All posts tagged: Faring Purth

Faring Purth and “Grace” in Forest Park (Chicago)

Faring Purth and “Grace” in Forest Park (Chicago)

“A woman’s guess is much more accurate than a man’s certainty.”
~Rudyard Kipling

We mention this Kipling quote in this description of Street Artist Faring Purth because

a.) she often seems like she’s plucked out of a traveling adventure from a Kipling tale,
b.) her instincts for creating new pieces are frequently on-point and a bit happenstance and magic, and
c.) we know enough men who are resolutely, absolutely certain of their opinion who are also wrong on a semi-regular basis. Like Uncle Marty, for example, and that guy Hakeem at the bagel store on Bedford Avenue who is always pontificating about the METS or the right way to barbecue a steak…but let’s not get into that.

Faring Purth. Grace. Forest Park, Chicago. March 2017. (photo © Faring Purth)

So here Faring Purth is in Chicago just for the weekend and she decides to paint one of her ladies. It was just a quick trip with a friend from St. Louis to visit with a friend for a couple of days; “mostly just to explore and touch surfaces,” she says.

“I wandered on foot from where I was staying, bundled up, head phones echoing, and came across signs that read, ‘I (heart) FP’,” she says, still not really knowing what the abbreviation stood for. In fact, as we have learned, she felt “like Alice down the rabbit hole – no idea of exactly where I was.”

So how did this painting happen? Oh, you know, people you meet in your travels…

Faring Purth. Grace. Forest Park, Chicago. March 2017. (photo © Faring Purth)

“I then met some community members in a local coffee shop,” who happened to like her artwork and asked her if she’d like to paint a mural. Or as she says,” I was introduced to Forest Park via a small spontaneous mural on the corner of Madison and Circle Avenue.”

The name of the new piece in Forest Park? “Grace.”

“The embrace of this small Chicago community was truly heart warming. Excited to wander back in the near future. Perhaps after Uruguay in May.”

Faring Purth. Grace. Forest Park, Chicago. March 2017. (photo © Faring Purth)

Faring Purth. Grace. Forest Park, Chicago. March 2017. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano, “Chrysalis” in Montevideo

Faring Purth and David De La Mano, “Chrysalis” in Montevideo

Faring Purth and David De La Mano collaborated on a wall in Montevideo, Uruguay last week in a very short period of time. “We have been corresponding for quite some time, years in fact, and the pieces finally fell into place for us to cross paths,” Faring tells us, and surprisingly her mysterious, somewhat mummy-like Chrysalis character came together in only half of an office work day.

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

De La Mano’s silhouetted forms bended and leaned organically nearby, mimicking the shadows of the bare branches and shadows here at Joaquín Suárez y Venancio Benavidez. Are they mere puppets controlled by the master, or are they the roots that give her sustenance and strength?

“I am thrilled to say creating with David was incredibly easy & natural. We met, shook hands, did a little bow to one another, and got to work. No plans ~ just a white wall and two artists kneading away, through the shadows of that incredible Uruguayan sunset.”

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

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Faring Purth and David De La Mano “Chrysalis”. Collaboration mural in progress in Montevideo, Uruguay. (photo © David De La Mano)

Our thanks to David for sharing his images here with BSA readers.

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Faring Purth “As in the Light of Marielle”

Faring Purth “As in the Light of Marielle”

Faring Purth is taking this one lying down in Westville, New Haven Connecticut on a long wall with Marielle. The 150 x 12 foot figure featured in “As in the Light of Marielle” was just completed and feted with an evening celebration that featured light artist Raven Fox, whom Faring says provided “breathtaking illuminations” overlaying her painted figure.

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Faring Purth. New Haven, CT. June 2016. (photo © Mark Jankowski)

Stretching luxuriously from fingertip to pointed toe along the length of a parking lot in a lushly greened neighborhood, the wall was completed as a result of of Farings’ involvement with a local community arts group, the Westville Village Renaissance Alliance.

