All posts tagged: Gilf

Young New Yorkers – A Preview of the Auction Benefitting NYC Youth

Young New Yorkers – A Preview of the Auction Benefitting NYC Youth

Don’t miss this cool auction of work by many of today’s Street Artists on the New York scene, and some other folks you might have heard of!  Young New Yorkers works with 16 and 17 year-old kids who have been caught in the criminal justice system, giving them a second chance. This is your opportunity to support this non-profit organization that is doing good work for your neighbors and our neighborhoods and to add art to your collection.

Here are some brand new shots of pieces that will be available. For a full listing and to bid on the auction progress online, click here on Paddle8.

brooklyn-street-art-olek-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Olek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We had the opportunity to speak with Rachel Barnard, Executive Director and Co-Founder of Young New Yorkers about the event and their programs. We asked her to explain how the programs work.

“Art exercises in our programs are collapsed with restorative justice exercises and they give our participants a way of exploring the impact of their choices while empowering them to make wiser ones in the future. We work with photography, video, collage and illustration. More importantly, in the second half of the program art allows our participant’s to step into their own leadership and self expression,” she explains.

As the participants explore their creativity, they also examine it through a greater lens. “They explore a social issue that is important to them and develop a public art project around that. This is then presented at the final exhibition – one which the criminal court judges, acting district attorneys, social workers and other members of the criminal justice system, attend. It’s a way for everyone to re-meet our extraordinary participants as more than just their rap sheets. So in this way we use art to meet our main goal; which is to empower our young New Yorkers to transform the criminal justice system through their own creative voices.”

Here are some of the pieces that will be up for auction on April 1st.

brooklyn-street-art-swoon-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Swoon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lmnopi-obey-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Obey . LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mata-ruda-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Mata Ruda (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-icy-sot-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-miss-van-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Miss Van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hellbent-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Hellbent (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gaia-lny-mata-ruda-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Gaia, LNY and Mata Ruda collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faring-purth-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Faring Purth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-cb23-sonni-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

CB23 . Sonni (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-cost-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

COST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-sol-25-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-cosbe-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Cosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-case-maclaim-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Case Ma’Claim (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-young-new-yorkers-jaime-rojo-03-15-web

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Young-New-Yorkers-Fairey-Mar-2015899-1426775886-P8_AUCTION_Poster_Detail

Young New Yorkers provides arts-based programming to court-involved young people. The criminal court gives eligible defendants—all of whom are 16- and 17-year-olds and who in New York are tried as adults—the option to participate in Young New Yorkers rather than do jail time, community service, and have a lifelong criminal record. With the ultimate goal of empowering participants to transform the criminal justice system through their own creative voices, all of YNY’s programs culminate with a public exhibition where members of the Criminal Justice System are invited to re-meet the graduates as creative and empowered individuals. In most cases, upon successful completion of the program, the participants’ cases are sealed; so far, 100% of participants have graduated from YNY’s programs.

We look forward to seeing you at Joseph Gross Gallery on April 1 for the Silent Art Auction. Get your advance tickets for only $35 here.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Young-New-Yorkers-Fairey-Mar-AUCTION_with names

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Happy New Year 2015 – BSA Readers Choice Top 10

Happy New Year 2015 – BSA Readers Choice Top 10

Happy New Year to All! Thank you for inspiring us to do our best and to those of you who continue to support our personal art project / cultural examination, we extend our gratitude more than ever.

BSA-READERS-CHOICE-TOP-10

Begun as an enthusiastic discovery of what was happening in a few neighborhoods in New York, we continued to expand our view into more cities around the world last year and into the history and future of the scene. We also aimed to provide you with a critical platform for examination of the street art/ graffiti / public art/ contemporary art continuum with interviews with artists, curators, collectors, organizers, observers and thinkers in the street, studio, gallery, and museum – trouble makers and taste makers alike.

In the end, it’s your observations and the conversations on the street that are most important. As we begin the year with over 300K fans, friends, and followers on social media platforms and 225 articles on the Huffington Post (thanks HuffPost team!), we feel like we get a valuable good survey of current opinions heading our way daily.

With in-depth interviews, investigative articles, opinion infused examinations, plain celebratory reverie, occasionally silly non-sequitors, and public appearances where we get to meet you, we get a good analytical look at an ever-evolving movement, glittery polish and warts and all.

As the new year begins we take a look back at the top stories chosen by BSA Readers in the last 12 months. Among them are two takeover pop-up shows in soon-to-be demolished buildings, a story about commercial abuse of artist copyrights and the effort to fight back, a street art community’s response to the sudden death of an activist street artist, a Street Art tourist trip, and a few inspirational women, men, and Mexican muralists.  Even though we published at least once a day for the last 365 days, these are the most popular pieces, as chosen by you, Dear BSA Reader.

10. Exploring Lisbon as a Street Art Tourist

brooklyn-street-art-os-gemeos-blu-stephen-kelley-lisbon-04-14-web-4

Os Gemeos / Blu (photo © Stephen Kelley)

9. Kara Walker and Her Sugar Sphinx at the Old Domino Factory

brooklyn-street-art-kara-walker-jaime-rojo-creative-time-domino-sugar-05-14-web-9

Kara Walker. The artist portrait in profile with her sugary sphinx in the background. (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

8. Women Rock Wynwood Walls at Miami Art Basel 2013

brooklyn-street-art-fafi-martha-cooper-wynwood-walls-2013-miami-web-2

Fafi (photo © Martha Cooper for Wynwood Walls)

7. A Sudden Secret Street Art House Party in Manhattan

brooklyn-street-art-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-01-10-14-web-4

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

6. Niels Shoe Meulman Balancing “Unearthly” Paintings

brooklyn-street-art-niels-shoe-meulman-brock-brake-white-walls-gallery-web-2

Niels “Shoe” Meulman. Process shot. (photo © Adele Renault)

5. It’s All the Rage, Street Artists Filing Lawsuits Left and Right

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-msk-copyright-cavelli-graffiti-artists-revok-reyes-steel-suing-roberto-cavalli-for-copyright-infringement-01-960x640

4. Shok-1 Street Art X-Rays Reveal a Unique Hand at the Can

brooklyn-street-art-shok1-jaime-rojo-03-14-web-1

Shok-1 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

3. 12 Mexican Street Artists Stray Far from Muralism Tradition In NYC

brooklyn-street-art-sego-jaime-rojo-dorian-grey-gallery-05-14-web-9

Sego (photo © Jaime Rojo)

2. Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

brooklyn-street-art-army-of-one-jc2-jaime-rojo-01-14-web-3

Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

1. Graffiti and Street Art Lock Up “21st Precinct” in New York

brooklyn-street-art-pixote-jaime-rojo-08-14-web

Pixote in action. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please follow and like us:
Read more
The 2014 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

The 2014 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

Here it is! Our 2014 wrap up featuring favorite images of the year by Brooklyn Street Art’s Jaime Rojo.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Images-of-Year-2014-Jaime-Rojo-740-Screen-Shot-2014-12-16-at-9.55

Before our video roundup below here is the Street Art photographer’s favorite of the year: Ask Jaime Rojo, our illustrious editor of photography at BrooklynStreetArt.com , who takes thousands of photographs each year, to respond to a simple question: What was your favorite photo of the year?

For 2014 he has swift response: “The Kara Walker.” Not the art, but the artist posed before her art.

It was an impromptu portrait that he took with his iPhone when the artist unveiled her enormous sculpture at a small gathering of neighborhood locals and former workers of the Domino Sugar Factory, informal enough that Rojo didn’t even have his professional camera with him. Aside from aesthetics for him it was the fact that the artist herself was so approachable and agreed to pose for him briefly, even allowing him to direct her just a bit to get the shot, that made an imprint on his mind and heart.

Of course the sculpture is gone and so is the building that was housing it for that matter – the large-scale public project presented by Creative Time was occupying this space as the last act before its destruction. The artist herself has probably moved on to her next kick-ass project after thousands of people stood in long lines along Kent Avenue in Brooklyn to see her astounding indictment-tribute-bereavement-celebration in a hulking warehouse through May and June.

