All posts tagged: Jaime Rojo

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.15.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.15.19

Did you see that micro-moon on Friday the 13th? We were up on the roof with artists and friends and weirdos celebrating “mid autumn moon” and looking at the New York skyline and that beautiful moon, which didn’t seem 14% smaller, did it? Seemed like your run-of-the-mill gorgeous Harvest Moon, right? Also, a dope opportunity to say “apogee“, which you just don’t get to say very much. No those are not those tassels that exotic dancers put on their nipples.

So here’s our harvest of Street Art and graffiti for you! The city has been producing amazing crops all year, to tell the truth.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Almost Over Keep Smiling, Crappytalism, Jason Naylor, Jocelyn Tsajh, Li-Hill, Peoples Power Assembly, Plannedalism, Pure Genius, Rider, Subway Doodle, Surface of Beauty, The Joker, Thomas Allen, and Will Kurtz.

Jason Naylor and Surface Of Beauty collab for ST.ART NOW. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor and Surface Of Beauty collab for ST.ART NOW. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Plannedalism commentary on the polarization of our society. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Li’ Hill commentary on Climate Crisis. According to the text accompanying his art work the artists writes that the World Bank estimates that as many as 145 million people could become Climate Refugees in the near future. Global warming is causing temperatures to rise at alarming levels rendering vasts swats of the earth as inhospitable for its inhabitants. High-level heat and humidity are one of the main killers of humans by heat strokes. Humans are abandoning their lands and homes in search of a cooler environment. This exodus is causing logistical problems for the countries receiving the refugees as many lack the resources to provide and care for them. Wars, famines, and diseases are no longer the only reasons for people to abandon their homes. Global Warming has been added to the list, yet countries are reluctant to declare extreme heat waves as natural disasters. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Li-Hill. A Perilous Journey In A Changing World. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jocelyn Tsajh (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Unfortunately the only word we could read on the signature is Lily. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between Subway Doodle and Thomas Allen. We had published a portion of this piece. It sits on a construction material business that insists on placing merchandise on the sidewalk thus the piece is almost fully blocked most of the time. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
As opposed to where? Crappytalism (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pure Genius (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Almost Over Keep Smiling (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unless it is. Peoples Power Assembly (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
This is an ad. The piece is not signed but it’s branded. It’s hand-painted and the artist is rendering a scene from the movie The Joker starring Joaquin Phoenix. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Will Kurts sculpture made with plastic shopping bags and tape. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rider (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Lower Manhattan. Summer 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Film Friday: 09.13.19

BSA Film Friday: 09.13.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. “Word on the Street” Debut
2. INO – “Freedom For Sale” in Athens
3. Two in a Row from Alex Prager: “La Grande Sortie” & “Despair”


BSA Special Feature: “Word on the Street” Debuts

“Fuck the old days. Graffiti is now!”

The last five years have been explosive for Street Art worldwide, and with “Word On The Street” you have a good indicator that the graff writing game is alive and well in New York as well – and tenaciously prolific.

Anonymous filmmakers infused the doc with vibrating audio and visual distortion and a sense of ever-present surveillance, or the implication of it cloaked in darkness. Interviews, late night runs, frozen wire fences, loose footing, bloody scrapes, and the sweet smell of aerosol lightly purring from cans across a shadowed wall. The labor of love for the filmmakers is the only thing that pushes a project like this to fruition. And fumes of course.

It’s first public screening is coming up September 29 in Brooklyn. Click HERE for more information.

It’s first public screening is coming up September 29 in Brooklyn. Click HERE for more information.

Featuring 143, AJES, BIO, BRAT, CASH4, CARL WESTON, CLAW, CHRIS RWK, DEK 2DX, DIVA, DSR, EDO, EL7, FAES, FLASH, JAKEE, JESUS SAVES, KLOPS, LEX, LOOSE, MERK, MRS, MUTZ, NEG, NOXER, PANIC, PLASMA SLUG, POE, SCAE, SEO, SILON, SMURFO, SPRAY, STOR, STU, and VEW.

INO – “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

Constantino Mass adds just the right amount of slickly pounding wipes and cuts to this installation by INO in Athens. We published photos from this a few days ago so have a look and enjoy the video.

