All posts tagged: Spaik

Spaik Snakes Back to The Tunnel In Ibiza

Spaik Snakes Back to The Tunnel In Ibiza

For the BLOOP Festival in Ibiza this year Mexican artists Spaik swirls around inside a tunnel with a folkloric styled, two fanged, tongue wagging snake, taking advantage of perspective and a unique throughway to add drama to the reptilian slither. If this piece is related to this years  theme of “Changes”, then it looks like Spaik is not feeling very hopeful about upcoming transitions.

Spaik. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © Sr. Mini)

It is not his first time at BLOOP, so the creative advertising agency that organizes the annual Bloop, now in its 7th year, must like what Spaik brings to the island in the Mediterranean Sea off the east coast of Spain for this festival that showcases installations, architecture, photography, video mapping, and of course, plenty of parties.

Spaik. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © Sr. Mini)

Spaik. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © Sr. Mini)

Spaik. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © Sr. Mini)

Spaik. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © Sr. Mini)

Spaik. Bloop Festival 2017. Ibiza, Spain. (photo © Sr. Mini)

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BSA Images of the Week 10.09.16

BSA Images of the Week 10.09.16

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Donald Trump didn’t change. Your “News” did.

Any New Yorker on the street can tell you that Donald Trump has always been this way – he hasn’t made a “secret” of it. We just called this stuff “tabloid news”, and tabloids were an exception. Now they nearly rule all public discourse.

Lowest-common-denominator “News” has produced a lowest-common-denominator candidate. He almost clinched the highest elected office. There is a trail of polarized destruction in the wake.

For over a year this profit-driven entertainment media actually created a cancerous candidate who gives them daily “clickable content” while they hold their noses and count the dollars. These people aren’t serving you, or democracy. We are all collectively debased – men and women, black and white, Mexican and Muslim, rich and poor, families, children, teachers, workers, nurses, doctors, cashiers, church people, atheists – as a result.

The GOP’s flirtation with starting and fanning racist bonfires over the past decade or so has finally swallowed it in flames, leaving it in smoking embers, their leaders completely covered with fecal matter, quieted and stunned. The reputation of the US around the world took a battering thanks to this tabloid news candidate as well. Traveling to Street Art events outside the US this year, invariably someone would shake us by the lapels and ask us what the hell was going on with this Trump guy?!.

In recognition of the woman-hating man who came dangerously close to the White House, here are a number of different women and girls by Street Artists creating in the public sphere at the moment, covering a range of styles, backgrounds, techniques and points of view.

So, here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Beast, Danielle Mastrion, Faile, finDAC, Jilly Ballistic, Kevin Lyons, Leticia Mondragora, LMNOPI, Marina Capdevila, Myth, Never Crew, Ouch, Shepard Fairey, Sipros, Slick, Spaik, Stray Ones, Taker, Who’s Dirk, and Zimer.

Our top image: FinDac (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey. Detail. For The L.I.S.A. Project in The East Village. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey. The L.I.S.A. Project in The East Village. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Zimer (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Danielle Mastrion and Lexi Bella collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Beast (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faile (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Leticia Mandragora (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Marina Capdevilla in Switzerland for Vision Art Festival. (photo © Marina Capdevila)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stray Ones (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stray Ones. Catch him if you can! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ouch (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Taker for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Never Crew in Luzern, Switzerland for Viva Con Agua. (photo © Never Crew)

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Sipros for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jilly Ballistic. Palimpsest in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown. Sexual predator for USA President. How can you people defend him still? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown. She is not perfect. She is also not crazy. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Whos Dirk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Slick. Murals In The Market/1XRun 2016. Detroit, Michigan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kevin Lyons. Murals In The Market/1XRun 2016. Detroit, Michigan. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Spaik. Sardegna in Italy. (photo © Spaik)

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Untitled. Subway dreams. NYC Subway. Manhattan, NYC. October 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.02.16 : Spotlight on Climate Change

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.02.16 : Spotlight on Climate Change

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Faile. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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He loves me, he loves me not. He loves me, he tells me I’m an idiot because I trust scientists about climate change and that actually it is a hoax created by the Chinese.

Sorry, everything reminds us of Donald J. Trump and his outlandish claim for the presidency. Even when we are looking at the new Faile mural in Greenpoint, Brooklyn called Love Me, Love Me Not.