But the photo remains.

And Rojo feels very lucky to have been able to seize that quintessential New York moment: the artist in silhouette before her own image, her own work, her own outward expression of an inner world. 

jaime-rojo-kara-walker-web

Jaime’s personal favorite of 2014; The site specific Kara Walker in front of her site specific installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in May of this year in Brooklyn. Artist Kara Walker. (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

Now, for the Video

And our holiday gift to you for five years running, here is the brand new video of favorite images of graffiti and Street Art by Brooklyn Street Art’s editor of photography, Jaime Rojo.

Of a few thousand these 129 shots fly smoothly by as a visual survey; a cross section of graffiti, street art, and the resurgence of mural art that continues to take hold. As usual, all manner of art-making is on display as you wander your city’s streets. Also as usual, we prefer the autonomous free-range unsolicited, unsanctioned type of Street Art because that’s what got us hooked as artists, and ultimately, it is the only truly uncensored stuff that has a free spirit and can hold a mirror up to us. But you have to hand it to the muralists – whether “permissioned” or outright commissioned, some people are challenging themselves creatively and still taking risks.

Once again these artists gave us impetus to continue doing what we are doing and above all made us love this city even more and the art and the artists who produce it. We hope you dig it too.

 

Brooklyn Street Art 2014 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

2Face, Aakash Nihalani, Adam Fujita, Adnate, Amanda Marie, Andreco, Anthony Lister, Arnaud Montagard, Art is Trash, Ben Eine, Bikismo, Blek Le Rat, Bly, Cake, Caratoes, Case Maclaim, Chris Stain, Cleon Peterson, Clet, Clint Mario, Col Wallnuts, Conor Harrington, Cost, Crummy Gummy, Dain, Dal East, Damien Mitchell, Damon, Dan Witz, Dasic, Don’t Fret, Dot Dot Dot, Eelco Virus, EKG, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Etam Cru, Ewok, Faring Purth, Gilf!, Hama Woods, Hellbent, Hiss, Hitnes, HOTTEA, Icy & Sot, Jana & JS, Jason Coatney, Jef Aerosol, Jilly Ballistic, Joe Iurato, JR, Judith Supine, Kaff Eine, Kashink, Krakenkhan, Kuma, Li Hill, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Mais Menos, Mark Samsonovich, Martha Cooper, Maya Hayuk, Miss Me, Mover, Mr. Prvrt, Mr. Toll, Myth, Nenao, Nick Walker, Olek, Paper Skaters, Patty Smith, Pixel Pancho, Poster Boy, Pyramid Oracle, QRST, Rubin 415, Sampsa, Sean 9 Lugo, Sebs, Sego, Seher One, Sexer, Skewville, SmitheOne, Sober, Sonni, Specter, SpY, Square, Stay Fly, Stik, Stikki Peaches, Stikman, Swil, Swoon, Texas, Tilt, Tracy168, Trashbird, Vexta, Vinz, Willow, Wolfe Works, Wolftits, X-O, Zed1.

Read more about Kara Walker in our posting “Kara Walker And Her Sugar Sphinx At The Old Domino Factory”.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Huffpost-images-of-year-2014-740-Screen-Shot-2014-12-17-at-11.15.50-AM

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Picks 19 Things to See at DUMBO ARTS FEST 2014

BSA Picks 19 Things to See at DUMBO ARTS FEST 2014

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Chika-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-740-

brooklyn-street-art-dumbo-arts-festival-2014

New York Clobbers Fall again and one of the finest examples of art in the public sphere has again returned to swing the aesthetic bat straight at your head with the DUMBO ARTS FESTIVAL.

With it comes the electrifying Brooklyn energy that transforms the street into a place you actually want to be in, linger in, discover in. Smack between two iconic Bridges (Brooklyn and Manhattan) DUMBO boasts a world class art festival that has grown both organically and with great purpose, often commanding your attention.

You can make a plan to hit a few installations, performances, galleries… — or you can just show up and grab a map.

Above image is of artist CHIKA’s large scale interactive LED sculpture in the archway under the Manhattan Bridge. More on her SEI: Stella Octangula HERE.

Following are some BSA picks that we think are worth highlighting:

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Gilf-Folioleaf-740-by-day-by-night-collage

1. FOLIOLEAF GALLERY. “Bad Vibes” Rubin415 and David Head.

A solid mix of new contemporary work that leans toward popular tastes, Folioleaf is making a strong showing with a growing stable that includes a number of current Street Artist like DAIN, Gilf! (image above), Hellbent, and others that are tangentially related. Street Art culture is a wide world and gallery owner Todd Masters is stretching his arms to embrace it.

111 Front Street, Suite 226.

http://folioleaf.com/

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Sidehustle-740-by-day-by-night-collage

2. SIDE HUSTLE NYC: “By Day, By Night” Karoleen Decastro, Alyssa Gruen, Patrick Ramos, Jon Chen.

What is your sidehustle? In the ever more expensive NYC game, almost every creative we know has one – Check out this installation and on Sunday they will have another photo shoot.

Plymouth Street Park Perimeter Fence.

http://sidehustlenyc.com/

Brooklyn-Street-Art-DUMBO-Underfoot-Karen-Mainenti--740-by-day-by-night-collage

3. Dumbo Underfoot”. Karen Mainenti

Mainenti draws your attention to the actual street in this installation highlighting those rail tracks cutting through the neighborhood that were used by Brooklyn industries and trades like coffee, soap bubbles, sugar, shoes and Brillo steel wool pads.

See MORE here.

Plymouth Street (between Main and Washington Streets)

http://www.karenmainenti.com

Brooklyn-Street-Art-DUMBO-WALLS-740-by-day-by-night-collage

DUMBO WALLS – All over the place

Two Trees and Lisa Kim have humanized the experience year long for people working/living/passing through DUMBO by curating some large mural installations by some great Street Artists over the past couple of years. Below are a few to keep your eyes open for on the streets.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Faith47-740-by-day-by-night-collage

4. DUMBO WALLS: Faith 47

Pearl Street Underpass, BQE,
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Daleast-740-by-day-by-night-collage

5. DUMBO WALLS: dalEAST

Pearl Street Underpass, BQE
Brooklyn-Street-Art-EL-TONO-740-by-day-by-night-collage

6. DUMBO WALLS: El Tono

Corner of Prospect and Jay Streets
Brooklyn-Street-Art-CAM-740-by-day-by-night-collage

7. DUMBO WALLS: CAM

York Street (between Adams and Pearl Streets)
Brooklyn-Street-Art-MOMO-740-by-day-by-night-collage

8. DUMBO WALLS: MOMO

York Street (between Washington and Adams Streets)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Shepard-Fairey-740-by-day-by-night-collage

9. DUMBO WALLS: Shepard Fairey

Corner of York and Jay Streets

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Sagmeister-Shimizu-740-by-day-by-night-collage

10.  DUMBO WALLS: Stefan Sagmeister & Yuko Shimizu

Jay Street Underpass, BQE
Brooklyn-Street-Art-A-la-cart-smackmellon-740-by-day-by-night-collage

11. SMACK MELLON:

Á la Cart with Kristyna and Marek Milde

“If we are what we eat, who are we if we don’t know the origin and the context of the production of our food?”

Originally created for Smack Mellon’s exhibition FOODShed: Art and Agriculture in Action –

6 shopping carts filled with soil parked at Old Fulton Plaza.

Smack Mellon Gallery
92 Plymouth Street, Brooklyn
http://www.smackmellon.org
http://www.estebandelvalle.com

Brooklyn-Street-Art-DAD-En-Masse-740-by-day-by-night-collage

12. Global Virtual Drawing Party: DADA featuring EN MASSE

At the Festival, creators from around the world will be encouraged to draw on DADA, while artists on site will respond using their iPads. The results will be projected live.

1 Main Street, Festival Lounge

http://enmasse.info

http://www.dada.am

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Mighty-Tenaka-Chris-Otley-Herb-Smith-Veng-RWK-740-by-day-by-night-collage

13. MIGHTY TANAKA: “Here and There”. Chris Otley, Herb Smith

Which one are you?

