All posts tagged: Winston Tseng

“Back To School” Posters from Winston Tseng Thrill and Irk on the Street

“Back To School” Posters from Winston Tseng Thrill and Irk on the Street

Yo! It’s back to school, fool! We got this!

We’ve been through this before, right? – throngs of new excited students marching and plodding back to classrooms as fall approaches full of expectations. And yet, the adults in the room are scrambling to figure out how.

With 90% of families desperate for in-school learning and most kids too young to have vaccine shots, there are still debates about whether masks and social distancing are enough to keep everyone safe. Add to this the periodic closures because some classmates test positive and the rest have to go into quarantine- while parents and grandparents and all kinds of caretakers scramble for childcare and keeping their jobs if they have one. Stir in a toxic politicization of those who are sure this is a political conspiracy of some sort deviously designed to deny personal freedom, and suddenly an auspicious new school year feels like a stove gas leak filling your home with fumes.

Winston Tseng (photo © jaime Rojo)

You can always rely on street artist Winston Tseng to light a match at the right time. His bright flat graphics are on target: easily read and evidently easily misinterpreted. Familiar images and shapes sometimes require decoding – and he is happy to lead you to the hot spots in our current societal debates. This new fake poster is popping up around New York City this week; making some laugh, and making others breathe fire.

Well, at least we are still breathing!  

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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.29.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.29.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

A new hurricane, a new school year, a new variant, a new governor, a new fall of Saigon, and a new anti-vaccination song from rock guitar god Eric Clapton, who doesn’t want you to put suspect chemicals into your body. Presumably, cocaine is still okay, however, if you want to get down, down on the ground.

The summer storms keep coming, and yet somehow so does the incredible show of creativity on our streets; the celebration of murals and graffiti burners and painters and sculptors and characters and opinions and cogitations. However hot and steamy and hard New York can be sometimes, it also is positively ebullient and inspiring. We know our many differences are our greater asset, our combined aspirations a stunning new possibility.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring A. Smith, Captain Eyeliner, China, Cody James, CP Won, David Puck, Gabriel Specter, Huetek, Iquene, Jason Naylor, Jitr!, Amanda Valdes, Lorenzo Masnah, M.R.S.N., Not Your Muse, Peachee Blue, Sara Lynne Leo, Sasha Velour, Say No Sleep, Tyler Ives, and Winston Tseng.

CP Won (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Say No Sleep (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Say No Sleep (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Say No Sleep (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo in collaboration with Tyler Ives. “Remedial Purge” (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
A Smith (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Specter (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Huetek. Detail. Work in progress for The Bushwick Collective 10th Anniversary edition. (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Cody James. Work in progress for The Bushwick Collective 10th Anniversary edition. (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor. Work in progress for The Bushwick Collective 10th Anniversary edition. (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
China (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Jitr! (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
David Puck (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Iquena (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Not Your Muse (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Peachee Blue (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Amanda Valdes (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Masnah (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
M.R.S.N. (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artists (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.15.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.15.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Here we are, precisely on the 50th anniversary of Nixon’s shocking removal of the dollar from the gold standard. Seems like everything is going well with fiat currency and the banking system, right?

Ah, never mind, there’s gold in these here streets.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 4sakn, Adrian Wilson, Against Dgrams, Billy Barnacles, Captain Eyeliner, Corn Queen, De Grupo, DLove, Eye Sticker, Goblin, Mister Alek, Moka, More Less Eveything, Plannedalism, Sara Lynne Leo, Stikman, Sule, The Art of Will Power, Trace1, Werd Smoker, and Winston Tseng .

