All posts tagged: Jaime Rojo

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.18.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.18.21

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week! Ramadan Kareem to Muslim brothers and sisters in New York and around the world. May you have an easy fast.

We’re bowled over by the beauty in the streets and parks and rooftops right now, with performances and painting and the blossoming of flowers underfoot and on branches overhead. Fires are alit in hearts everywhere.


“All the roofs are wet
and underneath smoke
that piles softly in
streets, tongues are
on top of each other
mulling over the night.”

from Gamin ~ Frank O’Hara


Yes, there is a sort of battered nervousness in conversations on the streets and as we go about our quotidian duties; a discerned increase in agitation due to economic instability, surges of new Covid strains in our hospitals, and ongoing examples of police brutality toward black and brown people is met with resistance and sometimes violence as well.

Still, consider the robin. In your heart, may hope spring eternal. Also, we learn today that summer may be returning at least one exceedingly creative and participatory public art event as the Gothamist reports that “Coney Island’s Mermaid Parade May Return In The Flesh This Summer.”

And yo! Don’t sleep on the street artists who are putting up new work right now. They are addressing our ills, regaling us with visual puns, poking at our foibles, recontextualizing and performing feats of wonder under cover of night, or while heads are turned in broad daylight. Entertaining, bragging, dreaming… onward they go.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: Absconded Project, Atakbf, Bastard Bot, City Kitty, Clown Soldier, Degrupo, George Collagi, Lexi Bella, Manik, Marka27, Matt Siren, Peachee Blue, Royce Bannon, Sonni, Teens for Press Freedom, Vexta, and Zaver.

We welcome SONNI back to the streets of NYC. In collaboration with East Village Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Teens For Press Freedom (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Zaver (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Absconded Project (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Manik (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Clown Soldier. Bus shelter takeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lexi Bella welcomes the new rules for grass in NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren and Royce Bannon collaboration. #stopasianhate (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Matt Siren and Royce Bannon collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
We also welcome VEXTA back to NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“Bro do you even fish?” Not a direct quote from Jesus, as far as we know. George Collagi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
LEX (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cuomo keeps workin’ it, per Degrupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bowie does a hair flip while Bastard Bot gives him a mask (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Bastard Bot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Peachee Blue (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)
#atakbf (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Marka27 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Manhattan, NYC. Spring 2021 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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“White people can’t be trusted with power,” from Dread Scott on the Street in  Manhattan

“White people can’t be trusted with power,” from Dread Scott on the Street in Manhattan

Trust artist Dread Scott to perfect the provocative phrase that can raise the prickly ire of certain street passersby, simply and succinctly. And trust the self-elected censorious social media platforms like Instagram to actually ban it.

Chicago-born, Brooklyn-based Scott says, “White people can’t be trusted with power” in this new public artwork at 42nd near 10th Avenue in Manhattan. It may remind you of a Jenny Holzer “Truism” that she may have wheat-pasted on the street in the past, a pertinent pique that strikes at the heart of the matter, minus the sense of irony. But in the current context of white people’s reluctant awakening, Mr. Scott writes, “When this was originally posted, Instagram banned it as ‘hate speech.’ ”

The “opening” for this piece at the Playwrights Horizons performing arts theater was this week and will be up through May 9th.

Dread Scott. White people can’t be trusted with power. Manhattan, NYC. 2021 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

It remains unharmed as placed safely behind thick glass in a nondescript contemporary vacuum streetside, – leading street artist and conceptual artist Ann Lewis to compare it to a single layer stencil by Bristol’s Banksy further that lies north about 30 blocks, which is also behind protective perspex eight years after it appeared.

“Though,” she writes to us, “that was meant to protect it because people ‘loved’ it, not because its radical enough for folks to want to destroy it.” In fact, the piece she speaks of depicts a small boy in the act of destructive vandalism – hardly an act normally worth preserving for posterity, but there you have it. Speaking of Scott’s taut text, Lewis comments on his posting, “I love that it’s sitting behind glass as if to say it will likely be vandalized because we white folks can’t take this sort of blatantly obvious criticism without attempting to destroy the truth.”

While the sentiment may or may not be the artist’s, more powerful perhaps is the reaction it engenders – again providing a mirror to the viewer as much great art on the street does.

Predictably, IG commenters on his artwork run the gamut, from the hands-down agreement to the mildly put-out to the outraged and whiney. “Seems to me – “PEOPLE can’t be trusted with power,” writes a poster called Lil Oak Productions – clarifying that one shouldn’t single out the predominant race that has held power on this continent for centuries for specific criticism.  

