All posts tagged: Karl Addison

Karl Addison Paints In Refugee Camp in Greece with Syrian Kids

Karl Addison Paints In Refugee Camp in Greece with Syrian Kids

If your house is destroyed and you are chased from your neighborhood by bombs, anything that recalls normalcy is welcomed. Street Artist Karl Addison tells us a recent project with two other artists where he hopes their painting gave residents a sense of hope for their future.

Karl Addison for aptART. Elpida, Thessaloniki, Greece. April 2017. (photo © Karl Addison)

Based in an abandoned textile factory in Thessaloniki, Greece, the individual tented rooms are in rows on large open floors with common areas created for kitchens and space for children to play. Outside in the parking lot Karl smashed the walls with an ocean of blues over the course of six days – something comforting and reassuring perhaps.

“We were creating the artwork with the objective to make the place feel more like a home than an old factory,” Karl says, and she says that he invited people to be a part of the process of art making “hoping to inspire or provide some sort of normalcy to their lives.”

Mostly families from Aleppo, Syria, many of these families were previously in other camps and “have been split up along the journey and/or the war from their homes,” he says.

Karl Addison for aptART. Elpida, Thessaloniki, Greece. April 2017. (photo © Karl Addison)

“I wanted to paint some of the kids from the home and only managed to do two portraits.  For the rest of the canvas, we engaged the kids to put the theory of Abstract painting into practice. Inspiring them with contemporary painters like Rothko, Pollock & Cy Twombly. The movement and mark of paint becoming their expression.” An unusual exposure to 20th century painting, no doubt, and one that some of the kids got to participate in as well.

The project is sponsored and organized by apART, an organization that brings arts into places like the Elpida Refugee Home. Karl would like to thank Sam from apART, as well as give a shout out to the two other artists who were working at the camp with him, Billy (*http://www.billycolours.com/), and David Shillinglaw (*http://davidshillinglaw.co.uk/).

Karl Addison for aptART. Elpida, Thessaloniki, Greece. April 2017. (photo © Karl Addison)

“I can only hope that during the time we were there, there was a difference made.  If it’s a particular painting, phrase, or text from the beautiful artworks,” he says, his intention was to show “empathy for other humans in need – involvement through compassion.”

Karl Addison for aptART. Elpida, Thessaloniki, Greece. April 2017. (photo © Karl Addison)’

Karl Addison for aptART. Elpida, Thessaloniki, Greece. April 2017. (photo © Karl Addison)

Karl Addison for aptART. Elpida, Thessaloniki, Greece. April 2017. (photo © Karl Addison)


aptARThttp://www.aptart.org/

Elpida Homehttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/elpida-home-project-thessaloniki-greece-refugees-factory_us_57a3ab7fe4b03ba68011d08f

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Karl Addison “Carina” at Le M.U.R. in Paris

Karl Addison “Carina” at Le M.U.R. in Paris

Across the US today families are joining together/avoiding each other for Thanksgiving in a spirit of gratitude. For those who are afraid to have potentially firey political conversations at the dinner table or for those who are living too far away from home to afford to travel, Thanksgiving often becomes “Friendsgiving” – just gathering friends and like-minded neighbors together to eat, drink, tell stories, be grateful for the blessings of life that we recount to one another.

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Karl Addison Carina Le M.U.R, Paris, November 2016. (photo © Karl Addison)

American contemporary/street artist Karl Addison lives in Berlin right now but still created this tribute to a dear friend on a Parisian wall last week for the Le M.U.R. Project. Over 200 artists have created installations on this wall at 107 Rue Obrkampf and Karl’s is #221. He says he was inpired by the palette of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere this time of year, specifically the trees and leaves in Paris, when he created this portrait.

A tribute to a friend is a noble endeavor. As we reach across the table and the difficult cultural divide, may we all make just one more friend this week in the spirit of Thanksgiving.

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Karl Addison Carina Le M.U.R, Paris, November 2016. (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison Carina Le M.U.R, Paris, November 2016. (photo © Karl Addison)


 

With special thanks to Elisabetta.


 

“Title: Carina
Medium: Mural – Acrylic and Spraypaint
Size: 7m x 5m
Year: 2016
Location: Paris, France – Le M.U.R”

http://www.lemur.fr/.


Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

 

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Karl Addison : Creating Public Work for New Rail Line in Denver

Karl Addison : Creating Public Work for New Rail Line in Denver

The veils that separate our intellectual distinctions of art practice and theory are so quickly and easily pierced when viewing creative expression as lying upon a continuum. Somewhere between free improvisational, unauthorized, radical self expression (mark-making, graffiti, perhaps) and juried, approved, charted public art (institutional murals, perhaps) lie a thousand shadings of aesthetic expression – and myriad degrees of relationships between artist and passersby.

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

Today we look at a commissioned public work by mural artist Karl Addison, who has previously engaged in less structured, free will art-making in the public.This kind of painting takes planning (over a year) and a number of people in Denver to approve it (20 or so panelists) before he could make his first mark.

Concept, budget, timelines, sketches – each element carefully considered with input from office holders and planners, a public project on a federal light rail station with permission is anathema to the approach of taggers and bombers of trains. Which is not to say that all bombers are antagonistic of public taste or wishes.

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

Additionally, unlike many but not all Street Art festivals which simply plop down artists on empty walls without a proviso to even educate themselves about the community they are visiting, Addison says a main consideration was whether the community likes or approves of the work they would be left to live with. “I love working with local communities and the people that inhabit those places – they are the ones that take the ownership and passion for their public artwork to the next level.”

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

So here are new work-in-progress images from photographer Henrik Haven of Addison’s station, one of 8 new Federal RTD Stations along 11 miles of new track in Denver that will open this October. Addison says the forms of giants and small people are meant as placeholders, everyday archetypes if you will. His particular interest is color theory and the effect his careful washes and blends will have on train travelers.

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

“The giants are overlaid on a smooth gradient of color blending from a rich warmer purple, to soft creams and ice blues, to a deep rich purple into blue,” he says. “The color transition goes into green and lighter subsection exceeding to the far left along an Ashlar Stone facade.”

In the most integrated consideration, he hopes that his work is soothing, and he painstakingly created each effect to ensure it. “Each cinder block is painted one by one with the same color blends as the gradient – a map of larger color blocks so the viewer can start to translate the 90 colors used.”

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison. Federal RTD Station in Denver, Colorado. July 2016. (photo © Henrik Haven)

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Karl Addison Paints Pilot Seattle Wall for Next Year’s “artSEA”

Karl Addison Paints Pilot Seattle Wall for Next Year’s “artSEA”

artSEA and its producers are planning ahead. It’s ten months until the 10 day festival that will coincide with the Seattle Art Fair, but already artSEA is putting together their lineup of public artwork and artists.

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Karl Addison. “Messier” Detail.  For artSEA. Seattle. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

Today we are showing you the first wall, a “pilot art work”, as he calls it, by the muralist Karl Addison. He tells us it is part of an on-going series rooted in intimate portraits of humanity – this one is called Messier. Karl says it focuses on the power of primary colors blue and red, “to build the composition’s figurative strength.”

Executive director of The World is Fun (TWIF), Amy Faulkner, the volunteering organization that produces artSEA, explains what will be happening in this Washington seaport city of 3.6 million next August 14-14, and who will be there so far.

“Each artist in the artist exchange will be creating one public artwork (mostly murals), one community exchange (which will consist of a talk, workshop, or nonprofit benefit), and will participate in a group exhibition which we are working with an outside gallery to curate and execute.” We don’t know the name of the gallery but so far artists confirmed are Rylsee, TWOONE, Cern, Alice Mizrachi, Jessie & Katey, Paola Delfin, David Walker, Addison Karl, ROA, and Andrea Wan.

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Karl Addison. “Messier” for artSEA. Seattle. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison. “Messier” for artSEA. Seattle. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

 

http://www.artseaproject.org

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“AVATAR” of Ourselves by Karl Addison and Jarus in Atlanta

“AVATAR” of Ourselves by Karl Addison and Jarus in Atlanta

How much of you is here with me right now? Are you giving me 100% of you? 80%? 15? When we are texting and “liking” and “sharing” and posting we prefer to think that we are interacting with the world and our selected circles of friends through active and passive participation.

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Karl Addison . Jarus. “Avatar” Work in progress. Art On The Beltline Project.Atlanta. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

A new mural for Atlanta’s Art On The Beltline Project highlights the nature of the current vogue for digitally experiencing the world and a term loosely defined as “community”.

Artists Karl Addison and Jarus first collaborated on a wall together during Wall\Therapy in Rochester, New York in 2014 and then later on a project called “Glasshouse” in Berlin. For this one, “Avatar” they say their narrative is about our digital personality and identity. To depict the actual and virtual, they alter her physical features the further they are from the screen.

