All posts tagged: Mathieu Tremblin

“Post-Posters” Puncture Public Discourse in Strasbourg, France

“Post-Posters” Puncture Public Discourse in Strasbourg, France

Post-Posters in the city of Strasbourg, France From March through May 2019


“Actions Speak Louder Than Ass Ads,” says a new stencil-style printed poster by New York’s epic, if sometimes cryptic, street commentator of four decades, John Fekner. Anyway, who will argue with that?

John Fekner . Carole Douillard. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)

Post-posters is a cooperative proposition about public billposting,” says French conceptual street anarchist Matthew Tremblin about his new project with hit-and-run situationist street posterer Antonio Gallego. Together they reclaim space with individually produced posters and they invite artists from around the world to do the same.

Over a two month period the creative placemakers are facilitating an  international crew of artists to post posters on the occasion of the double exhibition by Banlieue-Banlieue group* (°1982, Poissy) taking place in Strasbourg, at both AEDAEN and the Syndicat Potentiel.

Icy & Sot. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)

The simple plotter printing and limited color palette give the collection of sentiments and sneaky statements a pre-Internet flavor, now delivered in the streets with post-Internet zeal. As advertisers begin to take more public space and mind space with screens of all sorts on the streets, these simple posters actually can appear to be more powerful.

Given that the streets of Strasbourg are regularly ringed by smoke bombs and the air is full of chants from the raging Yellow Vest protests, this campaign may also strike you as a Situationist protest against predatory capitalism now metastasizing into corporate fascism in so-called Western societies.

Or it may simply seem like a lot of curious posters.

Émilie Akli. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)

Post-posters features worldwide artists including: Céline Ahond & Valérie Tortolero, Émilie Akli, Liliana Amundaraín, Groupe Banlieue-Banlieue (Alain Campos, Antonio Gallego, José Maria Gonzalez), La galerie des locataires présente André Cadere, Mathieu Boisadan, Lénie Blue, Hervé Bréhier & Laura Morsch-Kihn, Émilie Brout & Maxime Marion, Raphaël Charpentié, Vincent Chevillon, Emma Cozzani, Minerva Cuevas, Alain Declercq, Michel Dector, Justin Delareux, Caroline Delieutraz, Carole Douillard, Michel Dupuy, Souad El Maysour, Encastrable, Escif, John Fekner, Sebastian Freytag, Antonio Gallego, Jakob Gautel, Roland Görgen, Anahita Hekmat, David Horvitz, Icy & Sot, Rafael Gray, Ann Guillaume & Tom Bücher, Antoine Hoffmann, Rodolphe Huguet, Jason Karaïndros, Jiem L’Hostis & Mary Limonade, Laurent Lacotte, Thomas Lasbouygues, Lise Lerichomme, Richard Louvet, Jean-Claude Luttmann, Gabrielle Manglou, Laurent Marissal, Roberto Martinez, Cynthia Montier & Myriam Suchet, Tania Mouraud, Aurélie Noury, Myriam Omar Awadi, Leila Payet, Patrick Pinon, Igor Ponosov, Arthur Poutignat, Arzhel Prioul alias Mardinoir, Jacques Sy, Mathieu Tremblin, Marianne Villière, Addie Wagenknecht, Éric Watier.

