All posts tagged: Shepard Fairey

“Beyond The Streets” On Paper Opens in Southampton

“Beyond The Streets” On Paper Opens in Southampton

This time of year, it is hard to find people in Manhattan on the weekends – they’re “weekending” in the Hamptons, darling.

Khari Turner, Hands

Not exactly the original setting you might associate with graffiti, street art, hip-hop, punk rock, zines, and underground art culture but where else can curators Evan Pricco and Kim Stephens sell these works on paper while sipping cool drinks poolside?

“Beyond the Streets” carries the mobile party to Southampton Arts Center this Saturday with a wide swath of styles – 500 works from over 100 artists in an art fair-sized venue. It may remind you of the Urban Air Fair tried in Manhattan in summer 2017, but this one has something that one didn’t: Roger Gastman.

Shepard Fairey, Elysium Lotus

If it’s here, it’s because it is quality work and has a connection to the roots of these subcultural scenes usually as well. Expanding now to the more nebulous category of Contemporary, you may be surprised to see more accessible interpretive variations on the themes. Let’s see that paper, people. 

Jane Dickson, Fourth of July 2

Artists include: Action Bronson, Addam Yekutieli, agnès b, AIKO, André Saraiva, Andrew Schoultz, Andrew Thiele, Andy Rementer, Aryz, Bert Krak, Brandon Breaux, Broken Fingaz, Bryant Giles, Camille Walala, CES, Cey Adams, Charlie Ahearn, Chloe Early, Chris FREEDOM Pape, Clark Fox, Cody Hudson, Conor Harrington, Craig Costello, CRASH, DABSMYLA, Daniel Rich, David “Mr StarCity” White, DAZE, DEFER, Emily Manwaring, Eric Haze, Ermsy, Escif, FAILE, Faith XLVII, Fucci, Greg SPONE Lamarche, Gustavo Zermeno, Hilda Palafox, House 33, HuskMitNavn, Ian Reid, Icy & Sot, Jaime Muñoz, Jamilla Okuba, Jane Dickson, JEC*, Jeremy Shockley, Jillian Evelyn, JK5, John Konstantine, Julian Pace, KATSU, KC Ortiz, Kelsey Brookes, Khari Turner, Kime Buzzelli, LeRoy Neiman, Linas Garsys, Liz Flores, Lucy McLauchlan, Lujan Perez, Maripol, Mark Mothersbaugh, Martha Cooper, Marshall LaCount, Matt McCormick, Maya Hayuk, Michael Vasquez, MIKE 171, Mister CARTOON, Neena Ellora, Nehemiah Cisneros, Nettie Wakefield, NUNCA, Otto183, Paije Fuller, Paul Insect, POSE, Rebecca Morgan, Reko Rennie, Rello, Richard Colman, RISK, Ron English, Ryan McGinness, Sage Vaughn, Saladeen Johnson, Scott Campbell, Sean from Texas, Senon Williams, Shantell Martin, Shepard Fairey, SJK 171, Sofía Enriquez, SNOEMAN, Spacebrat, STASH, Steve ESPO Powers, SWOON, TAKI 183, The Perez Bros., Timothy Curtis, Todd James, Troy Lamarr Chew II, Umar Rashid, Victor Reyes, Wasted Rita, Wulffvnky, Yarrow Slaps, Yusuke Hanai, ZESER, ZOER and 45RPM.

BEYOND THE STREETS on PAPER
July 17—August 28, 2021
Southampton Arts Center, Southampton, New York, 11968

For more details, schedules, etc. click HERE

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Shepard Fairey in Dubai: A Mosaic Future and a Solo Show at Opera

Shepard Fairey in Dubai: A Mosaic Future and a Solo Show at Opera

Shots today from last month’s Shepard Fairey “Future Mosaic” at Dubai’s Opera Gallery. With works on canvas, paper, wood, and metal, as well as examples of iconic images and repeated motifs from the breadth of his art and design history, Fairey was very much present for his first solo show here. In a grueling schedule of just 9 days he also managed to install two huge murals facing a skate park in a commercial district of the city, the d3 (Dubai Design District).  

