All posts tagged: Little Ricky

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.26.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.26.21

The Harvest Moon flooded New York skies three nights this week as we welcomed the fall equinox and we all stared up at the sky and the Koreans ate mooncakes and the tensions on the street seemed to tighten and then release. There is a fresh new hell of a Covid vaccine fight threatening staffing at hospitals, but luckily this week food delivery workers successfully fought for and won better conditions from a parasitic app/restaurant system that extracted their labor and gave precious little back in return. Schools opened and we’ve ducked a few good storms; the Italian Catholics are celebrating the Feast of San Gennaro and the Hasidic Jews are celebrating in those small sukkah buildings all around some neighborhoods in Brooklyn.

A pause. It’s unusual to feel this sense in this city – but it’s there – on a sunny day where the sky is clear of clouds and a flock of geese still waddles and honks in the tall weeds and garbage by the Wallabout Channel. Is it a pause of satisfaction at the end of a summer full of fun, or perhaps a calm resignation before a storm as businesses are staying closed or operating at reduced staff. And while the Federal Reserve and ECB and World Bank insist there is just a smidgen of temporary, transitory inflation, tell us why a pound of butter is $6.00 at the local deli, the average price of a used car is $25K, and shipping container prices have soared to $20K?

There is a steady number of new street art pieces going up on doorways, power boxes, and concrete walls, but they are competing all of the triumphal purple and blue and pink Morning Glories flooding fences and walls and garden gates in neighborhoods throughout Brooklyn – a most generous overflow that summer gives as a parting gift.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Cssh4, Cheak, Clown Soldier, Diva Dogla, Drecks, ERRE, Fat Jak, Font 147, Goblin, Goog, JerkFace, Little Ricky, Mort Art, Praxis, Rambo, Seibot, Sinclair the Vandal, and Smetsky.

Jerkface gave his double Mickey Mouse a face lift. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Clown Soldier (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cash Poor 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rambo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Seibot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Diva Dogla (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fatjak (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Smet Sky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Font 147 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Erre says “Come Mierda” (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Goblin (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cheak (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sinclair The Vandal (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Goog (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Last day of Summer. Brooklyn, NYC. September 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.19.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.19.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week.

For all the flooding of our street art consciousness by the mural movement during the last handful of years, we’re still impressed by the completely organic personality of New York’s scene. New York has the ability to absorb countless graffiti and street artists from around the world and still retain its own particular attitude regardless. Prickly, preening, pensive, or ready to throw a punch, you are never quite sure what you will end up with the art on the streets here. However, you are guaranteed to see something unique — and you’ll never have time to be bored.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Al Diaz, Alex Ferror, ATOMS, Billy Barnacles, Brooklsey Dark, Carlitos Skills, Don Rimx, Drecks, Duel1, Gane, Hiss, Jowl, Little Ricky, London Kaye, Lucky Rabbit, Praxis VGZ, Skewville, Smells, and UFO907 .

Al Diaz (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“Abolish ICE” by Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gane (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Duel1 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
UFO907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Smells (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lucky Rabbit (photo © Jaime Rojo)
London Kaye (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Carlitos Skills (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Don Rimx (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jowl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Brooksey Dark (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Alex Ferror (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hiss, Bastard Bot. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Atoms (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Say No Sleep (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Mid-Summer Discovery: Burgeoning Magnet Wall in Manhattan Boasts Bounty

Mid-Summer Discovery: Burgeoning Magnet Wall in Manhattan Boasts Bounty

We like findings spots that feature walls slammed with street art in a most organic way, the aesthetic signature of a current ecosystem mid-evolution. These spots are often a magnet for street artists to get up in NYC, L.A., Berlin, Lisbon, Madrid, Paris, Barcelona, Mexico City, Miami, Boston, London, and beyond. Usually illegal, they allow the artists a quick way to safely leave their imprint on the chaos of the city, a welcome to international artists on their spraycation as well as locals who relish the feeling of standing among peers. The art is usually limited to small original pieces, stickers, and posters, wheat pastes.

