All posts tagged: Madrid

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada Gives a Byte of Eye Candy in Madrid for URVANITY ART 2021

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada Gives a Byte of Eye Candy in Madrid for URVANITY ART 2021

Dazed and confused, how much of our population is apparently anesthetized; directed through daily decisions by a delicious blend of disinformation and propaganda? Everyone will insist they are not, but look closely. Occasionally there are glimmers of civic engagement, even democratic movements that pop up – before they are gently maligned and subtly marginalized as if simply a matter of consumer “choice”.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Urvanity Art 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

‘Byte the Candy’ is the new work in Madrid by Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada; a portrait of a woman is contoured as if a computer chip inlaid with circuitry, no more than a central processing unit.

“In 1984, Niel Postman gave a talk about how we are ‘Amusing Ourselves to Death,’” says Rodriguez-Gerada of his inspiration for this new piece he did in conjunction with the Urvanity art fair. “He criticized how the news we see on television is entertainment,” he says, “there only to maintain our attention in order to sell advertisement time instead of trying to make us think.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Urvanity Art 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

Notable also is the earthen color range the artist selected as if merging his precise realism on large-scale murals with his other field of public expression, land art. Even the uniformity of spacing and graduated shading suggests industrial farming methods… but his greater point is the melting together of ethical conscience and the judgment-free manipulation of the subconscious.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Urvanity Art 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

“Today, we are living something beyond what Niel Postman was warning us about – social media platforms, with a system of algorithms that have no conscience or mercy,” says Rodriguez-Gerada. “These algorithms work incessantly to keep our constant attention to see advertising and propaganda, and in that way become more efficient with the use of personal data, achieving the ability to target advertising that coincides exactly with the profile of interests of each user.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Urvanity Art 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. Urvanity Art 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
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Urvanity 2021: Highlights. A Selection Of Works From The Galleries

Urvanity 2021: Highlights. A Selection Of Works From The Galleries

Madrid’s Art Week – who would believe that it could actually happen? And to prove it, we have the 5th Anniversary of Urvanity defiantly strutting from one end of the COAM headquarter to the other. Taking its original inspiration from graffiti, post-graffiti, surrealism, pop, and that broadly applied “Urban Contemporary” tag, Sergio and the Urvanity team have persevered this year again.

Case Maclaim presented by Ruby Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

Where others have failed, Urvanity has succeeded and grown and even matured – with more than 25 national galleries and others from as far away as New York, Brussels, and Bogotá. This is not about fanboys and big unsubstantiated claims, Urvanity drives for quality, and it shows.

SANER presented by Swinton Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

The talks this year revolved around high-caliber artists, gallerists, architects, and curators of projects that have made new pathways and invariably give you insight and inspiration in equal measure. BSA has been proud to sponsor this thinking-persons fair, along with the artists and creators; we even hosted their talks a couple of years ago and loved the folks we met there.

Here are a few images of fine art works evolving from the street practice of a number of artists whose names you may recognize.

PICHIAVO presented by Stolen Space Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Laurence Vallières presented by Swinton Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Grip Face presented by Limited by Solo Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
D*Face presented by Stolen Space Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada presented by Duran Monkey Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Belin presented by Duran Monkey Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Wasted Rita presented by Ruby Gallery. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

To see the complete list of galleries and the artists exhibited with the available works click HERE

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Portraiture by Case Maclaim and Helen Bur in Madrid for Urvanity 2021

Portraiture by Case Maclaim and Helen Bur in Madrid for Urvanity 2021

Frankfurt-based ultra-talent Case Maclaim is with the Urvanity Art Fair this week, and he has created a new mural in Madrid’s old, historical city center. His work is being shown by Brussells Ruby Gallery, along with that of street artists EverSiempre and Wasted Rita. Still, he just wanted to go big with a tribute to children’s imagination.

Case Maclaim. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)

“I gave the viewer a new character of a yet unknown fairy tale,” Maclaim says of the confident kid wearing a mermaid costume. “I have high hopes that it will encourage especially the young audience to come up with their very own story.”

On another wall, tall and thin, on calle Fuencarral 47, artist Helen Bur painted a figure as a tribute to her mother and to the recently departed Street Artist Hyuro. She says she pays homage to these two women – ‘Humilty, strength, elegance & poetry of the subtle.”