The Greenest Point is an initiative that wants to raise awareness of Climate Change and three Street Artists have just completed two murals here in Brooklyn to support it. The organization says that they hope to gather “together people from different backgrounds, professions and skill-sets who are bonded by aligned values and a common vision.” By integrating Street Art with technology, film, sound and voice, they hope that we’ll be more capable of piecing together the climate change puzzle as a collective.

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Faile. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We don’t pretend to be scientists, but we trust the ones we have and we decided that this week we would dedicate BSA Images of the Week  just to this new project and this topic. We also know that it is now well-documented that tobacco companies fought us citizens with disinformation and legislative trickery for decades before they finally admitted that smoking was killing us and our families, so there is reason to believe that oil companies and related industries who flood our media and politicians with money are possibly buying time while we’re all heating up the atmosphere.

Here are new images of the two new murals in Greenpoint and Williamsburg, Brooklyn and an interview with the three artists who participated; Vexta, Askew, and long time Greenpoint studio residents, Faile.

BSA: Why do you think art is an important vehicle to highlight climate issues?
Faile: We feel it’s important to create work that can resonate with people on an emotional level. Something that we can live with everyday and that has a place in our lives that brings meaning to our experience. This is how we think people must learn to connect to climate change. It’s not something you can just think about, it’s something that you have to do everyday. It has to become part of you. We hope art has the power to be that wink and nod that you are on the right track. That the little things you do are meaningful and that change starts with you in the most simple of ways.

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Vexta and Askew. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Greenpoint has a history of blue collar communities who worked in factories producing goods for the both the merchant marine and the USA Navy. Those factories are all gone and only a few of the original settlers remain in the neighborhood such as the Polish community. How do you think the murals painted for the festival relate to them?
Vexta: Our collaborative mural hopefully offers a voice to people directly to people who will become a part of the history of Greenpoint and its legacy. We will have QR codes installed that link to video pieces that physically give Askew’s subjects a voice as well as linking to the birds calls and information about their situation.
Faile: We tried to be aware of the history of Greenpoint. The communities that make this neighborhood what it is. We tried to incorporate some nods to them through the work, specifically with the traditional Polish pattern in the socks. Unfortunately, Greenpoint is also home to some of the worst ecological disasters this country has ever experienced, the effects of which are still present. We wanted to bring something positive and something beautiful to the neighborhood that spoke to everyone. There are other historical murals in the neighborhood so it didn’t feel like it required another.

The neighborhood is also quickly changing. It’s home to many young families and has a vibrant creative class, not to mention our studio for the last 12 years. When creating an artwork in a public space, especially a park, there’s always that balance of trying to make something that people can connect with on a visceral, then psychological level in an immediate way–once that connection is made you hope they can dig a little deeper into the more subversive side of the meaning.

BSA: Do you think art and in particular the murals painted for this festival have the power to change the conversation on climate change and positively move and engage the people who either are indifferent to the issue or just refuse to believe that climate change is a real issue caused by humans? 
Faile:Whether you believe it or not there are basic things that people can do in their everyday lives to create a more beautiful environment around them. Picking up trash, recycling, being mindful that our resources are precious – none of these really imply that you have to have an opinion about climate change. Just the fact that we have a green space now in Transmitter Park is progress towards an environment that we can fall in love with.

We think that’s ultimately what the idea of Love Me, Love Me Not is asking. What kind of environment do you want? Do you want renewable green spaces that offer future generations beauty and room to reflect within nature? Or do you want to pave over the toxic soil and oil spills with the risk of repeating the past? If people can even ask themselves that question then we are at least engaging them into the dialogue where the seeds of action can be planted.

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Vexta and Askew. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Why do you think art is an important vehicle to highlight climate issues?
Vexta: For me as an artist it is the means that I have to talk about what I know to be important. Art also stands as this symbolic, most often visual, gesture that can bring people together, ignite debate and shine a light towards a new way of thinking that is perhaps still in the shadows of the mainstream. There is no more pressing issue right now than Climate Change.

There was a famous piece of graffiti up for a long time in my home city of Melbourne that read “No Jobs on a Dead Planet” in a beautiful font running down a power plant chimney. This work spurred my thinking back before I had begun making art professionally. That simple creative action out in public space was powerful and it spoke a simple truth and showed me that you can do a lot with a little. Art and art out in the streets is a great vehicle for talking about issues like climate change, because its a gesture in a shared space, it provides something to meditate on or think about that ultimately is a shared reality, this makes sense to me as climate change is a problem we need to work together to address.