De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We call them “magnet walls” – and NYC has had its share of them. Now, however, they are increasingly endangered because of Gentrification and the voracious real estate market in the city with its apparent never-ending appetite for building new soaring soul-free glass towers. One spot is still welcoming artists to its walls: Freeman Alley. This favorite enclave, composed of two long walls along a narrow corridor in the Lower East Side, is constantly updated in an organic way with contributions by local and international artists. We have surveyed it for years, often publishing our findings in the popular “BSA Images Of The Week.”

C0rn Queen (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Last week we rolled by the alley again and to our surprise, we discovered a gate ajar; one that leads the lobby of a relatively new hotel. Usually locked with a code, this secret Bowery spot instructs guests to enter through the alley. Once inside, they’re greeted with a nicely landscaped, small-scale courtyard leading to a lobby. Surprisingly, it is now bursting with new stickers, posters, stencils, paintings, collages, wild imaginings. Technically, this is a legal magnet wall – but most of the artists whose work is on display here can also be found illegally on the walls of the alley.
Here’s a fresh selection just for you:

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drecks (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dewei (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dewei (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dewei (photo © Jaime Rojo)
General View (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eye Sticker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Timmy Ache (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Timmy Ache (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Timmy Ache (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (the fire hydrant is real) (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Voxx Romana (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Modomatic (photo © Jaime Rojo)
General view (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vegan Club (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Poor Mike. Probably feeling sad about labor conditions in sweatshops. Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
David Puck (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Make Art!
Savior Elmundo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RAD and friends (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.28.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.28.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week as we head into Passover and Easter. If street art reflects society, and we know that it does, Governor Cuomo is in hot water and may not keep his job. But then, we thought the same about the war criminal George Bush and the grifter Trump, so never mind.

Thank you to reporter Jim O’Grady for interviewing us for a story on WNYC radio this week – along with our colleague Sean Corcoran who is the Curator of Prints and Photographs and a graffiti historian from the Museum of the City of New York.

“As Covid Ravaged New York, Street Artists Fought Back” is the name of Jim’s eight-minute exposition – and his storytelling adds so much to our appreciation of the city and the environment that gives life to our street art and graffiti scene here. Thanks for including us Jim.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: Chris RWK, CRKSHNK, Dwei, Hope Hummingbird, I Heart Graffiti, Little Ricky, Peachee Blue, Raddington Falls, Rambo, SacSix, Sara Lynne-Leo, Sticker Maul, and Technodrome.

Chris. RWK / (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Technodrome (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Peachee Blue / NYCThrive for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Peachee Blue / NYCThrive for East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
We’d like to think that this collab between Little Ricky and Sara Lynne-Leo happened organically, whereupon, first either one of the artists found the one piece on the wall and the other had the best placement opportunity of the day. Both pieces are illegally placed. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
And here again we find our friend Little Ricky cavorting with other friends. Raddington Falls, I Love Graffiti. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sitkman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman’s installation on a traffic sign draws attention to climate change. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist addressing climate change as well. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#nomalarkey (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dwei (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RAMBO (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We’ve seen an uptick of messages on the streets aimed at Governor Cuomo

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sticker Maul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SacSix (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hope Hummingbird pays tribute to the great Margaret Kilgallen. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zoomy out for a walk on the first Spring day in NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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US Election Day 2020, Trump v. Biden, and Politics on the Street

US Election Day 2020, Trump v. Biden, and Politics on the Street

Street art in the last five years has been lit on fire with politically themed illustrations, installations, slogans, opinions, and insights that implore passersby to take action and to be engaged in the direction that society is leading.

WoreOne Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The once-consolidated TV-print media system has had many challengers in social media and websites, though those now too are being censored, demonetized, and throttled by the corporations and certain state actors who have infiltrated and hampered the free-flow of opinions and political discourse under various “honorable” guises.

Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Because major political machines and the corporate media don’t typically use the streets as a communication platform in US cities, aside from the occasional poster campaign for a candidate, the rather unfiltered collection of views and voices come through.

The inheritor of the historically revered “soapbox”, a physical and metaphorical location in a public square where people put forward their opinions, beliefs, philosophies, and ideologies in an impassioned voice, street art currently thrills, perplexes, informs, and annoys. It reaches the tech-savvy and the greater majority of our neighbors who are not on social media.

Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Given that these opinions could be easily buffed or blighted by any passerby yet are permitted to stay, there is an argument that art on the street is the present Vox Populi, a truer representation of the voice of the people.

In the city that knew him first, Donald Trump is given special scrutiny and particular invective for his actions, inactions, behaviors in the role he has occupied as president of the country since 2016. His official opponent in the race is a career politician, an historically right-wing version of a left-wing party, is somehow positioned as a better alternative for an electorate who is desperate for something, anything better than what they have.

By night’s end (or week end, or year end) we will know who is the winner of today’s election; Trump or Anti-Trump. No matter who prevails, street art will undoubtedly weigh in with its opinion.

Raddington Falls Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls, Little Ricky, Diva Dogla. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mike171, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HeartsNY, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Robert Fontanelli, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dylan Egon, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joseph Grazi, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Butterfly Mush, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eye Sticker, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Anna Lustberg, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Individual Activist, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies, Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies. Detail. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies. Detail. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies. Detail. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies. Detail. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies. Detail. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Wall Of Lies. Detail. Vote2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.06.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.06.20

Anarchists and lawlessness on the streets of New York? Where are you looking exactly? This is a narrative that charlatans like to slander our fair city with, where we spent 8 hours hanging out on blankets on the grass yesterday in Prospect Park, performing anarchist acts like eating sandwiches, reading books, taking naps, going for walks with thousands of our neighbors. So far this is one of the most beautiful Labor Day Weekends we’ve seen in ages and there was no army present.

Every time the fearmonger’s from outside of NYC try to scare people into voting for something, you have to be amused by their ignorance and obvious disinformation – and wonder if it isn’t a generalized fear of black and brown people that drives their critiques. Maybe they are fearful that New Yorkers are the most ethnically diverse population in the country and we are always getting along just fine with each other, even liking and loving each other on a daily basis and we have been doing so for years. Gorgeous and expansively green Prospect Park in the middle of Brooklyn is a fine example of it this weekend – you’ll see people of many backgrounds hanging out happily and civilly, barbecuing meats and vegetables, playing volleyball with the youth group, tossing the frisbee with their girlfriend, sitting on blankets and playing board games with their kids and neighbors, helping babies take their first steps, helping grandpa into a folding chair.

We didn’t see one fight or argument Saturday, and the park was completely teeming with people, and we saw maybe one or two police officers throughout all day – because apparently tens of thousands of us co-New Yorkers know how to enjoy a sunny day in the park with each other and without invoking chaos. On blankets, in lawn chairs, on picnic tables – there we all were; Indians, Africans, Mexicans, Germans, Italians, Jews, Conservatives, Liberals, Koreans, Chinese, Europeans, Buddists, LGBTQI, singles, couples, families, church groups – too many to list here. You could see all kinds of different foods if you walked around and heard music being played – some of it live and spontaneous, like the Dixieland jazz band, the violin quartet, the guy on the flute. We love New York and we love New Yorkers more than ever before.

So, no, Mike Huckleberry or the Foxes or the Divider in Chief, we don’t fall for it because we know the great people of our city. Scare people in the middle of the country with stories about lawlessness in our city, but you don’t fool us for a second. For the record, 93% of the Black Lives Matter marches across the country this year have been peaceful. We’re all capable of having the hard conversations, despite what you and your networks want people to believe – New York has been proving that for years. Sorry, society is moving on – or in many cases already has moved on – from the cultural hegemony phase. It ain’t perfect, but Jesus sometimes it can feel like it.

And now some street art images recently shot – our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Antennae, Damon NYC, JKos Art, Little Ricky, Raw, Stikman, and Urban Russian Doll NYC.