Artist Steve Locke responds directly to this comment as if calling to a cabaret singer, “Great. Now do ‘All Lives Matter’ since you are playing the hits.”

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BSA Film Friday: 04.16.21

BSA Film Friday: 04.16.21

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Nadia Vadori-Gauthier and Friends Dance Through Parisian Empty Spaces
2. New Burner from Olivier Kosta-Thefaine – Symphonie / Hangar 107
3. Sofles / Mega Bunses With Sirum
4. “Ingobernable” with C. Tangana, Gipsy Kings, Nicolás Reyes, Tonino Baliardo

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BSA Special Feature: Nadia Vadori-Gauthier and Friends Dance Through Parisian Empty Spaces

Nadia Vadori-Gauthier: Dances in places of art and culture closed to the public during the Pandemic.

“In the almost-silence of these emblematic places, usually punctuated by the passage of crowds, vibrates an intense life: those of works, feelings experienced, memorial traces of art experiences, of the succession of eras.

Dancing in this context is, for me, both a resistance and a manifesto. It is an act of solidarity, a gesture of love and recognition. Because I would never be who I am without the familiar attendance of these extraordinary places where, over time, through the face-to-face with the works, a look is forged that embraces otherness, the new, the difference, a look that invites participation in life. ”

Nadia Vadori-Gauthier


New Burner from Olivier Kosta-Thefaine – Symphonie / Hangar 107

During his residency at Hangar 107, artist Olivier Kosta-Théfaine patterned the walls using a lighter, selectively burning 70 square meters to create a new carbon visual symphony.


Sofles / Mega Bunses With Sirum

This video shows some mega bunsens being painted with SIRUM,” says Sofles in this brand new video filmed and edited by After Midnight.

“The sheer diversity of style Sofles has is unparalleled,” says only casual on Youtube. “I’ve seen the work of thousands and thousands of writers and nobody even comes close. It’s insane.”

“There is so much going on in every letter of that sofles piece that each letter could be a video of its own! And also, I’m so stoked that they used some proper dope dnb for the tune!,” says Sciz. “Awesome work by Sirum too, whom I’ve followed for quite some time on Instagram; I always try to follow the artists whom I feel are breaking down barriers and this collaboration came out perfect because of the expertise of both artists.”


“Ingobernable” with C. Tangana, Gipsy Kings, Nicolás Reyes, Tonino Baliardo

Next time you make a video be sure to invite your sister, mother, and lots of aunts. It will leave the competition shaking in their shoes.

This guy is El Madrileño


    
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MOMO Leaves His “Parting Line”

MOMO Leaves His “Parting Line”

A year after its close, we open the book on American street artist MOMO’s new book chronicling the exhibition “Parting Line.” Writing about and covering his work for 15 years or so, we’re always pleased to see where his path has led – never surprised but always pleased with his evolution of decoding the lines, textures, practices, serendipity of discoveries unearthed by this wandering interrogator.

Here, along the river Seine banks, we see his exhibition for the still young Hangar 107, the recently inaugurated Center For Contemporary Art in Rouen, France. While we think of his work in New York in the 2000s, we see the steady progression here – his cloud washes, raking patterns, his experimental, experiential zeal. This is the spirit of DIY that we first fell in love with, the lust for uncovering and desire for making marks unlike others across the cityscape, quizzically folding and unfolding, pulling the string, drawing the line.

In this svelte purple rose volume, his work is captured. More importantly, we can see a sliver of the joy that he applies his entire being to the art of discovery with.

Edited by Christian Omodeo, “Parting Line” contains texts by Tilt, El Tono, Vittorio Parisi, and an interview with and by Swoon.

MOMO “Parting Line”. Hangar 107. Edited by Christian Omodeo – Le Grand Ju. Published by Hangar 107. Rouen, France. 2020.

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Sasha Korban Creates a  “Little Magic” Under a Bridge in Ukraine

Sasha Korban Creates a “Little Magic” Under a Bridge in Ukraine

It is a tenous connection that an adult may have with the fantasies of their own childhood and concepts developed through playtime and free-wheeling imagination.

When we are older we may realize that we have all but abandoned that part of ourselves. There is a s system of discouragement arrayed against our confidence as a kid, one that severs our relationship with the creativity that once burst freely from our little minds and hearts and hands.

Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)

In her book The Artist’s Way, author Julia Cameron helps many people every year to rekindle that connection and celebrate it, nourish it.

Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)

Remember, your artist is a child. Find and protect that child. Learning to let yourself create is like learning to walk.”

