All posts tagged: HOXXOH

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.03.19

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.03.19

“Man, what’s with this cough that never goes away?” you ask your boy Tre, who’s laying on the moss green living room rug by the radiator drawing in his black book with an extra fine tip paint pen, listening to Wu Tang. “Could be January,” he offers. “Or maybe its asbestos from that work they’re doing in the elevator shaft.”

Right. “Never mind, lets watch some Beer Bowl!”

Meanwhile on the streets the ideas never stop. We were pretty excited to get up to 167th Street station to see the new mosaics by Brooklyn artist Rico Gatson, who does painting, video, sculpture and installation. These portraits of important contributors to the culture make us all proud. Here are just a handful but there are more and you should go and see them yourself.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this time featuring Atomik, Captain Eyeliner, Deih XLF, finDAC, Go Vegan, Hoxxoh, Kai, Kevin Ledo, Lefty Out There, Mastrocola, My Dog Sighs, Pez, Rico Gaston, The Revolution Artists, Uninhibited, and What is Adam.

Kai (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Captain Eyeliner (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Supreme Justice Sonia Sotomayor immortalized by Rico Gatson in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Poet Laureate Maya Angelou immortalized by Rico Gatson in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Singer Celia Cruz immortalized by Rico Gatson in the NYC Subway. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lefty Out There in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Go Vegan (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Atomik and friends in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
What Is Adam in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Pez in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Collaboration between FinDAC and Kevin Ledo in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Uninhibited in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
The Revolution Artists in Miami. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A collaboration among different artists in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A collaboration among different artists in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
A collaboration among different artists in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
My Dog Sighs (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mastrocola in Miami (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Wynwood, Miami. December 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 03.25.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 03.25.18

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

Sharp tongued and defiant, that’s the way we like our young people, and Gen Z has a lot of loud mouthed articulate and savvy ones who are not going to be fooled out of gun control, if yesterdays marches in NYC and hundreds of cities are any indication. As Spring officially arrived in New York on Thursday, we are expecting even more action in the streets from artists and activists each passing day now.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets (and elsewhere), this week featuring Adam Fujita, Anthony Lister, Balu, Banksy, Baron Von Fancy, Bifido, Dain, Dede, Gane, GlossBlack, Hoxxoh, JerkFace, Kuma, Lacky, Nitzan Mintz, Paper Skaters, Pussy Power Posse, Ratanic, RESP, Shock, and Texas.

Top Image: GlossBlack in collaboration with Klughaus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gane . Texas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adam Fujita (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Baron Von Fancy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Lister (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Balu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Balu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Balu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Balu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lacky. Built to Mob (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dede . Nitzan Mintz (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Resp . Shock . Kuma (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Banksy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Banksy no more… (photo © Jaime Rojo)

08AM (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We can’t read the signature on this massive wall. Help please. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pussy Power Posse (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ratanic (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jerkface (photo © Jaime Rojo)

HOXXOH (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bifido “We Are Only Guests” in Volos, Greece. (photo © Bifido)

Paper Skaters (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. New York City. March 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Boston’s “Underground Mural Project” Opens With 11 Artists

Boston’s “Underground Mural Project” Opens With 11 Artists

“I love transforming a raw space for everyone to discover. It’s the best feeling to see people enjoying themselves in front of my art,” says artist Cey Adams in Boston as he finishes his “LOVE” mural in a letter style recalling the funky late 70s.

Cey Adams. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

At the start of September Adams and 10 other artists joined the Underground Mural Project to transform 150,000 square feet of walls and pavement in a park here, curated by Street Theory Gallery, a creative studio founded by Liza and Victor ‘Marka27’ Quiñonez. The 8-acre public underpass located between Boston’s South End and South Boston neighborhoods has been leased to a privately owned company that has turned it into “an active urban park, cultural attraction and parking amenity”, now named Underground Ink Block.