Alt-right symbol sticker – Pepe the Frog with Q Anon eyes, is smacked over a happy cat – alongside “Help Each Other.” Unidentified artists (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JKos Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stikman (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Urban Russian Doll NYC for East Village Walls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Antennae brings the much feared Asian Killer Hornet to NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RAW (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist on a fence in the park (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Damon NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Little Ricky Takes Ewe to the Streets of NYC with Anna, Keith and SHEEP

Little Ricky Takes Ewe to the Streets of NYC with Anna, Keith and SHEEP

Little Ricky thinks Anna Wintour is someone important whom people consider significant or iconic in popular culture, which is already a humorous supposition. In his multiple street iterations of the fashion editor, he has dressed her as a sheep in Chanel, as a sheep in boxing gloves with Andy Warhol (replacing Basquiat), as an American Express fashion gladiator in stickers and wheat pastes on the Streets of New York.

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Each tiny episode of his ongoing SHEEP series may bring a perplexed smile to the average person who is looking at them while waiting for the traffic lights to change. In the case of the Wintour character preaching and prognosticating and posing, an insider joke that appeals to the fashion gatekeepers in this city, of which many have self-appointed. The question you may ask is, who’s the sheep, who’s the shepard.

A Street Art icon/brand in the making, Little Ricky’s talisman-woman of a candy pink sheep character inhabits the new strata of 20-teens Street Art that reflects the ease of social media commentary here grafted onto actual walls, the fascination we have with visually sampling pop cultural references, and the time-honored practice of lampooning with absurdity. A California-based Gen X Street Artist with uncommon discipline and work ethos in his practice, Little Ricky has been studying, developing, archiving, formulating his campaigns in the Street and gallery for the better part of a decade now.

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Recently in New York to sample the late-summer fragrance potpurri of pot, urine, and Italian sausages on the streets of Lower Manhattan, BSA had an opportunity to chat with Little Ricky one night when we were gallery hopping with a buddy.  He talked about new art on lightposts and guard-rails, the nature of his one-off comical creations, and his deep desire to launch a Keith Haring show here next year using his ewe-inspired interpretations of Harings work and life.

Brooklyn Street Art: We’ve seen many Anna Wintour pieces recently by you on the street. How does the muse find you?
Little Ricky: I never imagined that I’d be spending a year working with Anna as my muse. It’ll be weird once the year comes to an end. But I know that SHEEP will continue to surprise me and Anna will most likely keep popping up in my work. The connection will always be there.

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

She can find me on IG. But, since she doesn’t have a personal IG account, I hashtag her name #ANNAWINTOUR and I tag @voguemagazine. Maybe one of her PA’s will get the word out to her. A few months ago, I even sent her a large pink manilla envelope with a SHEEP zine/bio and stickers too. Whether she ever received it is another story.  I don’t expect to hear from her, but I have a feeling that our paths may cross at some point. Either way, our stars are crossed, at least in my head.

Brooklyn Street Art: People are sheep, aren’t they? 
Little Ricky: I’d like to think that we’re all sheep but without the negative connotations. Sure we can all follow along with the masses, or maybe not fit in, but at some point we all crave to be ourselves as we are. At the heart and soul of SHEEP is that we’re ALL different. When Alexander McQueen referred to himself as a ‘pink sheep’ I understood that he was making a comment not only on his sexuality, but more importantly on the idea that he was different from even the black sheep. Reading that sentence in his biography altered the course of my life and is what inspired SHEEP.

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

After 51 years of life and almost 7 years of working on the series, I’ve learned this. (See if you can follow along or if it makes some sense) Being born is what we ALL have in common. Yet at that moment no one ever has or ever will be identical. In one moment we’re connected and different at the same time. We then spend a lifetime searching for meaning/purpose. The secret- to learn, embrace, and honor all those many little things about ourselves that make us…ME! When we do so, we go back to that moment of connection. So yea we’re all sheep finding our way back to an essence of being. 

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about your feelings toward Keith Haring and the impression he and his work made on you? 
Little Ricky: I feel a deep connection to Keith. It goes beyond being inspired by him. I feel him alongside me like he’s guiding me along. I first came across his work in the late ’80s. The simplicity of his images struck some magic in my soul. They still do. They felt familiar. Until now, I didn’t realize that Keith’s passing in February of 1990 coincided with my coming out the month before. Weird! Maybe he passed the torch along. My first boyfriend who I met in January of 1990 even drove Keith around SF the year before. I wasn’t into the art scene in any way, but I started taking art classes while at UC Berkeley. I imitated his lines and figures, but there was no ‘me’ in what I was creating.