Goblin (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Midnight Cowboy’s Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman. Goblin (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The beloved Biz Markie, who passed in July. The Art of Will Power (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Biz Markie gets his wings. The Art of Will Power (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sule Cant Cook (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Corn Queen (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Corn Queen (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Corn Queen (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Moka (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Against Dgrams. Mister Alek. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adrian Wilson in collaboration with The LISA Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
4sakn CBS. Trace1. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
More Less Everything (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Werd Smoker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between Eye Sticker & Billy Barnacles. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between Eye Sticker & Billy Barnacles. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DLove (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner. Some rascal edited the text by adding and subtracting letters. The original text read: “Oh no I look incredible”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Still life with Queen Anne Lace & Sunflowers. Summer 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Winston Tseng: Money Fixes Everything

Winston Tseng: Money Fixes Everything

On a recent sunny May day, we followed street artist Winston Tseng to document his new series of posters installed on three locations in Manhattan. The series is titled “Money Fixes Everything.”

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The flat and colorful 2-D illustration style of street artist/graphic artist Winston Tseng doesn’t scream social inequity and cultural insanity the way other graphic styles may. The graphic language is the 2-D, flat, icon-based vernacular familiar to phones and applications, a neutral and familiar reduction to precisely convey the visual elements necessary to infer more is there. Brilliantly pared and exacting in composition, a close look allows the viewer to unpack Tseng’s specific brand of critique – perhaps causing you to crack a smile, or roll your eyes, shake your head.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

New York street artists have tackled social, political, religious, class, and structural systems of inequity in waves during street art’s newer rise to consciousness. Rather than using messages as a blunt instrument for screeds, you now see the subtle nature of messaging in Tseng’s work. Skilled in the unspoken and the finespun art of steering consumer pathways toward the adoption of products or services, Tseng uses these images on the street to evoke other concepts.

Tseng delivers in the common street form of wildposting, employing the familiar poster form as a vehicle on the street, piqued passersby’s interest with his razor-sharp perspective that digs into more complex themes. His own sense of activism is not necessarily vicious, but when he plucks the proper internal chord, he can produce a virulently strong reaction. He tells us that he savors every inflection.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here, his new campaign parallels nicely with the unprecedented pumping of trillions of fictional dollars into the economy to prevent (some would say ‘exacerbate’) a potential domino-style collapse at this moment in history. He maintains that we need to examine this default response to many problems by simply throwing money at them. Tseng may be hinting that he doesn’t think this solution will work.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Winston Tseng spoke with Brooklyn Street Art about his approach, the context he is creating within, and what market he is smartly selling his ideas to.

Brooklyn Street Art: Do you have a name for this campaign?
Winston Tseng: The name for the series is “Money Fixes Everything.” That’s obviously a sarcastic comment.

BSA: Well, sometimes sarcasm helps.
WT: True, that’s true.

BSA: Can you talk about where you draw inspiration from? Current events? You obviously follow the news and media landscape…
WT: Absolutely. I think I consume the news and the Internet the way many people do these days. I feel like it’s hard to turn away and hard to tune it out.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: As you are watching current events and something catches your eye or ear, do you immediately make a concept of how that will look? What is the process?
WT: I would say that I wish that it came to me quickly. Sometimes it does, but a lot of times it doesn’t. A lot of times, I feel like it comes in two parts. There is one part about essentially the topic that I want to capture, and ultimately I want the work to reflect the times that we are in. The other part is “how do I say it in a certain way, through my style, which is corporate advertising as a medium”- How do I say it in a way that gets the idea across in a manner that I like to express it in, which is toeing the line between being really blatant and be more subtle?

BSA: It looks like you try to strike a balance with humor in your work. I don’t know if that is intentional or it’s you, not knowing that you are funny.
WT: I think I try to use humor; I don’t think I’m doing it in the funniest way because it is a bit of dark humor. I think the medium I use is a good way of getting peoples’ attention, getting them to tune in to the work I’m putting out there. I think humor is something that people are pretty receptive to. 

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: It is interesting that you use corporate advertising as a model. At the same time, one could see it as a kind of political cartoon, although different perhaps from a typical New Yorker cartoon, for example. It appears as if you are trying to get the point across while poking a finger at the media and corporations. It is like three stones are being thrown at the same time.