Ewok-MSK. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Our thanks to photographer Todd Mazer who shares some of his images with BSA readers today from the event. Todd also conducted an interview with painter, muralist and graffiti artist Rob “Problak” Gibbs, a native of Roxbury, a neighborhood in the southern part of Boston. As participant in the project, community arts advocate, and a lifetime Boston citizen who believes strongly in the power of public art, graffiti, and HipHop culture, Poblak offers a unique perspective to the Underground Mural Project.

Todd Mazer: In your origins as a writer you have spoken about the importance of outdoor classrooms like Peters Park what are your hopes that a place like the Underground at Ink Block can be a catalyst for?
Problak: I hope that the Underground at Ink Block can be a catalyst for the next generation of graffiti writers, muralist and landscape artist to be inspired to take what we contributed to the space and add on to the practice. If our times are documented the stories can be told better through a variety of disciplines artist come to the table with.

When a place like the Underground exists, up and coming artist can work on creative ways to contribute towards a venue that exhibits community art for the people of greater Boston at a world wide scale. The Underground can be a bridge that takes anyone (young or old) on an adventure through the creative process of an artist that may have work in that space.

VyalOne. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Todd Mazer: As an artist, activist and architect/educator how have you discovered the importance to expand your skill set in order to create opportunity for your own and others artistic endeavors?
Problak: I discovered how important it is have to have a variety of ways to tell your story. Pose2 always told us “your only as good as your last piece” and Kem5 added “ and the people you place yourself around” When that whole phrase is combined positioned my mind in a place to have my skill set be in a good position to always grow.

“Walking the talk” confidently comes from paying dues. Dues that range from humble beginnings to bad experiences that I learned the greatest lessons from. Expanding my skill set opened up new doors to meet and build a variety of relationships with other artist who too are skilled and tackle tasks through creative problem solving. The more skill you have the less you’ll find yourself saying NO to a majority of the challenges you’ll get approached with.

HOXXOH. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Todd Mazer: As a follow up more specifically could you offer some insight from 91 til infinity… in other words how has your involvement in AFH (Artists For Humanities) shaped your actions and given you perspective on the importance of this new space?
Problak: LOL from 91 til………..

My involvement with AFH is very instrumental to what I do because the creed we practice in our studio has become the DNA to my life’s work. I grew up around a small nit of artist who are gifted and who challenged me along our journey. That small crew grew into the organizations leadership. The ethos has evolved and revolved off of our actions. We took responsibility for our own learning and shared that practice with a large amount of youth for the past 25 years.

Don Rimx . Problak . Marka27. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

The importance of this new space is that concept of giving space and opportunity for a genre that is powered by energy in this city that is untapped. An energy that has the interest of the youth and the ability to challenge them to think, digest, seek their own truth and hopefully contribute. Sometimes you have to be exposed to or shown the examples to develop your voice. This space could serve as a megaphone to help project it. The examples are the trailblazers who show everyone in the space what’s possible.

Todd Mazer: Why is it so important to artistically reclaim overlooked spaces?
Problak: It’s important to “Add to” vs. reclaim because with all due respect to the city’s architecture, I view these spaces as a series of blank canvases embedded inside of what I would compare to the city’s respiratory system. The work we do would breathe life into these spaces so that the city would not have to hold its breath and encourage others to do the same. These spaces can be landmarks and spark the next mind to be great or be that picture worth a 1000 words that would speak to the generations to come.

The participating artists include: Vyal One, Imagine, Cey Adams, Don Rimx, Marka 27, Problak, Ewok MSK, Thy Doan, Upendo, Percy Fortini-Wright and Hoxxoh. Our thanks to Todd Mazer for sharing his photos and interview with BSA readers.

Marka27. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Ewok-MSK . Thy Doan. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Thy Doan. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

 

Perci Fortini-Wright. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Perci Fortini-Wright. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Imagine876. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Upendo. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Problak . Vyal . Marka27. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Having fun at the block party. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Having fun at the block party. Urban Art Park. Beantown, Boston. September 2017. (photo © Todd Mazer)

 

 

Underground at Ink Block from National Development on Vimeo.

