All posts tagged: Tuco Wallach Pacifico

BSA Film Friday: 01.14.22

BSA Film Friday: 01.14.22

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Humask & Shadow _ Light off/Light on. Tuco Wallach Pacifico
2. Bastardilla: La lingue dei carciofi
3. Saber: Escaping Los Angeles. From Chop ’em Down Films

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BSA Special Feature: Humask and Shadow

For artist Tuco Wallach the street art story has nearly always been a family affair that mixes easily with his Humask campaign. His psychological treatise on man’s relationship with himself and society and masks may be internal, but the actual street practice is often externalized to include friends and family to create, place, document the new works that go into the public places. Here, as a chill holiday recording of a moment, we see the intimate and precise care that goes into his process – a process that is open and welcoming, and participatory. He says the video is about wood cabins, family, shadows, lights, friends, and Humask.

Humask & Shadow _ Light off/Light on. Tuco Wallach Pacifico

Bastardilla: La lingue dei carciofi

In the depths of New York winter, we like to escape to that sticky and warm time in summer when the air and the bees buzzed in unison, the thick richness of the days and nights, lingering in reverie. At the time we called it Bastardilla in Love With Bees and the Taste of Summer in Stornara, Italy. We dare you not to fall in love or at least be enchanted.

Saber: Escaping Los Angeles. From Chop ’em Down Films

“You can tell a lot about a city just by reading its walls.” Okay, Saber, you have our attention. And it’s shot by Chop ’em Down films? We’re there. Here the graffiti writer and fine artists narrate the police state of the LA during one of its more dismal periods caught on camera – and the record of a constant state of uprising.

Now a grand don of graffiti looking back, he sees the fall of LA hasn’t halted, only intensified, but his heart is still in it. He has become performative, crystalizing the movements of his work and his history into a gestural full-body modern performance; rebellious and distraught and yet full of passion – his own evolution from the street to the studio to the street again.

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