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With SHEEP, almost 30 years later, I can see his influence in my work, always will. But now I know, that I’m creating a world of my own with a little touch of his magic. It’s been an effortless process. For that, I give some credit to Keith. When the idea for SHEEP came to mind in 2013, I didn’t know what I’d be creating. I purchased a toy sheep and started doodling. After a while, a shape took form and it looked familiar like I had seen it before.

Thinking about this now, I realize that it was like finding my own Haring ‘baby.’ I wasn’t looking for it, but when I saw it, I knew it was the beginning of everything. P.S. Last year in May, I did a 31-day study I called SHEEPDOG. Each day, I painted an image combining Keith’s dog and my SHEEP. I was surprised that I hadn’t thought of it earlier. It was magical seeing it evolve. 

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Recently Dusty Rebel has been traveling around the world speaking with and filming Street Artists from the GLBTQ community. Why is it important to know if a graffiti writer or Street Artist is GLBTQ?
Little Ricky: As I get older, labels have become less important. I jokingly tell my sister that I’m the ‘+’ in the GLBTQ+ If I’m to label myself, it’s definitely queer over gay. I like qweirdo even better! When I started the series, I assumed the street art community was a bunch of heterosexual males. Other than the names Bansky and Shepard Fairey, I knew nothing about it. Knowing that the SHEEP were queer, I felt some hesitation about how the community would embrace them.

Unknowingly, I’d even censor myself so that they weren’t too ‘gay.’ That all changed after the Orlando shootings when I was reminded of the importance of living out loud and proud. But once I started meeting the artists, I came to find out that no one cared about how I identified or if the sheep were gay or not. All that mattered was that I was getting up and they loved what I was doing. Meeting all these artists, queer or not, has been one of the greatest parts of working on SHEEP. So, it’s not so much about knowing who’s queer or not, because in the end, we’re all doing the same thing. But thanks to Dusty, there’s a new found community.

Once I started, other than HomoRiot, I wasn’t aware of anyone else. It took me a few years before we eventually met up. Now, I have a new community of peeps that I get to call friends. I’m excited to meet many more along the way. I feel grateful to Dusty and all his work. He’s shedding light on an untold story and the many artists who often go unrecognized. It’s like the M&M commercial- we do exist!  

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Which city is more fun for Street Art right now? 
Little Ricky: As much as I love my beloved city of LA, I feel like I’m living ‘in’ art when I’m in NYC. Art’s everywhere! Aside from SHEEP, walking is a great passion and there’s no better city than NY to combine my two loves. When I was there recently, I put in 20 miles in one day. The opportunity to paste-up SHEEP is everywhere and anywhere. LA’s different that way. Even though I do walk a lot and I paste-up wherever I go, it’s not the same. It’s very random. Plus you’re not going to see my work whiledriving aroundd. SHEEP is definitely for the pedestrian and NY is the perfect place. Initially, I thought my little SHEEP would get lost in it all, but came to find out that New Yorkers do pay attention while walking.

When it comes to the queer art community, street or not, I often wondered if my work didn’t fit in because it wasn’t erotic or specifically depicting a ‘queer’ image/message. But I now know, that regardless, they’re queer and they’re pink! It’s in the heart and soul of the each SHEEP. Whether this is conveyed when coming across my work is not as important as the feeling you have when seeing them. Feel the JOY! 

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: In what way is your work political? Is it commentary? Critique?
Little Ricky: This was a tough question. I don’t see it as being overtly political or even commentary. There are some pieces that may be so, but overall they’re expressions of joy. I keep it simple. If you smile or laugh out loud when finding my pieces on the street, I know I’ve done my job. I often laugh out loud when creating them. There’s such silliness. For example, the idea of Anna Wintour as a pink sheep in roller skates makes me laugh. When I began the series, they started off as ‘gay’ sheep and now they’re more a symbol about a feeling. 

I’ve always felt different, it goes beyond my sexuality. As I age, I feel more and more different. And the more different I feel, the more connected I am. So the SHEEP being out and about, regardless of the character or message, are a symbol of that feeling that we all feel. Being different, feeling different is a beautiful thing! 