“The composition is a woman lying down using her phone,” says Addison as he describes her face bathed in the glow of the screen. “As the painting drifts back she becomes pixelated with color blocks and more abstract within the negative space.”  Enjoy this real painting from the perspective of your digital device.

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Karl Addison . Jarus. “Avatar” Work in progress. Art On The Beltline Project. Atlanta. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison . Jarus. “Avatar”.  Art On The Beltline Project. Atlanta. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison . Jarus. “Avatar”.  Detail. Art On The Beltline Project. Atlanta. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison . Jarus. “Avatar”. Detail.  Art On The Beltline Project. Atlanta. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison . Jarus. “Avatar”. CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE.  Art On The Beltline Project. Atlanta. 2015 (photo © Karl Addison)

 

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Karl Addison in Moscow: The Fisherman and the Depleted Sea

Karl Addison in Moscow: The Fisherman and the Depleted Sea

Karl Addison was in Moscow recently for the MOST art festival and based his mural on a Russian fairy tale by Alexander Pushkin entitled The Fisherman & The Fish, written in 1833.  “The mural is a symbol from this folklore showing the Old Man with the Fish and to the corner his Wife as the Sea,” says Addison, “Each level of the Sea is a darker and dark blue symbolizing the five requests she makes – making the Sea grow darker and violent each time.”

Additionally the artist says his mural is a commentary on the modern methods of fishing that are rapidly killing off entire species. According to the World Wildlife fund, we are plundering our oceans at a rate that is completely unsustainable and by 2048 “Unless the current situation improves, stocks of all species currently fished for food are predicted to collapse by 2048.” Addison says his mural is meant as “a strong warning with the exploitation of our natural resources-   depleting them till there is nothing left.”

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Karl Addison “The Fisherman” MOST Art Festival. Moscow, Russia (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison “The Fisherman” MOST Art Festival. Moscow, Russia (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison “The Fisherman” MOST Art Festival. Moscow, Russia (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison “The Fisherman” MOST Art Festival. Moscow, Russia (photo © Karl Addison)

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Karl Addison “The Fisherman” MOST Art Festival. Moscow, Russia (photo © Karl Addison)

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.21.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.21.14

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Autumn in New York yo! Crisp cool, sunny days. Girls in tight sweaters. Boys in combat boots. Every cool air festival you can think of is all happening simultaneously – skateboarders closing down Kent Ave on BKs north side, Indian Larry’s block party with motorcycles of every stripe, and this years San Gennaro festival in Little Italy looks like it wants to reclaim this part of town before it is subsumed by the crushing wealth machine now chewing through Chinatown. Literally the festival looks like it spans the entire length of Mulberry from Canal to Houston – that’s longer than the line to get the new iPhone in Soho!

But neither one of those will compare to todays’ expected line of concerned citizens snaking through the streets in Manhattan to address the effect of climate change. Coordinated with marches in cities around the world it’s estimated to draw 100,000 people. We’ve had a sneak peek at what Street Artist Swoon has in store for an installation at the end of the march, including some of the very same materials she just used for her “Submerged Motherlands” at the Brooklyn Museum, but arranged entirely cleverly differently.

A few weeks ago at Nuart we were invite to speak about activism on the street around the world using Street Art as a form of expression, and we are surprised to see a rising wave of it that not many seem aware of – including some of our artworld peers. This week alone a few Street Artists have created new work to promote today’s march. It is not hard to get us into the street on a regular day so this is just one shiny bauble of grassroots creativity that you won’t want to miss. Also, technically, it’s still summer until Tuesday.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Bifido, Crash, Daze, Gilf!, Hek Tad, Jetsonorama, Karl Addison, LMNOPI, Misshab, Sean9Lugo, and Skount.