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 01.08.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 01.08.17

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015
Over the holidays we made a quick stop in West Palm Beach, Florida to take a look at the murals from the CANVAS program, adjacent to the neighborhood of the Trump resort where he spent New Year’s Eve where he charged guests a minimum of $525 per person to attend his party. Scrubbed clean of any actual graffiti or organic Street Art, the downtown West Palm Beach shopping neighborhood adds these murals to a sleepy commercial area to pick up the glitter of a current fascination with Street Art.

With the highly contentious and disputed Trump right next door at his Mar-a-Lago estate, one wonders if any political messaging will be visible in the future, or will the neighborhood expressions of art in the streets be comprised of these decidedly apolitical and attractive murals created in advance of his presidency.

So here’s our first weekly interview with the streets for the year, this week featuring Anthony Hernandez, Astro, Bikismo, Case Ma’Claim, EMC, Grafftoyz, Greg Mike, Herakut, Hoxxoh, Kobra, Lonac, Michael Dweck, Pastel, PHD Graphitti, Pichi & Avo, Pipsqueakwashere, Sipros, Tristan Eaton, and WRDSMTH.

First image above: Lonac for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kobra for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Kobra for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tristan Eaton in West Palm Beach, Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pichi & Avo. Side A. Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pichi & Avo Side B. Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Herakut for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Hernandez. West Palm Beach, Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Case Maclaim for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Case Maclaim for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Collaboration between Grafftoyz, EMC and PHD Graphitti in West Palm Beach, Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Collaboration between Grafftoyz, EMC and PHD Graphitti in West Palm Beach, Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Collaboration between Grafftoyz, EMC and PHD Graphitti in West Palm Beach, Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sipros for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ASTRO for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pastel for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Michael Dweck for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bikismo for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hoxxoh for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hoxxoh for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

WRDSMTH for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Pipsqueakwashere for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Geg Mike for Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Greg Mike. Side A. Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Greg Mike side B. Canvas West Palm Beach. Florida. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Landing. New York City. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

To learn more about CANVAS WPB click HERE

Please follow and like us:
Read more
ONO’U Festival 2016 as Captured by Martha Cooper in Tahiti

ONO’U Festival 2016 as Captured by Martha Cooper in Tahiti

Lucky Us! Our senior reporter on the ground in Tahiti for this years’ ONO’U Festival is the quick-witted eagle-eyed Martha Cooper, who shares with BSA readers her fresh shots of the action in paradise.

Personable and outgoing, Cooper covers a lot of ground quickly, introducing herself and asking questions and snapping pictures. Of course people often know her before she knows them, especially in the Street Art/ Graffiti game – but frankly she just wants to see artists work and learn about their process.  So get working!

We’re thankful that Martha is taking the time to share with us all her images and some details of the surrounding action, which we elaborate on here for you.

brooklyn-street-art-phat1-lady-diva-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Phat1 AKA Charles at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

“Charles is painting an Omamao bird endemic of Tahiti,” says Martha, “and it is listed as a critically endangered species.” Why do you hear this same story in whatever part of the world you are in today? More importantly, are you doing anything about it?

brooklyn-street-art-charles-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Phat1 AKA Charles at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-phat1-lady-diva-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-2

Phat1 AKA Charles with help from Lady Diva AKA Jeanine Williams. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

After the mural was finished, Martha says there was a blessing of the mural. Above you can see the minister in the photo above performing the blessing.

brooklyn-street-art-bordalo-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Bordalo’s sketch for his installation. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Bordalo shows us the original sketch for his new piece made with recycled trash.

brooklyn-street-art-bordalo-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-3

Bordalo II at work. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-bordalo-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-2

Bordalo II. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-bordalo-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-4a-web

Bordalo II. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-adnate-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Adnate at work on his mural. Martha tells us that his muse for the mural was a woman whom both he and Martha had photographed in the market.  ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-adnate-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-2

Adnate. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-adnate-askew-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Adnate & Askew. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-seth-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Seth at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Returning mural champion Seth made good use of “an odd shaped wall, turning it into the Rainbow Warrior, a Greenpeace ship which led a flotilla of yachts protesting again French nuclear testing in French Polynesia,” Martha tells us. According to Wikipedia, “Fernando Pereira was a freelance Dutch photographer, of Portuguese origin, who drowned when French intelligence detonated a bomb and sank the Rainbow Warrior, owned by the environmental organization Greenpeace on 10 July 1985.”