Together, they explore the impact between native and invasive species within both of their local communities.

111 Front Street, Suite 224, Brooklyn

http://www.mightytanaka.com

Brooklyn-Street-Art-I-____-a-Dollar--Jody-Servon-740-by-day-by-night-collage

14. “I ____ a Dollar” . Jody Servon

Main Street (between Plymouth and Water Streets)

Brooklyn-Street-Art-v-740-by-day-by-night-collage

15. BE MIGHTY! SPACE: LA2/LA ROC

“LA2, aka LA ROC, collaborated with Keith Haring to create iconic NYC street art in the ’80s. LA2 is part of the original street art movement, and a godfather of the scene. His work is highly sought after for its iconic nature and history. This exhibit will showcase some of the classic styles that LA2 is known for, along with his new work that pushes the style into a more contemporary realm. On display will be works on canvas, wood, and an assortment of objects.”

80 John Street

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Masters-Projects-740-by-day-by-night-collage

16. MASTERS PROJECTS: “Lost Corcosa” . Various Artists

The largerer and higher ender version of FolioLeaf , this the MASTERS PROJECTS. oof!

Peter Buechler, DAIN, Dee Dee, ELLE, Amze Emmons, Dima Gavrysh, gilf!, Nicolas Holiber, Steven Katzman, Karl Klingbiel, Amanda Marie, Timothy Paul Myers, QRST, RAE, Jon Rappley, Joram Roukes, Shin-Shin, Cris Uphues, Nathan Vincent, Charles Wilkin, X-O.

111 Front Street, Suite 212

http://www.maste.rs

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Reflection-Kolonihavehus--740-by-day-by-night-collage

17. REFLECTION / KOLONIHAVEHUS . Tom Fruin and CoreAct

“The colorful glass house is inhabited by two performers, who portray everyday dilemmas and lifestyle paradoxes in a subtle manner. They have lost the ability to meaningfully discriminate, and are trapped in a long chain of procrastination, mirroring our current social patterns. As an audience you can wonder in and out of the performance as you like. “

Empire Fulton Ferry Deck

Brooklyn-Street-Art-GILF-740-by-day-by-night-collage

18. “TRUST YOUR VISION” . Gilf!

Front Street (between Adams and Pearl Streets)
Brooklyn-Street-Art-Lee-Mandell--XAM--740-by-day-by-night-collage

19 . MPH-BENCH . Lee Mandell, XAM

MPH-BENCH is an indoor and/or outdoor furniture piece created using the idea of adaptive reuse. We like the fact that this hydroponic bentch can be whe bench can be wheeled around to fit into various aesthetic environments – Mobile agriculture!

1 Main Street, Festival Lounge
http://www.xambuilt.com
http://www.boswyckfarms.org

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Truffula-Loraxia--XAM-Lee-Mandell-740-by-day-by-night-collage

BONUS!*** TRUFFULA LORAXIA . Lee Mandell, XAM

Truffula Loraxia is a hydroponic sculpture project created by Lee Mandell and XAM. It combines growing technologies with design. Truffula Loraxia’s basic structure is a tree, which extends from a dodecahedron shaped base.

Main Street Park

http://www.xambuilt.com

http://www.boswyckfarms.org

For a complete schedule of events, maps and other details click HERE

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
BSA Images Of The Week: 09.21.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.21.14

brooklyn-street-art-lmnopi-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web-1

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2014

Autumn in New York yo! Crisp cool, sunny days. Girls in tight sweaters. Boys in combat boots. Every cool air festival you can think of is all happening simultaneously – skateboarders closing down Kent Ave on BKs north side, Indian Larry’s block party with motorcycles of every stripe, and this years San Gennaro festival in Little Italy looks like it wants to reclaim this part of town before it is subsumed by the crushing wealth machine now chewing through Chinatown. Literally the festival looks like it spans the entire length of Mulberry from Canal to Houston – that’s longer than the line to get the new iPhone in Soho!

But neither one of those will compare to todays’ expected line of concerned citizens snaking through the streets in Manhattan to address the effect of climate change. Coordinated with marches in cities around the world it’s estimated to draw 100,000 people. We’ve had a sneak peek at what Street Artist Swoon has in store for an installation at the end of the march, including some of the very same materials she just used for her “Submerged Motherlands” at the Brooklyn Museum, but arranged entirely cleverly differently.

A few weeks ago at Nuart we were invite to speak about activism on the street around the world using Street Art as a form of expression, and we are surprised to see a rising wave of it that not many seem aware of – including some of our artworld peers. This week alone a few Street Artists have created new work to promote today’s march. It is not hard to get us into the street on a regular day so this is just one shiny bauble of grassroots creativity that you won’t want to miss. Also, technically, it’s still summer until Tuesday.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Bifido, Crash, Daze, Gilf!, Hek Tad, Jetsonorama, Karl Addison, LMNOPI, Misshab, Sean9Lugo, and Skount.

Top Image >> A portrait of Ta’kaiya Blaney, a 13 year old girl from the Sliammon First Nation (Vancouver) and an environmental activist. The large mural was painted by Street Artist LMNOPI this week to commemorate the People’s Climate March here today in NYC. Click HERE for more details on the march. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lmnopi-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web-2

LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jetsonorama-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

A collaborative image created by Jetsonorama and Monica Canilao  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

Gilf! created this new piece to bring people to the march.(photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-miishab-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

Misshab (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-skount-Wurzburg-Germany-StreetMeet-Festival-09-21-14-web-2

A cosmic folkloric futurist meeting of souls from Skount at the StreetMeet Festival in Würzburg, Germany. (photo © Skount)

brooklyn-street-art-skount-Wurzburg-Germany-StreetMeet-Festival-09-21-14-web-1

Skount. Detail. StreetMeet Festival. Würzburg, Germany. (photo © Skount)

brooklyn-street-art-karl-addison-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web-1

Karl Addison for The Bushwick Collective. That spot to the left may look like a prison, but that’s what we call a beer garden in Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-karl-addison-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web-2

Karl Addison for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hek-tad-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

Hek Tad. A public declaration of love. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-artist-unknown-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

An outdoor installation of craft paper by an unknown artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bifido-Caserta-Italy-09-21-14-web-1

Oh, hi! Sorry I kicked the ball into your head. Bifido “Do It” Caserta, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

brooklyn-street-art-bifido-budapest-hungary-09-21-14-web

A porcine pal to stand atop, but you are still not tall enough. Bifido “I Want My Meat” Budapest, Hungary. (photo © Bifido)

brooklyn-street-art-sean9lugo-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

Could be cheese. Could be a brick of a hallucinogenic substance that gives people animal heads. Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-crash-daze-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

Crash and Daze for The L.I.S.A. Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jaime-rojo-09-21-14-web

Untitled. SOHO, NYC. August 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please follow and like us:
Read more
Gilf! in the Maze Says “Trust Your Vision”

Gilf! in the Maze Says “Trust Your Vision”

A new optic vibration under the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood by Street Artist Gilf! has been installed for passersby to decode and in a recent conversation with the artist she frankly reveals that she’s has been just as busy decoding her own myriad motivations for doing art in the public sphere.

The piece is entitled “Trust Your Vision”, a commentary on the influence of an ever- more competitive city environment on our personal ethics and goals. The project is a public works project sponsored by the DUMBO Improvement District in partnership with the NYC Department of Transportation Art Program and it was completed with donated space by the newly formed private Masters Projects.

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-1

Gilf! and an assistant at work on the panels. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The eye-jarring near-florescent orange/purple maze mounted on the recessed vertical pattern of a corrugated metal wall itself will challenge your vision; a discomfort that Gilf! is comfortable with. Buried in the patterning is her message, which may not be clear without some study. Her own record on the streets as an activist in the last few years advocating social and political issues around topics including war, sexism, free speech, and gentrification is becoming better known and it positions the artist as an outspoken critic, fanning the flames of recognition as a renegade vs. the system. But life is rarely that simple, is it?