Top Image >> A portrait of Ta’kaiya Blaney, a 13 year old girl from the Sliammon First Nation (Vancouver) and an environmental activist. The large mural was painted by Street Artist LMNOPI this week to commemorate the People’s Climate March here today in NYC. Click HERE for more details on the march. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A collaborative image created by Jetsonorama and Monica Canilao  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gilf! created this new piece to bring people to the march.(photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Misshab (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A cosmic folkloric futurist meeting of souls from Skount at the StreetMeet Festival in Würzburg, Germany. (photo © Skount)

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Skount. Detail. StreetMeet Festival. Würzburg, Germany. (photo © Skount)

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Karl Addison for The Bushwick Collective. That spot to the left may look like a prison, but that’s what we call a beer garden in Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Karl Addison for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hek Tad. A public declaration of love. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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An outdoor installation of craft paper by an unknown artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Oh, hi! Sorry I kicked the ball into your head. Bifido “Do It” Caserta, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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A porcine pal to stand atop, but you are still not tall enough. Bifido “I Want My Meat” Budapest, Hungary. (photo © Bifido)

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Could be cheese. Could be a brick of a hallucinogenic substance that gives people animal heads. Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash and Daze for The L.I.S.A. Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. SOHO, NYC. August 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 08.10.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.10.14

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If you haven’t gone barefoot in the park yet this summer, what are you waiting for? Everybody’s doing it. Not recommended for the sidewalk in Bushwick, Bedstuy, …okay, most of Brooklyn. Limit your barefootness to grassy areas.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring AK, Bifido, Che Man, Clint Mario, Cooper, Crummy Gummy, Damon, Jilly Ballistic, Karl Addison, ME, OverUnder, Pyramid Oracle, Razo, Sean9Lugo, and Skount.

Top Image >> Jilly Ballistic blasts something out of the sky while the modern version of the Keystone Cops blasts an advertisement at unsuspecting citizenry. What’s with all the guns all the time? Jeez.(photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Che Man makes a comparison with Pancho Villa and the EZLN in Bushwick. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Overunder continues to completely blow your mind. This one for Wall Therapy 2014. Rochester, NY (photo © Mark Deff)

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And it goes something a little like this… Karl Addison for Wall Therapy 2014. Rochester, NY (photo © Josh Saunders)

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Skount at Java-Eiland. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. (photo © Skount)

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Sean9Lugo making perfect sense as always. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Love in the bushes. Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Here’s something from waaa-hay-hay back. Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cooper (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clint Mario and ME do a collaboration and an ad takeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clint Mario and ME do a collaboration and an ad takeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Damon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crummy Gummy  new installation in Detroit. (photo © Crummy Gummy)

“I recently visited Detroit, MI and created some new work while I was there. When I told people I was going to Detroit the typical reaction was “It’s Dangerous” Or “That place is dirty!” or they would just make a face about it like I’m crazy for going. After visiting I felt, yes there are some areas that are not great to hang around at, but I also fell in love with the people there and how they take a lot of pride in their city. So the two works loosely were inspired by people’s reactions to visiting Detroit using references of “crime” and “cleaning up” with my twist of humor put in them” – CG

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Crummy Gummy  new installation in Detroit. (photo © Crummy Gummy)

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AK (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido. Cusano Talk Festival. Cusano Mutri, Italy (photo © Bifido)

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Razo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Razo feeling the pulse of the city EKG (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Razo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pyramid Oracle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Brooklyn, NYC. August 2014 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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JBAK in Berlin, a 32 Meter Human Totem and How it Got There

JBAK in Berlin, a 32 Meter Human Totem and How it Got There

Karl Addison and James Bullough, as JBAK, Share Their Trip With You

Berlin’s dedication to public art takes another leap with a newly completed mural by American duo James Bullough and Addison Karl, creatively partnered as JBAK. Nearly a year after the art and education initiative LOA Berlin (Lichtenberg Open ART) put out the call for submissions to hit this tower in the housing association HOWOGE Wohnungsbaugesellschaft mbH, the two guys find themselves exhausted and elated with their latest photorealist painting in this high profile location.

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JBAK (Karl Addison and James Bullough) and their new “Totem Mural” for Howoge LOA. Berlin, Germany. (photo © Just Photography)

“From meters away the seeping feeling of being proud and accomplished washes over. The kind words of passer-bys, neighbors and the local business owners. Making every long moment worth every second of it,” Addison tells BSA below as he recounts how personally affected they were by the process of pitching to be considered and eventually awarded above a competitive field of around 50 artists and artist teams from six countries.

And then there was the execution of the actual mural.

The average observer of a mural like this one in Lichtenberg, and Street Art or urban art in general, has little appreciation perhaps for the psychological/ spiritual / physical energy that can go into the process for any given artist or project. In fact, many artists don’t realize the effort until they endeavor to try. When the project is formalized to the degree that this one is, many artists simply choose to not apply at all, so intimidating and resource intensive it the process. Not to mention the setbacks, sudden turns, revisions, and problem solving on the fly. But of course, it happens all the time and people who create art in the streets can be pretty scrappy and resourceful.