Case Maclaim. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Case Maclaim. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Case Maclaim. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Helen Bur. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Helen Bur. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Helen Bur. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Helen Bur. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
Helen Bur. Urvanity 2021. Madrid, Spain. (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art Fair)
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Paintings of “Centropelia” in Madrid by Juan Yksuhc

Paintings of “Centropelia” in Madrid by Juan Yksuhc

Juan Yksuhc is more oil-on-canvas than aerosol-on-steel, but he’s done the latter with the same fantastical figurative free-wheeling quotidian panache as the former. Rich tones and stretched torsos give way to static snapshots of real life, always rendered in a fevered fervor.

Juan Yksuhc. Centropelia. Madrid. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)

Here in Madrid his paintings are episodic and serially thematic, you may say. Photographer Ricardo Hernandez seeks them, warmed with curiosity at their formal classicism, their nonplussed aplomb and sometimes obvious symbolism. It’s a different kind of lengua de la calle.

Juan Yksuhc. Centropelia. Madrid. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)

Yksuhc in fact is not eager to be unpacked, preferring the graphic manifestation of a historical present to catch you in your moment, ready to walk into the world he’s just painted for you.

For example he tells us that this series “Centropelia” is an allusion to the conflicted realities bound within gentrification; as modern as it is historic with its themes of speculation, expulsion, and the spiraling economic violence of rent.

Juan Yksuhc. Centropelia. Madrid. (photo © Gema Rodríguez y Guillermo de la Madrid)
Juan Yksuhc. Centropelia. Madrid. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)
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Madrid Dispatch: Primo Banksy and TVBoy

Madrid Dispatch: Primo Banksy and TVBoy

These days it is the default storyline of a non-British arts journalist to deign that their local street artist is “Tel Aviv’s Banksy”, or “Wanaka’s Banksy”. Here in Madrid, this artist just calls himself Banksy’s cousin, or at least that could be one interpretation of his artistic name.

Primo Banksy. Tribute at Garcia Lorca. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)

Primo Banksy is a trained artistic talent and uses his carefully rendered ink and watercolor illustrations to highlight cultural figures in art, politics, literature – like John & Yoko, the girl from the Velázquez’ Las Meninas, or this portrait of Federico García Lorca, the poet, playwright, and theater director.

Primo Banksy. Tribute at Garcia Lorca. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)
Primo Banksy. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)

Meanwhile the street artist known as TVBoy is much closer in style and sentimentality to the Bristol-born street art man of mystery known around the world. The Barcelona based Italian favors the pop side of so-called “urban art” here, his filter treatments of popular figures a sure hit for passersby who relate to the subject.

TVBOY. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)

Our thanks to BSA reader Ricardo Hernandez who shares with us some recent shots while strolling the streets of Madrid.

TVBOY. Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.29.20 / Dispatch From Isolation #7

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.29.20 / Dispatch From Isolation #7

Highest claims for unemployment in our history. The best day on the Stock Market since 1933. People won’t get relief from the government for weeks and many live paycheck to paycheck. Typically one might predict these are conditions for a domino effect that sets in motion a revolution, if you’ve read history books. Already there are talks about mass rent strikes for April.

Meanwhile, our neighborhood in Brooklyn is in the code red zone on the maps for Covid-19 outbreak in New York; so you’ll forgive us if we don’t go outside to capture fresh new Street Art for a while. We did have to leave once this week for a friend’s medical emergency (not the virus, thankfully) but we’re back on self-quarantine. Much respect to all medical personnel all across the world.

So, as long as we’re able, we’re going to publish work from the street. But please do send us what you see, what you capture – maybe out the window. But don’t put yourself at risk, or others.

We have to flatten this curve and it will take us all to do it.

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring DeGrupo, 1UP Crew, Gris, Hellon Wheels, Jeff Kowalsky, Laszlo, LOOK, Joan Aguilo, Seco, The Brujo, and Yiannis Bellis.

Joan Aguilo in Madrid, Spain. (photo © Ricardo Hernandez)
Vidom + Look in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vidom + Look in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hellon Wheels (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist in Berlin. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Brujo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP Crew in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist at the marquee at the Magic Bag theater in Ferndale, MI.(photo © Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images)
DeGrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gris in Berlin. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Yiannis Bellis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SECO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Laszlo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Shabat prayers in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. March 2020. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Urvanity 2020 – Madrid Murals from Zest, D*Face, Never Crew, and Eversiempre

Urvanity 2020 – Madrid Murals from Zest, D*Face, Never Crew, and Eversiempre

New walls from Madrid from only a few weeks ago at the Urvanity Festival, before the city became known as a hub for Coronavirus, went on full lockdown – today closing all of its hotels…

Zest (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)

We start off the collection with graffiti writer from Montpellier, France named  Franck Noto aka Zest. His gestural abstracts are just the kind of bright swipes of energy that capture a commercial market these days, and here he brings those energies to the street as well.