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-4

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Contemplating the conundrum of becoming commercially or professionally viable while advocating for what she believes in takes some time and careful consideration, but Gilf! is determined to do it. For some reason certain purists can’t find a place for political speech unless you take a distinctly outsider vow of poverty. When it comes to Street Art culture however we have seen a bucking of this limiting mindset in recent years; an ability to advocate for social and political change while not sacrificing an artist career. You may see some charges of “selling out” lobbed at artists as they become commercially successful, but words like those rarely come from anyone who has offered to help out and naturally has no skin in the game themselves.

But even this project, while done with a city agency and a BID from Brooklyn, caused the artist to examine her motivations, and she shares some of her thought process and vision with BSA readers today.

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-2

A careful assistant to Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What is this project that you have been working on?
Gilf!: I’ve been kind of working on this new aesthetic for a year and a half or so and it has evolved, become more maze-like. I’ve been finding myself in this sort of transformation and it is sort of confusing. I’ve been hitting all of these dead ends and and somehow visually I’m relaying it through this sort of maze-like work. It’s been a very frustrating period, especially when doing public work and how my social views fit into that has been very confusing. And some how the experience is coming out visually.

Brooklyn Street Art: Do you think that it is a subconscious process that brings these patterns upward or do you play with the patterns and find one that seems to fit?
Gilf!: Yeah I was going through of styles and patterns; dots, lines, – like those lines that were at 45 degree angles. But they were really hard to read. And that mural I did in Bushwick about democracy – nobody could read it.

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-5

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: It sort of vibrated, but it didn’t speak much.
Gilf!: Yeah, in my prep for the piece using chalk lines it was legible and you could read it but as soon as I filled it in with paint you couldn’t read it. It was super frustrating because that took me forever. Just like this has taken me forever. Also I don’t want the message to be too hidden – I like for people to have to work for it a little bit.

Brooklyn Street Art: You are also dealing with people’s short attention spans and maybe their unwillingness to unpack things.
Gilf!: It’s funny because the work I originally started doing on the street was more obvious – you looked at it and you would get it – which gave me a certain amount of gratification. And this new work is a complete 180 degree turn for me because I feel that people are starting to look at Street Art differently now and they are taking the time to look at things – especially murals. Since they take more time looking at a mural I think doing it on a larger scale makes more sense.

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-15

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: So this will get a lot of traffic with people walking by it all the time –but will it be readily evident or will they have to dig a little to discover meaning?
Gilf!: They don’t have to work too hard, there will also be a little plaque to help explain it. I don’t know, I’ve never done of this big and I did one in Miami and people said, “Oh it’s a maze,” and they didn’t even see the letters. This one, with the vibrational colors, will make it a bit more difficult to see it though.

Brooklyn Street Art: It feels like it is a conceptual piece that is appropriate for the denizens of DUMBO. It appears as a contemporary piece of public art – not committed to any particular philosophy and you could interpret it a few ways.
Gilf!: Yeah well it’s the BID right? It also has to be approved by the City. So I couldn’t go too aggressive. I’ve done work here before with the DUMBO Arts Festival last fall and it was a really cool experience and part of what this is saying is “hold on to what you are going after”. One of the things with the festival for me was this feelling that it was a milestone and a realization that “Oh! There are people who actually think that the work I do is worthy of sharing.”

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-14

Getting Gilf! up in Dumbo requires some serious help. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: There is a certain validation to your work when that happens.
Gilf!: So when you do that it is important to keep things in perspective and sometimes just focus on me and the message and not just making money.

Brooklyn Street Art: I think it’s a balancing act that you have undertaken.
Gilf!: And with you as well I mean you guys are doing a million things all the time just on BSA, let alone actually paying the rent here with your day jobs, so.

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-10

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Yeah it feels like a juggle. It’s a continuous juggle. Is it a conflict for you to do commercial work and to pursue your activism side?
Gilf!: Yeah, it’s frustrating. I feel like stuff like this helps me to do a lot of other things and while I don’t necessarily know if I consider this commercial, because I consider it “public art” and it is at least in part sponsored by the city – and I have a lot of problems with things that happen with the city sometimes – but I feel like if I can take that energy and I can funnel it toward projects where more activism is needed then I am using it the right way.

Brooklyn Street Art: I’m not sure if it is fair generalize about the City like it is all one monolithic thing. After all it is meant to be representational of “the people” and “the people’s will”. You could say that “the people” have set aside this amount of money to edify the city and to give artists money through programs like this to subsist, if not prosper. In a way this is also activism within the context of government action.
Gilf!: I agree there is a lot to be said in that New York does actually put a lot of money into the arts, whereas some cities don’t. And the culture here – this whole city has been based around creativity for generations, for decades. I think it is important to keep that going because I think it is eroding. And I was really honored when they said, “We like it. Let’s do it” and I’ll do more work like this; it will just depend on the context.

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-11

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-8

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-9

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-12

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-jaime-rojo-06-14-web-13

Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Tehran To NYC / NYC To Tehran, Curated by Icy & Sot

Tehran To NYC / NYC To Tehran, Curated by Icy & Sot

Iranian Brothers Generate Cultural Exchange Between Two Homes

Icy & Sot, the Iranian Street Artists who have been making their mark on the New York scene for just two years are again making news by curating a gallery show that introduces Iran and the US to one another through the visual vernacular of Street Art.

With two shows running concurrently in Tehran and Brooklyn, the stencil loving spray painters have successfully exposed fans of this genre to the artists in another country with actual examples of art in a gallery setting rather than simply through the Internet. During the South Williamsburg opening on June 13th guests at the TBA temporary space were treated to works by 10 Iranian artists as well as a video projection on the wall of their counterparts  viewing the US artists show at Seyhoun Art gallery, which was recorded only hours earlier.

brooklyn-street-art-ck1-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web-6

Iran’s CK1 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Without diplomatic relations between the two countries, it is a wonder that this exchange could be cultivated, let alone executed. Given the restrictions imposed upon music, film, literature, and art since the revolution of 35 years ago, it added a layer of incredulity for gallery goers to measure the implications while viewing the works by a youth culture that has as its DNA a certain strain of rebellion.

New York sent the work of 35 artists, an impressively sized roster of participants who were each given size restrictions to keep shipping simpler and costs lower. While the brothers were clearly elated to bring new work to both cities, one might have surmised that the more excited feelings were directed toward their recently departed home where about 55% of the population is estimated to be under 30 years old and a youthful cultural evolution is said to be happening in the artist underground.

brooklyn-street-art-ck1-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s CK1 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Work from the Iranians reveals an accurately studious affinity for the pop of Warhol and irony of Banksy alongside polished versions of wildstyle and more modern graffiti lettering and loose splattering. The larger cross section of New Yorkers sampled from that pot as well as the myriad influences on the streets today including illustration, photography, geometric patterning, cartoon, and collage.

BSA spoke with the brothers as they were installing the New York show:

Brooklyn Street Art: So would you say this is primarily about cultural exchange?
Sot: Yeah, I mean the fact that there hasn’t been any relationship between Iran and the US, but this is totally about the relationship between the artists.

brooklyn-street-art-ill-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s Ill in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What do you think that a viewer at the New York show is going to realize when seeing these works?
Icy: First of all they are going to get to know the artists because they are not familiar with their work and haven’t had a chance to know them before. Also they will realize the fact that there are people in Iran doing this kind of art. It is underground, it is just a small scene, but still.
Sot: It’s a good chance for these artists to show their work.

Brooklyn Street Art: Would you say that these artists are taking real risks by showing their work like this?
Icy: I mean, for the street artists there everything is risky, putting works in the street… like having the show is stressful but luckily the people there have gotten their permits and stuff.

brooklyn-street-art-cave2-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s Cave 2 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Who did they have to ask for permission and what did they need to see?
Sot: It’s hard to translate the name but it’s an official organization
Icy: They have to check out the work and see it and they have to approve it.
Sot: Yes they have to do that for everything – for music performance or for art exhibits or anything, they have to go through this – but for this show it is at one of the oldest galleries in Iran so.