WT: I think you’re right. For me, corporate advertising is really just a medium that helps get the message across. One because we are inundated with it, and because of that familiarity, unfortunately, we aren’t paying attention to it. Still, it is a way I can reach peoples’ attention. That said, the media isn’t really the message or part of the point. The corporation is definitely not always a target. More so, it’s just a way to register in people’s brains what the message might be. For example, in this latest series where I use “GoFundMe,” but it’s not a shot against “GoFundMe” really at all. I think what they are doing enables a lot of people to get help. It’s kind of weird that it is a for-profit company. But other than that, it’s more just about using “GoFundMe” as a quick way for people to put it together.

BSA: At other times, you really do go after, for example, the health industry and the banks.
WT: True.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Corporations aren’t necessarily evil, but capitalism appears to have run amok. It looks like it has forgotten that it doesn’t have to be only for the few, but can be for everybody. For the new series, you were talking about people having enough food or money to buy it, people having enough money to buy insurance, people being able to be who they are on the street without being afraid of the reaction to the color of their skin or their country of origin or their ethnic background. There are so many topics right now that are just boiling, and it is rather overwhelming. Can you sleep at night?


WT: I think you hit it on the head, which is that this series allowed me to check a lot of boxes at once and to touch on a lot of subjects that have different causes and different route reasons why they exist in our society, and I guess the commentary that I am making and this one is that our solution right now is one of throwing money at it. It’s not really going to solve those problems systemically. This was a case, to your point, where I had a bunch of ideas of subjects that I wanted to address, and as it turned out, I could get them all done with one concept that checked off six subjects.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Also, you found a spot on a large wall where you could put 18 posters at once, mimicking what we see on the subway, where they plaster one entire subway car with the same ad campaign. In that way, you were taking a page from the advertising companies. 


WT: Absolutely. I think it has been proven that repetition get messages  
across and, in this case, I think that if I put these posters one at a time on their own, a person might not get the full picture of what I’m trying to convey. It was important for this series to have a lot of posters together. The use of repetition is important because these are things that we constantly see in our society again and again. We see mass shootings; we see hate crimes; we see police brutality; we see people who are having financial problems. So the idea of the repetition is there also to support how it is occurring in our society.

BSA: So in the last few years since we first followed you on this ongoing project doing an installation like this, you have received some “cease and desist letters”?


WT: Yes, I have gotten a few “cease and desist“ from the companies that run these advertising spaces. They haven’t come directly from corporations.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Also, you have received some attention in other media. You received a write-up recently in Juxtapoz magazine, I believe. And so are you satisfied? I know your work is never done until it’s done. Have you gotten a level of satisfaction so that you can continue to do it? Have you become a little despondent and like “this is not working” or “this is not working”? Is your goal to do it for yourself, do it for others? Is your goal to change the world one person at a time. What is your goal?


WT: First and foremost, it’s mainly for me. I get either personal satisfaction or stress relief out of it. It’s a creative outlet. I think it is always encouraging. I always appreciate any sort of coverage or people sharing or commenting on social media. Ultimately what I’m trying to do is capture the times we are in to reflect our society. It is hard to know if I am doing that correctly or achieving that goal – so all of these other things are giving small confirmations along the way.

BSA: So they have asked you to stop using their furniture on the street to put your art? 


WT: I haven’t responded. I don’t know that it warranted a response. I know what they want, and I’m not responding.

I think I won’t really know until later on when we can all look back and say, “this was what it was like back then. This is something that was happening. This is crazy; this is fucked up.” So I am definitely as motivated as ever before to keep doing this. To what end? I think it’s just the general idea that, if I can just capture this time at this moment, maybe in the future there will be some benefit. Not personally, not for me, as a society.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Do you get hate mail?
Winston: Yes.

BSA: Does it bother you?
WT: I think it varies depending on how serious it seems. I think it’s on a case-by-case basis.

BSA: Do you respond on social media?
WT: No, I don’t. I don’t really engage. I don’t feel like it is an effective end to that. 

BSA: We were first with you when you were doing this series, and there was one poster that generated many controversies, and I was surprised that it was the one that had a sports reference in it.
WT: I don’t think that was the most controversial of those ones.

