanco. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“As Estha stirred the thick jam he thought Two Thoughts and the Two Thoughts he thought were these:
a) Anything can happen to anyone.
and
b) It is best to be prepared.”
Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things

Among other things. Baron Von Fancy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Collaboration between CRASH and Nick Walker. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Erosie for Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporar Art. PM/12 “What In The World” Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Moloch is the Biblical name relating to a Canaanite god associated with child sacrifice. The name of this deity is also sometimes spelled Molech, Milcom, or Malcam.” We wonder whose children Moloch would sacrifice in this premonition from an unidentified artist on the streets of NYC. Yours? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Alice Pasquini in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist on the streets of NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martin Whatson for Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pear. Or, in this case, Richie’s pear next to Fabco’s shoes. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tod Seelie for Art in Ad Places. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Drsc0 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Coney Island, NY. May 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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She Broke Night – Olek and Performers Inside/Outside UN in Berlin

She Broke Night – Olek and Performers Inside/Outside UN in Berlin

“Strong individual artistic statements in the streets can create these magical, deeply human moments in your everyday routine and push you out of the frame,” says Sebastian Purfürst. “It’s an alternative and amazingly uncontrollable channel of human to human communication.”


Multi-dimensional artists like the Polish-now-Brooklyn-based OLEK find it difficult to describe their work because they fall into many categories; installation, sculpture, performance, theater. Often they create their own category entirely, unconcerned with labels and dogmatically narrow definitions. Thanks to the elastic quality of her crocheted art materials, you may see people wearing them at official events, at dinners, in a swimming pool, or simply crossing a busy Berlin street on a Friday night.

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

As guests shuttled back and forth across Bülowstrasse to see the shows inside the raw space of the soon-to-be UN museum and the polished gallery space of the UN Project M/12 show, you may have caught one of those Olek moments where her costumed performers traipsed and cavorted along the sidewalks, momentarily distracting attention from the sex workers whose neighborhood this is.

“For me street art has the potential to turn the anonymous, commercial urban space into a walkable, immersive space to think and to feel, provoking new perspectives, ideas and communication,” says photographer Sebastian Purfürst, a Berliner who captured these inside/outside images last week and likens them to Street Art as much as live performance that occupies and activates public space.

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

A video/new media artist and musician whose sound and visual design has appeared in commercial, artistic, theatrical and academic settings Purfürst tells us that he was mesmerized by the immersive spectacle that unfolded and transformed the environment. “Street art has the chance to act and react fast, directly and in a totally unexpected way – literally over night. It’s a direct physically manifested response to a world.”

The warmth of the spring night made their languorous limbs entangle as the Olek performers  danced, posed, capered and marched, silently interacting with traffic and passersby, their creator strolling languidly among them in an impossible corset and red-rimmed round glasses.

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

“Strong individual artistic statements in the streets can create these magical, deeply human moments in your everyday routine and push you out of the frame,” says Sebastian. “It’s an alternative and amazingly uncontrollable channel of human to human communication.”

They were just a few moments to experience, and we’re glad Purfürst captured them. The images are full of energy and an insouciant charge of electricity and blood and flesh elevating the senses, street ephemera that wafts into you, through you, past you.

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

Performers are:

Hugo Bailly
Kevin Bright
Mila Bollansee
Carla Cixì
Aleksandra Szkopek
and Olek

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

Olek. We Broke Night. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Sebastian M. Purfürst | Lem-studios.com)

 


 

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BSA Film Friday: 05.26.17

BSA Film Friday: 05.26.17

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Nuart Aberdeen 2017 – The Movie.
2. Edjinn for 12 + 1 Project in Barcelona
3. Trump Meets the Pope on the Street
4. Dale Grimshaw at Memorie Urbane 2017
5. “The Brainwashing of My Dad.”

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Nuart Aberdeen 2017: The Movie.