Julia Cameron, The Artist’s Way

And we just have to take that first step. Followed by one more.

Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)

A native of Kirovske in the of Donetsk Region, Ukraine, muralist Sasha Korban says this new work under a bridge in Kyiv is called “Little Magic.”

“I believe that only a little magic can help us with our pathway,” he says.

Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)
Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)
Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)
Sasha Korban. “Little Magic” Kyiv, Ukraine. (photo courtesy of Yulia Ostrovska)

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California’s Augustine Kofie is in a New York “State of Mind” at Hashimoto

California’s Augustine Kofie is in a New York “State of Mind” at Hashimoto

It really is primarily about your State of Mind, says LA-based painter Augustine Kofie about his battle with art and quarantine during this last year.

Augustine Kofie. “Disbelief System”. Hashimoto Contemporary. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

“The pandemic was a stop, an interruption, a loss of control,” he says – and points to the incomplete cycle symbols that appear throughout his new collection of paintings. Normal life, in its circular wending, was interrupted time and again, along with all our typical expectations.

His warm abstractions on canvas and upon large walls have always been human – with deep roots in graffiti and hand rendering – ‘overspray, tape blocking, detailed handwork, deconstruction, and draftsmanship drawn from architecture,’ says the PR statement from Hashimoto Gallery in New York where this new exhibition will open.

“My feelings are in the brushstrokes,” he says, “the movements, the process of repeatedly adding and taking away, the layers of time it took to complete these paintings.”

Augustine Kofie. “Enlighten Moment”. Hashimoto Contemporary. (photo courtesy of the gallery)
Augustine Kofie. “Pyle Driver”. Hashimoto Contemporary. (photo courtesy of the gallery)
Augustine Kofie process shot while painting “Weight”. Hashimoto Contemporary. (photo courtesy of the gallery)
Augustine Kofie. “Weight”. Hashimoto Contemporary. (photo courtesy of the gallery)

The gallery will be open by appointment only. In order to ensure the health and safety of visitors and staff, please note that masks are legally required for entry.
The exhibition will be on view from Saturday, April 17th to Saturday, May 8th.

For further information about the exhibition, to view the whole collection of works and for prices click HERE

To schedule an appointment, please click HERE.

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Gonzalo Borondo: “Hereditas” Installation in His Childhood Segovia

Gonzalo Borondo: “Hereditas” Installation in His Childhood Segovia

A site-specific immersive exhibition by the artist at Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente From April 8 to September 26, 2021


Style and genre, and era have never been particularly magnetic topics for Borondo; his heart is too poetic for such limitation. Instead, he continues to bring an ambiance, a sense of place – after he has studied it.

Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)

The former graffiti writer may have been political after leaving his childhood town of Segovia, Spain. Still, his senses and sensibilities were fed by this World Heritage Site’s atmosphere and its historical arches, turrets, towers, churches, cathedrals, monasteries, and convents – and possibly the enormous Roman aqueduct.

Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)

Now returning here to mount his own exhibition in Esteban Vicente Museum of Contemporary Art, his aesthetics and reverence for holy places are also tempered with his age, this age – a fusion now tempered by maturity, but only just so. Creating most of his work on-site, the searching is the story, and the journey is as important as the destination.

Consulting, convening, channeling his formal studies, his street practice, wanderlust, and an ever-present rebellious streak, Borondo still knows how to alchemize the environment. And this place has hosted many; a former city palace of King Enrique IV of Castile, a home of nobles, then a hospice, a school of arts, and a museum. In what time are we living right now? Borondo will not trouble us with such matters.

Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (process shot © Laura Aruallan)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)
Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. (photo ©Roberto Conte)

Gonzalo Borondo. “Hereditas”. Museum of Contemporary Art Esteban Vicente. Segovia, Spain. From April 8 to September 26, 2021. Curated by José María Parreño

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BSA Images Of The Week: 04.11.21

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.11.21

This week we received a note from a friend in the graff/street art community urging us to encourage street and graffiti artists to create artwork on the streets that beseeches GenZ to get the Covid-19 vaccine.

They needn’t worry.

Graffiti and street artists have continued to respond to the COVID mask and vaccine issues as much as they did with the rejection of Trump and everything that came with him. During the last few years, they also have strongly responded to the BLM movement, to the topic of police brutality, to structural inequality in our economy, to last fall’s election, to indigenous people’s rights, to Asian hate, LGBTQ rights, to drug use, to anxiety, to depression, to love, to hope, to our effect on the Earth’s environment, and many social/political issues. Not always high-minded, Street artists also like pop culture icons, cute animals, and emulating successful artists who came before them and whom they admire.