Martha notes that Pereira also was a photographer and he was trying to save his equipment at the time that the ship went down.  “The mural shows Polynesian girl in her fragile canoe pulling alongside the ship.”

brooklyn-street-art-seth-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-2

Seth at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-seth-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-3

Seth. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-niko-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

NIKO at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

“This guy says he can paint any animal he’s seen out of his head—very impressive!” says Ms. Cooper about NIKO, whose mural shows animals arriving in Tahiti from around the world from the harbor close to where the wall was. “The USA is represented by an alligator with a Miami Dolphins hat on,” she says.

brooklyn-street-art-okuda-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Okuda taking a break. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-okuda-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-3

Okuda at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-mast-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-2

MAST at work on his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-mast-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Mast sketch for his mural. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

MAST was channeling Brooklyn hard in Tahiti, with this shout out to the honeys back home, the subway at Franklin Avenue, and he reconfigured the train lines to reflect the letters of his crew – The Great Escape (TGE).

brooklyn-street-art-mast-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-3

Mast. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-cranio-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Cranio. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-leon-keer-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-1

Leon Keer. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

The anomorphic master Leon Keer is pictured here with his wife assisting. Martha says that these figures are “Painting of robots arriving from the harbor.” As usual, Mr. Keers work rather blows your mind when it is completed and you are standing in just the right location.

brooklyn-street-art-leon-keer-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-2

Leon Keer. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-leon-keer-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web-3

Leon Keer. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-inkie-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Inkie at work on his wall. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-kalouf-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Kalouf at work on his wall. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-kalouf-marko-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Kalouf left with Marko on the right. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-peeta-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Peeta. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-hoxxoh-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Hoxxoh. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

brooklyn-street-art-jobs-abuzz-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Jobs & Abuzz. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

“Tribal Pursuit” is the name of this wall by Tahitians Jobs and Abuzz, named so after the board game called Trivial Pursuit. “The black lines are the Maquesa’s cross,” Martha says, and “the designs are the contradictions of old and modern traditions from Polynesia such as  the ‘head breaker’ a traditional weapon and tiki, the sea animal because they are surrounded by water.” The skull, of course, “represents the atomic tests.”

brooklyn-street-art-phat1-askew-martha-cooper-onou-tahiti-10-16-web

Charles and Askew partake on  traditional dance with a local troupe of female dancers. ONO’U Festival 2016. Tahiti. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Street Art Sancocho : “ArteSano Project” Brings Dominican Flavor (VIDEO)

Street Art Sancocho : “ArteSano Project” Brings Dominican Flavor (VIDEO)

New Year, new mural festival! 

Truthfully, the appearance of new mural festivals today is faster than annual – it’s more like quarterly – but this one in the Dominican Republic was inaugurated three weeks ago and brings a certain hand crafted authenticity that holds promise for its future.

brooklyn-street-art-jade-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-3

Jade. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

“ArteSano Project” gives you an indication of the personal nature of the art you are likely to see from the 25 local and international artists invited to Rio San Juan from December 11-22.  It could be the name influencing our perception, but in one way or another it looks like these artists are chosen for their down-to-earth hand hewn approach. Sometimes  decorative, sometimes storytelling, there are familiar themes and motifs that play well to their local audience as well as the virtual gawker.