Askew: I think that in particular art in the public space can be a very powerful way to put messaging on issues that matter right out in front of people who may not otherwise engage with it. Also an artist has the freedom to make the image captivating in a way that perhaps other platforms for speaking about serious issues don’t. People get bombarded with so much conflicting information every day especially via the mainstream media, art can put people in the contemplative space to engage differently.

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Vexta and Askew. Detail. The Greenest Point Project. Greenpoint, Brooklyn. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: You have participated in at least one other art festival whose principal mission is to highlight the well being of our ecology and our planet. What would you say is unique characteristic of The Greenest Point that differentiates it from other festivals with equal goals?
Askew: Well I think this is different because it’s so focused on a specific place whereas the scope of other events I’ve painted look more generally at global issues. I think it’s great for communities to narrow their focus to directly around them to tackle very tangible local change. If every neighborhood did that globally, imagine the impact.
Vexta: I agree with Askew, What is special about The Greenest Point is that it’s very locally based yet has a global focus. The Greenest Point has brought so many different parts of our local community together, from creatives to government to business. It has shown us that people in our neighborhood really care about Climate Change.

BSA: Your collaborative mural with Askew represents the current and future generations of children. What do you think is the principal message to send to the children so they are more aware of the problems facing our planet?
Vexta: My mural with Askew represents a coming together of numerous ideas. The future belongs to the youth and the world’s children will be the ones most impacted by Climate Change. I think they are really aware of this problem and it’s a very scary prospect. Our mural brought together not only representations of young people but also birds found in the NY state area that are currently climate threatened & endangered (according to Audubon’s Birds and Climate Change Report) as well as icebergs made of my shapes that represent the particles that make up all matter.

I would hope that we can inspire them to feel empowered to make small changes that they see as being possible whilst also acknowledging that all the other parts of our world – the birds, animals, water, air and land are just as important as they are. We are all in this together.

Askew: For me personally, celebrating young local people who are giving their time to make change in Greenpoint around sustainability and community-building issues is immediately inspiring to other young people.

BSA: Do you think art and in particular the murals painted for this festival have the power to change the conversation on climate change and positively move and engage the people who either are indifferent to the issue or just refuse to believe that climate change is a real issue caused by humans? 
Askew: Everything we do has impact, positive and negative – that’s the duality we deal with inhabiting this space. It’s a closed system, resources are finite and so we must respect them and do our best to live in harmony with this earth that supports us and live peacefully amongst each other and the various other creatures we share this planet with. No one thing is going to make pivotal change but everyone being mindful and keeping the conversation and action going is what will make a difference.

Our special thanks to the team at The Greenest Point and to the artists for sharing their time and talent with BSA readers.

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One image from this week by Street Artist Sipros depicts Climate-Change-denying Donald Trump as the character The Joker, from the Batman movies. A frightening piece of political satire, or perhaps propaganda, depending on who you talk to. Mana Urban Art Projects. Jersey City, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Lincoln Street Art Park. Detroit, Michigan. Septiembre 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 11.22.15

BSA Images Of The Week: 11.22.15

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Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Carcioffola, Cern, City Kitty, COST, ENX, Invader, Isaac Cordal, Le Diamantarie, London Kaye, MSK Crew, Otto Osch, Sean 9 Lugo, Space Invader, Spaik, Stray Ones.

Top image above >>> Invader’s new series of pieces in New York is a campaign to pay tribute to some of our icons. Here is Joey Ramone at The Bushwick Collective – done in cooperation with Mana Urban Art Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Invader. Lou Reed. The Bushwick Collective/Mana Urban Art Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Invader. The Bushwick Collective/Mana Urban Art Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Invader.  Damaged almost as soon as it went up. The Bushwick Collective/Mana Urban Art Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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COST. The Bushwick Collective/Mana Urban Art Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stray Ones (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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London Kaye. The Little Prince of Bel-Air. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Otto Osch new piece in London, UK. (photo © Otto Osch)

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Isaac Cordal in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Isaac Cordal over looking the New York Stock Exchange in lower Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Isaac Cordal in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Isaac Cordal in Manhattan, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Studio Affordability Project protesting in front of the Brooklyn Museum about gentrification and a Real Estate event being held there. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Carcioffola new piece in Naples, Italy. (photo © Carcioffola)

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Sean 9 Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Modern Love. We are not sure who did this or if it’s a Holiday Ad. It reminded us of the work of a collective who was active in the early 2000’s under the name of Eternal Love. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cernesto brings all his lil’ characters on parade on this wall. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cernesto (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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MSK Crew(photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Spaik in Bordeaux, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Le Diamantarie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ENX (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Bushwick, Brooklyn. November, 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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BSA Film Friday: 06.20.14