It’s all part of the gig.

When we hit the streets in the pursuit of arts, we never know what we’ll find and where we’ll find it. This week we were surprised by a certain uptick in the number of sculptures on the streets. The artists used different materials, from ceramic to resin, metal, cement, and techniques associated with papier-mâché. The sculptures were mostly affixed to traffic signposts but sometimes were placed on street construction barriers. We are always happy to see sculptures on the streets as they bring back the days when sanctioned murals were definitely not the norm, and illegal street art ruled the streets in myriad small formats.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring: A Cool 55, AJ Maldo, Billy Barnacles, Chris Protas, City Kitty, CRKSHNK, JJ Veronis, Mataruda, Mort Art, Mr. Triple Double, Patrick Picou Harrington, Phetus, Raddington Falls, Sibot, Spy33, Turtle Caps, Winston Tseng.

Oh Sailor boy! Seibot (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Raddington Falls (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mort Art (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (Mint & Serf?) (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Spy33 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Chris Protas (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Winston Tseng (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JJ Veronis. Mr. Triple Double (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A portrait of Mr. Beyonce AKA Jay-Z by an unidentified artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
CRKSHNK (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ Maldo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
City Kitty and Turtle Caps (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Billy Barnacles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A Cool 55 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rose time is almost here peeps!! (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Phetus (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mataruda in Kingston, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“Hey baby give me a kiss” JJ Veronis (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Patrick Picou in Albany, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Manhattan, NY. April 2021. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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“Muralitos” in Barcelona: A Weekend Paint Jam With Friends

“Muralitos” in Barcelona: A Weekend Paint Jam With Friends

The springtime wall jams have begun! And random Saturdays or Sundays are usually perfect days to schedule an event in many cities – since most people have time off during that time, depending on their work schedule. If an artist is lucky enough to have a job these days…

An informally organized event like this provides an opportunity to explore and create alongside peers, converse and discuss ideas and techniques, and hang out with visitors who stop by saying hello.

Lidia Martinez. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Lidia Martinez. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)

“We thought it was a good idea that we could notify each time any of us was going to paint,” says Spanish artist Jaume Montserrat, “in case someone else wanted to accompany them and have a good time doing what we like so much.”

He says he and his buddies have a WhatsApp group to keep each other apprised of their street art and mural projects. For this particular Sunday a couple of weeks ago, it was as simple as reaching out via text to fellow artist Núria Farré, he tells us.

Pablo Navas. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Pablo Navas. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Laia Mas)

“I wrote to her asking if she would like to do it on one of Wallspot’s legal walls, and when we found a date that suited us, we decided to invite some friends.”

BSA contributor and photographer Fer Acala was there in Barcelona to capture the action and the art, and we’re pleased to share his shots of the artists at work and the days’ activities.

Núria Farré. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Núria Farré. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Núria Farré. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Juanjo Sáez. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Juanjo Sáez. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Juanjo Sáez. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
The artists with Juanjo Sáez mural in the background. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Antón G. Seoane. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Antón G. Seoane. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Antón G. Seoane. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Antón G. Seoane. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Senyoerre)
Sigrid Amores. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Sigrid Amores. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Sigrid Amores. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Maria Cuellar & Rabassa. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Maria Cuellar & Rabassa. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Jaume Montserrat)
Valiente Creations. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Valiente Creations. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Valiente Creations. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Valiente Creations. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jaume Montserrat. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jaume Montserrat. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
Jaume Montserrat & Valiente Creations. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)
The happy artists doing what they love to do most. Muralitos in Barcelona. (photo © Fer Alcala)

Our thanks to Fer Alcala for sharing his excellent photos with us and BSA readers.
Artists include:
Irene Valiente (@valiente_creations)
Sigrid Amores (@sigridamores)
Pablo Navas (@pabl0navas)
Antón G, Seoane (@antonseoane)
Juanjo Sáez (@juanjo_saez)
Núrria Farré (@nuriafarreabejon)
Maria Cuellar (@mariacuellar.m)
Lidia Martinez (@lidia.mpakkete)
Rabassa (@israbassa)
Jaume Montserrat (@jaumemontserrat)

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BSA Film Friday: 04.09.21

BSA Film Friday: 04.09.21

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Sofles / Kawaii. The artist paints a piece for his daughter Violet.
2. ACBR and ZONE take Rick and Morty Underground
3. Honet x Art Azoi in Paris

BSA Special Feature: Sofles / Kawaii. The artist paints a piece for his daughter Violet.