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.08.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.08.19

Surreally yours! The art on the streets this week appears to reflect the times. It’s going to take all this creativity and force to turn the tides!

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring 1Up, AJ LaVilla, Android Oi, Cern, Dark Clouds, Dirty Cobain, Early Riser, Invader, Jason Naylor, Little Ricky, Lubaina Himid, Lucas Blalock, Oscar Lett, Robson, SacSix, Subway Doodle, Zimer .

Subway Doodle vs Brooklyn Rats for Under Hill Walls. You can see here there are some subtle differences between Brooklyn rats and regular ones. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Subway Doodle vs Regular rats (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lucas Blalock (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Robson (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Android Oi for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lubaina Himid (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dirty Cobain for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ceci n’est pas une Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dark Clouds (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP in good company… (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SacSix for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Oscar Lett for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ Lavilla for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zimer for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Shadows. Brooklyn, NY. September 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 07.21.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 07.21.19

Dog days of summer be damned, the Street Art in all of its fabulous illegal varieties, the true Vox Populi (and self-advertisment) persists and insists through the streets this July.

On the topic of illegal, we’ll state it again for the many persons who have an incorrect impression – Street Art, by definition, is illegal. If it is not illegal, please do not call it Street Art. That work you are looking at is probably a mural. Unfortunately we’ve seen some recent flagrant misuses of the term by some folks who probably should know better.

Good to see “Hysterical Men” here in New York, after admiring the campaign from Philly. The artwork reminds us of Robbie Conal as well, who is reliably skewering public officials with his wilting depictions of them on posters on the street. This week we also were reminded of Chicago’s Dont Fret when we saw the work of Matt Starr, with his textual witticisms. Don’t get us wrong, its not a criticism to have similar work – it’s just an observation.

Finally, considering the treatment of immigrants, the mounting fascism, racism, misogyny, and rageful ignorance being modelled and engendered from the highest offices in the land, we’re shocked that, with a few notable exceptions, Street Artists are not taking those messages to the streets. So much for its reputation for being activist. Not so much.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Benjamin’s Brother, Bones, Cammix Vx, Captain Eyeliner, Diva Dolga, Domingo Zapata, Dr. Nothing, Hysterical Men, Invisible Essence, Little Ricky, Matt Siren, Matt Starr, Mattew Wythe, Mr. Djoul, Obey, Praxis, Raddington Falls, Rammellzee, Sara Lynne Leo, Sinclair, Sunflower Soulz, The Postman Art, and You Go Girl!

Sara Lynne Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Choose Love (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mattew Hyte (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Obey (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sunflower Soulz (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hysterical Men…fighting for women’s rights…the wrong way… (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hysterical Men (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Praxis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Starr (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Starr (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Domingo Zapata (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dr. Nothing (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bones (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CammixVx (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Invisible Essence . The Postman Art. Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Symbol…FYI (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Benjamin’s Brother (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Diva Dolga . Raddington Falls . Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sinclair (photo © Jaime Rojo)
You Go Girl! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mr. Djoul (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rammellzee looking dapper at Beyond the Streets exhibition in Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Palimpsest in Manhattan. July 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 06.09.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.09.19

Jeez, that only took 50 years. Stonewall Riot Apology: Police Actions Were ‘Wrong,’ Commissioner Admits”, cooed the New York Times this week. Of course the NYT headline at the time focused on how the helmeted, armed police were affected, rather than the couple of hundred citizens who they harrassed, intimidated and beat up for being many shades of LGBTQ – “Four Policeman Hurt in Village Raid”. Thankfully Macy’s and HSBC bank and all the corporations ran to the rescue of those folks in 1969 and throughout the 1970s and 1980s, 90s, right?

Aside from the multiple lessons we all continue to learn in the fights for people’s equality across society and in our institutions, one lesson comes through loudly and clearly: real, meaningful change almost never comes from the top down. Social, political, and economic justice comes from the grassroots, rank-and-file, everyday people fighting day after day, year after year.