Shepard Fairey. “Future Mosaic”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 

Rise Above Peace Dove and Rise Above Peace Fingers incorporate what appears as a richer vibrant palette and pulsing graphic interplay than previously, perhaps due to more dense hues and the fact that his core crew of Dan Flores, Luka Densmore, and Rob Zagula were on hand along with Jon and Marwan offering additional help. Staying clear of strident language or slogans, the new works are largely representational and universal in themes of “justice, peace and human rights.”

Shepard Fairey with the dream team ready to work. “Future Mosaic”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 

Fairey withstood criticism on social media for even working in the region, it would appear, let alone lending his name to an effort that they saw as hypocritical in light of his previous vocal stances on human rights, for example.

He took to Instagram to address his critics, “I hate to burst anyone’s bubble, but it’s not a perfect place, but perfection does not exist and certainly not in the US. However, without this experience, I would not have been able to engage in robust discussions with the great people I met in Dubai. There’s nothing more relevant to my inside-outside strategy than traveling there and doing public art conveying harmony and positivity.”

Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 

Elsewhere in another post, he wrote, “It is very important for me to do public art when I travel because it engages people outside of the art world, but it is not easy to secure public walls in Dubai.”

The opportunity to show and share and sell your art is something we want for any artist. In the case of Fairey, judgment metrics would need to include his two decades of generous acts promoting and supporting all manner of environmental, social justice, and civic participation efforts. We’ll confidently observe that year after year, his impact can far outstrip the average street artist and certainly most art collectors by miles. We dare say he’s unmatched. Let that be your goal.

Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 

“The show was massive, with 159 works that utilized the gallery space with a rhythm of scale and concentration,” he says. “My art practice focuses on the work’s cumulative effect, both visually and conceptually, so I was pleased with the final result.”

Shepard Fairey. “Future Mosaic”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. Skectch for “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Dove”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Dove”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Dove”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
Shepard Fairey. “Rise Above Peace Fingers”. Dubai. UAE. March 2021. (Photo: Courtesy ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong) 
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COVID-19 365 Days Later; Art in the Streets That Narrated a Pandemic

COVID-19 365 Days Later; Art in the Streets That Narrated a Pandemic

What the hell just happened? Has it been a year? Or has it been 10 years? Or just one long nightmare/daymare? Or has it been 10 years? Did we already ask that?

In March 2020 we awoke to a world that was transforming before all of our eyes, yet we felt so cut-off from it and each other. The first days seem so long ago as we mark the first anniversary of the pandemic. Still, the initial shock of those days resonates in our chests so strongly that we confidently talk about a collective global trauma that has indelibly marked a generation.

Pobel. Stavanger, Norway. March 14, 2020. (photo © Tore Stale Moen)

From Stockholm to Mexico City to Barcelona to Bethlehem to New York to LA, BSA brought you street art that was responding with fear, derision, critique, hope, and humor to the never-static, always evolving barrage of Covid news. Stuck inside and afraid to expose ourselves to each other, we New Yorkers became accustomed to experiencing the outdoors only through our windows, connecting with neighbors we’ve never met who were also banging pots and pans or clapping and waving and yelling.

We listened to ambulances screaming past our windows every half hour or so during those first weeks, imagining the torn families, the terrified fellow New Yorkers now being rushed to the hospital and separated from their loved ones without a goodbye, gasping for air. We wondered if we would be next.

Jilly Ballistic and Sack Six. Manhattan, NYC. March 23, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

When we did go to the streets, they were empty – or nearly. In New York this was unheard of. In this bustling, noisy metropolis, we experienced a daily disconcerting quiet. That is, until the killing of George Floyd by cops finally pushed the anger/anxiety into the streets all summer.

The deadly hotspot of New York quelled, but the fires of Covid spread west, grabbing communities who thought they would avoid impact. At the same time, local, state, and national leaders fumbled and argued or famously callously ignored the desperation of citizens, occasionally admirably filling the shoes they were elected to occupy, often misstepping through no fault of their own.

Pure Genius. Manhattan, NYC. March 23, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We have no particular wisdom to offer you today beyond the obvious; this pandemic laid bare inequity, social and racial and class fault-lines, the shredded social net, the effect of institutional negligence, the ravages of 40 years of corporate privatization, and the power of community rising to the occasion to be in service to one another in ways that made us all more than proud.