The guys related some of the exigencies of putting a show like this together and Sot talks about one of the artists who is an old classmate of his who doesn’t use the tools of communication that so many of his peers in the west would. “He doesn’t have a website for his art and he’s not on Facebook,” says Sot, “so I was like Facebook messaging another friend to ask him to call this guy for me and ask him to be in the show, and then to ask him for the status of shipping of his piece or information about the piece.”

brooklyn-street-art-hoshvar-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s Hoshvar in “Tehran to New York”(photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: So with the Superman and the Warholian Marilyn, I like this idea where there is a mixing of the two cultures together quite literally.
Sot: Yeah, for these shows there wasn’t really a theme but some artists, because they knew where they were going to be displayed made specific choices to communicate something. Like Gilf! wanted to write something in farsi so she picked the words “I am You” in farsi.
Icy: And El Sol 25 did the words “Iran So Far Away”, which is inspired by the song. (by Flock of Seagulls)

brooklyn-street-art-mad-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s MAD in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: What is one of your favorite pieces here, or rather, which one would you like to talk about?
Icy: I like them when they talk about social issues.
Sot: Like this one with CK1 – it has all these pictures from newspaper with the Shah

Brooklyn Street Art: They look like they may have been around ’81 or ’82…
Icy: Yeah, then the hijab came after the revolution and then the women had to wear the hijab.
Brooklyn Street Art: So before then they didn’t have to wear it?
Sot: No, before that they could choose.
Icy: Then they had no choice.
Sot: And this one with Superman and on his chest it says “love” in farsi and there is Tehran in the background and there is the freedom tower in the background?

Brooklyn Street Art: Is that called “Freedom Tower”?
Sot: Yeah, or Liberty Tower, it’s like the symbol of Tehran. It’s like you have the Statue of Liberty here and that’s the freedom tower in Iran.

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-9

Iran’s CK1 in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-FRZ-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

Iran’s FRZ in “Tehran to New York” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-shb-tehran-to-nyc-jaime-rojo-06-2014-web

A more traditional piece by sh’b varies from the Street Art theme and displays the artistic influence of distinctly Persian origins. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

“NYC TO TEHRAN”

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-8

Tony De Pew, Sonni, Hellbent and Bishop203 (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-6

Gilf! on the wall with Joe Iurato on the pedestal. (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-2

A screened piece by Chris Stain based on a Martha Cooper photo. (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-4

Buttless Supreme and El Sol 25 on the bottom. (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-7

QRST, Cruz, Phetus (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-3

Enzo and Nio, Russell King  and Gilf! (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-1

Cern and Contemporary Adult Music (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

brooklyn-street-art-tehran-to-nyc-06-2014-web-5

The mood in Tehran (photo © Rana Ahmadi)

The Exhibition NYC to Tehran is currently on view at Seyhoun Art Gallery in Tehran, Iran. Click HERE for more details. The sister exhibition from Tehran to NYC is now closed.

 

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 

 

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
New High-Water Mark for Street Art at Fairs for Armory Week

New High-Water Mark for Street Art at Fairs for Armory Week

This year represents a high-water mark for current Street Artists being represented at the New York fairs if what we have just seen over the last couple of days is any indication. For those who have been following the trajectory of the new kids we’ve been talking about for the last decade, the room is rather getting a lot more crowded. Only a handful of years ago names that produced blank stares at your forehead and a little sniff of dismissal are garnering an extra lingering moment near the canvas and snap of the cellphone pic, complimentary champagne flute in hand.

brooklyn-street-art-hellebent-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Hellbent at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With the gusts of wind provided by a couple of recent auctions, optimism about an up-turning economy, and even the Banksy one-month residency, it is not hard to imagine that we have some “overnight” stars in the midst of this constellation, but it is really anyone’s guess.

While we are certainly aware of it, we don’t dedicate too much ink to the commercial aspect of the Street Art scene, preferring to learn the lingua franca of these artists who have developed their narrative and visual style before our eyes, to celebrate experimentation, the creative spirit, and to give a pedestrian view of the street without being pedestrian.

But just as neighborhoods like Bushwick in Brooklyn, El Raval in Barcelona, LA’s downtown Arts District, and parts of London, Berlin, and Paris have been transforming by gentrification, we would be remiss if we didn’t note the more frequent raising of commercial eyebrows all around us when the topic turns to Street Art. It’s not a fever pitch, but can it be far off? There is already a solid first tier that everyone can name – and the stratification is taking shape below it.

brooklyn-street-art-herb-smith-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Herb Smith (previously Veng RWK) at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Buffeted by blossoming sales of works by early 2000s Street Artists and the burgeoning of lifestyle companies now appropriating this cultural wealth and transforming it into “content” that helpfully couriers all manner of merch from spirits to soda, sneakers, and electronic smoking devices, we are looking for our seat belts as there a major shift in popular acceptance and critical embracing of 21st century Street Artists up ahead.

As for the streets, the flood is going to continue. Street Art is Dead? Yes, we’ve been hearing this since 2002…

Here’s a brief non-specific and uneven survey of only some work showing this weekend by current or former Street Artists and graffiti writers – perhaps a third of what you can see in the New York fairs and satellite galleries.

brooklyn-street-art-rubin-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Rubin at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-fumero-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Fumero at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-gilf-icy-sot-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Gilf! and Icy & Sot at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-lemour-supreme-ekg-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

EKG and Lamour Supreme at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-alice-mizrachi-jon-burgerman-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Alice Mizrachi and Jon Burgerman at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-chris-stain-rubin-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Chris Stain and Rubin at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-see-one-chuck-berrett-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

See One and Chuck Berrett/Nicole Salgar of Cargo Collective at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-JMR-cake-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

JMR and Cake at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-vicki-dasilva-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Vicki DaSilva at Fountain (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-pose-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Pose at Volta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-vinz-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Vinz at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-amanda-marie-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Amanda Marie at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tip-toe-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Tip Toe at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-el-mac-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

El Mac at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-know-hope-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Know Hope at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-cope-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Cope at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-aakash-nihalini-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Aakash Nihalini at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-banksy-jaime-rojo-03-14-web

Banksy and friends at Scope (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Street Artists At The Fairs For Armory Week NYC 2014

Street Artists At The Fairs For Armory Week NYC 2014

BSA-At-the-fairs-2014

Not quite spring, the Art Fairs are arriving in New York ahead of the tulips. We strolled the impossibly long aisles and peered into the booths to find the folks who have at other times been called “Street Artists”. This weekend they’ll be fine artists, and the list is quite a bit longer than years past as the professionalization of the street continues.

Shows like the Armory, Scope, Volta, and Fountain are good testing venues to see the commercial viability for many of these artists and some have foregone representation – preferring to foot the bill on their own. Since walking the streets to see their work requires multiple layers and hats and gloves – traipsing through the fairs can be far preferable than dirty old Brooklyn streets. It’s also nice to see how some of these folks look in a tie or a blouse – or even just hit a comb. Here below we include some possible gems for you to hunt down.

THE ARMORY SHOW

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Armory-2014-740

Pace Prints

How & Nosm at Pier 92

brooklyn-street-art-how-nosm-slice-every-all-pace-prints-03-14-web-2

How Nosm at Pace Prints (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For The Armory Show Art Fair location, dates, times, booth numbers, etc… click HERE

SCOPE ART FAIR

brooklyn-street-art-SCOPE-NY-banner-03-14-web-2

Andenken Gallery

Amanda Marie, VINZ

brooklyn-street-art-Andenken-Gallery-740-VINZ-03-14-web-2

Vinz at Andenken Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

Black Book Gallery

Judith Supine, WK Interact, Ben Eine, Cycle, James Reka, Cope2, Indie184, Shepard Fairey

brooklyn-street-art-judith-supine-black-book-03-14-web-2

Judith Supine at Black Book Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

C.A.V.E. Gallery

PEETA, Pure Evil

brooklyn-street-art-pure-evil--03-14-web-2

Pure Evil at C.A.V.E. Gallery (image courtesy the artist)

Fabien Castanier Gallery

Speedy Graphito, Mark Kenkins, RERO

brooklyn-street-art-how-speedy-graphito-copyright-Fabien-Castanier-Gallery-03-14-web

Speedy Graphito at Fabien Castanier Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