BSA: Which one was it?
WT: It was the woman holding the Bible.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Let’s talk about it because it was a comment on Boston sports fans from our social media commenters, which seemed meant as a joke.


WT: That one, in my opinion, was what is the “lowest hanging fruit” and the least provocative. Again, I am trying to reflect the times or the sentiment or peoples’ attitudes. That’s not necessarily my personal opinion about sports, but it is a prevalent opinion that exists out there, especially in New York City, where there’s a rivalry with Boston sports. So that is not something that I created. I think the fact that it struck a nerve in either one of those cities among sports fans just kind of confirmed the concept behind it.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: I thought it was funny the people who are into sports were so upset when they were other topics that were, in my opinion, more important – or at least ones that should be discussed more and in-depth. Those topics were kind of ignored because these fanboys were defending their teams. But it is interesting how passionate people get with those issues. Many people are interested in pulverizing you rather than debating issues. Many people who are there with personal attacks on social media are not there to debate the issue and to learn something about it, and come to a middle ground. They are there just to destroy you because they don’t want you talking about it.


WT: Yes, absolutely. I think that is the state of social media and the interactions between people who essentially don’t know each other in real life.

Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng. Money Fixes Everything. Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.23.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.23.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week, where we are keeping our minds expanded and eyes wide open as the transformation of society and its fabric is happening right before us. We’re living in a bubble, or on one – an everything bubble at the end of a boomer age that will pop. Institutions compromised, media compromised, social net torn, leaders purchased and adrift. Late spring romanticism buoys us, as does the removal of masks out doors and sometimes inside them. New York is back, but its not sure.

And Jerome Powell finally announced that the dollar is in the gallows – or will rather be once he has successfully inflated to its ultimate death. No, we have no advice – No one is listening anyway.


So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: Aaron Hauck, Bastard Bot, Goog, Matt Siren, Mel, Mort Art, Neckface, Royce Bannon, Sac Sic, Samantha French, Stay Busy, Stikman, TNAW, and Winston Tseng.

Royce Bannon and Mat Siren. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman and an unidentified artist above. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)

These two images are part of Winston’s new series, we’ll talk about this new series later on BSA.

Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Goog (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TNAW (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stay Busy! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Neck Face (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MEL for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Aaron Hauck and Samantha French for O+ Festival. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
This spot previously had a Banksy inspired “Stop Asian Hate” mural. The mural has now morphed into this. We aren’t sure if Adrian Wilson, the artist who made the original mural has anything to do with this new concept. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Saver (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untiled. Trees. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 04.11.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.11.21

This week we received a note from a friend in the graff/street art community urging us to encourage street and graffiti artists to create artwork on the streets that beseeches GenZ to get the Covid-19 vaccine.

They needn’t worry.

Graffiti and street artists have continued to respond to the COVID mask and vaccine issues as much as they did with the rejection of Trump and everything that came with him. During the last few years, they also have strongly responded to the BLM movement, to the topic of police brutality, to structural inequality in our economy, to last fall’s election, to indigenous people’s rights, to Asian hate, LGBTQ rights, to drug use, to anxiety, to depression, to love, to hope, to our effect on the Earth’s environment, and many social/political issues. Not always high-minded, Street artists also like pop culture icons, cute animals, and emulating successful artists who came before them and whom they admire.

It’s all part of the gig.

When we hit the streets in the pursuit of arts, we never know what we’ll find and where we’ll find it. This week we were surprised by a certain uptick in the number of sculptures on the streets. The artists used different materials, from ceramic to resin, metal, cement, and techniques associated with papier-mâché. The sculptures were mostly affixed to traffic signposts but sometimes were placed on street construction barriers. We are always happy to see sculptures on the streets as they bring back the days when sanctioned murals were definitely not the norm, and illegal street art ruled the streets in myriad small formats.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: A Cool 55, AJ Maldo, Billy Barnacles, Chris Protas, City Kitty, CRKSHNK, JJ Veronis, Mataruda, Miyok Madness, Mint & Serf, Mort Art, Mr. Triple Double, Patrick Picou Harrington, Phetus, Raddington Falls, Sibot, Spy33, Turtle Caps, Winston Tseng.