Seeing the slumber of Marielle and her heavily lidded eyes, we are reminded of this Shakespeare Sonnet XXVII

“WEARY with toil, I haste me to my bed

The dear repose for limbs with travel tired;

But then begins a journey in my head

To work my mind, when body’s work’s expired:”

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Faring Purth. New Haven, CT. June 2016. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. New Haven, CT. June 2016. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. New Haven, CT. June 2016. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. New Haven, CT. June 2016. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. New Haven, CT. June 2016. (photo © Mark Jankowski)

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen Bed Stuy Collabo: “Cypress, Top Wrung”

Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen Bed Stuy Collabo: “Cypress, Top Wrung”

The dynamics of collaborations between artists are often informative, even revelatory to the viewers as well as the artists. By deliberately casting your creative lot with that of another you are taking a bit of a risk, experimenting with your own conceptions, responding alongside and in tandem with the style and vision of your partner.

Sometimes it is symbiotic, like Warhol with Basquiat. Or hilariously stunning, like Christopher Walken dancing to Fat Boy Slim. More recently the reviews were awfully mixed with the performance art collaboration of Jay Z and Marina Abramovic.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Today on a windy Brooklyn roof we look at a fresh collaboration with Oakland’s Faring Purth and Rochester’s Thievin’ Stephen, and we wonder how it will play to the J train audience who pass by it in Brooklyn’s Bedstuy neighborhood.

Purth travels the country in service to her nearly spiritual in-the-moment musings, her willow-limbed figures ephemeral and hash-marked, comporting themselves outside of realism. The surety of a knife-cut line ensures that stencil-wielding Stephen would not be as on-the-fly when spraying out a portrait, even that of a surrealistic frog sponge being squeezed by his main lady.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We spoke with the artists to get their take on the collaborative experience and we learned that despite their stylistic differences the creative partnership was strengthened by “Cypress, Top Wrung” and by facing the challenges of painting outdoors in Brooklyn during January.

Brooklyn Street Art: How did the collaboration come about?

Faring Purth: We met a few years back during the 2013 Wall\Therapy festival in Rochester, New York.  We formed a very unusual close bond after a crazy week of creating – and subsequently surviving a chemical fire on the rooftop of an abandoned building where we were working with a few other artists.  Since then, we have adopted each other as family, becoming very familiar with each other’s work. Collaborating was a natural progression to that.

Thievin’ Stephen: Whenever Faring is back in Rochester we make it a habit to link up, and I’ll take her to paint in one of my favorite abandoned spots. We used to explore together and do separate pieces, but after we had fun on a quick collabo this fall in the abandoned Rochester subway, the next logical step was to work together on a bigger wall. Our schedules lined up, so we decided to take advantage of the bizarre January heat wave and meet in Brooklyn

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faring Purth: It’s our first official, large scale collaboration. We tossed around a few different locations and ideas. Brooklyn ultimately won – we both have a particular love for this area. The piece itself developed through dialogue and then through exchanging sketches until a cohesive blueprint was formed. That blueprint was the basis and we are thrilled with how the piece ultimately manifested.

Brooklyn Street Art: Where did the name Cypress come from, and is that the character in the painting?

Faring Purth: It is. While we were completing the work, two friends of mine gave birth to their first child, a beautiful baby girl whom they named Cypress Valentina. The name immediately struck me and resonated as I continued to carve away at this pearl in the freezing cold. I found myself rolling it off my tongue while shivering and clapping my hands together to get the circulation back in my fingers. The elements tested us to say the very least and “Cypress” became a strange mantra for me the following week – helping me feel a little bit stronger and a tiny bit warmer every time I said it.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Thievin’ Stephen: Yeah, Faring usually gives her women a name, and I enjoy using word play related to my imagery

Faring Purth: I ultimately decided the figure in the painting should take the name of her celestial twin.  It’s not every pearl that gets to share their shucking with a human birth. And it’s not every name that carries such profound wisdom. Cypress Valentina is now ten days old.  Cypress, Top Wrung is two days old. I hope one day their paths cross and that they unlock some universal secret not even I know.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The work began immediately after the new year began and that became of certain significance in itself: It’s the first of an epic year to come, the release of an epic year just lived.  This piece exposed me to a very different process than my own and provided me with many tools and lessons going forward. The experience simultaneously tested my body & spirit greatly. By the time the work was actually done, I had massive bruises, battle wounds, & life lessons to show for it.

As for the stylistic juxtaposition of the work & the various narratives the piece inspires, both are open to interpretation and a happy side effect of our familiarity as artists and friends. We knew how to work with and play off of each other’s visions and allow that dialogue to unfold on its own.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: Your styles couldn’t be more different yet the balance and the composition works really well within the context of the piece. Can you talk about your thoughts and experiences creating it.

