All posts tagged: Madrid

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.29.20 / Dispatch From Isolation #7

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.29.20 / Dispatch From Isolation #7

Highest claims for unemployment in our history. The best day on the Stock Market since 1933. People won’t get relief from the government for weeks and many live paycheck to paycheck. Typically one might predict these are conditions for a domino effect that sets in motion a revolution, if you’ve read history books. Already there are talks about mass rent strikes for April.

Meanwhile, our neighborhood in Brooklyn is in the code red zone on the maps for Covid-19 outbreak in New York; so you’ll forgive us if we don’t go outside to capture fresh new Street Art for a while. We did have to leave once this week for a friend’s medical emergency (not the virus, thankfully) but we’re back on self-quarantine. Much respect to all medical personnel all across the world.

So, as long as we’re able, we’re going to publish work from the street. But please do send us what you see, what you capture – maybe out the window. But don’t put yourself at risk, or others.

We have to flatten this curve and it will take us all to do it.

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring DeGrupo, 1UP Crew, Gris, Hellon Wheels, Jeff Kowalsky, Laszlo, LOOK, Joan Aguilo, Seco, The Brujo, and Yiannis Bellis.

Joan Aguilo in Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)
Vidom + Look in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vidom + Look in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hellon Wheels (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Brujo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist at the marquee at the Magic Bag theater in Ferndale, MI.(photo © Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images)
DeGrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gris in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Yiannis Bellis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SECO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Laszlo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Shabat prayers in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. March 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Urvanity 2020 – Madrid Murals from Zest, D*Face, Never Crew, and Eversiempre

Urvanity 2020 – Madrid Murals from Zest, D*Face, Never Crew, and Eversiempre

New walls from Madrid from only a few weeks ago at the Urvanity Festival, before the city became known as a hub for Coronavirus, went on full lockdown – today closing all of its hotels…

Zest (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)

We start off the collection with graffiti writer from Montpellier, France named  Franck Noto aka Zest. His gestural abstracts are just the kind of bright swipes of energy that capture a commercial market these days, and here he brings those energies to the street as well.

Enjoy the new massive pieces from London’s D*Face, Switzerland’s Never Crew, GVIIIIE and Argentinian Eversiempre as they each knock out new murals that Madrid is thankful for – or will be when people are allowed outside again.

Franck Noto combines the different energies found in Graffiti and brings them out through the basic shapes and the primary colors he uses. The bright colors symbolize the aspect of urban art that immediately catches the eye of passers-by, even before they give a positive or negative opinion on what they see. As for the transparency of the forms, it reflects an accumulation of energies and movements.

Zest. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
GVIIIIE (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
GVIIIIE. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
NEVERCREW (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
NEVERCREW. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
D*FACE (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
D*FACE. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
Nicolas Romero (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
Nicolas Romero. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Nicolas Romero AKA Eversiempre)
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Laurence Vallières and Red-Handed Mickey at Urvanity 2020

Laurence Vallières and Red-Handed Mickey at Urvanity 2020

Presented by Swinton Gallery at this year’s edition of Urvanity Art Fair in Madrid, Canadian artists Laurence Vallières’ installation turned heads and made people think. Ms. Vallières is well known for her sculptures, mostly of animals in peril made out of hard cardboard. Her outdoor installation at Urvanity had a lot to say with two images that stop people in their tracks.

Laurence Vallières. Urvanity Art Fair. Madrid, March 2020. (photo © Martha Cooper)

The center stage in the outdoor area features a murdered triceratops and a triumphant Mickey Mouse astride the hapless animal with blood on his hands, possibly dining on its entrails. Art, of course, can be interpreted in so many ways, and that’s one of its inherent powers. To us, this sculpture represents the centuries of American colonialism around the world and the trail of blood and misery left behind by the conquerors. At the least its a stab at corporate power.

Or does this represent a more generalized corruption in the highest offices – with unashamed displays of nepotism and greed run amok. More literally you may think of those clueless bounty hunters who boast about their kill of the last members of species.

No matter your analysis of the art piece and what it represents to you in particular, this is a powerful socio-political critique given the mainstage at Urvanity Madrid 2020, and many will have an opportunity to see it firsthand.

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Urvanity Madrid 2020: Outdoor Installations Soft and Hard

Urvanity Madrid 2020: Outdoor Installations Soft and Hard

The body as an object. The body as a sexual object. The body objectified.

Combine these notions with soft sculpture in a public space and you will begin to experience Junja Jankovic’s new work in Madrid as we lead up to Urvanity 2020, the newest campaign of contemporary urban art that focuses on galleries and artists working in the public sphere.