Groupe Banlieue-Banlieue (Alain Campos, Antonio Gallego, José Maria Gonzalez) Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Émilie Akli . Groupe Banlieue-Banlieue (Alain Campos, Antonio Gallego, José Maria Gonzalez) Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Éric Watier . Émilie Akli . Groupe Banlieue-Banlieue (Alain Campos, Antonio Gallego, José Maria Gonzalez) Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Emma Cozzani . Jakob Gautel . Michel Dupuy . Vincent Chevillon . Lise Lerichomme . Myriam Omar Awadi . Michel Dector . Addie Wagenknecht. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Vincent Chevillon . Lise Lerichomme . Myriam Omar Awadi. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Myriam Omar Awadi . Michel Dector . Addie Wagenknecht. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Emma Cozzani . Jakob Gautel. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Richard Louvet . Souad El Maysour. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Richard Louvet . Souad El Maysour . Arthur Poutignat. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Tania Mouraud. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Lénie Blue. Jason Karaïndros . Laurent Lacotte . Gabrielle Manglou . Anonyme. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Escif . Justin Delareux . Richard Louvet . Mathieu Tremblin . Thomas Lasbouygues . David Horvitz. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Céline Ahond & Valérie Tortolero. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Lénie Blue. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Minerva Cuevas . Liliana Amundaraín. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Roberto Martinez . Raphaël Charpentié . Antoine Hoffmann. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Marianne Villière . Jiem L’Hostis & Mary Limonade . Roberto Martinez. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Arzhel Prioul alias Mardinoir (background) . Émilie Brout & Maxime Marion (foregorund). Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Arzhel Prioul alias Mardinoir (background) . Émilie Brout & Maxime Marion (foreground). Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Leila Payet. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Justin Delareux. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Rafael Gray (top) .Sebastian Freytag (bottom). Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Rapid fire postering for the Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Céline Ahond & Valérie Tortolero . Caroline Delieutraz . Lénie Blue . Patrick Pinon . Escif . Antonio Gallego & Mathieu Tremblin . Mathieu Tremblin. Promotional posters. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Hervé Bréhier & Laura Morsch-Kihn (top) . Gabrielle Manglou (bottom). Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
Alain Declercq . Caroline Delieutraz. Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)
From top left and clockwise: Cynthia Montier & Myriam Suchet . Rodolphe Huguet .
Roland Görgen . Encastrable . Mathieu Boisadan . Laurent Marissal . Anahita Hekmat . Jacques Sy . Jean-Claude Luttmann . Aurélie Noury (center poster). Post-Posters Project. Strasbourg, France. April 2019. (photo courtesy of Syndicat Potentiel)

CREDITS: Production by Syndicat Potentiel, Strasbourg (FR). Installations by Antonio Gallego, Laurent Lacotte, Mathieu Tremblin. Fly posting and documentation in Strasbourg by Liliana Amundaraín, Antonio Gallego, Laurent Lacotte, Thomas Lasbouygues, Antoine Lejolivet, Arthur Poutignat, Mathieu Tremblin. Printing by Orgacompte (Nîmes). Thanks to Laurent Bourderon (Immédiats, Arles).

For more information about Syndicat Potentiel, Post Posters Project AND to download or buy a poster click HERE

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Unusual Art Installations in Toulouse Refugee Camp: “Creve Hivernale II”

Unusual Art Installations in Toulouse Refugee Camp: “Creve Hivernale II”

“Over the period of two months all the artists intervened on the site illegally and wanted to live in the same conditions as the refugee families,” says artist and journalist Sandra Butterfly as she explains these newly released and exclusive images of artworks and installations created in a refugee camp in Toulouse, France.

Dangerous barbed wire becomes less harmful through the use of cotton by Annlor Codina. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

A hybrid of autonomous political arts interventions and a neighbor-organized outreach arts program, the initiative opened discussion among those held in the camps as well and attempts to draw attention to conditions in and around restricted areas meant to provide temporary shelter but appear to expose the residents to great insecurities as well. As European nations continue to grapple with an influx of refugees from the war in Syria and other places undergoing tumult, official preparations come under scrutiny, some earning praise, others great criticism.

These art installations and surrounding scenes reflect the raw conditions and limited resources available – uniquely appropriated by artists to give voice to the plight of persons whose lives have been ripped from their home countries by war and economics, now retained in no-mans-land spaces throughout the world.