Faring Purth: “Cypress, Top Wrung” was an incredible learning experience both in the complications of the wall itself and in the personal life that was being lived during its creation. As for me, the two are impossible to separate… One always reflects and reveals elements of the other and in so doing provides me with certain personal epiphanies I needed to have at that moment. Suffice to say, creating Cypress was no different in this respect.

Thievin’ Stephen: My favorite collaborations are those where two friends divergent styles come together so that was the most exciting thing about melding my work with Farings’. My color theory mixed with Faring’s grey-scale compliment each other, and I think that’s what makes this mural feel like the true winter-time creation that it is.

It was fun watching the interplay between my sharpness and her fluidity unfold, and you can see it best where the hand and sponge connect, which was the last thing we did. Waiting for that moment to be done, as we went back and forth getting it right, that felt like a big pay off as it was really the first time our two styles merged into one piece. The wall also benefits from the combination of Faring’s painterly line work with my style of stencilism. I put forty something layers of stencils up on this wall. While our aesthetics are certainly far apart, I think the surreal anatomy that Faring gives her women harmonizes with my impossible creatures.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The finished piece probably means quite different things to Faring and me, and I think that makes it a more intriguing creation for the viewer.

It’s always great to be surrounded by the humanity you encounter in Brooklyn, and Bed Stuy never disappoints. A lot of crazy shit and hilarious things happened during the creation of this wall, but nothing overshadows the roof top experience. The elevated train line of the J right behind me was a nice inspiration, along with busy-ass Broadway directly below. You know it’s a memory when you have to put rock salt under your ladders! Being at the top of a ladder on the very corner of a roof top definitely attracts attention. MTA construction guys thought we were nuts. Maybe we were. I’m happy with the wall, and glad it felt like the good old days.

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth & Thievin’ Stephen “Cypress, Top Wrung”. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The artists would like to thank Cernesto and ArtsOrg for their help.

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Young New Yorkers – A Preview of the Auction Benefitting NYC Youth

Young New Yorkers – A Preview of the Auction Benefitting NYC Youth

Don’t miss this cool auction of work by many of today’s Street Artists on the New York scene, and some other folks you might have heard of!  Young New Yorkers works with 16 and 17 year-old kids who have been caught in the criminal justice system, giving them a second chance. This is your opportunity to support this non-profit organization that is doing good work for your neighbors and our neighborhoods and to add art to your collection.

Here are some brand new shots of pieces that will be available. For a full listing and to bid on the auction progress online, click here on Paddle8.

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Olek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We had the opportunity to speak with Rachel Barnard, Executive Director and Co-Founder of Young New Yorkers about the event and their programs. We asked her to explain how the programs work.

“Art exercises in our programs are collapsed with restorative justice exercises and they give our participants a way of exploring the impact of their choices while empowering them to make wiser ones in the future. We work with photography, video, collage and illustration. More importantly, in the second half of the program art allows our participant’s to step into their own leadership and self expression,” she explains.

As the participants explore their creativity, they also examine it through a greater lens. “They explore a social issue that is important to them and develop a public art project around that. This is then presented at the final exhibition – one which the criminal court judges, acting district attorneys, social workers and other members of the criminal justice system, attend. It’s a way for everyone to re-meet our extraordinary participants as more than just their rap sheets. So in this way we use art to meet our main goal; which is to empower our young New Yorkers to transform the criminal justice system through their own creative voices.”

Here are some of the pieces that will be up for auction on April 1st.

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Swoon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Obey . LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mata Ruda (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hellbent (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gaia, LNY and Mata Ruda collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CB23 . Sonni (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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COST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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El Sol 25 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cosbe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Case Ma’Claim (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gilf! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Young New Yorkers provides arts-based programming to court-involved young people. The criminal court gives eligible defendants—all of whom are 16- and 17-year-olds and who in New York are tried as adults—the option to participate in Young New Yorkers rather than do jail time, community service, and have a lifelong criminal record. With the ultimate goal of empowering participants to transform the criminal justice system through their own creative voices, all of YNY’s programs culminate with a public exhibition where members of the Criminal Justice System are invited to re-meet the graduates as creative and empowered individuals. In most cases, upon successful completion of the program, the participants’ cases are sealed; so far, 100% of participants have graduated from YNY’s programs.