Remember when Nirvana did that concert without electric guitars? You can call this one “Sofles Unplugged.” He has no soundtrack revving up your adrenaline or accentuating his skills. He’s just pure skillz.

Sofles / Kawaii. The artist paints a piece for his daughter Violet.

ACBR and ZONE take Rick and Morty Underground.

Ahhh, here we go! Vandals, surreptitious underground graffiti pieces, knives, mad scientists, syncopated dance numbers, and a ripping soundtrack. Back to what we all expected from our graff videos.

Honet x Art Azoi in Paris

A creation by HONET on the wall of the Pavillon Carré de Baudouin (Paris 20th district).

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Monumental Ransom:  Curious Case Of “The Jefferson Davis Memorial Chair” in Selma, AL

Monumental Ransom: Curious Case Of “The Jefferson Davis Memorial Chair” in Selma, AL

The same week we published Carlo McCormick’s extensive essay entitled “Why Monuments?,” in which he posits that we need to find a valid way to deal with statuary that celebrates enslavers, among other things, the county District Attorney Michael Jackson is looking to arrest members of “White Lies Matter” in Selma, Alabama for kidnapping a monumental chair.

Ransom note. (image courtesy of White Lies Matter)

This Friday, the anonymous artivists said they were set to return their ransomed confederate chair monument, “The Jefferson Davis Memorial Chair.” It was first reported missing from Live Oak Cemetery in Selma last month – an ornately carved stone chair dedicated in 1893 to the Confederate president’s memory and estimated to be worth $500,000.

They had demanded, via email, that a banner with a quote by Assata Shakur be hung from April 9th to April 10th at the headquarters of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia,  on Friday, the 156th anniversary of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender at the end of the Civil War.

“The rulers of this country have always considered their property more important than our lives,” said the banner.

A rendering of how the chair will be as toilet should the demands not be met. (image courtesy of White Lies Matter)

A member of the Black Liberation Army, Shakur was convicted of the murder of a New Jersey state trooper in 1977. In light of the currently running court case of police brutality in the killing of George Floyd, the use of Shakur’s quote is deliberate.

According to ransom documents, the chair would be returned unharmed if the banner was hung – but a new communication Wednesday evening showed images of the chair possibly being used as a toilet by a historically costumed and mustachioed actor.

A photoshopped image of the banner that the group is demanding to be put on display in front of the UDC headquarters in Richmond, Virginia for 24 hours. The banner reads: “The rulers of this country have always considered their property more important than our lives,” which is a quote by Assata Shakur. (image courtesy of White Lies Matter)

“As the UDC has given us every indication that they had no intention of hanging the banner, even going as far as declaring our demands, ‘fake news, White Lies Matter has decided to move forward prematurely with the alteration of the chair. It will be returned to the UDC immediately.”

According to news reported in The Washington Post, the White Lies Matter group wrote, “We took their toy, and we don’t feel guilty about it. They never play with it anyway. They just want it there to remind us what they’ve done, what they are still willing to do.

The original chair being carted into an unknown storage awaiting its fate. (image courtesy of White Lies Matter)

“But the south won’t rise again. Not as the Confederacy. Because that coalition left out a large portion of its population. All that’s left of that nightmare is an obscenely heavy chair that’s a throne for a ghost whose greatest accomplishment was treason.”

This image shows the chair being stolen from the Live Oaks Cemetery in Selma, Alabama on March 19. (image courtesy of White Lies Matter)

See additional articles from:
The Washington Post, AL.com, and Talking Points Memo.

UPDATE: The Washington Post is reporting that the New Orleans police have made an arrest on the theft of the chair. Two individuals are being held in connection to the theft while they search for a third suspect. The chair was recovered without damage to it and it will be returned to its original place.

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Kenor Paints Kinectic Geometric Confetti for Art Azoï in Paris

Kenor Paints Kinectic Geometric Confetti for Art Azoï in Paris

Barcelona-based KENOR has traveled around the world and worked with brands creating his own take on kinetic graffiti, whether on walls, on canvas, or as sculpture. Blowing air into his pieces of colorful geometric confetti, the painter catches the chaos of the city and paints it.

It’s a mismatched style that recalls the Memphis movement of the 80s, complete with a poppy palette and occasional patterning. Here with Art Azoi on a lower wall of Parc de Bellville in Paris, you can see how his emphasis on movement drives his creative choices at Place Alphonse Allais.

KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
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