Fuchs Projects

Rafael Fuchs, Aakash Nihalini, Skewville

brooklyn-street-art-fuchs-skewville-03-14-web-2

Skewville at Fuchs Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Krause Gallery

Ben Frost, Hanksy

brooklyn-street-art-ben-frost-krause-gallery-scope-03-14-web-2

Ben Frost at Krause Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

Moniker Projects

Beau Stanton, Ben Eine, David Shillinglaw, Greg Lamarche, Jon Burgerman, Pam Glew, Ron English,  Muffinhead, Keira Rathbone.

brooklyn-street-art-shillinglaw-moniker-scope-03-14-web-2

David Shillinglaw at Moniker Projects (image courtesy the artist)

Natalie Kates Projects

Skullphone, Swoon

brooklyn-street-art-skullphone-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-03-14-web-2

Skullphone at Natalie Kates Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

ThinkSpace Gallery

Know Hope

brooklyn-street-art-know-hope-copyright-jaime-rojo-03-14-web-2

Know Hope at ThinkSpace (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vertical Gallery

Stormie Mills, My Dog Sighs

brooklyn-street-art-stormie-mills-copyright-jaime-rojo-scope-03-14-web-2

Stormie Mills at Vertical Galler (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For SCOPE Art Fair location, dates, times, booth numbers, etc… click HERE

VOLTA NY

brooklyn-street-art-VOLTA-Banner-03-14-web-2

Jonathan LeVine Gallery

POSE

brooklyn-street-art-POSE-Jonathan-Levine-03-14-web-2

Pose at Jonathan LeVine Gallery (image courtesy the artist)

For VOLTA NY Art Fair location, dates, times and booth numbers, etc… click HERE

FOUNTAIN ART FAIR

brooklyn-street-art-FOUNTAIN-banner-03-14-web-2

Fumeroism, Jay Shells, Leon Reid IV, Vicki DaSilva are all showing at Fountain this year

brooklyn-street-art-vicki-da-silva-03-14-web-2

Vicki DaSilva at Fountain (image courtesy the artist)

brooklyn-street-art-Fumero-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-03-14-web-2

Fumero at Fountain (image © Jaime Rojo)

Urban Folk Art

Adam Suerte

brooklyn-street-art-copyright-Adam-Suerte-Urban-Folk-Art-03-14-web-2

Adam Suerte (courtesy Urban Folk Art)

Street Art Installation curated by Mighty Tanaka

Alex Emmert will be curating the Street Art Installation and he has invited Chris Stain, Alice Mizrachi, Skewville, Cake, Chris RWK, Joe Iurato, Rubin, EKG, Gilf!, Omen and LNY.

brooklyn-street-art-rubin-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-03-14-web-2

Rubin will be part of the installation of Street Artists at Fountain Art Fair (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For Fountain Art Fair location, dates, times, etc…click HERE

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
“Outdoor Gallery” Surveys Current Street Art Scene in NYC

“Outdoor Gallery” Surveys Current Street Art Scene in NYC

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-8

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin

The outdoor gallery is the one we visit most and NYC is always front and center in our heart even as we branched out to about 100 other cities and towns last year.  Outdoor Gallery – New York City is also the name of the brand new book by photographer and writer Yoav Litvin, who has spent the last couple of years shooting New York streets and meeting many of the artists who make the painting and wheat pasting that characterizes the class of 2014.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-1

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by Chris Stain.

Published by Ginko Press, the large 235 page hardcover features nearly 50 street artists / graffiti artists whose work you see here regularly (with the exception of two or three) along with comments and observations from the artists about their practice, their experiences, and the current Street Art scene primarily in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

When Yoav told us of his hope to publish a book last year we offered whatever advice we could – but primarily we advised him to stick to his vision and not to let anyone discourage him. A true fan of the scene, he has worked tirelessly to do just that and now he can share with you a personal survey and record of many of the artists who are getting up today in New York.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-2

Outdoor Gallery. New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by Joe Iurato.

Outdoor Gallery – New York City grew organically to embody my process of exploration and discovery on the streets of New York City. It is a creation that was born out of love for New York City streets and their people, and focuses on artists as leaders with a unique and necessary role in a society that aspires for freedom and change,” says Litvin in his introduction, and throughout the book you can sense the respect he has for the art and the dedication he has put into this project.

Careful to let the artists speak for themselves, he presents their work without commentary and with ample space given for expression. Using primarily his own photos, it is carefully edited and presented as an uncluttered and measured overview of each artists work.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-3

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by Jilly Ballistic.

For us it is a proud moment to see someone’s dream realized after so much effort and dogged determination – especially in a scene whose challenges we are well familiar with.  No one knows how hard it is to make something happen unless they do it themselves. So congratulations to Yoav for sticking to his vision and having the fortitude to finish this and thanks to him on the behalf of the artists whom he is helping to receive recognition for their work as well.

To that end, you are invited to the big launch party this Saturday at 17 Frost in Williamsburg. We’ll be there and we hope you can make it out for a great New York Street Art family reunion. You can’t miss the entrance, it’s been newly smashed by El Sol 25, Bishop 203, Royce and some other people we can’t remember right now but who will remind us as soon as this goes up ; ) .

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-4

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by Gilf!

You can find out more about it on the Facebook Event Page, but we understand there will be a newly debuted video from Dega Films, a special tribute to Army of One, and a full show of new works from many of the artists in the book, including;

Adam Dare, Alice Mizrachi, Army of One / JC2, Astrodub, ASVP, Billy Mode, Bisho203, Bunny M, Cern, Chris RWK, Chris Stain, Cope2, Dain, Dirty Bandits, El Sol 25, Elle Deadsex, Enzo and Nio, Free5, Fumero, Gaia, Gilf!, Hellbent, Icy and Sot, Indie 184, Jilly Ballistic, Joe Iurato, Kram, Lillian Lorraine, LNY (Lunar New Year), Miyok, ND’A, OCMC, OverUnder, Phetus88, QRST, Russell King, Shin Shin, Shiro, Sofia Maldonaldo, The Yok, Toofly, and Veng RWK.

 

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-5

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by Icy & Sot.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-6

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by Hellbent.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-7

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Art by QRST.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-9

Outdoor Gallery – New York City by Yoav Litvin. Front and back cover art by Bishop203, LNY, Alice Mizrachi, QRST, Gilf!, Cern and Icy & Sot.

Below is a look at behind-the-scenes of the making of the mural for the cover of the book.

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-10

Bishop 203. (photo © Yoav Litvin)

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-11

Icy & Sot balancing a stencil. (photo © Yoav Litvin)

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-12

Taking a step back to assess the progress. (photo © Yoav Litvin)

brooklyn-street-art-yoav-litvin-02-14-web-13

The final piece. (photo © Yoav Litvin)

Outdoor Gallery – New York City will be launched in conjunction with an art exhibition this Saturday, February 22nd at 17 Frost Art Space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Click HERE for more details.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
Please follow and like us:
Read more
#CheckYourSelfie, A New Online Project from Gilf!

#CheckYourSelfie, A New Online Project from Gilf!

Using Social and a Self-Pic to Start a Conversation with You

Street Artist Gilf! has been developing her work the last few months in a more conceptual direction and diversifying from straight paint on a wall. Her new online project incorporates photography, activism, online conversation, and the pinnacle of personal image promotion right now, the selfie.

And she’s hoping you’ll send her yours right now. It’s Saturday, what else is going on, laundry?

Also, you could change the world.

For Gilf! the heralded phone self portrait is more than just a way to show off your beauty mark or your biceps, it can be a way to open a conversation about a topic you care about. “This is an opportunity for people to connect with friends to discuss and brainstorm a cause or an important issue,” she says of the new art project she calls #Checkyourselfie.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_GILF-jan2014

Gilf! submits her own #checkyourselfie (© Gilf!)