We look forward to seeing you at Joseph Gross Gallery on April 1 for the Silent Art Auction. Get your advance tickets for only $35 here.

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The 2014 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

The 2014 BSA Year in Images (VIDEO)

Here it is! Our 2014 wrap up featuring favorite images of the year by Brooklyn Street Art’s Jaime Rojo.

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Before our video roundup below here is the Street Art photographer’s favorite of the year: Ask Jaime Rojo, our illustrious editor of photography at BrooklynStreetArt.com , who takes thousands of photographs each year, to respond to a simple question: What was your favorite photo of the year?

For 2014 he has swift response: “The Kara Walker.” Not the art, but the artist posed before her art.

It was an impromptu portrait that he took with his iPhone when the artist unveiled her enormous sculpture at a small gathering of neighborhood locals and former workers of the Domino Sugar Factory, informal enough that Rojo didn’t even have his professional camera with him. Aside from aesthetics for him it was the fact that the artist herself was so approachable and agreed to pose for him briefly, even allowing him to direct her just a bit to get the shot, that made an imprint on his mind and heart.

Of course the sculpture is gone and so is the building that was housing it for that matter – the large-scale public project presented by Creative Time was occupying this space as the last act before its destruction. The artist herself has probably moved on to her next kick-ass project after thousands of people stood in long lines along Kent Avenue in Brooklyn to see her astounding indictment-tribute-bereavement-celebration in a hulking warehouse through May and June.

But the photo remains.

And Rojo feels very lucky to have been able to seize that quintessential New York moment: the artist in silhouette before her own image, her own work, her own outward expression of an inner world. 

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Jaime’s personal favorite of 2014; The site specific Kara Walker in front of her site specific installation at the Domino Sugar Factory in May of this year in Brooklyn. Artist Kara Walker. (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

Now, for the Video

And our holiday gift to you for five years running, here is the brand new video of favorite images of graffiti and Street Art by Brooklyn Street Art’s editor of photography, Jaime Rojo.

Of a few thousand these 129 shots fly smoothly by as a visual survey; a cross section of graffiti, street art, and the resurgence of mural art that continues to take hold. As usual, all manner of art-making is on display as you wander your city’s streets. Also as usual, we prefer the autonomous free-range unsolicited, unsanctioned type of Street Art because that’s what got us hooked as artists, and ultimately, it is the only truly uncensored stuff that has a free spirit and can hold a mirror up to us. But you have to hand it to the muralists – whether “permissioned” or outright commissioned, some people are challenging themselves creatively and still taking risks.

Once again these artists gave us impetus to continue doing what we are doing and above all made us love this city even more and the art and the artists who produce it. We hope you dig it too.

 

Brooklyn Street Art 2014 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo includes the following artists;

2Face, Aakash Nihalani, Adam Fujita, Adnate, Amanda Marie, Andreco, Anthony Lister, Arnaud Montagard, Art is Trash, Ben Eine, Bikismo, Blek Le Rat, Bly, Cake, Caratoes, Case Maclaim, Chris Stain, Cleon Peterson, Clet, Clint Mario, Col Wallnuts, Conor Harrington, Cost, Crummy Gummy, Dain, Dal East, Damien Mitchell, Damon, Dan Witz, Dasic, Don’t Fret, Dot Dot Dot, Eelco Virus, EKG, El Sol 25, Elbow Toe, Etam Cru, Ewok, Faring Purth, Gilf!, Hama Woods, Hellbent, Hiss, Hitnes, HOTTEA, Icy & Sot, Jana & JS, Jason Coatney, Jef Aerosol, Jilly Ballistic, Joe Iurato, JR, Judith Supine, Kaff Eine, Kashink, Krakenkhan, Kuma, Li Hill, LMNOPI, London Kaye, Mais Menos, Mark Samsonovich, Martha Cooper, Maya Hayuk, Miss Me, Mover, Mr. Prvrt, Mr. Toll, Myth, Nenao, Nick Walker, Olek, Paper Skaters, Patty Smith, Pixel Pancho, Poster Boy, Pyramid Oracle, QRST, Rubin 415, Sampsa, Sean 9 Lugo, Sebs, Sego, Seher One, Sexer, Skewville, SmitheOne, Sober, Sonni, Specter, SpY, Square, Stay Fly, Stik, Stikki Peaches, Stikman, Swil, Swoon, Texas, Tilt, Tracy168, Trashbird, Vexta, Vinz, Willow, Wolfe Works, Wolftits, X-O, Zed1.