Dunja Jankovic. Wearable Sculptures: Dominant, Submissive, Frisky. Urvanity 2020. Plaza de San Ildefonso, Madrid. (photo © Leticia de la Morena)

The Croatian fine artist studied in Zagreb and New York and lives “on her home island of Lošinj where she runs a screenprint studio and a gallery in an abandoned sardine factory,” she says in her bio. These soft sculptures mimic the digital reality now interacting with city reality – inviting you to be a part of them.

Samuel Salcedo. “The heads”. Urvanity 2020. Plaza Juan Goytisolo, Madrid. (photo © Leticia de la Morena)

Joining her are Samuel Salcedo’s hyperrealistic and emotional heads, seemingly rolling around Plaza Juan Goytisolo in a possibly disturbing way. The Barcelona born sculpture commands the space, then holds your attention with subtle ironies and humor. You’ve seen these faces before, but not like this.

Abel Iglesias “The Cube”. Urvanity 2020. Plaza de Callao, Madrid. (photo © Leticia de la Morena)

A third participant in Urvanity’s public show this year is graffiti writer Abel Iglesias and his scattered abstractions applied to the intense weight of a steel cube. Running between Valencia and Barcelona the young experimenter is unhindered by formalism, offering a trip to 90’s Memphis and inflatable pastel motifs of whimsy and geometry. This perplexing form in dark solitude brings a new gravity to an often floating oeuvre of Iglesias.

Abel Iglesias (photo © Papagnimeca)
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URVANITY 2020

URVANITY 2020

Contemporary Urban Art fans, collectors, gallerists are coming together again this year in Madrid for Urvanity, a unique survey of current movements and trends along the Street Art/ graffiti/ urban art continuum, with a focus on canvasses and sculpture.

Again this year comes a strong program of talks with some scintillating professionals who have high profiles in many sectors of this ever-expanding field of art in the public sphere. We hosted last year and the conversations we had were enriching, the people whom we met well versed and passionate.

Please check out Urvanity 2020 to find out more.

Spanish artist Abel Iglesias (image © the artist)
Sixe Paredes (image © the artist)
Jorge Rodriguez Gerada (image © the artist)
Cinematographer Zane Meyer’s film on Conor Harrington
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Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, Forests, and Indigenous People in Focus at COP25 in Madrid

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, Forests, and Indigenous People in Focus at COP25 in Madrid

This story starts in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and ends in Madrid, Spain but its focus is global in nature.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

With the earth at the center of the eye, Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada tells us that the first of two murals he painted for the recent COP 25 conferences is called “Forest Focus.” As the world has been watching the largest forests of Australia burning this month, he clearly knows what we’re all facing.

“With an image of the world as the iris,” he says, “This mural has an artistic focal point that symbolizes the values set forth at the COP25 conference being held in Madrid.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

The Cuban-born Street Artist, now based in Barcelona, was partnering with a public art program/platform called GreenPoint EARTH during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference, or COP 25 to create two new street art pieces.

Well known for his “Terrestrial Series” of artworks spread over masses of land that are visible by planes flying overhead, Rodriguez-Gerada blends social and ecological themes seamlessly with sometimes profound results.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

His second mural of the series is a portrait of Hilda Pérez, a person indigenous to Peru and the Vice President of the National Organization of Andean and Amazonian Indigenous Women of Peru (ONAMIAP). The team says she was chosen to represent indigenous people because their voices are frequently marginalized in discussions about ecology and climate change, despite occupying 25-50 percent of the Earth’s land.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

“We need to think of every tool in our toolkit because time is ultimately running out,” said Greenpoint Innovations founder Stephen Donofrio at a panel discussion with the artist at the Action Hub Event during the COP25.

He was speaking about the pivotal role that Street Art has been able to fill in education, as well as his own interest in partnering with artists and other collaborators to raise awareness for a myriad of environmental issues. “That’s why it’s really important that Chile/Madrid COP25 has this really strong message that it’s time for action.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

With more plans to involve Street Artists around the world “to inspire climate action with positive messages about the interconnected themes of nature, people, and climate,” Donofrio says he believes that the power of communication that Street Artists wield can be focused to make real, impactful change.

“The connectivity is really important in these projects to establish that we are dealing with globally challenging issues that boil down to a really local consequence.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
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Urvanity Murals – Artez, Marat Morik, Poni, and Pro176

Urvanity Murals – Artez, Marat Morik, Poni, and Pro176

As part of the offerings on the street this year in Madrid, the Urvanity fair featured four artists creating new murals in the nearby environs to the
Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Madrid (COAM) campus.