As if you weren’t already fixing your hair and getting ready to snap, she’s sweetening the deal by offering to give you one of her prints from her 5-selfie series that she’s releasing each day next week starting Monday.  “The winner will be decided on my perception of the image’s ability to facilitate dialog, its composition, and of course the level of creativity that went into it,” she says, and already she’s gotten a few that are stretching the selfie concept into personally artful directions.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_xoaoart-jan2014

See a full discussion sparked by this image from xoaoart, “Okay, so I’m usually not one to do this but I love me some @gilfnyc and I’m always up for thought provoking discussion #checkyourselfie” (http://web.stagram.com/n/xoaoart/ )

Be extreme if you want to be, suggests Gilf!, and tell everybody what you care about, and this Street Artist who has always loved social, political, and environmental activism says she’ll promote you even more. “You’ll be surprised at how many people feel the same way you do, and how good it feels to get your opinion about something important out among like-minded people,” she says.

Check the end of this post for details on how to #Checkyourselfie, but first here’s Gilf! speaks with us about her project.

Brooklyn Street Art: Judy Pearshall from the Oxford Dictionary observed that the act of taking a selfie is an “essentially narcissistic enterprise.” Do you suppose the desire to share an image of your physical appearance is something more than that?

Gilf!: Absolutely. To share a selfie is a brave yet strategic move. Ultimately we don’t share things on social media if we are not seeking others’ opinions or approval. Often times I see selfies as requests for validation. As a society we are so inundated with the media telling us how we need to be thinner, hotter, and more stylish, so of course we’re all a bit insecure.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_halopigg-jan2014

A submission to #Checkyourselfie from @Halopigg on Instagram. “I wanted to challenge myself with this photo, which is why this photo and caption were made entirely by me using my feet and toes,” he says (image © Halopigg)

Every time we get a “like” on our photos we are rewarded with a jolt of dopamine. This can make us feel better about ourselves, but it’s short lived like any other drug. It doesn’t contribute to true self worth- but actually, in my opinion, creates further need for validation from our peers. I think the need for acceptance has become highly integrated in self esteem since the advent of social media. Maybe this isn’t new but it’s far more visible and intense than ever before.

Brooklyn Street Art: Television and advertising are often accused of defining beauty standards. Would you say that the “selfie” phenomenon is redefining those standards or otherwise altering them?

Gilf!: I see the selfie as an amazing tool that can redefine our understanding of beauty. The majority of the selfies I see are reinforcing the media’s beauty standards, but it doesn’t have to stay that way. I think it’s rare to see a selfie that blatantly shows and accepts a person’s flaws. We need more of these. It’s an incredible way to use the selfie as a source of empowerment. We can choose to hold ourselves up to the unrealistic, photoshopped version of beauty or accept and own our perceived flaws as part of what makes each of us unique and beautiful.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_unattributed-via-GILF-jan2014

“So #checkyourselfie is about using a selfie to create constructive dialog about things other than the self,” says Gilf!, “I don’t know how constructive this one is as an example- but it sure made me laugh!” (unattributed photo from Gilf!’s Tumblr on Jan 31)

Brooklyn Street Art: With more than 30 million Instagram photos carrying the hashtag #selfie, have we all become stars?

Gilf!: I think it’s gotten a little out of hand. It’s one thing to love ourselves, it’s another when we use social media to feed our egos. One of the questions I keep asking myself while working on #checkyourselfie is why do we have such a fascination with the self. Ultimately we can each only control our own self.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_Nancy-Musinguzi-jan2014

A #checkyourselfie from freelance photographer and writer Nancy Musinguzi (© Nancy Musinguzi)

The world and all it’s problems can seem so daunting on an individual level. “What can one person really do?” is a question I often hear. It’s so scary to feel helpless and ineffective. We turn our focus inward, because the self is the one thing we can control. While heavily “connected” with social media, by focusing on the self we can become disempowered, isolated individuals. It has such potential to connect us and create dialog yet social media has largely become a tool to stoke our egos.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_OhCaptain-MyCaptain-jan2014

Use your camera to create frehley: Street Artist Oh Captain My Captain (OCMC) submitted this image for #checkyourselfieOCMCPropaganda)

Brooklyn Street Art: You are using this project as a way to open a conversation – what do you hope we will all talk about?

Gilf!: Social media presents an incredible opportunity to create community and effect change, and I don’t think we’re harnessing its full potential yet. I want to use the selfie to create dialogs about greater issues. I’ll be using the project to discuss issues that I’m interested in like the environment, body image, and how we understand community. What I’m hoping participants will discuss are issues that are important to them. This can be a way to create new connections, bring people together, or motivate a group to actually organize or volunteer together, instead of just saying “someday”.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-checkyourselfie-copyright_cernesto-jan2014

Street Artist Cernesto’s selfie on Instagram for #checkyourselfie (photo © @Cernesto)

<<>>><<<>><><
 
 
How you can participate in #checkyourselfie right now:

To start a conversation, simply tag your image with #checkyourselfie. Your image will appear on Gilf!’s Instagramtumblr, and twitter under her handle @gilfnyc, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/gilfnyc, and her website website: www.gilfnyc.com.  See her website for more details.

<<>>><<<>><><

To see Gilf’s five new images in print you’ll need to go to DUMBO, Brooklyn next Thursday night at Arcilesi Homberg Fine Art . Since the artist is planning to be in attendance you can continue your conversation in person.

 

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA
 
 

 

Please follow and like us:
Read more
Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

Army Of One, Inspiration To Many : Jef Campion

New York’s Street Art and graffiti scene learned this weekend of the passing of one of its artists, Jef Campion, who went by the name of Army of One/ JC2. Jef died at his home in  Yonkers Friday night at the age of 52 and for those who knew him for his physically and personally powerful presence, the news came as a complete surprise.

A New Yorker through and through, Jef was known as a firefighter and first responder to Ground Zero after the 9/11 attacks who spent more than a month in that recovery effort, as a volunteer who gave a great deal of time and energy to working with charity organizations for children who were very ill, and for being a fine artist, a street artist, and an anti-war activist.

Speaking with many who knew him closely over the last few days, we learned that his days were not always light and he sometimes suffered from PTSD and related issues, but that he considered himself an overcomer and gave support and encouragement to his peers in the art world. We always saw him as a person who was determined to use his art and his creativity as a force for good in the world.  He also knew how to walk the talk.

brooklyn-street-art-army-of-one-jc2-jaime-rojo-01-14-web-3

Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As a Street Artist he was perhaps best known for adapting a photograph by Diane Arbus entitled Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962), and converting it into a sharply graphic anti-war message that he reproduced numerous times in many sizes and mediums to put onto the street. “Army of One” was usually scrawled like a shouting slogan alongside the wheatpaste of the silhouetted image. Sometimes the text was in black and other times it was in a red that matched the dripping red grenade in the boys hand. A startling sight to encounter in a doorway or on a signpost, it was at once a protest and a warning that war is not child’s play.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Diane-Arbus-Boy-Grenade-740wide-Army-of-One-JC2-Jaime-Rojo

On the left, the original Child with Toy Hand Grenade in Central Park, New York City (1962), by Diane Arbus. One right, its adaptation by Street Artist Jef Campion aka Army of One/ JC2 pasted over a collage by Street Artist ShinShin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For Jef it was an effective way to remind us that war invariably damages those who have nothing to do with the fight, some of our most vulnerable and treasured people who suffer from our unspeakable callousness and disregard for life.

When Jef put this work out on the street it wasn’t to get personal fame as much as it was to change minds and hearts. Jef hoped his art could give voice to the voiceless. In recent years his own red-painted hand became as important a symbol of the insanity and brutality of war as any of his work created for the street.

brooklyn-street-art-army-of-one-jc2-jaime-rojo-01-14-web-2

Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our condolences and thoughts and prayers go out to Jef’s family and friends today on Martin Luther King day and in the difficult days ahead. We also send our hopes that they can take comfort in knowing how much of a positive influence he was on many artists and peers, as well as complete strangers and passersby. Following we share with BSA readers remembrances from five people, but we easily could have presented many more.

GILF!
Street Artist and social, political, cultural advocate.

I met Jef during Art Basel Miami in 2011 at Fountain Art Fair. I had been familiar with his street work but was ultimately introduced to him by Samson Contompasis. He immediately went out of his way to include and befriend me, and with a megawatt smile on his face.

