All posts tagged: Reno

Cutthroat Trout & “The Art Of Beeing” in Reno, Nevada

Cutthroat Trout & “The Art Of Beeing” in Reno, Nevada

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“After 4 days of driving from Detroit to Reno we felt empowered by the incredible landscapes we had driven through, from salt lakes to deserts and the Rockies, not one part of the trip was unexciting,” says Louis Masai of the journey. “Well perhaps the 7 hours of corn fields.”

But The Art of Beeing Tour has buzzed into Reno, Nevada for some extinction talk in this lawless land. The English travelor is taking in all of the details of this next American city and remarks that there are plenty of casinos, indoor smoking is legal, and motorcycle helmets are for wimps.

Here he is painting a trout – the Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, to be exact.

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

“A trout is a moment of beauty known only to those who seek it,” the co-founder of Esquire and author of The Fishing in Print: A Guided Tour Through Five Centuries of Angling Literature Arnold Gingrich once said.

Unfortunately for the fisherpeople and the Earth, this trout found in the Lahontan basin of northern Nevada, eastern California, and southern Oregon, is in serious decline due to pollution from logging, mining, and urbanization, among other things.

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

The Art of Beeing continues to spotlight local endangered species in whatever region Louis and his compatriots visit and the trout is now jumping into Reno’s attention. He says the people are very welcoming and he’s been swimming around the metal and hippy cultural cityscape and describes a desert bohemia now peppered with “quirky coffee shops, bars and restaurants.”

Next stop, Sacramento!

Want to help the trout population? Donate directly to the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Also please check out the species foundation Western Native Trout.

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © TeeByFord)

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © Mia Hanak)


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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © Louis Masai)

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Louis Masai The Art Of Beeing. Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Endangered. Reno. Nevada. October 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

 

Click http://louismasai.com/projects/the-art-of-beeing/ to learn more about the project.

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Graffiti Haven “American Flats” Slated for Destruction in Nevada

Graffiti Haven “American Flats” Slated for Destruction in Nevada

The news of the impending destruction of a primary spot for graffiti fans in Nevada has saddened a number of artists who have spent long hours painting and socializing at the former site of the American Flat Mill in Virginia City. According to the Reno Gazette-Journal in late October the Bureau of Land Management has just awarded the contract “to dismantle, crush and bury what’s left of the massive mill.” As an abandoned industrial site for the last ninety years or so, it is catnip for graff writers and street artists. Even though it is one of Nevada’s most culturally fascinating relics anyone would admit that it can be hazardous because of its state of neglect, even if its an open secret that it is well trafficked by thrill seekers. For former Brooklyn-now-Reno Street Artist Erik Burke, the news signals the end of an era for him not only as an artist, but because he married his wife on the site. Today Erik provides an essay for BSA readers about his perspective on the loss of this site that holds many memories for tourists, artists, filmmakers, and countless others.
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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 . Please help ID the artists on this photo. (photo © Meryl Burke)

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by Erik Burke

Over the last week there has been increasing talk of the imminent demolition of The American Flat Mill. In case you are not familiar with this place, the CliffNotes version of the American Flat is that it was a gold, silver and low-grade ore processing plant that opened in 1922 and after a painstakingly brief period of boom it went bust in 1926. Since that time it has been a sightseeing and activity playground for countless visitors. Since local nostalgia is currently running a fever and countless people are sharing their experiences I feel compelled to share my unique bond with this skeletal ruin of Nevada’s formative mining days.

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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014. Please help ID the artists on this photo. (photo © Meryl Burke)

The American Flat will always hold a special place the relationship between my wife and I. It had been the destination of one of our first dates and in April of this year we were married there. The fact that we were able to share this experience with our closest friends and family was truly astonishing given the fact that our hallowed ground was on hollow ground.

The smell of sage and spray paint mingled with our Pastor’s words as we confided our eternal love for one another in a makeshift church, and while we forgave those who trespassed against us we too hoped the Sheriff would return the favor. It was in those time-slowing moments that we all could attest that there truly is beauty in ruins.

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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

During the prior week my closest friends and I spent whole days preparing for the ceremony by secretly removing fallen obstacles, assembling monumental towers of rusty barrels, creating mirrored mosaics, sweeping aisles through rubble, tie-wiring bouquets of brush and wild flowers. We also installed works by artist friends from Berlin, Tel-Aviv, Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis, and New Orleans.