A pentagon of wooden crates and illustrations on glass panels referred to treatment of the security and surveillance state towards less fortunate people and refugees, according to Butterfly. A4 Putevie. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Creve Hivernale II, the name of the project, is a play on the French words ‘Treve Hivernale’ which refer to a winter break during which landlords cannot evict tenants because to do so would be cruel or inhumane. In this instance, the first word is replaced by the word “Creve”, which means to die. Living in these rough conditions near illegal trash dumping grounds with limited access to running water, food, electricity, plumbing, and in a politically hostile environment fraught with the threat of preying thieves or abusive opportunists, Creve Hivernale II takes a much darker turn; literally translated as “Winter Death”. The 2nd in a series, this intervention follows the first session of Creve Hivernale that took place in a warehouse called ‘Le Frigo’, or ‘the Fridge.’ (read more here)

Initiated by a secretive artist named “<++”, according to Butterfly, Creve Hivernale II gathered like-minded activist artists (artivists) to intervene, possibly intercede. A mix of well known and emerging artists, many of whom work with institutions and galleries, to create site-specific works that could be documented and shared. “The challenge was to go beyond their own fears, face the harsh weather, and create artworks outside from the found trash and objects on the site,” says Butterfly.

A found boat in the trash has been painted in black, floating in a red pond, unable to reach the European coasts. Upgrayydd Recidive . Butterly. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterly)

Because of the sensitive nature of the location and the tenuous circumstances that residents were in, this project was performed over a year ago in December 2016 and time was allowed to pass before revealing it in this way. An unusual location and topic for art interventions, one wonders about the effectiveness, maybe even the appropriateness of an art installation in a somewhat remote location where people are living in such harsh conditions and under dire need. On the other hand, if these artists had not brought the subject in such a manner to our attention, we wouldn’t be writing this article to share with you and conditions of refugees may take on a greater public interest.

We asked Butterfly more about this unusual project to better understand the works in photos here:

BSA: Can you talk about the location? Is it a refugee settlement camp?
Butterfly: The location is in the center of Toulouse, France on a private land, forbidden to the public. It looks like a no man’s land located next to a Dechetterie, an official trash dump.

Mathieu Tremblin wrote poems on the found items on dumpsite. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

What you need to know is that in France you have to pay taxes to dump items at the Dechetterie that are above a certain weight and size and fall into a category of being toxic or damaging to the environment, for example. Next to the Dechetterie is a lot of trash that local residents left illegally because it was either too expensive or because the Dechetterie would not accept it according to regulations.

There are many people and families leaving there in extremely difficult conditions: no electricity or water, just surviving from mendacity on the nearby streets and the trash found on the site. The population is diverse, from homeless or less fortunate people, migrants abandoned from the retention center, ‘roms’ – paperless families from Eastern Europe. The majority of them are paperless and could be evicted from France if arrested.

This territory is very hostile, like a jungle where everybody is in survival mode, in constant fear, not trusting anyone, and thievery occurs all the time. The only protection is their barking dogs.

Artists provided materials and encouragement for some of the younger people to express creativity on a wall. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

BSA: Did those families know that the artists were making art about the topic?
Butterfly: Yes, but it took some time for them to understand that this was art. At first they were hiding, or looking at the art and artists from far away, avoiding any contact. Then bonds and communication were established through the children, who were curious, and who were the first to approach us and interact and play with the artists.

BSA: Could anyone in the general public see these installations, or was it behind fences?
Butterfly: After a period of exploration of the wasteland, artists started to create their installations and then we shared the location in a secretive way.

Only the GPS location was communicated on social media and on the artist websites with the European Flag replaced by barbed wire. The public was invited to bring flashlights and warm clothing, and the exhibition was open day and night to the public. At the same time visitors also had to trespass a forbidden territory to see the exhibition, and part of the land is behind barbed wires near the train tracks.