Here are some of our favorite Covid-themed street art pieces from over the last year, a mere sampling of the artistic responses. Interspersed we paste screenshots of the daily events (via Wikipedia) in 2020 that shaped our lives, and our society.

We mourn the losses of family and friends and the broken hearts and minds in all of our communities. And we still believe in the power of art to heal and the power of love to balance our asymmetries.

Trusto Corp. Los Angeles, CA. March 26, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Lapiz. Hamburg, Germany. March 30th, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Tag Street Art. Tel-Aviv, Israel. March 31, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Phlegm. April 6, 2020. London, UK. (photo courtesy of the artist) Phlegm created a visual diary of his experience with the Pandemic. We published his diary HERE
Don Langrend for USA Today Network. On April 13, 2020, we published a compilation of political cartoons with views on the Pandemic. Click HERE to see the whole collection.
Alessio-B. Padua, Italy. April 15, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Banksy. London, UK. April 19, 2020. (photo Instagram)
Shepard Fairey. Los Angeles, CA. April 20, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Banksy “The Girl with a Pierced Eardrum” Bristol, UK. April 23, 2020. (photo © Reuters/Rebecca Naden)
Cake Stencils. Bethlehem, Israel. May 10, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Almost Over Keep Smiling. Manhattan, NY. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner. Manhattan, NY. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SacSix. Manhattan, NY. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Oliver Rios. May 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Teo Vazquez. Barcelona, Spain. May 25, 2020. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Adam Fujita. Brooklyn, NYC. May 25, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Queens, NYC. June 2nd. 2020. (photo © Just A Spectator)
Russian Doll NY. Manhattan, NYC. June 6, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gianni Lee. Manhattan, NYC. June 13, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Various & Gould. Berlin, Germany. June 19, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artists)
Sara Lynne-Leo. Manhatttan, NYC. June 27, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman. Manhatttan, NYC. June 27, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentifed artist. Brooklyn, NYC. July 18, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo. Manhattan, NYC. August 1, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul. Manhatttan, NYC. August 6, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fintan Magee. Queensland, Australia. August 16, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Persak. San Miguel De Allende, Mexico. August 23, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
Novy. Manhatttan, NYC. August 29, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Asbestos. Cork, Ireland. September 8, 2020. (photo courtesy of the artist)
1111 Army. Brooklyn, NYC. September 12, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Brooklyn, NYC. September 12, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls. Manhattan, NYC. September 26, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Faust. Manhattan, NYC. September 26, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius. Manhattan, NYC. October 31, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
I Heart Graffiti. Manhattan, NYC. November 14, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO 907 in collab with MUK 123. Manhattan, NYC. December 15, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Creator. Manhattan, NYC. December 28, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty. Manhattan, NYC. December 28, 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Karma. Barcelona, Spain. January 4, 2020. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Pobel. Stavanger, Norway. February 11, 2021. (photo © Tore Stale Moen)
Aya Brown. Brooklyn, NYC. February 27, 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Manhattan, NYC. March 06, 2021 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Paolo Tolentino. Manhattan, NYC. March 07, 2021 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Manhattan, NYC. March 07, 2021 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)

As NYC went on complete lock-down and New Yorkers were ordered to remain in their homes in complete isolation the city’s residents organically joined together in a collective 7:00 pm ritual in support to the first responders. To the nurses, doctors, paramedics, trash collectors, public transportation, police, fire fighters, supermarkets workers etc…with their services and sacrifices we, the residents of this megalopolis were able to keep out hopes for brighter days to come.

Video of four former presidents urging people to “roll up your sleeve and do your part” and get the vaccine.

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Shepard Fairey says “Action is worth more than words” with Marianne in Paris

Shepard Fairey says “Action is worth more than words” with Marianne in Paris

“I actually side with people who oppose injustice,” says Shepard Fairey, “especially when it comes to human rights.”