Not to be confused with Nuart Aberdeen 2017: The Board Game, or Nuart Aberdeen 2017: The Cheese, or Nuart Aberdeen 2017: The Stuffed Baby Panda.

Herewith is The Movie, courtesy of director Doug Gillen at Fifth Wall TV and the team at Nuart Aberdeen. This mini-movie gives you a greater context to see the festival in during a cold spring week in this northern seaside town in Scotland where Street Art and murals are something brand new to many – an opportunity to experience public space in a communal way, or an individual one. Nevermind the bigger questions, enjoy the sense of discovery here. You can see how Doug is using his arsenal of sound and visual tools to weave scenes together and tell his own particular story here, and it is quite a nice bit of poetry. Hope you enjoy!

 

Edjinn for 12 + 1 Project in Barcelona

A few weeks ago we featured this little wall in a piece called “Grandpa Gives Thumbs Down”.

Now we get to see how it was made!

Trump Meets the Pope in the Street

The street continues to lambast Trump at every turn, including here in anticipation of his visit this week with the Pope here in Rome. Claimed by a Street Artist named TVBoy his name is reported as Salvatore Benintende. Regarding the actual visit, the Pope looked like he had some indigestion during the event.

Dale Grimshaw at Memorie Urbane 2017

Couldn’t be fresher! This piece was just finished this week at part of the Memorie Urbane 2017 festival by artist Dale Grimshaw.

 

What Happened to Dad?

Not related to Street Art, but have you heard of propaganda? For anyone who cares to see it, the media is a tool of war, and US citizens have have been under attack. This trailer caught our eye this week – its about what America is looking like after 30 years of gradual continuous assault on our minds. We are being taught to hate and distrust one another, but we actually don’t.  And it is not stopping. “The Brainwashing of My Dad.”

THE BRAINWASHING OF MY DAD – Trailer from Jen Senko on Vimeo.

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Artists Re-Fresh “Coney Art Walls” for ’17

Artists Re-Fresh “Coney Art Walls” for ’17

After all that sun and surf and sashaying up the boardwalk in espadrilles and a big hat, what smashing city girl doesn’t like to throw on a fresh coat fire-engine-red lipstick ? Smart Sallys know that fresh paint on the kisser can bring a bevy of new beaus to take those lips for a ride.

Crash is actually a returning Coney Art Walls champion, here doing a brand new 2017 welcome and giving a shout out to Tats Cru. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Coney Art Walls is getting a solid touch-up for the new summer season too here in this waterside Brooklyn hotspot as a number of new artists have just joined the procession.

Unofficially the first weekend of summer tomorrow, you can be assured that there will be popcorn, cotton candy, beer, flip-flops, a bit of sleaze and a lot of freak show parading around these newly painted pieces by Crash, Alexis Diaz, Jim Drain, Ganzeer, Shantell Martin, Lee Quinones, Marie Roberts, Mark Bodé, Skewville and Chris Stain.

Chris Stain reprises a classic Martha Cooper photograph in his new mural for Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This outdoor museum of murals by Street Artists and graffiti writers is again curated by that two headed curiosity of the “Art Hypnotist” Jeffrey Deitch and “Real Estate Lion” Joseph Sitt for the third colorful year. Curious visitors to the Coney Art Walls are once again regaled with a labyrinthine tour of walls painted by artists of all backgrounds here on this gritty city beachfront that roils with raven-haired shimmery mermaids and muscled snake handlers with handle bar mustaches.

The elegant ring master Deitch tells us that many of the previous years walls are returning for another show season but that the program has added artists from as far away as equestrian England, enticing Egypt, passionate Puerto Rico, cray-cray California and good old fast-talking New York – a place so nice they had to name it twice.

Chris Stain in collaboration with Martha Cooper. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

One particular attraction for the hometown crowd will be the spectacular and splendiferous Lee Quinones, who famously painted hundreds of whole-cars on the NYC subway during graffiti’s halcyon days of the late 70s and early 80s.