Two in a Row from Alex Prager

Alex Prager debuted a new short film at Lehmann Maupin Gallery in New York this month, and it has piqued the interest of many in her work of disconnected, reconnected narratives. Impeccably styled, humorously shot, it’s a staged invoking of old Hollywood and street scenes, enveloped in drama and frequently suspense. Often the LA born director provides just the deconstructed portion of the scene you have seen, and keeps reworking it in surprising ways. Go to the gallery to see the new “Play the Wind”. Below are two of her short films from five and nine years ago respectively.

“La Grande Sortie” by Alex Prager

“Despair” by Alex Prager

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Bloop Festival 2019/Ibiza Dispatch 1: Vlady Plays “Hopscotch” in the Sea

Bloop Festival 2019/Ibiza Dispatch 1: Vlady Plays “Hopscotch” in the Sea

“Whenever, everywhere, anyway” “Hopscotch”

Ibiza is that place where you appreciate beauty and youth and hedonistic forays into western values of free will and free love. Or at least that’s what we’ve heard.

VLADY. “Whenever, everywhere, anyway” / “Hopscotch“. BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival. Edition 2019. Ibiza, Spain. (photo courtesy of BLOOP)

While Street Art was probably not initially part of the brief of this island when it transformed its reputation as a destination for fog-machine laser glow-stick dancing and poolside debauchery, initiatives like the BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival have extended the creative range of expression that is celebrated for almost a decade now. With the theme of “Art is for Everybody”, BLOOP has welcomed more than 60 murals and installations so far – about 30 of which are currently on view throughout the year on the isle known as an adult playground.

VLADY. “Whenever, everywhere, anyway” / “Hopscotch“. BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival. Edition 2019. Ibiza, Spain. (photo courtesy of BLOOP)

Today we look as a more conceptual/situational installation in the Balearic Sea that surrounds the Spanish islands, a la Brad Downey or Fra. Biancoshock. Here laying on the bottom of the quivering, wiggling and enticing blue sea you are invited by VLADY to play hopscotch. As if to channel the mindset of many a party animal, he is labeling the installation “Whenever, Everywhere, Anyway”.

Dive in and play!

VLADY. “Whenever, everywhere, anyway” / “Hopscotch“. BLOOP International Proactive Art Festival. Edition 2019. Ibiza, Spain. (photo courtesy of BLOOP)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
SEBS is “Headvertising” in the Suburbs of Lisbon

SEBS is “Headvertising” in the Suburbs of Lisbon

An argument today from SEBS for the power of politically charged Street Art in the suburbs of Lisbon. He shares with us his new adaptation of a previous project on child labor called “Slaves ‘R’ Us.” This one is a consciousness raising campaign he’s calling “Headvertising”

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

The mindless obeyance required by consumer advertising messages and PR firms that push disinformation has left the suburban landscape a disjointed, deactivated communities. We would argue it is about an eroding sense of responsibility toward preserving local culture, the pod-based life of traveling from location to location in automobiles, the lack of communal public spaces, and the seductive power of electronic media that demands us to sit passively and be entertained to death.

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

In our cities, the vox populi is alive and well on the streets, and our Street Art reflects it with textural and visual critiques of politics, policy and culture. But SEBS (Mauro Carmelino) says that he’s creating and advertising for fictional products to encourage us to “use our heads” and think about the great problems of modern societies, such as consumerism, pollution or the misinformation. He talks about these humorous hand-painted pieces he’s been putting up to help people re-connect, and he tells us about the disconnection between the suburbs and the city and how he feels about populations whom he wants to reach.

“The geographical gap between the city and the suburbs is accentuated in the degree of information and even in education, particularly in older age groups and in the most economically fragile communities. This remoteness has a negative impact on the ability of suburban populations to be part of discussions that can lead to the decisions that alter the social fabric, which, like in a vicious cycle, aggravates their remoteness – turning it into a kind of endemic exclusion.” To tell the truth, this isolation happens everywhere.

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

Today’s images come from the neighborhood of Reboleira, Damaia and 6 de Maio in Amadora city in the northwest of the Lisbon metropolitan area.

“These works are meant to be of satirical or subversive nature,” SEBS says, “with a light and sometimes even humorous approach. Advertising that usually sells products, brands and dreams of consumption is used to sell us structural social problems. I want the audience to turn from a passive consumption of reality to develop the critical thinking the world so badly needs to change.”

Here his message is conveyed through mass culture vernacular influenced by cartoons – the medium is brush and aerosol.