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JBAK (Karl Addison and James Bullough) and their new “Totem Mural” for Howoge LOA. Berlin, Germany. (photo © Just Photography)

 

With a generous sense of sharing some insight on the process, Addison gives BSA readers personal view of the experience from an artists perspective, revealing the costs involved to merely to be considered for a public/private works project such as this where a variety of voices are involved in the conversation before an ultimate decision is made. It reads like a personal journal, but it is a template for many who would try to make the transition to professional artist.

“ ‘For the long haul’ – it’s one of those things you hear about from a good friend and exceptional fellow artist. At first glance the whole experience seems a bit overwhelming but then you put your head down and buckle down for the application process. What to show, how to explain – will the work stand-up by itself? Some times you may complete 10-15 applications like this per month – it is always the beginning with very little turnover to actual work or the creation of beautiful things to come.

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JBAK (Karl Addison and James Bullough) and their new “Totem Mural” for Howoge LOA. Berlin, Germany. (photo © Just Photography)

“ ‘Maybe this one is different’. After a few months we received a nice letter of acceptance. Surprised, happy – and ‘oh shit’ are all simultaneous reactions. Now the grind of what comes next – so many factors to include; the building, the audience, the people who live there, the colors, my collaboration with James Bullough, HOWOGE (the ones organizing the whole project under LOA), my own interests, passion, the scale and much more.  Then there is ‘The Unknowing’ ; is this the best artwork I can create for this project – will it be accepted – can I do better? Every question leads nearly to no answer, but 45 more questions.

‘It is the winter months and we’re working online and in a studio going back and forth as to the possibilities and composition. After a long day of taking hundreds of mock-up photos somehow the very last photo taken has the concept we need. We begin planning out the colors, the theory and the collaboration aspect of the painting. We make a full canvas piece in the proportions of the wall to get the right details.

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JBAK (Karl Addison and James Bullough) and their new “Totem Mural” for Howoge LOA. Berlin, Germany. (photo © Just Photography)

“ The time has come for us to present our idea – in a room sits many people loaded on every side except directly behind James and I. We’re overwhelmed because there are three times more people in the room then we expected to be there. Pushing forward, we begin to discuss and present our artwork and concept. It does not go well. We leave discouraged and feeling all the holes of our artwork for this project. A week or so goes by – and again to our surprise we get another nice email asking for some revisions to our artwork.

“Back to the studio, we’re trying to fill those holes in – and to fix what we can with the work. We come to a point where the collaboration is happy – we have both created something in over three years of doing projects together and we are both happy with this. The artwork compliments both sides – it is strong and subtle with room for the imagination and interpretation of the viewer. It has a strong positive message for it’s new home on Landsberger Allee 228b in Lichtenberg. With fingers cross we send in the second proposal.

‘Waiting….. waiting….. waiting… doubt…. waiting…..

“An email comes in – I read it once, twice and for a third time. It sinks in. The Totem Mural is accepted! In an instant we have been selected for the next Howoge LOA mural. I’m sitting on my couch in my studio when I read it, lucky for me. I’m nearly speechless as I show the computer and email to one of my best friends Adrian – and he is screaming with excitement.

“Because of all the work we did during all this process – we have already addressed such a huge part of the painting : everything is nice planned out, prepped and nearly ready to go. The only things left are the logistics about the painting, the materials and how to get up a 32 meter wall. We get the help of a good friend Dennis G. to help us organize the installation – then we plan for the next 4 weeks of work.

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JBAK (Karl Addison and James Bullough) and their new “Totem Mural” for Howoge LOA. Berlin, Germany. (photo © Just Photography)

“ It takes long days and nights, two nights to outline – the first going from sundown to sun up. We focus on keeping the artwork in proportion as we do it in three sections and from different locations. Without sleep we are back up to do it again the next day. The first week is long and unsure and our lift breaks three times,  we have some rain delays and down time until we change machinery. Our schedule for the next month is 6 days a week, 12-14 hours a day. There are late nights coming home when I feel barely able to stand. But then there is the rising up early every morning and getting to work and feeling the warmth of the wall radiating from the sun throughout the day. After four weeks of nothing else, the Totem Mural is finished.

“From meters away the seeping feeling of being proud and accomplished washes over. The kind words of passer-bys, neighbors and the local business owners. Making every long moment worth every second of it.”

 

For more about Lichtenberg Open ART (LOA Berlin) and HOWOGE please click HERE.

 

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