That’s why we keep our eyes on graffiti, Street Art and all manner of expression on the street – its proven to be a reliable source for the vox populi.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring CANO, Carl Paoli, Dain, David Puck, El Ergo, FKDL, Infynite, Isabelle Ewing, Justin T. Russo, Little Ricky, Meres One, Ramiro Davaro-Comas, Sara Lynne Leo, Screwtape, SeeTF, Skewville, Solus, and Stray Ones.

seeTF portrait of Taylor & Lauren with Meres One’s heart shaped rainbow. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Homo Riot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Justin T Russo. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)
David Puck. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
FKDL (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Solus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ramiro Davaro-Comas (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stray Ones (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Stray Ones (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Isabelle Ewing (photo © Jaime Rojo)
El Ergo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Infynite (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Carl Paoli (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist Justin T Russo. WorldPride Mural Project Initiative. The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)(photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cano (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. The Last Picture. East River, NYC. June 2019 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 05.05.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.05.19

The eyes have it.

Have you noticed the number of faces and eyes that are pasted, painted, drawn on the Streets right now? Maybe they are an indicator that many more of us are truly paying attention and that we see how close the danger is, even if we don’t know exactly what to do.

The first step of course, is to pay attention. Turning off the corporate controlled media helps.

What do you see?

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Arkane, CP Won, Dylan Egon, Eyebrows, Greta Thunberg, Himbad, Hiss, Little Rickey, LMNOPI, Lungebox, SacSix, Sara Lynne Leo, Soten, The Postman Art, and Who is Dirk.

Top image: Little Ricky imagines three icons through the eyes of a ewe – Madonna, George Washington, and John Lennon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Arkane (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Arkane (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Soten (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CP Won. Portrait of a friend and Brooklyn resident. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CP Won. Portrait of a friend and Brooklyn resident. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CP Won. Portrait of George C. Parker. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SacSix (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Postman Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Still Life with Lungebox. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Who Is Dirk (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Who Is Dirk (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hiss (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Himbad (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dylan Egon (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Sara Lynne Leo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eyebrows (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Perseus with Medusa’s head. Metropolitan Museum of Art. NYC. May 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 03.04.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.04.18

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

We made it! But it was a rough few days just finished with storms and rain and snow and high winds and flooding and downed trees around New York and its environs. Similarly, as one surveys the chaos reigning in Washington, one must not be blinded by the sound and fury and has to measure what foundations are being broken and what soil is being eroded during this deliberate and man-made storm. Also Tax Payers, You’ve Been Scammed.

In other news Street Artist JR and New Wave cinema pioneer Agnès Varda are well positioned for an Oscar tonight, Nuart continues a 2nd year in the beautification of Aberdeen, Street Artist Haifa Subay is painting murals to help ensure that victims of Yemen’s grueling three-year civil war are not forgotten, conservative Street Artist Sabo took over three billboards to attack Hollywood about hidden pedophilia, a Florida billboard calls NRA a ‘terrorist organization’ , INDECLINE did a billboard takeover protesting gun violence and criticizing the ease of gun access, and NY street collage artist PhoebeNewYork says her background in fashion is the driving influence in her work on the streets.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Below Key, Bond TruLuv, Bunny M, Combo, Crash, Eleonora Arosio, Faith XVVII, Free the Bunny, Imraan Christian, Jaeraymie, Lamkat, Little Ricky, Manyoly, Olek, Ollio, PAM, Paper Skaters, RAD, SK, Specter, and UFO907.

Top Image: Crash for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Combo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ollio in Stockholm. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Manyoly (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Manyoly (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Paper Skaters (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Olek. Magic City Stockholm. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Eleonora Arosio (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaeraymie. Free The Bunny (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Below Key (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bond TruLuv. Magic City Stockholm. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)

RAD (photo © Jaime Rojo)

RAD (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Specter McDonlad’s Take Over. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO 907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faith47 . Imraan Christian at Magic City Stockholm. Deatail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lamkat (photo © Jaime Rojo)

bunny M (photo © Jaime Rojo)

PAM . SK. Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluís Olivé Bulbena)

Untitled. Subway reflection. Stockholm, Sweden. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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