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

SEBS. Headvertising. Lisbon. (photo © SEBS)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BustArt Pounds Pavement With Pop Crosswalk in Greensboro, NC

BustArt Pounds Pavement With Pop Crosswalk in Greensboro, NC

“As a European without a driver’s license it can be a task to get around in America.”


BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)

Walkable Neighborhoods? D. That’s one grade above F (Fail) – it’s the grade the United States gets on its own report card on walking safely in our towns and cities. Actually, that’s one of the better grades in the report, where in most categories the United States is failing, especially in comparison to the rest of the developed world.

We simply don’t make it easy, safe, or friendly for people to walk here.

BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)

Blame it on the oil, automobile, and highway industry, all of whom lobbied congress with overwhelming force after World War II to create a pro-business Interstate Highway system, actively discouraging public transportation and passenger trains – making us dependent on cars to do everything.  And its still happening now: oil and oligarchs like the Koch brothers have been using their money to shut down public transit plans all across the country in the last decade, according to The New York Times.

“As a European without a driver’s license it can be a task to get around in America,” says Street Artist BustArt, who shares with us his new colorful crosswalk in Greensboro, North Carolina. “Once you leave downtown the sidewalk becomes smaller and narrower, to the point where it is nonexistent. Same for the crosswalk, you get roughly19 seconds to make it over a massive stretch, while cars still pass over it due to the green light.”

Dude, here’s your report card from The 2017 Uhttp://physicalactivityplan.org/projects/walking/Walking-report-card-FINAL.pdfnited States Report Card on Walking and Walkable Communities

Invited by commercial real estate developer and brewery owner Marty Kotis to add to the 85 murals he has organized in the city over the past few years as part of a program called Kotis Street Art, BustArt says that he decided to paint something on the ground as a departure.

“After I arrived in Greensboro we looked at a few spots where a crossing would work,” he says. “Sadly there was not enough time to get the city onboard so the crossing had to be on private property.”

BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)

Even though it wasn’t painted across a city walkway, his crosswalk project of colorful pop/advertising inspired pavement was harder than he thought, he tells us. First, he painted at night when there was less traffic. Secondly, a heavy rainstorm damaged 40% of the work. “At 5am we were finished and extremely happy about the outcome . . . until two minutes later it started to rain heavily for a short yet frustrating 15 minutes.”

After another nine hours of painting, the project was finished – and BustArt says he wanted to make sure it actually could be used to safely protect walkers. “We added a non-slip varnish to roughen up the surface and make it safer for pedestrians.”

BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)
BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)
BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)
BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)
BustArt. Kotis Street Art. Greensboro, North Carolina. (photo © Peggy Butcher)

Bustart says he would like to thank: Keif for his knowledge, Skatin for his hard work and motivation, Kotis Street Art for making it possible, and photographer Peggy Butcher who provided the great images and documentation.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 09.08.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.08.19

Surreally yours! The art on the streets this week appears to reflect the times. It’s going to take all this creativity and force to turn the tides!

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring 1Up, AJ LaVilla, Android Oi, Cern, Dark Clouds, Dirty Cobain, Early Riser, Invader, Jason Naylor, Little Ricky, Lubaina Himid, Lucas Blalock, Oscar Lett, Robson, SacSix, Subway Doodle, Zimer .

Subway Doodle vs Brooklyn Rats for Under Hill Walls. You can see here there are some subtle differences between Brooklyn rats and regular ones. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Subway Doodle vs Regular rats (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lucas Blalock (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Robson (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Android Oi for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lubaina Himid (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Little Ricky (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dirty Cobain for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Ceci n’est pas une Invader (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Early Riser (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jason Naylor (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dark Clouds (photo © Jaime Rojo)
1UP in good company… (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SacSix for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Oscar Lett for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ Lavilla for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zimer for Under Hill Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cern. Detail. Arts Org Murals. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Shadows. Brooklyn, NY. September 2019. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Martha Shoots Adele, Fintan, a Pigeon Fancier and More at Eugene 20X21 – Edition 2019

Martha Shoots Adele, Fintan, a Pigeon Fancier and More at Eugene 20X21 – Edition 2019

Photographer Martha Cooper again rules the roost at BSA with her new photos of the 20×21 EUG Festival in Eugene, Oregon. Organized and funded by the City of Eugene’s Cultural Services Public Art Program, the citizenry is invited to be a part of events and symposia – an intimate affair with this years select list of invited artists.