Even with two dozen artists, it isn’t bloated: no logos or product tie-ins or DJs or high flying scissor lifts scaling massive multi-story walls with abstract surrealism, hyper photo-realism or dark pop human/animal/robot hybrids here – yet. Well, we take that back on the surrealism score; Pixel Pancho is here with a brood of chickens bobbing their industrial mesh necks atop fired tile bodices, hunting and pecking their way toward the beach, and Miami artist duo 2alas & Hox created a portrait of a boy with a partial mask overlay that calls to mind cyborgs (and Sten & Lex). But here in the loungey bare-foot tropical DR coastal area, even Pixel Pancho mutes the hues toward sun-bleached pastels, more easily complimenting their surroundings.

brooklyn-street-art-jade-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-1

Jade. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

Free-running fowl overtook a few artists thematically, including another international artist who usually paints hybrid forms with dimension and almost mythic metaphor, but who this time tried his hand at something much more folkloric. “Importacion Cultural”, the flatly bright piece by Buenos Aires born Franco “Jaz” Fasoli, presents an entire wall with hand cut and paper collage, adding to the general feeling of approachability, and introducing a form of craft-inspired art-making more common to DIY Street Art of the 2000s than recent aerosol-infused mural festivals.

“The community was transformed during those days and over two weeks they began to see these great artists’ work and create specific pieces in different places around the town,” says Mario E. Ramirez, a Puerto Rican artist who has been documenting and capturing the burgeoning graffiti/Street Art scene in his country and places like DR with his partners at Tost Films. He says that an event like this that connects with a community yields a greater dialogue than some of the more commercial Street Art and graffiti enterprises, because the artists get to interact with neighbors closely. “At the completion of the ArteSano each artist felt like a distinguished guest of Rio San Juan. They made us feel at home, it was one of the best experiences of 2014.”

brooklyn-street-art-jade-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-2

Jade. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

One of the organizers, Dominican born artist Evoca1, has experience working as a Street Artist as well as bringing actual physical sustenance and support to a community. For about four years the Miami based artist has delivered many meals to folks living on the street with his wife and friends through an organization he began called “Sketches For Mankind.”

With Evoca1 hosting the ArteSano project it became another form of community outreach and the curatorial responsibilities for the public art initiative was offered by the folks at the Vienna based INOPERAbLE Gallery, who have represented a mix of urban artists work including some in this show and others that are range into pop, dark pop, graphic irony, and more “traditional” contemporary Street Art.

brooklyn-street-art-vero-rivera-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Vero Rivera. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

Organizers say they hope that ArteSano gains traction and that people get to know the Dominican Republic as a good place for urban arts and muralism. There is not much transgressive here; With its mix of mainly latin name-brand and local homegrown talent, it looks like ArteSano makes a respectable entry into the international mural festival mileu with what may be the emerging alchemy of the decorative and the pleasing – peppered with some more challenging themes and muted socio-political messages.

Overall no one will argue that Rio San Juan is a great location for a painter or street artist from the northern hemisphere in December. Among the invited artists were BIKISMO, JADE, 2ALAS, HOXXOH, PASTEL, JAZ, EVER, ELIAN, LEO, VERO RIVERA, MODAFOCA, ENTES, FAITH47, AXEL VOID, PIXEL PANCHO, FILIO, ANGURRIA, 3TAMAROOTS, GABZ, POTELECHE, BAD6, SHAK, RUBEN, JOHANN,SEBAS, and PAOLA.

brooklyn-street-art-bikismo-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Bikismo. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-1

Entes. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-entes-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-2

Entes. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-io-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

IO. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-jaz-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

JAZ. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-elian-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Elian. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-BAD6-SHAK-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

BAD6 . SHAK. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-Fili-2alas-hox-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Fili . 2alas . Hox. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-hoxxoh-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

HOXXOH. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-hoxxoh-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web-2

HOXXOH. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-gabz-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Gabz. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-pixel-pancho-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Pixel Pancho. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-pastel-pixel-pancho-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Pastel . Pixel Pancho. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-pastel-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Pastel. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-moda-foca-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Moda Foca. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-axel-faith47-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Axel . Faith47. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-ever-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Ever. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-johann-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Johann. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-poteleche-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

Poteleche. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

brooklyn-street-art-3tamaroots-artesano-project-tost-films-mario-ramirez-Rio-San_Juan-Dominican-Republic-12-2014-web

3tamaroots. ArteSano Project. Rio San Juan, Dominican Republic. December, 2014. (photo © Mario E Ramirez/TostFilms.com)

 

 

 

Thank you to Mario E Ramirez for his invaluable help to make this article possible for BSA readers.

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more