He’s speaking about the recently vandalized mural of the famous Marianne produced by the artist named Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite (Liberty, Equality, Fraternity) in the 13th arrondissement of Paris a few years ago. In a high-profile act of defilement, the anonymous artists/activists who sprayed through the text and added tears to the figure at the end of 2020, captured in a video by Milan Poyet.

Shepard Fairey. “Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite”. Restored mural in collaboration with Galerie Itinerrance. Paris, France. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

Determined to reassert his narrative over his work, Fairey has restored the original beacon of confidence and optimism and added a teardrop to her visage – to acknowledge the actions of the collective as well as the fact that we are failing as a people in such obvious ways to honor these values of liberty, equality, and fraternity.

Shepard Fairey. “Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite”. Restored mural in collaboration with Galerie Itinerrance. Paris, France. (photo screen grab from the video)

In the end, these are only words, and they are meaningless unless you back them up with deeds. Fairey tells us that he wants actions to speak louder than that, so in coordination with Galerie Itinerrance, he is releasing a new print of this image Wednesday, February 17, 2021, and the profits will be entirely donated to the non-profit association “Les restos du coeur,” which fights daily for people in difficulty.

Shepard Fairey. “Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite”. Restored mural in collaboration with Galerie Itinerrance. Paris, France. (photo screen grab from the video)

Find out more about the edition of 650 of the Marianne (#MariannePleure) by checking out the the Itinerrance.fr website and of course obeygiant.com


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Labor Day 2020 and the Dire State of Everyday People

Labor Day 2020 and the Dire State of Everyday People

Today we celebrate American worker’s contributions to our society. The workforce is the engine moving our country to the realization of our dreams and goals. The men and women who get up every day to seek a decent living in this country are increasingly under assault by the corporation’s manipulation of people and profits. Our labor unions have been decimated and the workers’ rights chipped away little by little, or a lot by a lot. All of it began with Reagan and it hasn’t stopped since. Congress is beholden to special interests with most of our elected officials’ ears more attuned to the lobbyists’ demands roaming the halls of Congress than to the ordinary people’s plight for help for better wages, better work conditions, better parental leave, better health insurance.

Shepard Fairey. Los Angeles, CA 2011 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Pandemic has only exacerbated the already perilous conditions among the middle class and poor Americans. Most working-class individuals were already living paycheck to paycheck with little if any savings to confront personal, family crises. The poor have always counted on the safety net that the government has put in place to help alleviate their financial and health burdens but those services have been either privatized for-profit or totally eradicated. When Covid-19 took hold of the whole world and Trump made the situation in the USA worse, the majority of Americans have found themselves steps removed from the economic precipice, or pushed into it. Strangely, Democrats also are not coming to the rescue.

There are many lessons to be learned from this Pandemic, one of them will undoubtedly be the abysmal difference between those with money and those without it to confront this crisis. The rich are getting incredibly richer and the poor are getting poorer. Lockdown has been difficult for all of us but certainly easier for those without financial difficulties.

Shepard Fairey. Los Angeles, CA 2011 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Almost 30 million Americans have lost their jobs, and their hopes of getting them back are slimmer by the week. If there is to be an economic recovery in this country the divisions of who’ll benefit from said recovery will be sharply divided. While the stock market has hit record levels of wealth, ordinary Americans have seen greater inequality. So you might wonder, what are we celebrating today? Our workforce is in tatters and our service economy has been decimated.

Shepard Fairey made the works shown above in LA almost a decade ago, and his message resonates even stronger today.

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BSA Film Friday: 08.28.20

BSA Film Friday: 08.28.20

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Plain Brutality Again: Jacob Blake.
2. INDECLINE: Get Dead – Pepper Spray
3. Shepard Fairey: Arts Vote 2020

BSA Special Feature: Plain Brutality Again: Jacob Blake

The violence against black people continues. The latest shooting of a black American citizen by the police took place in Kenosha, Wisconsin where a police officer shot Jacob Blake on Sunday.

Mr. Blake, a father, a son, a brother, and uncle, was shot seven times by the police as he leaned into the driver’s seat of his car resulting in Mr. Blake being paralyzed and unable to walk and under intensive care at the hospital. Yet he is being handcuffed to his bed. Mr. Blake was not carrying a weapon.