Read more about Kara Walker in our posting “Kara Walker And Her Sugar Sphinx At The Old Domino Factory”.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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BSA Images Of The Week: 11.02.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 11.02.14

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Marathon Day in NYC today with people running in the streets more than usual, the time clock moved back an hour today, mid-term elections are this Tuesday, and New York’s first ebola patient is feeling a little better.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring 2Face, Aine, Bifido, Caratoes, Cleon Peterson, Dal East, Dee Dee, Esteban Del Valle, Faring Purth, June, Kai June, Sean9Lugo, and Tara McPherson.

Top Image >> Chinese graffiti/Street Art due 2Face have been popping up around NYC and BK for the last few months, including this enormous portrait above of Ai Wei Wei looming large in Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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2Face. A smaller more personal version of it. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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2Face combines their trademark ski mask and pronounced mouth detail with this Van Gogh portrait in a Warholic repetition. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JR (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dal East (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth. “Ru” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Caratoes (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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OK here is what we don’t know about this billboard: The artist’s name. Here is what we know: The billboard is printed, not painted. The same artist who did this one put another one in the Summer with the legend “May The Bridges I Burn Light The Way”. Anyway who didn’t dream of running away at some point in their lives…either solo or with company? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Cleon Peterson. “The Kiss” (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sean 9 Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido. “Immotus ned iners” Caserta, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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June’s new piece for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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June. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kai June (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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This wall by Esteban Del Valle recalls a linotype wheatpaste by Elbowtoe a few years ago. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Aine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Someone who you don’t see often on the street, Tara McPherson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tara McPherson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Domino Sugar Factory. Brooklyn, NY. October, 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Images Of The Week 10.26.14

BSA Images Of The Week 10.26.14

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BSA-Images-Week-Jan2014

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Anser, BustArt, City Kitty, Dasic, Faring Purth, Flood, Gum Shoe, GWAD, Hot Tea, KIN, Labrona, Muse, Never Crew, Nick Walker, One Eye Mickey, and Spok Brillor.

Top Image >> Nick Walker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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MUSE (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic and Spok Brillor collaborating for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic and Spok Brillor collaborating for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dasic and Spok Brillor collaboration for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Anser (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faring Purth. “Annabel”. Rochester, NY. October 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Nela”. Cambridge, MA. October 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Flood. The Tin Man levitates before he sees the Wizard of Oz. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Labrona and GWAD in Toronto, Canada. (photo © Labrona)

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Labrona and KIN in Toronto, Canada. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gum Shoe. Girls! Girls! Girls! (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hot Tea (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bustart, Never Crew and Mohamed Khaled collaboration in Cairo, Egypt at the Swiss Embasy. (photo © Bustart)

“The Nevercrew and I are the first ever people from outside of Egypt who painted in downtown Cairo, which had its rise in Street Art during the last 4 years and during the revolution. The military is back in charge now and the art on the streets came to a stop since you will end up in prison when they stop you (we had permission for this.” – Bustart

 

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One Eye Mickey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Pennsylvania. October 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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Faring Purth Repairs “Cookie”, Somber in St. Louis

Faring Purth Repairs “Cookie”, Somber in St. Louis

Faring Purth just wrapped up another large mural piece in St. Louis and it was a rough ride to the finish.

“Some idiot vandalized the latest work from new-to-St. Louis artist Faring Purth Thursday,” reported The Riverfront Times when the painting in progress was strewn with words common to boys in seventh grade.

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Virginia Harold)

“Her name is Cookie,” say Ms. Purth about the character on the red brick wall. “She was actually tagged the night Mike Brown was shot,” she says of the killing of a young man in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson that has gripped much of the country this month, and she can’t help but see a connection. “A random act of violence across her heart – they always get the soft spots,” she says.

With her customary tact, Purth has repaired her rather somber painting, and we’re happy to share it here with BSA readers. If only all wounds could be healed so quickly.

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Mark Jankowski)

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Mark Jankowski)

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Virginia Harold)

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” Detail. St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” Detail. St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Cookie” St. Louis, MO. August 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

 

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Prime Nipple and Faring Purth in St. Louis

Prime Nipple and Faring Purth in St. Louis

As you pull yourself away from looking at the latest Kardashian thong photo shoot in Thailand, allow us to redirect you to the supremely offensive painted mural that features the outline of a nipple – right next to the “Nails 2000” sign in a St. Louis parking lot.  Perhaps the dollar store has a nipple cover we could purchase? Should we create a Kickstarter?