Artists invited visitors to trespass through a zone of PEUR (meaning FEAR in French), where visitors had to face their fear to move forward in an unknown area. Signage indicated zones of fear and less fear (Peur and –Peur by Upgrayydd Recidive). Upgrayydd Recidive. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

The buff squad. “Following complaints, the city sent some road cleaners to erase the painted sign on the road,” says Butterfly,”Ironically they were erasing the Fear (Peur) from the area.” Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Butterfly. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Installations made out of found trash illustrated the Mediterranean Sea with a swimming pool (Sophie Bacquie and Lucie Laflorentie).  Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Mardi Noir. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Natalie Svit-Kona Eifyran. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

“During the two months self imposed residency, despite the language barrier, artists developed strong bonds with the families and children there and involved them in artistic activities,” says Butterfly. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Sid Poliekoff. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Madmoiselle Kat . Mardi Noir. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Mardi Noir. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

A4 Putevie. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

A4 Putevie. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Imposing fortresses made from foil survival blankets and sculpted wood represent the non welcoming Europe with all its barriers by Upgrayydd Recidive. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Upgrayydd Recidive. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Upgrayydd Recidive. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Molo Molo. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Manuel Pomar. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Luke Warm. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Upgrayydd Recidive. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

Young residence pause before a sign that says “evadage”, or “escape”. Upgrayydd Recidive. Creve Hivernale II – Toulouse, France. (photo © Butterfly)

 


Participating artists included:
NADIA VON FOUTRE – JEAN DENANT – MANUEL POMAR – A4 PUTEVIE – MADEMOISELLE KAT – SID POLIEKOFF – MATHIEU TREMBLIN – MARDI NOIR – UPGRAYYDD RECIDIVE – MOLO MOLO – CLAIRE SAUVAGET – DON QUICKSHOT – LURK WARM – BUTTERFLY – SOPHIE BACQUIE – LUCIE LAFLORENTIE – ANNLOR CODINA – NATALIE SVIT-KONA EIFYRAN

Related stories about this refugee camp:

‘WE NEED TO ACT’ Fears of new Jungle in Toulouse as town camp EXPLODES with 400 migrants

Supporting refugees in Toulouse

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NUART 2014 Roundup : Activism, Muralism, Graffiti and Aesthetics

NUART 2014 Roundup : Activism, Muralism, Graffiti and Aesthetics

The Norwegian mural festival named Nuart took place last week with a marked tilt toward the conceptual and the interventionist, a direct debate about the relevance of activism amidst a rising tide of sanctioned murals, and Tilt leading us down a path toward traditional graffiti.

Ironically graffiti seemed a rather tame topic for once.

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TILT. “Panic Room” Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

“Urban interventionism is about not only making social commentary through artistic expression, but actually intervening in a public and social space in a poetic, unexpected or provocative way,” said architect and organizer Nicola Markhus when speaking to the local Stavangernews. Markhus may have been thinking about the Portuguese artist ±Maismenos±, who constructed a miniature oil tanker platform from found objects and installed it temporarily atop a sculpture honoring canning workers in Lervig Courtyard, by way of contrasting the past with the present.

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±MaisMenos± NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

Or maybe she was thinking about the Madrid-based SpY, who painted a massive red-lettered “ERROR” on two sides of a brutal block long building in decay down by the waterside, an ironic judgment on the eyesores of unfortunate urban decay. Among the contextual social commentary as well were the oil-dripping sentiments of geologist/artist Andreco, who regaled the façade of a classic Norwegian building with his geometric interpretation of rocks found poking up from the soil, and the three dimensional mural of homeless people by Brooklyn-based Iranian brothers Icy & Sot only three blocks from an outdoor encampment of homeless travelers whom some locals call gypsies.

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SpY. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Such is one of the traditions of Street Art: social and political commentary that some call activism because of its advocacy, or at least its stubborn acknowledgement of imperfections in the human condition. This year’s Nuart fosters the spirit and intellectual pursuit associated with academic examination and in doing so again separates itself from the growing number of Street Art festivals who implicitly or explicitly censor the choices of the invited due to commercial or political pressures. Even during the painting this year there were conversations among artists about a high profile festival underway elsewhere that had just dis-invited certain Street Artists because of their “political” work in the past.