Each morning we would arrive to a bit of un-curated vandalism that happened during the night and we would have to do damage control. When people say, ‘how would you like it if I tagged your house?’ I can now sympathize.

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Arnz . Rogue. Yesir . Sunset. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

By the day of the wedding we had completely transformed the place, and like so many current testimonies about the Flats, the site had also transformed us. Whether you perceive the ruins as a backdrop to your fashion shoot, canvas to your creative whim, or, as my wife and I did, center stage for exchanging your vows, I think The American Flat should be preserved for generations to come.

While some individuals and entities see the demise of the flats as a trash-strewn, rotting liability of juvenile vandalism, a far larger majority see it as an Americana gestalt. Sadly, Building Solutions Inc. out of Reno recently won the contract with a $1.3 million bid for an un-building solution and they will begin dismantling shortly.

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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

When the Reno Gazette Journal interviewed Dave Erbes, a BLM geologist working on the project, he said, “There is going to be more known about the site after it is gone than there ever was before. In a couple of months hopefully you will be able to go online and tour the whole thing.”

Sadly the difference between knowing and experiencing is quite significant. Future generations will never know the feeling of clinging to the sun-warmed iron stairs as pebbles of concrete ping their way into a darkened tunnel or the sight of dropping a cheap flashlight into a pool of cyanide and watching it illuminate.

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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

Mark Twain said, “an honest politician is an oxymoron”, and he would be rolling in his grave at the thought of an online “experience”. It’s disheartening to live in a western society that chisels history off the totem pole and places a fence around the remainder all in the name of liability. While it seems that salvation of the mill is not in our cards perhaps this demolition will serve as a good kick in the ass for us to get out there and truly experience our diminishing back yard.

American Flats, we’ll miss you.

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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Author. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Clairvoyance. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

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Dirt TBK . Overunder. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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ABC Art Attack. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Various & Gould. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Overunder. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

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Overunder. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Meryl Burke)

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IRGH . The Reader. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Klone. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Joins CBS. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Overunder . Klone . Joins CBS. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Mike Fitzimmons. American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Erik Burke)

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Erik and Meryl’s wedding ceremony at American Flats. Reno, Nevada. 2014 (photo © Lindsey Pisani)

 

Please help ID artists whose names we didn’t know in this article. Thank you.

 

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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Nanook and Overunder Saw a Building in Half in Reno

Nanook and Overunder Saw a Building in Half in Reno

For those who were perplexed by the title of ‘residency’ in Banksy’s recent visit to New York, lets just say it was rather tongue-in-cheek to call it that. Artists have been applying for and getting residencies for many years from benefactors of one sort or another – institutions and individuals offering opportunities for artists to come and create with variables of lodging, materials, and length of stay all tied to the mission of the residency and the resources available.

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

Street Artist and fine artist Overunder has hosted his own artists residency for a couple of years since leaving Brooklyn for Reno, Nevada called the Big Little Residency. Focused on social practices through public works of art, the residency is one week to one month long and he has had a few artists come out to live in the little cabin he built out back.

Yesterday Nanook finished his visit and today we bring you some images of the site-specific collaborative wheat pastes, paintings, and installations he completed which include a large wooden handled saw that cuts a building in half.  The whimsical element is not entirely to be coy, but to re-frame our perspective on size and scale, a recurring visual feature of certain works by Nanook. Given the shrinking economic expectations of many Americans for the forthcoming generations, this sizing down of the dream also feels like an apt metaphor for our growing serfdom.

So enjoy the collaborative intervention with latex paint and wood entitled “Do You See What I Saw”, as well as some other pieces of public art Nanook completed with Overunder within the Truckee Meadows in this part of Nevada.

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder.  Detail. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

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Nanook . Overunder. Big Little Residency. Abandoned railroad tunnel with Donner Lake and the Sierra Mountains seen in the distance. Reno, Nevada 2013. (photo © Overunder)

 

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BSA Covers the Globe, Top Stories with HuffPost in ’12

BSA is not just Brooklyn, you know. Last year we brought you new Street Art from Atlanta, Arizona, Baltimore, Berlin, Boston, Bronx, Brooklyn, Brisbane, Bristol, Costa Rica, Chicago, China, Dominican Republic, The Gambia, Guatemala, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Istanbul, Italy, Jamaica, Johannesburg, Kenya, Los Angeles, London, Mexico City, Miami, Mongolia, Nicaragua, Norway, NYC, Palestine, Panama, Paris, Perth, Queens, Reno, Spain, South Korea, Sweden, and Trinidad. And that is a partial, incomplete list. Remember that the next time someone says we cover just Brooklyn and New York. Not quite.