Oh Sailor boy! Seibot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mint & Serf (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Spy33 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Chris Protas (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JJ Veronis. Mr. Triple Double (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A portrait of Mr. Beyonce AKA Jay-Z by an unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ Maldo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty and Turtle Caps (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Cool 55 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Miyok Madness. Rose time is almost here peeps!! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mataruda in Kingston, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“Hey baby give me a kiss” JJ Veronis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Patrick Picou in Albany, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Manhattan, NY. April 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.21.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.21.21

Nowruz Mubarak! Happy Persian New Year to all the New York neighbors who celebrate it. Also, Happy Spring! Did you think it would never arrive? Already the birds are chirping in the trees, and the crocus is popping up from beneath the garbage and dog crap. That guy who lives downstairs named Manny and his brother are washing their car on the curb while blasting a mix from Marley Marl & Red Alert at top volume for the block to enjoy. All the while, there is a colorful parade of young bucks and shorties who are strutting around the neighborhood with big eyes and a burning flame of hope in their hearts.

Another reason Brooklyn is feeling hopeful is the announcement Friday by Chuck Schumer saying that New York is to get 1.6 million COVID shots every week thanks to a ‘vaccine supercharge.’ One year after the sounds of ambulances filled the air and refrigerator trucks became mobile morgues on Brooklyn streets, people are eagerly running to pharmacies and Yankee Stadium and Citi Field to get the shot.

New Yorkers are also taking to the streets to protest Anti-Asian discrimination and violence locally and nationally. Many point to Trump’s use of the term “Chinese Virus” repeatedly in the last year as a direct causal relationship to increased acts of prejudice. But once again, New Yorkers know how to re-enforce the message: “United we stand, divided we fall.” As a New Yorker and as a person, it makes you feel proud.

Finally, street art is popping off in all kinds of stylistic and thematic directions this week – from the secular American saint, Dolly Parton, posed as a vaccine nurse by SacSix, to Sticker Maul’s Priority Mail collages, to Winston Tseng’s subtle and damning phone booth campaign of Walmart and McDonald’s workers who represent our formerly middle-class neighbors who are paid so little that they actually qualify for food stamps.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: Almost Over Keep Smiling, City Kitty, D7606, Damien Mitchell, Ethan Minsker, Invader, LET, Matt Siren, Mort Art, NET, Rambo, Raw Raffle, Royce Bannon, SacSix, Sara Lynne Leo, Sticker Maul, Tram, Voxx Romana, and Winston Tseng.

SacSix (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Damien Mitchell (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne-Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tram (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rambo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Cat called LET (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ethan Minsker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren . Royce Bannon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raw Raffe (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty. Vox Romana. D7606 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Daniel Mastrion (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. March 2021.(photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Street Art Says “Happy Inauguration” to Biden and Harris

Street Art Says “Happy Inauguration” to Biden and Harris

The streets have been anticipating the arrival of the new president and vice president for a few months now. Today it took place and the U.S. has a 46th President – Joe Biden and 49th Vice President – Kamala Harris.

President Joe Biden by Mah Cima (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vice-President Kamala Harris by SacSix. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
President Joe Biden and Vice-President Kamala Harris by Winston Tseng. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 01.10.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.10.21

Now that the orange man has been censored by social media he’ll have much more time to pack his boxes and do some deep vacuuming of the living room furniture.

All tolled, this week was perhaps the most effective public demonstration of white privilege on parade for everyone to see – and one that was beamed across the world, including into the countries who once looked to the US for leadership and promise. BLM could not have made a more powerful and impactful statement about the systemic inequality that is baked into American society. Did you see all those video split screens of how police treated the different crowds?

Trump is on his way out, but as the author Thomas Frank likes to say, Trumpism is here to stay.

Ahhhh, but the future is unwritten. Where’s you marker?