Artist Faring Purth has again provoked the public discourse with her painting, and we’ll let her tell you in her own words below about the outrage caused by her stylized female figure and its comportment.

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Faring Purth “Prime” St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

Presumably those so offended have also a lawsuit against the City of St. Louis for the horribly offensive titillation of La Rivière by Aristide Maillol – especially her wanton position as she spreads herself across the calm reflective pool by the café in Citygarden. And what about the chopped off woman’s head lying on its side, which this kid seems to have his hands up the nose of?

Listen, we all know about family values, since many of us have families – including the folks who shop at Family Dollar and rent movies at the kiosks there, where the covers of DVDs espouse a healthier image of women in a more wholesome respectful way than this mural, such as the fish net wearing gun toting teens of “Suckerpunch” and the pants-free fetal position of the actress on the cover of “Chained”. Obviously this is the case of an outside artist painting with callous insensitivity and disregard for context and norms of a community.

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Faring Purth “Prime” St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

As she talks about her new painting, Faring says, “It’s been an experience to say the least. Unlike anything I could have expected.”

She writes below:

When I landed in St. Louis, I was quickly put in contact with Jason Deem, a very ambitious and soulful  caretaker to many abandoned properties in the South End of the city. We became fast friends & I went on to create and complete “Prime” on the side of one of his buildings, in the growing Cherokee Art District.

“Prime” caught the attention of the community and local press very quickly. There was unexpected criticism of the vulnerable position of her silhouette and the color of her base coat began a rather shocking conversation of the racist and sexist connotations a few locals interpreted her as bearing. That was very quickly followed by legal threats made by Family Dollar towards Deem’s company, South Side Spaces, based on the mural’s inclusion of a nipple – or rather, the outline of a nipple. It was an outline they claimed was deterring costumers from their business.

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Faring Purth “Prime” St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

The ongoing conversation I have faced recently, regarding female nudity in my work, continues to surprise me. Here I have become, “a controversial artist,” without any intent or desire… whispering “keep soul” while trying my best to stay out of sight.

I’m continuing to take it all in though, as an ongoing story; Acknowledging and reflecting upon how powerful the female form has become (when expressed in public art) in contrast to highly sexualized, scantily clad, women in nationally broadcasted commercials. We are, after all, working within the American culture, where one can still be so desensitized to the soul resting within and reflecting through, our naked skin, nipples and all.

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Faring Purth “Prime” St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

I’m relieved to say that the gratitude and breathlessness of the locals (The murals’ actual audience,) however, greatly outweighed this. The Cherokee community has welcomed me with open arms which has been quite shocking to my system. The experience, overall, has been enlightening, heart-warming, and profoundly touching. We have undoubtably found ourselves in a city eager, hungry, and ready for a dialogue on public expression & the power of contemporary street art; One that I am proud to continue to build upon with the help of a few others.

~Faring Purth

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A shot of the wall before the art went up. St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth “Prime” on the back ground with Jason Deem on top of the truck. St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth “Prime” St. Louis , MO. February 2014. (photo © Jason Deem)

******************

Here are two items from The River Front Times about the before and after commentary while “Prime” was painted.

http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/dailyrft/2014/02/artist_faring_purth_cherokee_mural_nebula.php

http://blogs.riverfronttimes.com/dailyrft/2014/03/photos_faring_purths_monumenta.php

 

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Tagging Somebody’s Painting : Two Walls Interrupted

Tagging Somebody’s Painting : Two Walls Interrupted

Whose voice gets to be heard, and at what cost? It’s an ongoing battle with companies and politicians and citizens fighting to control the radio airwaves, broadcast television, cable providers, news outlets, the Internet. In the conversations that take place on walls in public, the struggle is just as strong and often as vehement. We just aren’t happy when somebody else gets the mic if we can’t grab it and rock it too.

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Maya Hayuk. Detail. Houston Wall, NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A couple of recent visual disruptions of Street Art installations have us thinking about the need to be heard at the expense of an artist’s work mostly because we learned about them both within a few days of each other.  Maybe it was the amount of time and labor that went into the walls, or maybe it’s because it can still be shocking even when you know it goes along with the rules of the street.