Only a lucky few ladies and gentlemen will get to see this punctilious wizard of aerosol painting his wall LIVE with their own eyes. The rest of the crowd will undoubtedly be screaming on a nearby mechanized tilty-ride or looking longingly for someone to smooch under the boardwalk.

Alexis Diaz sketching his wall. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Returning champion Coney Art Walls this summer will include those by John Ahearn, Aiko, Buff Monster, D*Face, Daze, Eine, eL Seed, Haze, How & Nosm, Icy & Sot, IRAK, Kashink, Lady Pink, The London Police, Miss Van, Mister Cartoon, Nina Chanel Abney, Nychos, RETNA, Ron English, Pose, Sheryo & Yok, Tats Cru, and Tristan Eaton.

Alexis Diaz process shot. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Marie Roberts will bring the circus animals out this time. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Marie Roberts at work…nothing much is happening next to her. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jim Drain at work on his wall. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ganzeer at work on his wall. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ganzeer at work on his wall. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ganzeer at work on his wall. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shantell Martin. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville dramatically at work on his new color-blocked composition. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Like Madonna said, “Strike a pose.” Skewville at work. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mark Bodé. Coney Art Walls 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Evan Pricco Curates “What In The World” at Urban Nation in Berlin

Evan Pricco Curates “What In The World” at Urban Nation in Berlin

“The graffiti and Street Art movements – they have all these tentacles and they can be non-linear.”


A new exhibition in Berlin’s neighborhood of Schöneberg epitomizes one of the central schisms that has vibrated through Street Art and graffiti for years: the question of where to draw boundaries between these two scenes. Each may have been born in the margins of society but are now evermore commingled. Debates aside, everyone agrees that once in the gallery space, street become fine art after all.

Erosie on the left with Grotesk’s Juxtapoz News Stand on the right. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As Editor-in-Chief of the San Francisco based art magazine Juxtapoz and curator of this “What in the World” show at Urban Nation’s project space, Evan Pricco is well aware of the landmines that can explode when one is negotiating the terminologies and practices of sundry sub-cultural art manifestations that have bubbled to the surface in the last decades and which now often melt with one another inextricably.

“The graffiti and Street Art movements – they have all these tentacles and they can be non-linear,” Evan says as we walk down a subterranean parking ramp to see a low, long outdoor mural by Sweden’s EKTA; an abstract series of roughly square patches that closely emulate the sewn panels he has suspended from the ceiling inside the gallery.

Speaking of the tentacles, he continues, “It can be starting points to end points – it can be end points to starting points. There are all of these different cultures that grew out of that 1970s-80s set of counter-culture art movements.”

Hyuro. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I think the people that I really wanted in this show are kind of on the periphery of that. They clearly dip their toe into those movements, are clearly influenced by them. Their practice doesn’t necessarily fit in with what is going on in Street Art and graffiti but also its informed by it.”

To introduce a new crop of artists to Urban Nation that haven’t been shown here yet, Pricco choses some of Europes street/mural/conceptual artists who emphasize color and mood, an expansionist approach that he welcomes at the magazine as well. Not surprisingly, the range reflects some of the same interests you’ll find flipping through the influential art publication; old school graffiti, commercial illustration, comic book history, abstract fine art, political art, some lowbrow, some conceptual. There is even Grotesk’s newsstand, the actual one that he designed and constructed with Juxtapoz that sat in Times Square in October 2015.

Erosie on the left with Grotesk’s Juxtapoz News Stand on the right. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Primarily from Europe and raised in the hothouse of the 1990s epic graffiti scenes that enthralled youth in many EU big cities, this group of 7 artists each has moved their practice forward – which may lose them some street cred and gather new audiences.

Included are Berlin’s Daan Botlek, Sweden’s EKTA, Ermsy from France, Erosie from the Netherlands, Hyuro from Spain, Serge Lowrider from Switzerland and Zio Ziegler from the US. If you speak to any of them, you may find the commonality is the freedom they actively give themselves to pursue an autonomous artistic route not easily categorized.