Enjoy the new massive pieces from London’s D*Face, Switzerland’s Never Crew, GVIIIIE and Argentinian Eversiempre as they each knock out new murals that Madrid is thankful for – or will be when people are allowed outside again.

Franck Noto combines the different energies found in Graffiti and brings them out through the basic shapes and the primary colors he uses. The bright colors symbolize the aspect of urban art that immediately catches the eye of passers-by, even before they give a positive or negative opinion on what they see. As for the transparency of the forms, it reflects an accumulation of energies and movements.

Zest. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
GVIIIIE (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
GVIIIIE. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
NEVERCREW (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
NEVERCREW. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
D*FACE (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
D*FACE. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Leticia Díaz de la Morena)
Nicolas Romero (photo courtesy of Urvanity Art / Madrid 2020)
Nicolas Romero. Urvanity Art/Madrid 2020. (photo © Nicolas Romero AKA Eversiempre)
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Laurence Vallières and Red-Handed Mickey at Urvanity 2020

Laurence Vallières and Red-Handed Mickey at Urvanity 2020

Presented by Swinton Gallery at this year’s edition of Urvanity Art Fair in Madrid, Canadian artists Laurence Vallières’ installation turned heads and made people think. Ms. Vallières is well known for her sculptures, mostly of animals in peril made out of hard cardboard. Her outdoor installation at Urvanity had a lot to say with two images that stop people in their tracks.

Laurence Vallières. Urvanity Art Fair. Madrid, March 2020. (photo © Martha Cooper)

The center stage in the outdoor area features a murdered triceratops and a triumphant Mickey Mouse astride the hapless animal with blood on his hands, possibly dining on its entrails. Art, of course, can be interpreted in so many ways, and that’s one of its inherent powers. To us, this sculpture represents the centuries of American colonialism around the world and the trail of blood and misery left behind by the conquerors. At the least its a stab at corporate power.

Or does this represent a more generalized corruption in the highest offices – with unashamed displays of nepotism and greed run amok. More literally you may think of those clueless bounty hunters who boast about their kill of the last members of species.

No matter your analysis of the art piece and what it represents to you in particular, this is a powerful socio-political critique given the mainstage at Urvanity Madrid 2020, and many will have an opportunity to see it firsthand.

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Urvanity Madrid 2020: Outdoor Installations Soft and Hard

Urvanity Madrid 2020: Outdoor Installations Soft and Hard

The body as an object. The body as a sexual object. The body objectified.

Combine these notions with soft sculpture in a public space and you will begin to experience Junja Jankovic’s new work in Madrid as we lead up to Urvanity 2020, the newest campaign of contemporary urban art that focuses on galleries and artists working in the public sphere.

Dunja Jankovic. Wearable Sculptures: Dominant, Submissive, Frisky. Urvanity 2020. Plaza de San Ildefonso, Madrid. (photo © Leticia de la Morena)

The Croatian fine artist studied in Zagreb and New York and lives “on her home island of Lošinj where she runs a screenprint studio and a gallery in an abandoned sardine factory,” she says in her bio. These soft sculptures mimic the digital reality now interacting with city reality – inviting you to be a part of them.

Samuel Salcedo. “The heads”. Urvanity 2020. Plaza Juan Goytisolo, Madrid. (photo © Leticia de la Morena)

Joining her are Samuel Salcedo’s hyperrealistic and emotional heads, seemingly rolling around Plaza Juan Goytisolo in a possibly disturbing way. The Barcelona born sculpture commands the space, then holds your attention with subtle ironies and humor. You’ve seen these faces before, but not like this.

Abel Iglesias “The Cube”. Urvanity 2020. Plaza de Callao, Madrid. (photo © Leticia de la Morena)

A third participant in Urvanity’s public show this year is graffiti writer Abel Iglesias and his scattered abstractions applied to the intense weight of a steel cube. Running between Valencia and Barcelona the young experimenter is unhindered by formalism, offering a trip to 90’s Memphis and inflatable pastel motifs of whimsy and geometry. This perplexing form in dark solitude brings a new gravity to an often floating oeuvre of Iglesias.

Abel Iglesias (photo © Papagnimeca)
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URVANITY 2020

URVANITY 2020

Contemporary Urban Art fans, collectors, gallerists are coming together again this year in Madrid for Urvanity, a unique survey of current movements and trends along the Street Art/ graffiti/ urban art continuum, with a focus on canvasses and sculpture.