Also while we were surveying what we did in 2012, we were curious to see which were the top stories we covered for the Huffington Post, measured by hits, social sharing, and emails sent to us. Here are the top stories you liked the most of the 44 we cross-published with Huffington Post Arts & Culture in 2012. (A complete list at the end of the posting)

Baltimore Opens Its Walls To Street Art

 

MOMO. Open Walls Baltimore 2012. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Atlanta Hosts First All Female Street Art Conference 

Neuzz (photo © Wil Hughes)

OS Gemeos And “The Giant Of Boston” 

Os Gemeos “The Giant of Boston” at the Rose Kennedy Greenway at Dewey Square, Boston. This side of the van was with Graffiti Artist Rize. (photo © Geoff Hargadon)

(VIDEO) 2012 Street Art Images of the Year from BSA 

Slideshow cover image of Vinz on the streets of Brooklyn (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mexico City: High Art in Thin Air

Escif (photo © courtesy of All City Canvas)

UFO Crashes at Brooklyn Academy of Music

UFO 907 and William Thomas Porter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

‘See No Evil’ in Bristol Brings Thousands to the Streets 

El Mac. (photo © Ian Cox 2012)

What’s New in Bushwick: A Quick Street Art Survey 

QRST in the wild. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sex In The City: Street Art That is NSFW

Anthony Lister in NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

NUART 2012: International Street Art Catalysts in Norway 

Ben Eine (photo © Ian Cox)

Springtime in Paris : Une Petite Revue of New Street Art

David Shillinglaw and Ben Slow (photo © Sandra Hoj)

Pulling Strings in Berlin; “Heinrich” The Public Marionette

Various & Gould “Heinrich” (photo © Lucky Cat)

“Poorhouse for the Rich” Revitalized by the Arts

Adam Parker Smith. “I Lost Of My Money In The Great Depression And All I Got Was This Room”, 2012. Installation in progress in collaboration with Wave Hill. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here is the complete list of BSA / Huffington Post pieces for 2012

 

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Overunder and ND’A in Nevada

A Street Art Residency is born in Reno

The Street Art scene exists at least partially in tandem with the digital sphere and one of its effects on the concept of community is that artists today are more mobile and internationally connected to one another than their pre-Internet graffiti predecessors were.

The growth of connectivity is producing a foundational change to the world of the Street Artist and his or her relation to society as a hidden and/or marginalized figure. Increasingly it appears that it is impossible to be socially isolated when you are so busy relating, even if anonymously. Unwittingly, the stereotypical vision of the outsider is melting as one is pulled into a collective environment where peers regulate and monitor the actions of one another and settle disputes or give encouragement and opportunities.Harrington and Rojo, Freed from the Wall, Street Art Travels the World, an essay for Eloquent Vandals, 2011

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Any Street Artist who has visited another city quickly realizes that there is a network of couches across the world – open to the adventurous artist who has paid dues and built a trustworthy or respected reputation among their peers. If you are cool, you’ll find a brand new batch of friends who will help you out. Even as you can remain anonymous on some level in your online presence, a sort of relational database exists in the tribes hands today that enables peers to perform a streetwise background check on you. If you have a solid rep, you’ll easily get offered a place to crash and a tour of favorite spots to hit. That sort of camaraderie has always existed to some extent of course, as well as rivalry.

One relatively new development is the Street Art residency. The concept of a residency (or some variant) is not foreign to academically trained artists and as many artists on the streets today have some formal training, they will have exposure to the idea. But discussing a residency for Street Artists feels ironic as these artists have inherited and altered a scene that once was populated and defined almost exclusively by youth who grew up with far fewer opportunities, resources, or access.

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

As always there are still the philanthropists and the collectors today who give lodging and materials to young artists and many times today these doors are also open to Street Artists. Additionally there are the loosely cobbled-together festivals that are more prevalent in the last 5 years where one artist with leadership qualities is able to pool enough paint, available bedrooms, and beer to invite a collection of peeps to their city to kill some walls.  With the rise in interest in Street Art due to high profile names like Banksy and Fairey, increasingly we are seeing corporate cash is slipping into that model as well so that lifestyle brands can more easily mingle with a scene that might help it sell product.