Are we only to add his name to the endless list of black and brown people brutalized and killed? Here we post a recent short film that examines this moment in American history as well as through the lens of system racism.

Voices from the Black Lives Matters Protests ( A short film) Vanity Fair

INDECLINE: Get Dead – Pepper Spray

An amalgam of blinding rage and graffiti, anti-authoritarian self-destructive vandalism melded into a demand for the end of state-sponsored violence played out to a raspy-voiced tirade and gutter-crunch guitars and drums. Many of society’s contradictions are here on display for all to see.

Shepard Fairey: Arts Vote 2020

For more information on ARTSVOTE click HERE.

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Street Artists Fairey and Swoon Among Those Saying “Remember What They Did”

Street Artists Fairey and Swoon Among Those Saying “Remember What They Did”

Artists Shine Light on Trump, GOP Atrocities in Emotionally-Charged New Billboard, Street Art Campaign

The billboards are going up in Detroit, Michigan, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Phoenix, Arizona – all so-called “battleground” states for this years presidential election. Using their talent as street artists to draw attention in public, this group of billboards is grabbing the attention of passersby with aesthetics as well as content.

Rafael Lopez. “I don’t care” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)

In a campaign funded by Collective Super PAC, the SuperPAC affiliate of The Collective PAC, a number of street artists as well as artists from other genres and practices are lending their individual skills to remind potential voters what has already been done – with a warning that four more years would march us straight off a cliff, in their opinion.

Artists Shepard Fairey, Nekisha Durrett, Nate Lewis, Rafael Lopez, Robert Russell, Rob Sheridan, and Swoon each take on their variation of the messages on topics like police brutality, racism, hate speech, immigration and the Coronavirus pandemic. Some are simply dedicated to controversial statements made by Trump and others on his team.

Swoon. “A beautiful picture” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)

“Our message is simple: Remember what they did and vote them out,” says organizer Robin Bell, whose known for his projections on the façade of the Trump Hotel.

For Shepard Fairey, it was the irony that this spring and early summer Trump was trying to solve our problems with police brutality with, uh, police brutality.

Nate Lewis. “…that’s going to sort of just disappear, I hope.” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)

“My art piece is a reminder that while the American public was protesting in the streets, in record numbers, against racism and police brutality, Donald Trump was encouraging police brutality against the protesters, reinforcing the very same problems within law enforcement and the criminal justice systems the protesters were demanding to be reformed,” says Fairey. “This image implies that the police are supposed to be peacekeepers, not warriors, and that Donald Trump is on the wrong side of social justice and the wrong side of history!”

Shepard Fairey. “When The Looting Starts The Shooting Starts” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)

The images are stark, sometimes shocking, but then so are the times they are documenting – and street art is often holding a mirror up to society. “Life imitates art, and the images we see have a direct impact on our democracy,” says Quentin James, Founder and President of The Collective.

As the economy continues to deflate and the Greater Depression is waiting to be triggered by a crash, not only will we see more street art, we’ll depend on it as tea leaves to read about ourselves and hopefully remember what we all did (and didn’t), so we can learn from it.

Nekisha Durrett. “We must build upon our heritage” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)
Robert Rusell. “Fine people on both sides” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)
Rob Sheridan. “Even if the world goes to hell in a handbasket, I wont lose a penny” (photo courtesy of RememberWhatTheyDid.com)

The RemememberWhatTheyDid campaign is a project of Artists United for Change.

To sponsor a billboard and/or to register to vote click HERE

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Power To The Earth: Celebrating 50 Years of Earthivism / Dispatch From Isolation # 31

Power To The Earth: Celebrating 50 Years of Earthivism / Dispatch From Isolation # 31

The Earth says “Thanks!” to us today.

Unfortunately it doesn’t realize that all this clean air and water from the last couple of months is not intentional – we just had to stay inside our homes and not ruin stuff.

Shepard Fairey. Earth Day 2020. (photo courtesy of Studio No. 1)

Factories are closed, little traffic on the highways, streets and, roads. Oil futures went below 0 this week. People were actually paying you to take it.