It’s always been part of the game; once you put it on the street you must be prepared to let it go, even though you secretly hope it will ride a while. Without doubt it will be buffed, slashed, ripped, taken, crossed out, tagged over, and deteriorated by the elements. If you’re going to play, you might get played and most artists know it and accept it.

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Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall tagged while the artist was in the process of completing her work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Houston Street wall in Manhattan has become a touchstone for many a graffiti and Street Artist over the last few decades thanks to its early beginnings as a canvas for artists like Keith Haring and Kenny Scharf and because as Soho and the Bowery gentrified most available walls disappeared. Now its an honor to get chosen to do your thing on the wall, even as it often provides a stage for the the still breathing battle between some graffiti writers and the rest of the Street Art making world.

Before the latest painter finished her piece last week, Maya Hayuk found her eye crossing color jam geometry had some unexpected collaboration. It’s not the first time Street Artists have been hit by graffiti on this wall; Shepard Fairey’s installation famously got hit so heavily that holes were literally punched into the wall, and Swoon’s community collabo with the Groundswell kids got wrapped with a thick belt of throwies last fall.

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Maya Hayuk. Completed and restored. Houston Wall. Manhattan, NY (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hayuk tried to shrug it off like a champ and uttered a few terse words – but ultimately recovered her poppy patterning and finished the wall victorious.

The new tagging on Hayuk’s wall brought a fussilade of opinions, wizened philosophical observastions and bromides on social media, including this sampling from Instagram:

“Ever since Banksy month these toys having been running rampant” @phillip_s

“We love your work. Forget the jealous ones” @christianguemy

“It sucks that the work wasn’t even finished buuuut you paint something on the street you run the risk of it getting dissed/painted over. End of story” @jaackthebeard

“That’s too bad, but sadly part of the life of a work on the street. Still an absolutely beautiful piece though.” @denverstreetart

“Someone who wants pristine work that persists is always free to paint privately on canvas. The chaos and struggle of the image on the street is part of what makes graffiti awesome. This doesn’t strike me as a spoiler bomber and their throwie looks great on the piece. There are no tears in street art. I know what its like to have someone hit up your piece. You can get good with it, go over it, or move on.” @zoharpublishing

“Wow. What is wrong with people” @erromualdo

“So rude! It’s just takes one a/hole. Looking great anyway” @lisakimlisakim

After completing the new wall and taking a bow, it was hit again. This time harder.

The tags are mostly unreadable to the average public passerby, but it is not those people who these additions are usually speaking to but rather to their peers. So the collaboration is insistent, and in some way perfectly New York.

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Maya Hayuk. Houston Wall tagged once more after the original was restored and completed. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The other sanctioned wall we’ve been thinking about is in Rochester – still in New York State, but close to the border of Canada and near Lake Ontario. Faring Purth took a long time to finish this long limbed lady throughout the autumn months, enduring wayward comments, praise and  sometimes harsh words from this upstate community who liked yelling things out their car (and school bus) windows as they drove by. “I received equally supportive and hostile attention from the public while I was painting her. It was a new experience in more ways than I can count,” she says of the mural that measures 12 feet high by 125 feet long,

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Faring Purth. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

Ultimately the religious contingent who had badgered previous visiting artists in Rochester over perceived thematic threats to family values tagged the face of her “Etty” and put a rudimentary cross in her hand when Faring had gone a way. This was a different sort of diss. It wasn’t a turf battle, it was a theological one and more broadly, it was about community norms. As in the case of Hayuk, the aerosol writer may not even have been addressing the artist or even known who she was. They may have been just striking a victory for the Lord against the evil of the art. Who knows?

Also like Hayuk, Ms. Purth decided to repair her work.

“I fixed her. Or rather, changed her, before hitting the road. She’s different now, it taught me a great deal. So finally, stitches and all, here she is.”

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Faring Purth. Restored. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

There is no real end or summation to this story and these two recent examples are merely a fraction of the works that get tagged or crossed out every day. It is interesting to note that although the motivations were different for the people who defaced the mural art, the aerosol tool used to express their opinion was the same.  Additionally let’s all recognize the sublime irony that we are perilously close to using the word “vandalism” in this article.

But in a way, it is still about having a voice and using it, however edifying or injurious. The continuous cycle of constructive and destructive, adorning and scarring, speaking and silencing, is likely to continue as long as artists create in the street.  As long as people have a need to be heard, they are going to find a way to get their voice out there.