Erosie at work on his piece. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lowrider is clearly in love with the letter-form, as is the graffiti tradition, but he steers sharply toward the calligraphic practices of crisp sign-painting and inverting the pleasantly banal messaging of advertising from an earlier era. Perhaps the tight line work overlaps with tattoo and skater culture, two creative brethren frequently in the mix in graffiti and Street Art scenes.

Hyuro uses a figurative symbolism heavy with metaphor and a color palette that is too understated for the flashy graphics that many associate with today’s mural festivals, yet she’s built a dedicated following among Street Art fans who admire her poke-you-in-the-eye activist streak. Daan Botleks’ figures wander and cavort amidst an abstractedly shaped world calling to mind the shading of early graffiti and the volumizing pointillism of Seurat after some wine.

 

Daan Botlek at work on his piece. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Painter Jeroen Erosie emphatically will tell you that he was in love with graffiti when he first did it on the streets as a teenager – and for many years afterwards. But he says he ultimately bristled at a scene that had once symbolized freedom to him but had become too rigid and even oppressive in its rules about how aesthetics should be practiced by people – if they were to earn respect within the clan.

At Saturday nights opening along Bülowstrasse with the front doors open to the busy street and with the sound of the elevated train swooshing by overhead, Erosie explained with a gleeful certainty his process of deconstruction that led him to this point. “I removed one of the pillars of graffiti from my work and I liked the result, the change. So I started to remove more pillars, one by one,” he says, describing the evolution that transformed his letter forms and colors into these simplified and bold bi-color icons that may call to mind Matisse’s cut outs more than graffiti bubble-tags, but you’ll easily draw the correlation if you try.

Daan Botlek. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Project M series of exhibitions over the past three years with Urban Nation, of which this is the 12th, have featured curators and artists from many backgrounds, disciplines, and geographies as well. The myriad styles shown have included sculpture, stencil, wheat paste, collage, calligraphy, illustration, screen-printing, decoupage, aerosol, oil painting, and even acrylic brush. It has been a carefully guided selection of graffiti/Street Art/urban art/fine art across the 12 shows; all presented respectfully cheek to jowl, side by side – happily for some, uncomfortably for others.

The ultimate success of the Project M series, initiated by UN Artistic Director Yasha Young, is evident in just how far open it has flung the doors of expectation to the museum itself. When the house opens in four months it will be a reflection to some extent 140 or so artists who pushed open those doors with variety of styles emblematic of this moment – converging into something called Urban Contemporary.

Daan Botlek and Ekta. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“What in the World” indeed: this show is in perfect alignment with the others in its wanton plumbing of the genres.

“I was trying to find people that are not part of the regular circuit – and I don’t mean that in a negative way but I mean there is kind of a regular circuit of muralism and Street Art right now – but I was looking for people who are really sort of on that periphery,” Pricco says. “Also because they are coming from these different parts of Europe, which to me sort of represents Juxtpoz’ reach, and they all kind of know each other but they’ve never really met – they all kind of bounce off of each other.”

Ekta. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: This grouping sounds anathema to the loyalty that is often demanded by these scenes – particularly the various graffiti scenes in cities around the world. You are describing an artistic practice that has a sort of casual relationship to that scene.

Evan Pricco: Right. And I think all of these artists have these graffiti histories but they weren’t completely satisfied with that kind of moniker or label. So it is slightly expanding out now. And then there’s something about them that makes me think of crafts, especially with Serge who is more of a sign-painter. I felt that all of these people approached their work in a way that felt very craft-oriented to me, and I really appreciated that. That’s kind of what I wanted to show too.

Ekta. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Each of these artists appears to have a certain familiarity with the art world that is outside a more strict definition of street culture – graffiti and Street Art and their tributaries. Would you say that you could see a certain development of personal style in this collection of primarily European artists that might be due to exposure to formal art history or other cultural influences?