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adrian Wilson, Bastard Bot, De Grupo, Ethan Minsker, Gane, Glare, HeartsNY, Lunge Box, Timothy Goodman, Wane, Winston Tseng, and You Are Loved. Yes, you are loved.

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Timothy Goodman. In Memoriam. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Timothy Goodman for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HeartsNY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adrian Wilson for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Are Loved (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ethan Minsker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lunge Box (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gane, Wayne, Glare. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.27.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.27.20

They are not staying quiet. If you had doubted the inclination of street artists to join the socio-political fray in 2020, don’t. Among the cute and decorative pieces out there, we are steadily discovering that artists are using the public sphere to take risks, addressing issues that are thorny and puzzling. As ever, the streets are a reflection of our society and all its fabulous dysfunction – a refreshing take on free speech that often makes much more sense than the disinformation war raging hourly right now on corporate media.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adam Fu, Blood and Soul, Clint Mario, Faust, Gazoo to the Moon, Jarus, Maia Lorian, Pure Genius, Raddington Falls, Sticker Maul, Stikman, TV Head ATX, Will Pay, and Winston Tseng.

RBG – RIP VOTE NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Emmanuel Jarus in collaboration with Street Art for Mankind and the United Nations on its 75th anniversary a few blocks away from the UN Headquarters hopes to raise awareness on food insecurity. They don’t have to look far to find hungry people, as reportedly 2.5 million New Yorkers were already grappling with food insecurity before the coronavirus pandemic, and a new report from City Harvest says another 800,000 have been added to that figure in just the last six months. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Emmanuel Jarus in collaboration with Street Art for Mankind and the United Nations on its 75th anniversary. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Will Pay (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TV Head ATX (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Faust (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gazoo To The Moon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls with friends. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Maia Lorian (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fujita for The Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Blood and Soul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Clint Mario (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images of the Week: 09.13.20

BSA Images of the Week: 09.13.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring CAM, David F. Barthold, JJ Veronis, Martha Cooper, Poi Everywhere, REVS, SoulOne, Tones, UFO 907, Winston Tseng, and WK Interact.

Tones (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tones. Wolf Pack. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tones tribute to SoulOne (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Poi Everywhere (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)
WK Interact (photo © Jaime Rojo)
David F Barthold (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JJ Veronis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JJ Veronis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
REVS SuperSport has been updated one more time. This piece has been running for more than a decade going from black to silver to red and blue. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. ACAb (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CAM (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
As it’s become customary every year, the FDNY honored their fallen brothers and sisters who rushed to save the victims of the 9/11 attacks on the Twin Towers in NYC 19 years ago. Hundreds of firemen in uniform gathered at the Firemen’s Memorial Monument at Riverside Park in Manhattan. The names of the 343 members of the New York City Fire Department who were killed at the site of the attacks were read. In addition to those killed 19 years ago, 227 firemen have died of illnesses related to their rescue and recovery efforts at the WTC, their names were read as well. Riverside Park, Manhattan, NYC September 11, 2020. (photo © Martha Cooper)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.30.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.30.20

The winds of change are gathering force and weaving together – social, political, financial, environmental… and it is all being reflected in street art today. Ironically, because media in the US is addicted to money and misdirection and is completely disinterested in the poor and working class as a whole, thoughtful analysis that pops off city walls seems unadulterated, capable of giving you more truthful assessments of what is missing, what is out of whack, and who’s gotta take action. Your face here.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adam Fu, AJ LaVilla, Antennae, Black Ligma, City Kitty, CRKSHNK, De Groupo, Hearts NY, Novy, Pork, Surface of Beauty, The Greator, Winston Tseng, X Rebellion NYC, and Zuli Miau.

Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Black Ligma (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Creator (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Antennae (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ LaVilla (photo © Jaime Rojo)
X Rebellion NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fu collab with Surface of Beauty for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zuli Miau (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Take Out Racism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TGLNYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pork (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Novy (photo © Jaime Rojo)
I Heart Graffiti . Hearts NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Individual Activist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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