Today we have some shots of the new works by Artez, Marat Morik, Poni, and Pro176, who each were working on their pieces while the Madrid crowds milled by in what really felt like the first sunny days of spring. Here are some process shots and final shots of the walls.

Artez

Serbian Artez brings his realistic illustration style says he is talking “About this Town” with this mural placed in the central shopping district. “Instead of carrying shopping bags,” he says on his FB page, “the girl is depicted as holding a pile of books important for the history and culture of the city along with a plant with a small birdhouse that is inviting all the ‘birds’ to come and feel like home!”

ARTEZ. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pro176

Parisian graff writer Pro176 busted out a tall slim slice of back-alley wall with his collaged pop comic style that may trigger memories of childhood adventures with superheroes and comedic capers. You may have to hunt for it but it feels like a reward once you discover this hidden powerhouse by an aerosol painting pro.

PRO176. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PRO176. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PRO176. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

PONI

The Mexican artist Poni brings this balance of feminine and statuesque alive on this tall slab of wall that rises high above the street. With a nod to sisterhood and Matisse cutouts, her solid shapes buttress the history of womens work and liberates as well.

PONI. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PONI. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PONI. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo courtesy Urvanity ART)

Marat Morik

Former graffiti writer Marat Morik from Russia now uses his illustration style work to evoke the dramatic, darker elements of the street and fiction novels perhaps. Here his portrait of poet Anna Akhmatova, who looks like she’s been caught unaware amidst a deepening plotline shrouded in collaged symbolism, text and textural elements.

MARAT. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MARAT. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MARAT. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo courtesy Urvanity Art)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.17.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.17.19

Patti Smith begins the roll call for BSA Images of the Week in this portrait by Huetek. The punk term is loosely tossed around today, but it only applies to a certain number of people truthfully. In so many ways she is one. But she is also an author, poet, activist, and champion of the people – who she says have the power.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Adam Fu, Bella Phame, BK Foxx, Bobo, Deih XLF, Exist, Huetek, Isaac Cordal, Koralie, Koz Dos, Sixe Paredes, Smells, SoSa, UFO 907, Velvet, WW Crudo, and Zoer.

Huetek pays tribute to Patti Smith for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BK Foxx for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
BK Foxx creates this portrait of American Rapper MacMiller, who passed away so young last September –for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO907 . Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Deih XLF for Points de Vue in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Deih XLF for Points de Vue in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zoer and Velvet in Bilbao, Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SoSa (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“Yo can I get a drag off your Costco membership?” Bobo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal for Points de Vue in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal for Points de Vue in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bella Phame for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Exist in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Exist in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fu (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sixe Paredes in Bilbao, Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
WW Crudo and some Keith Haring stickers? (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Koz Dos for Points de Vue in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A digital “propaganda” advertisement telling people in Madrid the cost of buffing graffiti in the city… (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Koralie for Points de Vue in Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
We Love You! Reads this political gate written in Basque to remind the people of Bilbao of the plight of political prisoners in Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Meanwhile in Bayonne, France an old political mural informs the public about the political prisoners who were detained and disappeared during the Basque Separatist confrontation with the Federal Government of Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Sky landscape in Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.10.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.10.19

A paper published last autumn by HEC Paris and Columbia Business School finds that artists are more likely to be professionally successful if they network widely – and that their innate talent as an artist may have less to do with commercial success than many thought.

Unearthed by Artsy this week, the paper is ricocheting across social media with shock and dismay uttered by some artists who lament the hollowness of the modern graffiti/ Street Art/ Urban Art world, purporting to be distinct and above it all, yet posing in countless photos on their social pages with myriad peers and professionals and potential clients cheek-to-cheek.

It may be time that some hardcore Graffiti and Street Artists can shed some of the charades about how the globe turns, even if you are a graduate of the “School of Hard Knocks”. This movement we are witnessing toward self-promotion and marketing has always been true: This research paper doesn’t even use modern artists as a model for study – the subjects were part of the 20th Century abstract art movement and most died years ago.

You’ll recall that a central tenant of graffiti is that writers spread their names on every wall in different neighborhoods and cities to get “Fame”. As the authors of the paper Banerjee Mitali and Paul L. Ingram say, “CEOs, activists, scientists and innovators all benefit from fame. Meanwhile, the struggle for fame is becoming ever more intense and complex in a digital economy.” Download the paper here.

Yes, networking helps your career. In other breaking news, puppies are cute, the Pope is Catholic, and boys like short skirts.

This week our Images of the Week are coming to you directly from our latest visits to Madrid, Bilbao, and Bayonne. We’re excited to share what we found with BSA readers.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Anna Taratiel, Artez, Aryz, C215, Dan Witz, Eltono, Invader, Monkeybird, MSW, Stinkfish, and Suso33.