Adele Renault (photo © Martha Cooper)

“This year 20×21 organized ‘viewing parties’ at the walls to give the community an official chance to meet and socialize the artists at their walls,” says Ms. Cooper about the 10 day series of events. You could meet Fintan Magee at his wall, or talk to Sidney Waerts aka SIT at Well Balanced (center for integrative care), consort with local muralist Kari Johnson at Lane County’s Dining Room, or see a new show of incredibly framed artworks at Coffee Plant Roaster with painter Adele Renault and photographer Ms. Cooper.

Adele Renault (photo © Martha Cooper)

Blending small family owned businesses, the chamber of commerce and cultural organizations together with the artists and artworks is a finely balanced effort, and according to people we spoke with Eugene is careful to get the balance right. For example the combination of Adele’s mural and Ms. Coopers photo installation was in a coffee shop owned by Irv Weiner, who is a pigeon flyer/fancier originally from New York.

Adele Renault (photo © Martha Cooper)

“His coop is on top of the building with the pigeon mural and the coffee shop is inside,” says Martha of the interconnectedness of programming. Now Mr. Weiner has added to his list a cannabis growing supplies business; a rather normal development in this city that has become known for its marijuana-related economy during the last decade.

Adele Renault. Pigeon Fancier & coop owner, Irv Weiner holding Eugenie. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Here are exclusive images of the artists at work, as well as some additional interesting details and local color about this mural-centric cultural event in Eugene.

Adele Renault. Irv is captured on camera as he releases Eugenie. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Adele Renault (photo © Martha Cooper)
Adele Renault (photo © Martha Cooper)
Martha Cooper and Adele Renault exhibition. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Adele Renault (photo © Martha Cooper)
Fintan Magee (photo © Martha Cooper)
Fintan Magee (photo © Martha Cooper)
Fintan Magee (photo © Martha Cooper)
Fintan Magee (photo © Martha Cooper)
Fintan Magee (photo © Martha Cooper)
Fintan Magee (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sydney Waerts (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sydney Waerts (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sydney Waerts with fellow muralist, Eugene resident and festival assistant, Bayne Gardner. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Sydney Waerts (photo © Martha Cooper)
Kari Johnson (photo © Martha Cooper)
Kari Johnson (photo © Martha Cooper)

Eugene was first recognized as good mural festival location perhaps because of the work done here by activist, performer, storyteller, and public artist Kari Johnson. Her dedication to her work as social mission and communication inspires her peers and is emblematic of what Eugene is.

In a 2016 bio by the artist for the Regional Arts & Culture Council, Kari Johnson shared her history and outlook:

“Both of my grandmothers were painters named Ida. They managed to paint landscapes and still lifes in spare moments while raising big families during the Great Depression and WWII. Continuing where they left off I began painting when I was 14 and completed my first mural 10 years later. Other than learning how to make prints with potatoes at a summer fair, I am self-taught.

I feel the most inspired when I’m making public art. Being a public artist is like being an architect of mood, stirring feelings and inspiring connection, helping to anchor and identify a place. In my art I particularly care about promoting social justice, harmony between humans and our plant and animal relations. I want my art to invite individuals to belong to the place, join community, and help shape our human story.”

Kari Johnson (photo © Justin Bauer)
Kari Johnson (photo © Justin Bauer)
Kari Johnson (photo © Justin Bauer)
Artist Shamsia from Afghanistan was invited to paint at last year’s edition of 20x21EUG. Travel issues delayed here arrival and Ms. Cooper was not there to document her work so we include here it her mural from 2018. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Kiran from Nepal had similar travel issues as Shamsia and here is his mural from last year. (photo © Martha Cooper)
And a smaller piece by Kiran from last year as well. (photo © Martha Cooper)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Film Friday: 09.06.19

BSA Film Friday: 09.06.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Swoon and The Heliotrope Foundation: A Catalyst For Local Change
2. One Minute Dance: Petites Deambulations Sur “Paradis Perdus”
3. Festival Concreto #5 – Narcelio Grud in Fortaleza, Brazil
4. Murfy Paints Mural for La Fiesta de los Corremayo


BSA Special Feature: Swoon and The Heliotrope Foundation: A Catalyst For Local Change

Long term economic development? From a Street Artist? Sustainable homes? Jobs? Schools?