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John Fekner. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

As if to drive the point home, New York street and multimedia artist John Fekner, who created hundreds of environmental, social, political and conceptual works consisting of stenciled words in NYC beginning in the 1970s that highlighted failed urban planning and public policy, was invited to reprise his classic text based “False Promises” stencil here. The choice of Fekner was perhaps atypical and one that could be overlooked if Nuart founder Martyn Reed didn’t decide to champion the artists work in his mini-retrospective indoors.

And need we mention that his indoor installation space for Saturday’s gallery opening was shared by Fra.Biancoshock’s instantly controversial merging of the nazi flag with the Facebook logo? Moments after we posted an early image of the installation in progress, cheers and condemnation populated our social media feeds – a happy discord that Nuart isn’t traditionally spooked by.

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Fra.Biancoshok. Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

“This is a representation of two different iconic movements; the Nazis and the Facebook age,” says the Milan based Fra.Biancoshock who specializes in street interventions, not Street Art, per se. “I wanted to unite the two concepts in a unique logo as a way of describing two different ways to have control of the masses in two different ages. It is a provocative representation that is meant to say, ‘Imagine if these two things had met in the same period,’ ” he explains of the illuminated wheel of instantly recognizable letter f’s popping from a four alarm red background at the temporary gallery show in “tunnels” at Tou Scene.

“Obviously the story of the Nazis is very dramatic and heavy and Facebook is only social media but for me if it is not used in the right way it could result in some serious damage; in the areas of privacy, in having control (of people). So I wanted to make this interpretation of our contemporary situation of a certain totalitarianism in our communications today.”

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DOT DOT DOT. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Comparatively the graffiti writer on display this year is a relative lightweight! Toulous-based Tilt actually created one of the more visually compelling installations (and an instant hit) at the indoor gallery of Tou Scene entitled “Panic Bathroom”, which consists of a tiled men’s restroom evenly split between YMCA and CBGB. The untouched half is pristine and gleaming white while its brother across the line is slaughtered floor to ceiling by pugilistic color, swollen bubbles and drippy tags; all just out of reach of the velvet rope that holds guests back.

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±MaisMenos± NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

For the Norwegian born Street Artist named Strøk, Nuart this year is as much about aesthetics and the beauty of the moment as it is the intellectualizing that was on display here during the pub debate and two days of presentations for Nuart PLUS, organized by Eirik Sjåholm Knudsen. He shows us his rendering of figures casting long shadows across the wall on his glossy tablet and he talks about composition, negative space, and the serendipity of catching figures in motion.

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Strøk. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

“I like watching people running around and seeing these movements, these frozen moments when they are heading somewhere but you don’t know exactly where – like a moment when time has frozen,” he says. “It’s a snapshot and you just happened to be there.”

Fortunately for many Nuart still knows how to produce a memorable shot of art in the public sphere, and we have some here for you to enjoy.

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±MaisMenos± created Norway/No Way as a commentary about joining the European Union. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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±MaisMenos± Detail. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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±MaisMenos± Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

 

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TILT. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Andreco. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Andreco. Deatil. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Andreco. Detail of his installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

 

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SPY. Installation at TOU Scene enabled you to see the “error” part of the word only when the black light revealed it. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Martin Whatson. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Martin Whatson. Installation at TOU Scene.  NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Martin Whatson completed this new mural at the airport – after being stranded on top of the cherry picker for a few hours the first day because the balance was off. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Strøk’s new mural on the right and a large ground installation on the left by ±MaisMenos±. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Anders Gjennestad)

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Levalet was one of many of the artists this year who made direct or indirect reference to the oil industry – the one that powers the economy in this town and much of the country. Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Levalet. Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

 