Again this year comes a strong program of talks with some scintillating professionals who have high profiles in many sectors of this ever-expanding field of art in the public sphere. We hosted last year and the conversations we had were enriching, the people whom we met well versed and passionate.

Please check out Urvanity 2020 to find out more.

Spanish artist Abel Iglesias (image © the artist)
Sixe Paredes (image © the artist)
Jorge Rodriguez Gerada (image © the artist)
Cinematographer Zane Meyer’s film on Conor Harrington
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Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, Forests, and Indigenous People in Focus at COP25 in Madrid

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada, Forests, and Indigenous People in Focus at COP25 in Madrid

This story starts in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and ends in Madrid, Spain but its focus is global in nature.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

With the earth at the center of the eye, Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada tells us that the first of two murals he painted for the recent COP 25 conferences is called “Forest Focus.” As the world has been watching the largest forests of Australia burning this month, he clearly knows what we’re all facing.

“With an image of the world as the iris,” he says, “This mural has an artistic focal point that symbolizes the values set forth at the COP25 conference being held in Madrid.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

The Cuban-born Street Artist, now based in Barcelona, was partnering with a public art program/platform called GreenPoint EARTH during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference, or COP 25 to create two new street art pieces.

Well known for his “Terrestrial Series” of artworks spread over masses of land that are visible by planes flying overhead, Rodriguez-Gerada blends social and ecological themes seamlessly with sometimes profound results.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

His second mural of the series is a portrait of Hilda Pérez, a person indigenous to Peru and the Vice President of the National Organization of Andean and Amazonian Indigenous Women of Peru (ONAMIAP). The team says she was chosen to represent indigenous people because their voices are frequently marginalized in discussions about ecology and climate change, despite occupying 25-50 percent of the Earth’s land.

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

“We need to think of every tool in our toolkit because time is ultimately running out,” said Greenpoint Innovations founder Stephen Donofrio at a panel discussion with the artist at the Action Hub Event during the COP25.

He was speaking about the pivotal role that Street Art has been able to fill in education, as well as his own interest in partnering with artists and other collaborators to raise awareness for a myriad of environmental issues. “That’s why it’s really important that Chile/Madrid COP25 has this really strong message that it’s time for action.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)

With more plans to involve Street Artists around the world “to inspire climate action with positive messages about the interconnected themes of nature, people, and climate,” Donofrio says he believes that the power of communication that Street Artists wield can be focused to make real, impactful change.

“The connectivity is really important in these projects to establish that we are dealing with globally challenging issues that boil down to a really local consequence.”

Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada for Greenpoint Earth Madrid 2019. Madrid, Spain. January 2020. (photo © Fer Alcala)
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Urvanity Murals – Artez, Marat Morik, Poni, and Pro176

Urvanity Murals – Artez, Marat Morik, Poni, and Pro176

As part of the offerings on the street this year in Madrid, the Urvanity fair featured four artists creating new murals in the nearby environs to the
Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Madrid (COAM) campus.

Today we have some shots of the new works by Artez, Marat Morik, Poni, and Pro176, who each were working on their pieces while the Madrid crowds milled by in what really felt like the first sunny days of spring. Here are some process shots and final shots of the walls.

Artez

Serbian Artez brings his realistic illustration style says he is talking “About this Town” with this mural placed in the central shopping district. “Instead of carrying shopping bags,” he says on his FB page, “the girl is depicted as holding a pile of books important for the history and culture of the city along with a plant with a small birdhouse that is inviting all the ‘birds’ to come and feel like home!”

ARTEZ. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pro176

Parisian graff writer Pro176 busted out a tall slim slice of back-alley wall with his collaged pop comic style that may trigger memories of childhood adventures with superheroes and comedic capers. You may have to hunt for it but it feels like a reward once you discover this hidden powerhouse by an aerosol painting pro.

PRO176. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PRO176. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PRO176. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

PONI

The Mexican artist Poni brings this balance of feminine and statuesque alive on this tall slab of wall that rises high above the street. With a nod to sisterhood and Matisse cutouts, her solid shapes buttress the history of womens work and liberates as well.

PONI. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PONI. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PONI. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo courtesy Urvanity ART)

Marat Morik

Former graffiti writer Marat Morik from Russia now uses his illustration style work to evoke the dramatic, darker elements of the street and fiction novels perhaps. Here his portrait of poet Anna Akhmatova, who looks like she’s been caught unaware amidst a deepening plotline shrouded in collaged symbolism, text and textural elements.

MARAT. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MARAT. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
MARAT. Urvanity Art 2019. Madrid. March 2019. (photo courtesy Urvanity Art)
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