Airplanes are grounded, parks are closed, and asthma is down. Wild animals are enjoying their natural habitat without the hordes of humans traipsing about their territory. Mountains, rivers, lakes, and our oceans are experiencing less stress and our cities, in general, are calmer and cleaner. When people float conspiracy theories about Covid-19, we always like the one about the Earth creating it to get our attention and be better earth citizens.

50 years after the first Earth Day, we pause to recognize people like US Senator Gaylord Nelson, a Democrat from the state of Wisconsin who founded it. He probably had no idea that corporations would take over the Senate and House and White House and the media here in 2020.

Who did?

Shepard Fairey. Earth Day 2020. (photo courtesy of Studio No. 1)

But the good work of those first environmentalists hasn’t been completely reversed, however they have tried to smear the name of people who love the Earth, eroding laws that protect it. “Teach-ins” from the Vietnam War era actually inspired Senator Nelson to envision a “national-teach-in-movement” where neighbors taught each other and empowered and encouraged one another to act positively and directly to protect natural resources. For all those who have fought for our environment and our fellow creatures, some at great personal cost, we salute you.

Street Artist and activist Shepard Fairey has been sounding the alarm on environmental issues and the climate for years now. His voice resonates because he’s informed and straight-forward with his graphic campaigns to elevate the discussion where we all can participate with the shared goal of leaving this planet in much better shape than it was when we were born. Here are a couple of posters he just released through his design studio Studio No 1.

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Shepard Fairey – Studio Number One. We Are All In This Together / Dispatch From Isolation # 29

Shepard Fairey – Studio Number One. We Are All In This Together / Dispatch From Isolation # 29

Dude, hope your printer still has ink.

This would look dope in your window right now.

You Are Not Alone (courtesy of Studio Number One)

This way when the neighbors in the building across the street see you hanging out the window during our 7 pm public applause session — they’ll know even more about your worldview.

Social Distancing (courtesy of Studio Number One)

“Art has the power to bring us together, even when we’re apart,” says Street Artist, graphic artist, fine artist Shepard Fairey, who has designed posters along with his Studio Number One for us all to use as we like. It may even help many of us feel like we are doing this together, instead of solo.

“We are all in this together,” Shepard says, “and we will overcome this.”



Thank You For Your Service (courtesy of Studio Number One)
Wander Within (courtesy of Studio Number One)
#apARTtogether – New Art by SNO!

Click HERE to get your free posters

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BSA Images Of The Week: 04.19.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 28

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.19.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 28

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week!

Where is the People’s Bailout? Why has the bailout that was promised to small businesses already run out? Why is congress on vacation? Why is Biden staring up at the wall like he’s concentrating on a dead spider? The people are dying, running out of food, the economy is dying, businesses are dying. The Post Office, starved and bad-mouthed for years by the capitalists who want to kill it, is finally dying. Do we realize which direction the US is being dragged by the oligarchs and their one party corporate Republicrat-Demoblicans?

We need Universal Basic Income!

Where is Medicare for All!

Main Street Debt Jubilee!

In other fun news, we’re still quarantining. Please send us your art in the streets! We love to hear from you. Spread love!

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring MeresOne, Shepard Fairey, Banksy, and other unknown artists.

Well, tomorrow is 4/20 after all. For difficult times…Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MeresOne (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey produced a series of new poster graphics honoring our heroes. (photo @obeygiant Instagram)
Trump Titanic. Unidentified artist of this social media meme
Banksy, with his typical sense of humor and levity, came out from isolation to share with us his visual metaphor that accurately illustrates one of the many ways in which isolation affects humans…photos were taken directly from the artist’s Instagram account. (photos @Banksy)
Banksy. Detail. (photo @ Banksy)
Banksy. Detail. (photo @ Banksy)
Banksy. Detail. (photo @ Banksy)
Banksy. Detail. (photo @ Banksy)
Untitled. Brooklyn, NY. Spring 2020 (photo @ Jaime Rojo)
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“Beyond The Streets” New York – Extends Through September 29

“Beyond The Streets” New York – Extends Through September 29

This summer New York has been crazily, sometimes chaotically overlaid with tons of graffiti, Street Art, and murals – a testament to the enduring passion of a public that wants to see this organic patterning of the city skin, and the unquenchable thirst that artists and writers in New York have for showing their work to the public without intervening forces. Some of it is illegal, some of it is legal – all of it is part of the New York conversation.