Evan Pricco: Good question, and that could be the case for a few of the artists in the show, but I think the characteristics of each artist in the show is more of a result of the world getting smaller and influences and boundaries just blurring. You can see it Ermsy’s pop-culture mash-ups, or Erosie’s exploration of lettering and color; it’s not really about one place anymore but a larger dialogue of how far the work reaches now than ever before.

Erosie and I were having this conversation this morning about this, this idea of access and influences being so widespread. And that is exactly what I wanted to do. “What In the World” is sort of a nod to not really having to have boundaries, or a proper definition, but a feeling that something is happening. Its not Street Art, its not graffiti, but its this new wave that is looking out, looking in, and finding new avenues to share and make work.

Ermsie. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: From comic books to politics to activism to abstract to sign painting, this show spans the Hi-Low terrain that Juxtapoz often seeks to embrace in many ways.  Is it difficult to find common threads or narratives when countenancing such variety?

Evan Pricco: We have been so fortunate with the magazine that we have been able to expand the content in the last few years, and the threads are starting to connect solely based on the idea that the creative life is what you make of it. There may not be a direct connection between Serge Lowrider and Mark Ryden, but there is a connection in the idea of craftsmanship and skill and how one goes about applying that skill in the art world. That is always wanted I wanted to help bring to Juxtapoz – this idea that variety in the art world is healthy and finds its own connections just in the fact that it exists and is being made.

Ermsie at work on his indoor piece. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Many of these names are not household names, though some have ardent fans within more narrow channels of influence. What role does a curator play by introducing these artworks/artists to a new audience and what connections would you like a viewer to make?

Evan Pricco: First and foremost, these are some of my absolute favorite artists making work right now. I do have the advantage of traveling a lot and meeting different people and seeing their process, but I really wanted to bring together a group that I hadn’t personally met but admired and communicated with from afar.

Ermsie. Detail. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

I was thinking about this when I walked by Hyuro’s wall this morning. Her work is incredibly strong, and it has this really fascinating way of being a story and narrative from wall to wall while remaining fresh and really site-specific. Her work here just blew me away; its so subtle, has this really unique almost anonymous quality to it, but has a ton of thought and heart in it.

Really it would be great if the audience sees this and finds her other work, and starts seeing this really beautiful story emerging, these powerful political, social and economic commentaries. So really, I want that. I want this to be a gateway of looking at work and artists and then jumping into their really fantastically complex careers.

Serge Lowrider at work on his indoor piece. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Urban Nation has invited curators from around the world and Berlin during these 12 “Project M” shows, each with a take on what “art in the streets” is, how it has evolved, and how it is affecting contemporary art. What makes this show stand out?
Evan Pricco: I really do think what makes it stand out is that it represents all the things Juxtapoz stands for; Opening up an audience to something new and different. I think there is an aesthetic that the Project M shows have had, which I like, but I didn’t want to repeat what everyone had done before.

This is most definitely a Juxtapoz show; I mean our damned Newsstand that Grotesk designed is right in the middle of the space. But that is like this “representation” of the print mag, and all the walls around it are the avenues the magazine can take you; sign painting, textiles, graffiti, abstraction, conceptual art, murals, comics, politics. … So maybe in that way, the fact that the magazine is 23 years old and has covered such a big history of Lowbrow, Graffiti and other forms of art, this is a nice encapsulation of the next wave and generation.

Serge Lowrider at work on his indoor piece. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Serge Lowrider at work on his indoor piece. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zio Ziegler. What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Evan Pricco. Curator of What In The World PM/12. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


“What In the World: The Juxtapoz Edition” presented by Urban Nation will be on display through June, 2017. 


This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Spanish Museum Exhibition brings Urban Art Inside and Out to the Streets : Murcia

Spanish Museum Exhibition brings Urban Art Inside and Out to the Streets : Murcia

Museo de Bellas Artes de Murcia mounts “Arte urbano: De la calle al museo”

“From the Streets to The Museum” features 85 international artists from all corners of the world.