Yes, if the question is about Cormiers, Haiti and the answer is Street Artist Swoon with her Heliotrope Foundation. You can draw a direct through-line from her earliest wheatpastes of people on the street to the earthquake surviving Haitians whom these buildings and programs are for and from. By listening, sharing, and working alongside, the volunteers and foundation have been building community. And you thought it was all about vandalism, didn’t you?

One Minute Dance: Petites Deambulations Sur “Paradis Perdus”

Nadia Vadori-Gauthier, the performance artist behind the project One Minute of Dance Per Day, has teamed up with other dancers for a new project titled Petites deambulations sur “Paradis Perdus”

Festival Concreto #5 – Narcelio Grud in Fortaleza, Brazil

For 6 years artist, professor, and organizer Narcelio Grud has gradually grown the Concreto Festival in Forteleza. As he and the team prepare for November’s new edition, he tells BSA readers about this video recap of Concreto 5.

“In the timespan of 9 days, downtown Fortaleza received more than 40 artists from Brazil and all over the world to participate in the 5th edition of Festival Concreto – International Festival of Urban Art. Great names from the urban art scene, such as Mônica Nador, Guto Lacaz, Inti Castro, Sabek, SatOne and others, met between November 16 and 24 to color and democratize art in the city.

In the year of 2018, the Festival brought interventions and other activities to Downtown neighbourhood in Fortaleza, Brazil, called ‘Centro’. The idea was to occupy and reestablish the connection with an area of the city that was once a great place of cultural movement, especially in the city’s ‘Belle Époque’. All this brought color and movement to the local landscapes, realigning the neighbourhood to a greater valorization of urban culture.

In the video, you can watch most of the activities and artworks that took place in the Festival, as well as participant artists, staff members and the general public talking about their experience within Concreto.”

Murfy Paints Mural for La Fiesta de los Corremayo

Muralist Murfy was in the south of Spain to paint this four-story portrait of a child on the street. “This is a girl dressed in a harlequin costume,” he says of the outfit, “a typical feature at a party in southern Alhama de Murcia, which is where this is.” The La Fiesta de los Corremayo is at the end of April and beginning of May and features bands, music, food, and lots of dancing in the streets by people wearing variations of the harlequin.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
INO: “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

INO: “Freedom For Sale” in Athens

It’s true, Athens is still in the throes of austerity, but not for everyone, darling.

The severe financial austerity imposed on Greece’s government and people by the international bankers was never meant for everyone – vulture capitalism is designed with winners in mind.

INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)

Just check out the clubs and nighttime entertainment near Kolonaki Square where this new INO mural is.

Once you pass the phalanx of security, you are welcomed into the party – preferably wearing designer labels – the men are in blazers and “casual cool” as they watch barely dressed women in high heels dancing on the stage, sometimes acting out fantasies to the aural euphoria and plumes of smoke blown skyward. In these thumping houses of free-market hedonism, you can feel free while waving your hands and glow sticks in the air at the DJ booth, but for a comparably hefty price.

INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)

The average annual salary in Athens is €21,618, or about 60€ a day. A visitor to one of these clubs reports that “prices start from 90€ (bottle of proseco/wine), 290€ for a bottle of vodka, and 145€ for a bottle of gin”.

This financial inequality may have been on his mind when INO painted this new mural. “They did not give me a specific theme and I chose to create an image that from the first point of view may look optimistic but it is not,” he says. The title is “Freedom for Sale”.

Who’s buying?

INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Check out the 1UP extinguisher tag across the street. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)
INO. “Freedom For Sale”. Athens. August 2019. (photo © INO)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Laia and “Magic Avenue” in Barcelona for Contorno Urbano

Laia and “Magic Avenue” in Barcelona for Contorno Urbano

Today we return to community murals for a minute, just to check on the progress of Barcelona based artist Laia. She says she started as a graffiti writer in ’99 at age 14, eventually gaining respect from peers for her serious skillz with tags, pieces, and style on underpasses, trains, walls, and freights.

I am Laia. On The Way To Magic Avenue. Contorno Urbano Foundation. 12 + 1 Project. Barcelona, Spain. August 2019. (photo © Clara Anton)

Two decades later, she’s redefining her style, she says. Here you may think more of street art motifs and when you look at her new wall for community group Contorno Urbano in her hometown Barcelona.

See Laia’s graffiti- inspired works on IAMLAIA on Instagram.