Additionally, and in concert with, this ongoing conversation is a private pop-up exhibition called “Beyond the Streets” that pulls back from this moment and looks at pertinent and fundamental slices of the first 50 years of art in the streets from the perspective of a handful of sharp-eyed curators who have done their homework.

Tenga One, Snipe1, Madssaki, Takashi Murakami. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Presented in the context of historians defining a view of the scene with an eye toward private collectors of contemporary art, the vast show features paintings, sculpture, photography, site-specific installations, commercially branded environments, a large gift shop, historical ephemera – and a 30th anniversary Shepard Fairey exhibition within the exhibition.

 “Beyond the Streets” in Williamsburg, Brooklyn was originally a three-month show that ran through August, it has been extended to September 29th – as they say – by popular demand.  In addition, to celebrate and thank the community for their support, BEYOND THE STREETS will host free admission day on Thursday August 29th.

Jon Naar . Carl Weston. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Barry McGee. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bast . Paul Insect. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fuct. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Huskmitnavn. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Craig R Stecyk III. Detail. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey. Beyond The Streets New York, (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.11.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.11.19

Street Art is hot and beautiful in New York this week, and we are cheered by the proliferation of styles and style- and some simply brilliant ideas.

West Side Highway was blocked this weekend by lines of people sitting with arms locked to protest the ICE arrests of poor, powerless, immigrants working menial jobs in the US this week and their treatment in jails set up for them.

Of course, the lines are probably still longer to get into the various rooftop pools that have popped up in New York this summer.

Also this weekend the child sex ring king Jeffrey Epstein was reported to have committed suicide in his jail cell. Also, a herd of unicorns just ran through Central Park. Please read the long list of world leaders he was alleged to have as clients. Check back with us in five years and tell us which of those men are in jail.

For some humorous summer reading ; the white-gloved New York Times took their semi-annual trip on the subway – just to stay in touch with the commoners – and was scandalized by the tawdry state of advertising in the subways, with suggestive phallic shapes and ladies posing in underwear and what not. NYT was not however scandalized by the chronically destitute conditions of subway infrastructure like the enormous pieces of peeling ceiling poised to drop on people at the Chambers station for example. Or the rats. Or the lack of garbage cans, police officers, newsstands, air conditioning or the the $2.75 fare that has outpaced inflation – meaning that the equivalent of a 1987 fare would be about $2.03 if it had stayed with inflation, for example.  That’s hardship on New York’s poor families – but New York Times is not talking about that.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Appleton Pictures, Banksy, City Kitty, Dr. SCO, Early Riser, FAUST, Gianni Lee, Heck Tad, Lambros, M*Code, Neon Savage, Shepard Fairey, and The Postman Art.

Top banner is a photo of a framed Banksy note in a high-end frame shop in Soho. Actually a Banksy? Who knows. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey’s portrait of actor and activist Rosario Dawson on the water tank of a Manhattan building called “Power & Equality. The image celebrates this Lower East Side original who has been a champion activist for girls and women and who stays true to her roots.

Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gianni Lee (photo © Jaime Rojo)
There has been a back and forth on this wall with Gianni Lee’s work and the graffiti artist’s work. We have been documenting the “dialogue” on BSA HERE, and HERE. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Postman Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sac Six (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stay Ugly (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Go Girl! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Faust (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (the side-bust Donald Duck is by Heck Tad) (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (the side-bust Donald Duck is by Heck Tad) (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty . M*Code . Dr. SC0 . Neon Savage (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty . Lambros (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We have been documenting this artist’s work for years now. His message is about diabetes/diabetic awareness and its causes, our addiction with sugar and the food industry relentless habit of adding sugary ingredients on almost all prepared foods…that and the innordinate sugar amounts on soft drinks of course. So it was a big surprise to have caught the artist in action while putting work on his usual spot on the magnet wall in Chelsea.

Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)
We know this is Appleton Pictures mascot and MUSE but we don’t know this handsome dog’s name. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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