Kobra. Detail. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

In April the Museum of Fine Arts of Murcia (Mubam) in Southeastern Spain mounted an exhibition gathering 85 artists from 23 countries entitled ‘Urban Art: from the street to the museum’. Among the artists include Blek Le Rat, Blade, Cope2, Shepard Fairey, Vinz, Vhils, London Police, Futura, JonOne, Bordalo II, Dran, even Cornbread – who is credited by many as having lit the fire under graffiti in Philadelphia in the late 1960s.

Outside, where this scene originated, the museum also created an exhibition of many current practitioners in the areas of graffiti, Street Art, and mural making in different locations in the city of Murcia – including names like Kobra, L7M, Callizo, Lily Brik, and Dale Grimshaw.

Here are a few examples of new works in the streets for the Murcia Street Art Project as captured by photographer Lluis Olive Bulbena especially for BSA readers.

Kobra. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Lily Brik. Detail. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Lily Brik. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

L7Matrix. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

L7Matrix. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Draw to the left with Dale Grimshaw on the right. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Draw. Detail. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Dale Grimshaw. Detail. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

D Juez. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Zaiman. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Zaiman. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

SoFreeSo. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Mr. Chapu. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Toren. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

Carlos Callizo. Murcia Street Art Project. Murcia, Spain. May 2017. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)


Murcia Street Art Project on Facebook

Museo de Bellas Artes de Murcia on Facebook 

Museum website

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Add Fuel and “OVERLAPANHA” in Viseu, Portugal

Add Fuel and “OVERLAPANHA” in Viseu, Portugal

Today we have a fresh look at a new piece by Portuguese Street Artist/muralist Add Fuel. Titled “OVERLAPANHA”, the freshly painted wall in Viseu is part of the Tons de Primavera Festival which just ran this weekend.

Typically Add Fuel studies the local craft of tile making and traditions that are honored in a region, as well as their significant histories, before beginning his sketches – and this new one is no different. The modern aspect of these traditional patterns in the “ripping away” illusion he creates, providing the illusion of seeing something hidden, perhaps gaining understanding of the present by studying the past.

Add Fuel. Tons de Primavera Festival 2017, Viseu, Portugal. (photo © Add Fuel)

different.

Here we find that one of the oldest established wine regions in the country (located in the Dão region) provides plenty of design inspiration and his patterning is revelatory. For those who know this precise work and Add Fuel’s native tile making influences, this blue and white tableau is a very classic and traditional Portuguese style.

“This is the result of an exploration on how two distinct quadrilateral shapes can inhabit in the same space and how this experience can be occupied by a semi-human component,” he says, “depicted as the romantic act of simply ‘holding’ ”.

Add Fuel.  Detail. Tons de Primavera Festival 2017, Viseu, Portugal. (photo © Add Fuel)

Add Fuel. Detail. Tons de Primavera Festival 2017, Viseu, Portugal. (photo © Add Fuel)



@municipio_viseu @visitviseu
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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.21.17 – Berlin Edition

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.21.17 – Berlin Edition

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

This week in Berlin we had the chance to meet so many great folks as a result of the final Urban Nation events before September’s opening of the museum. All the curators were in attendance, including your BSA friends here, for the “We Broke Night” show along with the artistic director, managing director, architect, and about 40 artists in the 225 person party that featured breakers on pedestals dancing with flourescent tape, Shepard Fairey as DJ, and plenty of new artworks created just for this event.

Along with the main museum space show, across the street was another exhibition, the Project M/12 show called “What in the World” with mainly European former graff writers/now-fine-artists curated by Evan Pricco from Juxtapoz. Overflowing from the main space, the sidewalks were a parade of aesthetes, fans, business people, graff writers, archivists, politicians, and sex workers… It’s a wild mix and it gets very rowdy and everyone is reacting to the dynamics at play and wondering aloud how a museum like this will pull this off.