Anna Taratiel. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Anna Taratiel. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Invader. Bilbao, Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Aryz. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Aryz. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Witz. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
C215 for Points de Vue Festival. Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
C215 for Points de Vue Festival. Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
C215 for Points de Vue Festival. Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
C215 for Points de Vue Festival. Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
C215 for Points de Vue Festival. Bayonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Artez for Urvanity Arts. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SUSO33. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SUSO33. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eltono. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stinkfish. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MSW. Beyonne, France. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Monkeybird. Bilbao Arts District. Bilbao, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Sunset. Madrid, Spain. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Film Friday: 03.08.19

BSA Film Friday: 03.08.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Isaac Cordal’s Installation at Urvanity 2019

2. Penique Productions Site Specific Installation at Urvanity Art 2019

3. Pro176 Mural for Urvanity Art 2019

4. 1010 Pedestrian Installation in Madrid

BSA Special Feature: Homemade videos at Urvanity 2019

Just in case you didn’t catch these verite recordings of some scenes in Madrid last weekend for Urvanity – here are the original captures by Jaime Rojo, seamed together.

Isaac Cordal Site Specific Installation at Urvanity 2019 Art in Madrid

Penique Productions Site Specific Installation at Urvanity Art 2019 in Madrid.

Pro176 Mural for Urvanity Art 2019 in Madrid

1010 Pedestrian Installation in Madrid for Urvanity Art 2019

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Urvanity 2019: Isaac Cordal’s Dire Courtyard Installation

Urvanity 2019: Isaac Cordal’s Dire Courtyard Installation

A large installation in the center of Urvanity by Street Artist Isaac Cordal went up and came down while we were in Madrid this past week, and we were fortunate to see how such a vision is realized in the midst of a modern school of architecture campus. We also witnessed the responses of guests who circled the ex-urban tale of with cocktails in hand, or in the case of sunny afternoons, reclining alongside it on the artificial green turf.

Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

At a commercial art fair of this caliber it was thrilling, chilling, to see this large scale courtyard installation depicting absurd and psychologically dire scenarios playing out in the wake of crises. This is the kind of discourse that gives a place gravitas, and may provide a route to go forward.

Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

But Cordal doesn’t regale us with color and vividly drawn character studies that some how charm us into a Dantean vision of circles and layers of hell. His dimly illuminated and apocalyptic tale is heavy and grey and in such slow motion you may not realize it is moving.

Here finally are the Business Class, climbing as ever, now also sinking into the toxic soil they created, the world translated as one continuous privatized prison complex.

Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isaac Cordal. Site Specific installation.Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Urvanity Madrid Diary 5: Selections From Urvanity Art Fair

Urvanity Madrid Diary 5: Selections From Urvanity Art Fair

This week BSA is in Madrid to capture some highlights on the street, in studio, and at Urvanity 2019, where we are hosting a 3 day “BSA TALKS” conference called “How Deep Is the Street?” Come with us every day to see what the Spanish capital has happening in urban and contemporary.

“Urvanity seeks to explore and thus imagine possible future scenarios for this New Contemporary Art,” they say boldly in the manifesto for this art fair/cultural platform in Madrid. A thrilling nexus is created here in this college campus of architecture where art from the streets is evolving in such ways that it is invited to come in from the street.

Isaac Cordal. SC Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Whatever your perspective is on this evolution, we encourage the conversation – which usually contains elements of tribalism (various), resistance, acceptance, even euphoria. During breaks from hosting the BSA Talks this weekend we are also skipping and swerving through the crowds to look at the art that galleries have on offer.

Anthony Lister, Marion Jdanoff and Victor Ash. Urban Spree Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Here we offer a very quick sample of some items that have caught our eye, looked fresh, or were indicative of larger movements in the so-called “scene”. And we use the word “scene” very loosely, because there is really not such thing as a homogeneous scene, only a constellation of them which are intersecting, coalescing, and redefining themselves. Some pieces are remarkable.

Here is the past, existing side by side with the future.

Jan Kalab. MAGMA Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Miss Van. Fousion Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Okuda. The Rainbow Mountain Installation. Detail. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Okuda in collaboration with his mother. The Rainbow Mountain Installation. Detail. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hendrik Czakainski. Urban Spree Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dmitri Aske. Ruarts Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
D*Face. Stolen Space Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Witz .Wunderkammern Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dan Witz .Wunderkammern Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pro176. Swinton Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sabek. Swinton Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sam3. Doppelganger Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
2501 .Wunderkammern Gallery. Urvanity Art Fair 2019. Madrid, February 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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