And so it appears like a natural development to find that OverUnder has a little shack in Nevada for a Street Artist to develop their craft, focus on their skills, and with some luck, to hit up some walls. Still in its beginning stages, OverUnder and his friend and co-Street Artist White Cocoa are hoping this residency can provide a safe space to expand and explore creatively for their hand-picked guests and to possibly work collaboratively. Here are some images from the very first residency guest who arrived this fall from Brooklyn, Street Artist ND’A. Among the local activities they did together were painting walls downtown, hiking a trail historically remembered for cannibalism, and slaughtering a pig on a ranch.

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

“Yeah, so ND’A was just out here and it was a very exciting yet strange time of changes. The residency is still being built up but is very close to being finished. White Cocoa and I built the entire structure with my brother over the summer and we tried to use mostly found materials which is evident by it’s idiosyncrasies. We also made a few trips to Habitat for Humanity and the lumber yard,” OverUnder explains about this multi-windowed shack with a slim sleeping quarter overhead.

The first mural they painted in Reno was at an old Dice factory that is now being converted to a band rehearsal space and a metal shop down by the railroad tracks. ND’A says the process was kind of like a conversation, “We just sort of worked out the idea on the wall – and we have gotten to a point where we communicate well with each other on ideas and we’re able to go back and forth and change things kind of “on the fly”. That’s what I’ve always like about working with OverUnder. He’s really adaptable. It makes it easy to work on the street.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

OverUnder agrees, “The great thing about working with ND’A is that the painting is very conversational. And it goes both ways because anyone that knows ND’A will tell you how friendly and talkative he is, but even more so he holds up a great dialogue on the wall.”

About the piece itself,  OverUnder helps explain what, for many, is work that needs some crib notes, “When painting together we tend to create non-linear totem poles that could be viewed like a cyclical ideogram,” he says.  “For example, this piece could be about being lost in the idea of home, aiming at becoming stronger, snake eye vision and being three sheets to the wind. Of course the dice represent the Flyce Dice factory where the mural is located, the rocker foam hand signals the transformation of the factory into band rooms and a metal shop, and the dogs curly breath hints at the corkscrew tail of the 300 lb pig living just to the right of the frame. So it becomes very lyrical with hints at the past and the present. And if you read into it you can literally read into it.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

“The second mural we painted is found in downtown Reno. In the scene you see two geese watching a royal hand requesting one shot,” he says, “The message in the bottle is delivered at lightning speed to a Native American Medusa grandmother.” Is that clear to you? OverUnder isn’t that worried, “What it all means? We have no idea. But plenty of people walking by told us what it meant to them, which is always cool.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

The experience on the street in Reno and the conversations they had with passersby was a little different from those in some of the rougher areas in Brooklyn or fast-paced Manhattan. Says ND’A, “For the most part we had a really positive interaction with the neighborhood. People seemed to appreciate having a little artwork.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

When not in the cabin working on sketches painting walls in Reno, the artists were hiking up a snow-covered mountain and checking out an icy lake.

OverUnder explains, “We took advantage of our adventurous artist and exposed him to some alpine exploration and painting at Donner Lake. This is the same area that was made notorious by the tales of the cannibalistic Donner party.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

ND’A was pretty enthusiastic, “We went up into the mountains up the Donner Trail and painted in the tunnels and that was a completely awesome experience. It’s really serene and pretty and you are freezing your ass off and you can’t feel your hands.”

“After nearly freezing ND’A we showed him the other side of our diverse landscape by taking him out to a ranch,” OverUnder recounts about ND’A learning to slaughter a pig under the guidance of a Basque rancher.  “None of us knew how we would feel when we did it – but it was a bonding and learning experience. It also provided meat for Thanksgiving and beyond that.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Not all residencies are the same, and while the FAME festival offers artists incredible food, none have reported having to kill it before eating it. But for the right Street Artist, OverUnder is going to offer some good experiences just by way of location and his lust for experimentation and affinity for collaboration.

ND’A says he liked working together on pieces, “Even though we both work in different mediums we both have similar ideas on style and I think that each one of our styles are significant in their own right but complement each other very well.”

Overunder . ND’A. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

“To say the least, our residency program is not the slight-most traditional; but either is Street Art or any of the passions that give us our drive,” sums up OverUnder, “We loved having ND’A in Reno and look forward to all the work he creates in the future.”

ND’A. Donner Tunnels. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Overunder . Kelly Peyton. Donner Tunnels. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

The Little Big Clubhouse. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

Donner Lake. Reno, Nevada. November 2012. (photo © Overunder)

To learn more about the Big Little Clubhouse Residency Program click here.

 

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