Jef reached out to me for a project about a year ago via email. We met up in person and had a lengthy discussion about war, the children at risk, and our ability to facilitate change for these young lives. He was always so focused on how he could help others. You could tell how passionate he was about the destruction of war with his work through his words and through his actions.

He never gave up, was always trying to do more to help, and feared no one. He did all of that while constantly supporting his friends and lending a hand whenever needed. His smiles and laughs were infectious and you couldn’t help but be happy around him. I will be forever grateful to have known such a righteous and honorable soul. His rebel spirit will continue to inspire me as I find ways of coping with this loss.

Of many we are all an Army of One.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Gilf-Jef-Campion-740

“This image was taken a day after we met. He was so welcoming and kind. We were instant friends.” (photo © Gilf)

 

Sinxero (SX)
Fine Grafstract artist, designer and gallery/mural curator based in The Bronx

I first met Jef, aka: “Army of One” at the “Street Artists Unite” exhibit at Dorian Grey Gallery where Jef was showing his art, a body of work and presence that commanded your attention. Jef and I shared a vision where artists could make a difference as “Comrades In Art”. Combining our artistic and business related goals, Jef and I formed “The Army Grows,” (TAG), with him as a resident activist. We expanded our mission to encourage both street & graffiti artists to work together and now TAG is also known as “The Art of Grafstract”.

Jef’s plethora of knowledge was priceless. His street & fine art grind was hard and direct, undiluted.

Why was Jef important to me and the Street Art / Graffiti scene? One day I remember showing up early to one of his many exhibits. Upon arriving Jef said, “let’s take a walk, its still early.” As we walked down Orchard Street, Jef took notice of a pair of gentlemen’s boots in a window display and walked in to ask the salesperson for his size. As we sat and waited for the gentleman to come back Jef and I discussed curating murals, owning your moniker and how to reach out to sponsors in order to build your name up. He told me that sometimes it is better to slow down and take notice of all that’s around you and address things one at a time – a better approach than it’s complete opposite.

I am grateful for having met Jef and having been given the opportunity to see life through his eyes. If anyone could walk a mile in Jef’s boots in the way he gave, embraced and loved as a friend, artist and compassionate human being they would be king for a day.

Jef, you were truly an “Army of One.” In your name, “The Army Grows.”

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Sinxero-and-Jef-Campion-740

Jef Campion (Army of One/ JC2) and Sinxero (photo © Sinxero)

Fumero
Street artist and fine artist.

I first noticed Army of One back in 2009 with his use of the Diane Arbus’ photo, ‘Grenade Boy’ and another graphic that followed, ‘The Bride of War’. As I walked the city streets after midnight, I always ‘ran into’ Jef (AoO) everywhere I went. I appreciated the image. It caught my attention because it had a gritty, NYC quality about it.

As a street artist, you usually meet others through their work first and later you actually wind up meeting the artist in person. I met Jef during the summer of 2010 at an upstate New York street art event. The moment we exchanged stickers, we already had a good sense of what the person was about. His message emphasized ‘peace’ and mine was about ‘family’.

Soon after that we met again to put some art after dark up in lower Manhattan and from that point on we became friends. In the years that followed we both participated in the same events here in NY and at Art Basel, Miami. Our greatest collaboration was for the XCIA’s Street Art Project book.

Army of One’s social commentary about needless wars that produce needless bloodshed was the central idea behind his message. I respected that notion and also that this message was everywhere. I admired his passion to spread his art and the enjoyment he received from it. Jef was a serious artist and if you knew him you understood why he was compelled to promote his idea to the public. His left a profound statement for us to never forget that each and every one of us has the freedom to be who and what we want to be and to live life accordingly and although we have different colors of our skin we are all ‘red’ inside and that makes us all the same; human.

I’m thankful to express my words about my friend. He will be missed. He was a force to be reckoned with, he was truly an army of one.

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Fumero-Jef-Campion-740

Fumero and Jef Campion, Army of One/ JC2 (photo © Fumero)

OCMC (Oh Captain My Captain)
Street artist and fine artist.

Jef was an important figure to me personally in the scene, as he was the first street artist I ever met. I had been doing it a while and saw his work everywhere. By a fluke the first art show I appeared in was a benefit show he was also in and we met there. It was exciting to meet someone who did what I did, and even more so because Jef was incredibly gracious and encouraging. It wound up we were from the same neighborhood so we shared a bond over that. From then on we were friends.

For the scene itself, I feel Jef was a very important voice. There is naturally a lot of ego in street art and graffiti. Jef’s art was about the meaning, not the advertising. He felt deeply for his cause and it was loud and clear in his artwork. Loud like that grenade of his.

Many of the posts I have seen since his passing describe him as a “great guy”, and how kind he was… And it’s very much the truth. Jef was a truly great man. His job involved saving peoples lives, his spare time involved helping kids with cancer, and his art involved his deep belief that war is never the answer. He wasn’t just a great voice out in the streets, his was a great voice for the world.

There’s a show coming we were both going to be in, and I am going to miss the way he would light up when he’d see me with an “OCMC!” and the hug that would follow… It always felt great to stand in the light Jef shined on you. But I am hardly unique there, because he made everyone feel like that light. That’s what I’ll remember most.

 

Samson Contompasis
Former gallery owner and artist

I worked with Jef at a few different points to help his studio work reach more people. I found Jef the same way many other people did, by his relentless coverage of the streets. When I met him for the first time the scope of this man expanded exponentially. Upon inviting me to his studio it was apparent that this street artist was much more then that; he was a fine artist of extraordinary measure. Whether it was his handwritten accounts of his life scrawled on vellum, his giant assemblages of nails, raw wood, and pieces of the city strewn about them, or his neon accompanied statements of original sin on charred wood that he tore out of a fire with his bare hands, I felt that his studio was a doorway into his soul and everything was brimming with emotion from the life he led.

One of the most important parts of Jef’s street work was that he had a message. He wasn’t just writing his name on a wall for himself or a crew…he was writing it for a greater purpose. To spread a message of peace. His intention was for that of a better world . There was a moment during a show where a woman was offended by a piece of his…. and I remember that at one point he simply stated, “Walk a mile in my shoes” We can never pretend to know the weight of someone’s soul….but if I was a betting man he would be giving the sun a run for its money.

He spoke to us with full lungs and a determined spirit in everything he did. He did not have the easiest life, having dealt with hard addictions growing up and PTSD later in life but it never kept this man from smiling. He was one of the only people that could effectively hug me back.

Jef, my sorrow is deep, but I know you’ve already been through hell and you will be shaking Gods hand with red paint. You will be always there and forever missed.

 

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Samson-Contompasis-red-hand-Jef-Campion-Jan-2014-740

“It is my tribute letting him know he is in our hearts and minds, says Samson of this new self portrait.” (photo © Samson Contompasis)

Samson also shares with us a poem that Jef wrote, from an installation named “Sanctuary”.

Atrophy

I’m awake now

I believe in fate
I believe suicide would not have been the answer.
I believe the drugs were not a deterrent but a lesson
a task
a journey

I believe Central Park in late May
Sitting on the bench in East Hampton and watching the ocean

Solitude

Chet Baker on a rainy Sunday afternoon
Beat cultures
Bohemian lifestyles

I believe Miles Davis
And Coltrane
Tom Waits will never die

The human form Vine charcoal and a large canvas
Jose Guadalupe Posada Francis Bacon
Brie

The Hudson River right outside Irvington NY
Baja Mexico Ice cold beer, In the shade of a palm tree
Laguna Beach at 11am Venice beach at 6pm New York City 24/7

Rene’s trust
Mimma’s eyes
Joanne’s soul
My grandparents who without I never survive this mess

I believe in a partner who can love you with every cell in their body.

Self inflicted pain is not the answer my friend

You’re going to suffer You’re going to bleed You’re going to fall

You’re going to die

I’m awake

Now.

~ Jef Campion

brooklyn-street-art-army-of-one-jc2-jaime-rojo-01-14-web-1

Army Of One AKA JC2 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Correction: An earlier posting listed Campion’s home as the Bronx. It was changed to Yonkers.

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please follow and like us:
Read more