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Faring Purth. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. Restored. Detail. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

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The complete piece Faring Purth for Wall Therapy in Rochester, NY. (photo © Faring Purth)

For more on Faring’s wall please see

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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This article also appears on The Huffington Post
 
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Faring Purth Repairs “Etty” In Rochester for Wall Therapy

Faring Purth Repairs “Etty” In Rochester for Wall Therapy

Street Artist Faring Purth is in many places and none of them as she likes to travel and paint and couch surf a bit – whether its Boston and Rochester or places further away like Uraguay, Argentina and California. Her slim and tapered figures and longly distorted portraits have character and sometimes symbolism, but usually they reflect her personal relationships and imagination.

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Detail. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. December 2013 (photo © Mark Deff)

In contrast with the hyper sensual or sexualized depictions of the female perhaps more common in graffiti or street art, Purth wraps and unwraps the layering and complexities of character in the humans she depicts. She takes her time to create, sometimes painting over days or even weeks in a public space, where the work usually remains untouched by more than the sun, wind, rain, snow.

In the case of Etty, her piece completed in December in Rochester, New York for Wall Therapy, it was damaged almost immediately, and the act caught her by surprise, but maybe it shouldn’t have.

Etty created some waves. As you know, a lot of my work involves blatant female nudity. With the tension Roa’s Sleeping Bears and Faith 47’s piece caused last year, they asked me to refrain from having her completely nude. So, I tried,” she says of the long figure lying (or floating) parallel to the sidewalk in an underpass. In fact the figure is not nude, at least not in any conventional sense, but it bothered someone enough for them to spray religious references in aerosol across the artwork. The birds are unclothed, maybe that was what upset them.

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Detail. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. December 2013 (photo © Mark Deff)

It is not often that you hear of Street Art festivals having problems with the reaction of people to bringing talented globally recognized artists in to adorn walls – in fact developers, city agencies, and arts organizations from Montreal to Lima to Baltimore to Łódź to Paris are now routinely dreaming up similar festival schemes to reinvigorate the cityscape and enliven public spaces.

Rochester for some reason isn’t having it, and this incident is just one more to add to those publicized in the press and privately related among some participants that certain locals aren’t always going to open their arms to you, regardless of your abilities or intentions.

 

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Detail. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. December 2013 (photo © Mark Deff)

Etty was created for Wall Therapy, but unlike most of the other artists involved I took my time with her while going back and forth to Boston and South America,” Purth says of the lengthy period for her installation of Etty which spanned some months. “I received equally supportive and hostile attention from the public while I was painting her. It was a new experience in more ways than I can count,” she says of the mural that measures 12 feet high by 125 feet long, her biggest yet.

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Detail. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. December 2013 (photo © Mark Deff)

Finishing it in early December, she left her temporary home base in Rochester and travelled south to Buenos Aires to do some more painting with Street Artist EVER and to enjoy the warmer weather. But what awaited her when she got back was a surprise. “When I finally returned to Rochester, Etty had been defaced with the word “JESUS” and a red crucifix over her hand- a hand that was, in fact, feeding a bird,” she relates about the discovery, which left her cold.

“It was a profoundly difficult experience for me; That after giving so much to a single piece of work, she could, with one cheap can of Rustoleum, be so grossly wounded.”

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. December 2013 (photo © Lisa Baker)

These are the “rules” of the street of course, and anyone working in the public sphere doing approved or unapproved work fully knows that their labors are up for crossing out, additional commentary, or outright destruction.  So no tears were shed.

Intrepidly, Faring says she made her piece whole again. “I fixed her. Or rather, changed her, before hitting the road. She’s different now,” Faring describes the repairing she did like a surgeon. “(With) stitches and all, here she is.”

So have a look at the progress shots of Etty, the before and the after repair work. As she keeps moving and painting – just now she was in Kentucky – Faring Purth is still thinking about her experiences in the cold north. “It taught me a great deal,” she says.  No word on how Etty looks now, a month later.

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Detail of her defaced face. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. January, 2014 (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Restored. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. January, 2014 (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Detail of her defaced hand. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. January, 2014 (photo © Faring Purth)

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Faring Purth. “Etty” Restored. Wall Therapy, Rochester, NY. January, 2014 (photo © Faring Purth)

 

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