We’re not wondering, however. The sheer volume and variety of interested artists and related art lovers and community supporters tells us that this museum is a success before it has even opened. Here are a few images from the last few days for you to take a look at from outside and inside.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring: Besonders, BustArt, Cranio, Daniel Van Nes, Fin DAC, Herakut, Lora Zombie, Millo, Nasca, Nuno Vegas, Sebastian Wandl, Shepard Fairey, Stikki Peaches, Snik, Tank Patrol.

Top image: FinDac. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

FinDac. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

FinDac. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nasca. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stikki Peaches. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey in Berlin translates his No Future piece for the words apathy, sexism, xenophobia, and racism. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cranio. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BustArt. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lora Zombie. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art in Conjunction with Project M/12. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pfui Teufel!” Ms. Merkel hears some disturbing news in this sticker placed on a post box.Unidentified Artist. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bleib Besonders. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Obey . Sura. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sebastian Wandl. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daniel Van Nes. Detail. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daniel Van Nes. Detial. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Herakut in purple light for the “We Broke the Night” exhibit inside the space that will be the Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stencil majicians Snik. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BustArt. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tank Petrol. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Millo. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lora Zombie. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nuno Vegas. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporary Art. We Broke Night. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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1UP Crew Hits Front of Urban Nation in Berlin

1UP Crew Hits Front of Urban Nation in Berlin

There are two things we never expect to see in our lives here on the streets when looking for new Street Art and graffiti. One is a live unicorn walking down the street twirling a hula hoop on its horn and farting glitter. The other is the 1UP crew hitting up a wall wild style in broad daylight, wearing those mystical Tron-Kabuki masks – on the front wall of the nascent Urban Nation Museum (UN).

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As the double barrelled aerosol assault was happening we could hear the sound of heads exploding when the news of this ubiquitous graffiti crew hitting up this location would hit various constituencies. We could also hear the sound of the guys yelling over the Bülowstraße street traffic to each other through their masks – asking for one to throw a particular can or to question whether to do a specific fill or line. “We don’t usually work during the day,” said one of them to us as he gazed up at the blue fire glow that frames the 1UP name. “With so many people around with cameras these days, we can’t take many chances.”

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In this historically graffiti-loving city you have to work really hard for people to notice your work, and crews like 1UP and Berlin Kidz are revered for their aerosol prowess – and the chances they take. Not sure what the German term would be but in English the word “crushed” may have a picture of 1UP next to it in the dictionary. Equally impressive is their ability to stay completely anonymous – and with more members than the annual Menudo reunion BBQ.

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Compound the occasion with celebrated graffiti and Street Art photographer Martha Cooper pacing back and forth on the pavement and capturing every angle of the action. She’s crouching low and climbing higher for the right show while normal every day dudes like Shepard Fairey walk up to the small group of assembled observers to see what the matter is.

Shepard and his crew have just finished a large building side mural a block from here, as well as an expansive piece inside the museum space, where he’s DJing tonight. He seems to like the 1UP work and he also mentions how he digs Berlin Kidz and their style of rappelling down walls – and then talk turns to Brazillian pichação writers.

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

When a red-faced teenaged girl approaches one of the masked markers, he takes a minute to answer her inquiries, can in hand, ready to hit the wall but happy to respond to her multiple follow-up questions. Then he darts back up the ladder to spray a few small white starbursts while she aims her smartphone up at the action and he starts to looks for a red can to spray Martha’s name. Seeing Martha’s name up there seems appropriate, considering the first Martha Cooper Library will open here in four months.

So that’s it, nothing special happened today here in Berlin, only that 1UP knocked out a large piece on the outside of UN. Nothing more to see here.

Keep your eyes open for unicorns.

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1UP Crew. Urban Nation Museum For Urban Contemporay Art. PM/12 – We Broke Night.  Berlin, May 19, 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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