BSA Film Friday: 06.20.14

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Art Is Rubbish Is Art, Penang: Ernest Zacharevic
2. Argentina Street Art 2014: Favela & Arawak Tainos
3. Urban Nation Project presents Project M/4 (Berlin)
4. Razon Comun on a Concrete Column in Spain
5. “El Hijo De La Luna” CIX – SPAIK in Mexico, DF

BSA Special Feature: Art Is Rubbish Is Art, Penang: Ernest Zacharevic

A visual documentary of George Town & Ernest Zacharevic, 2011-2014 – A Street Artist who is known for incorporating objects of a three dimensional nature with this paintings on walls, Ernest Zacharevic has been ingeniously implementing a childlike imagination and an affinity for play into each work, no matter how humble the location. Not to be confused with the artist who goes by the name Art is Trash, Zacharevic simply shows that no object can ever be discredited entirely when you have the ability to imagine. Here is a fast moving survey through a number of installations he accomplished in the last three years.

Argentina Street Art 2014: Favela & Arawak Tainos

“Two walls painted during my trip in Argentina 2014, one is FAVELA in the city of Cordoba, the other one ARAWAK TAINOS realized in Buenos Aires (Padilla 921) with the help of Argentinian friends Ever, Jaz, and people of the GALPON !”

Urban Nation Project presents Project M/4 (Berlin)

A pretty stunning presentation of the fourth installation of Project M in Berlin featuring Andrew Hosner of ThinkSpace Gallery as curator this spring.

 

Razon Comun on a Concrete Column in Spain

There is an endless amount of concrete that is blighting our natural and artificial landscape – “Have You Hugged a Concrete Pillar Today?” According to that blog post by Bill Gates, China has really ramped up the worldwide production of it in the last few years – producing more concrete in the last 3 years than the U.S. produced in a hundred. Huh?

Here in Girona, Spain, The Razon Commune (Kwets, Once, Sener y Spogo) decided to adorn the supporting column of a massive highway overhead. It’s unclear whether this was officially sanctioned or not, but it has a good beat and you can kind of dance to it if you are a robot of some sort.

 

“El Hijo De La Luna” CIX – SPAIK in Mexico, DF

Okay so who’s more stoned on peyote in this video: the director (Spaik), the artists (Cix and Spaik), or the kids who are going to get to play in this room when it is finished? A masterful quik-cut dizzying piece of storytelling on the walls dips into Mexican and possibly Andean folk lore, and is that the Kool-Aid guy?

 

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BSA Film Friday: 04.11.14

BSA Film Friday: 04.11.14

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. URBAN ART 2014 on Auction
2. Building Detroit – Revok, Nekst, Pose
3. Sheryo and Yok in Indonesia
4. Coachella Walls: Date Farmers by Medvin Sobio
5. Spaik and Libre. Mexico City 2014

BSA Special Feature: URBAN ART 2014 on Auction with Artcuriel

A film by Jérémy Jaoui

This is what it looks like now; a powerful visual documentation and summary of one plainly commercial aspect of this moment in the evolution of graffiti art/ Street Art/ urban art – and its collectability with a growing global artworld fan base. The video follows Artcuriel and it’s personable auctioneer Arnaud Oliveux as the crowd gathers and clinks glasses, listens to speeches, views live art-making and inspects a collection of fine art created by graffiti and Street Artists which will soon be auctioned.

As one observer notes while thumbing through the show catalog “Urban Art is becoming something real!” Now the vulgar rap lyrics that describe sexual acts to a beat which accompanied the visuals of the artists in the gallery are replaced with rarefied classical strings and no percussion when we enter the auction room where commerce takes place.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Screenshot-Artcuriel-auction-2014-740Excitement in the packed house is palpable and the auctioneer is the entertaining and electrified ringmaster, with poised assistants tensely perched on the telephone with international bidders.

“With an artist like LUDO, Arnauld is being very avant-garde,” says a knowledgeable admirer while we see the piece reach a record price to applause and pieces are placed on the mantel by men in white gloves. “Urban Art is now happening as we wanted it to,” says Monsieur Oliveux to us from his desk.

Well edited and skillfully presented, the film by Jaoui Jérémy gives you a rare glimpse into a world far removed from the street yet inextricably tied to it – where one time vandals become art stars, collectible artists, performers and celebrity endorsers.  It’s your call whether it is a celebration or an indictment, and perspectives will vary according to where you sit, but here the elements are all on parade before your eyes and presented in a passionate way.