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Icy & Sot created this mammoth 3-D installation with wooden cut-out stencils rising above the edge of the the building. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Icy & Sot. Installation at Tou Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Not an official guest this year Hama Woods was one of a number of artists who autonomously brought work to put up during NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Etam Cru. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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M-City. Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Borondo. Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Borondo. By scratching paint from the front of the glass and painting diagrams or symbols on the back, Borondo created a full illustration with shadow on the wall when illuminated correctly. Detail of the installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

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Levalet’s outside installations. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Levalet. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Mathieu Tremblin created an interactive piece that guests could participate in by photographing themselves before a bluescreen wall and sending the image to him. Installation at TOU Scene. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Due to torrential rains Borondo couldn’t complete this wall before we left for NYC. Here is a composite image of the wall in progress. NUART 2014. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

BSA would like to extend special thanks to photographers Butterfly and Henrik Haven for sharing their work with BSA readers.

Our sincere thanks to Nuart director Martyn Reed and the entire staff of Nuart and Nuart PLUS, including all of the volunteers and organizers.

 

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NUART 2014 Begins with “Broken Promises”

ETAM CRU AND NUART 2014 X BSA

NUART 2014 X BSA UPDATE 3

NUART 2014 X BSA UPDATE 4

NUART 2014 X BSA UPDATE 5

NUART 2014 X BSA UPDATE 6

 

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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This article is also published in The Huffington Post 

 

 

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Bien Urbain 2014 in Besançon, France

Bien Urbain 2014 in Besançon, France

Artistic Routes Through and with Public Spaces

The month long 4th Edition of Bien Urbain just wrapped in Besançon, France and the results are predictably rather awesome due to the quality of the work, the site selections, and the integrated nature of the entire presentation. “It is not about designing an open-air art gallery or about decorating the town,” say the organizers, and maybe that is why each artist seems to consider the whole before devising his or her addition to it.

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MOMO. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © MOMO)

BSA has been tracking Bien Urbain since its introduction and each time the collection of artists is thoughtfully selected, with each helping to define and refine the measure of public art without the trite pleasantries of commercially sponsored festivals nor stultifyingly bland results of design by municipal committee.

Whether purely modernist (MOMO), cerebral (Brad Downey) or poetic (Pastel), the contributions to Bien Urbain are more edifying than edifice and enable one to experience “artistic routes through and with public spaces,” as the festivals’ motto intones.

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MOMO. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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MOMO. Detail. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © L’Saint Hiller)

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MOMO. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © MOMO)

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Argentinian muralist Jaz chose the old citadel of Besançon (below) to pay tribute to his hosts and perhaps because his mind was on the World Cup, he also created a sepia-toned version of the Boca football club stadium in Buenos Aires. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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Jaz. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Elena Murcia Artengo)

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Jaz. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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Jaz also brought a pair of wrestlers to end cap this building. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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Ever (or EverSiempre) was a surprise guest this year and immediately took over a space with his allegorical forms and flowing fabrics. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © David Demougeot)

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Elian. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Elena Murcia Artengo)

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Elian. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Elena Murcia Artengo)

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Brad Downey. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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The American artist Brad Downey made a couple of interventions with existing materials in the Battant neighborhood. Brad Downey. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Brad Downey)

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Zosen & Mina Hamada. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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Zosen & Mina Hamada. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Naara Bahler)

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“It’s based on a poem for Victor Hugo ‘Les feuilles d`automne’ 1831,” says artist Pastel. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Elena Murcia Artengo)

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Pastel. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Quentin Coussirat)

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OX. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © OX)

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Graphic Surgery. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Graphic Surgery)

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Graphic Surgery. Detail. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Chloe Cura)

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The Paris based collective Les Freres Ripoulain created this variation on the typical children’s rocking toy . Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Mathieu Tremblin)

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Les Freres Ripoulain. Bien Urbain 4th Edition. Besançon, France. 2014. (photo © Mathieu Tremblin)

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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