She says she’s looking for positivity these days for herself, and she wanted to create something that reflects it to the neighborhood of Civic Center Cotxeres Borrell. Maybe something kid-friendly.

She’s calling it “Magic Avenue”. “There is no negativity, no sad colors, no violence!,” says Laia.

I am Laia. On The Way To Magic Avenue. Contorno Urbano Foundation. 12 + 1 Project. Barcelona, Spain. August 2019. (photo © Clara Anton)
I am Laia. On The Way To Magic Avenue. Contorno Urbano Foundation. 12 + 1 Project. Barcelona, Spain. August 2019. (photo © Clara Anton)
I am Laia. On The Way To Magic Avenue. Contorno Urbano Foundation. 12 + 1 Project. Barcelona, Spain. August 2019. (photo © Clara Anton)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Nuart Journal Punches Forward: “Eloquent Vandals,” Vol 1, No. 2

Nuart Journal Punches Forward: “Eloquent Vandals,” Vol 1, No. 2

The nascent voyage of ‘Nuart Journal’ comes slowly into view as a softly bound Street Art/graffiti cultural preservation document; its glossy cover is purple for issue Number 2, like a thick royal-court velvet, or a bruised eye.

Editor-in-Chief Martyn Reed opens this forum to a hand-selected series of thought leaders, artists, organizers, academics and friends who are invited to impart, illustrate, confound and inspire. It is an extension of what he has endeavored to do with his annual invitational public art/commercial art festival Nuart- the newest edition which commences this week in Stavanger, Norway.

An impossible goal; to track the precise movement of the dancing tentacles of this scene as it grew – as it grows – much less to assign motivation or significance or measure impact. A mutational march of interconnected disconnectedness, no amount of pontification will ever fully capture the width of this circle, but Nuart Journal is beginning to take its measure and introduce a sense of order if only to better examine it. The theme is “Eloquent Vandals”, a reference to Nuart’s 2011 self-survey in hardcover. Themes range from colorless black street bombing to definitions of place and authenticity, to Street Art’s movement into conceptual, and decolonizing artivism.

The layout is the new utilitarian modern; clean-framing articles, essays, interviews, inquisitions – text-based and visual. Editor and academic Suse Hansen is nimble, streetsmart, and canny in her guiding of contributors. Hopefully, she can continue to steer confidently through these choppy waters, guiding a forward-moving course of enlightening observations – as the ship passes icebergs of false intellectualism, pirate boats of one-eyed tribalist gatekeepers, or the occasional showboat. Anglers ahoy!

Here’s the lineup of contributors for “Eloquent Vandals”, Nuart Journal Volume 1 Number 2, 2019;

Jeff Ferrell, Oskolki, Jens Besser, Georgios Stampoulidis, Daniel de Jongh, Jaime Rojo, Vlady, Alison Young, Reuben Woods, Lindsey Mancini, Christian Omodeo, Vittorio Parisi, Faith XLVII, and Milu Correch.

Nuart Journal, Stavanger, Norway. Editor@nuartjournal.com Click HERE for more about Nuart Journal.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Street Art, Labor Day & Child Labor

Street Art, Labor Day & Child Labor

Labor Day in the US and around the world draws our attention to the rights of workers. A compounding topic is the fact that 265 million children are working around the world, according to the International Labour Organisation.

Because of our collective neglect as human society, children are being forced to work to provide for their families in countries all over the world. In many poor countries, children must work to provide for their families otherwise their families will go hungry.

Finnish street artist and political activist Sampsa puts a child at the center of a corporate labor machine – from 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Why do children have to work? Shouldn’t they be free to enjoy their childhood, be fed and clothed, go to school? This is a problem that needs to be condemned as much as it needs to be understood. Simply advocating for universal children’s rights to education, housing, and health care isn’t enough. For as long as greed and unchecked capitalism run amok, families are pushed into poverty – and some children are forced into labor, exploited, and abused under a constant threat of violence.

What Congress can do to end child labor in the US

Netherlands Takes Big Step Toward Tackling Child Labor

“There Is Enormous Suffering: ”Serious Abuses Against Talibé Children in Senegal, 2017-2018

Submission by Human Rights Watch to the Committee on the Rights of the Child Concerning Cambodia

More US Child Workers Die in Agriculture Than in Any Other Industry

Please follow and like us:
Read more