 

Building Detroit – Revok, Nekst, Pose

The graffiti and Street Art scene in abandoned Detroit is “thriving like I don’t think we’ve seen in the US for quite some time,” observes artist Pose, one of the few writers/artists who is straddling the street and commercial gallery world. “When you leave something and don’t care about it, we come here.” It’s a rallying cry for painters, a cautionary statement for authorities that encapsulates one of the primary dynamics of the graffiti/street art/public art scene.

But then Pose offers an additional sentiment that gets missed in these often simplified arguments. “We care about it, we’ll paint it all day.”

From MOCA in LA to MOCAD here, where both Revok and Pose have created large scale works, the institutional recognition of the contribution of the art form is remarkable. Simultaneously the freewill act of it a few blocks away from the museum has greater implications from a legal aspect.

Oh no! Complexity to contemplate.

 

Sheryo and Yok in Indonesia

“Sheryo and The Yok go to Indonesia to learn batik and sculpture” says their description but we think they may already know a thing or two about both. Here they are line illustrating with hot wax, adding a third dimension in clay to characters with phallus noses, and hitting up random walls throughout the city and on the beach with aerosol. Like any good guests, they make sure to credit their hosts here, which is real nice.  Oh yes, and there’s a gallery show at Turner Gallery in Purth March 21 – mentioned at the very end.

 

Coachella Walls: Date Farmers by Medvin Sobio

Hey man, ¿Qué haces? For this Coachella street-art-related event the dude Medvin Sobio is setting the scene again with  unscripted social outtakes and interactions are positioned as the main story – and he is framing it with this jukebox music. Yes, this is where The Eagles are national treasures, Marvin Gaye is a nice reminder of a time when singing about the environment could still get airplay, and MJ is always a party starter. Errrbuddy get up!

Spaik and Libre. Mexico City 2014

Part of a commercial gig for a traveling corporate electronic dance music festival, Spaik and Libre knock out a colorful wall while participants pile onto the big lot in DF for the multi-screen festivities.

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Spaik and Libre Collabo Mural in Mexico City

Spaik and Libre Collabo Mural in Mexico City

A collaboration between two Gen Y Mexican muralists went up this month for college age festival goers at an electronic dance event in Mexico City that features multiple DJs, carnival rides, laser light shows, and neon accessories. Here are some shots of the massive wall by Spaik and Libre and you can see the video at the end for more information.

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Click on this full length image above to see larger.

Spaik and Libre collaboration in Mexico City (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik and Libre collaboration in Mexico City. Detail. (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik and Libre collaboration in Mexico City. Detail. (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik and Libre collaboration in Mexico City. Detail. (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik and Libre collaboration in Mexico City. Detail. (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik and Libre collaboration in Mexico City. Detail. (photo © Jose Hernandez)

 

 

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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Spaik: Modernism, Muralism, and Color in Morelia, Mexico

Spaik: Modernism, Muralism, and Color in Morelia, Mexico

An Awakening!

A good way to start the week, and in the case of murals by Mexican Street Artist SPAIK a way to take flight. You can see it in all three – the small pink birds that lift off the heart, the voice, the printed page – and you know that the artist is also talking about his life through symbols, pattern, and with color.

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

The just completed murals in Morelia, Michoacan de Ocampo, Mexico are striking because of the unapologetic use of color – strong, bold, even simple. Not surprising in a culture where color is an integral part of the artisanal, mythical, and even modernist legacy of the country. It is a well known fact that when the Spanish Conquerors entered Tenochtitlan, the sprawling Aztec city, they were most impressed not only by the majestic architecture but the striking colors in which most of the buildings were brilliantly painted.

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

Little of that color remains today in the archeological sites and Mesoamerican artifacts in museum collections – but it is extensively chronicled in accounts of the invasion and the post-colonial times that the  Aztecs adorned and highlighted their monuments in vivid colors. Master Mexican Muralists of the 20th Century carried the tradition and Spaik brings it into the 2010s with these huge figures, commanding and sweeping with polychromatic force and symbolism. As a painter Spaik is a student of that tradition and of folklore and as a formal student he is getting his bachelors in film studies – imagine where these traditions and magical mythical stories will carry him and us en la futura.

There will be more awakenings from Spaik.

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Detail. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening” Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

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Spaik “The Awakening”. Morelia, Mexico. 2013 (photo © Jose Hernandez)

Spaiks walls are part of Festival de Arte Urbano Nicolaita 2013. Please look them up!

 

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