All posts tagged: Exhibitions

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems, Possible Futures at Joshua Liner

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems, Possible Futures at Joshua Liner

Our challenge in the new world may not to fly, but to be grounded.

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone may see the dangers of the modern age, as he contemplates the over saturation of images and messages – traditional symbols and systems neatly sliced away from their original meanings and histories. It is a world of movement and alienation and dislocation coursing with eye candy and violence. For his current show at Joshua Liner he looks to the kinetic art of the recent past (Victor Vasarely, Carlos Cruz-Diez) and pays homage while setting it alight in the ideal promise of a digital future.

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The graffiti writer, Street Artist, mural painter, kinetic sculptor and multi-media fine artist is brave facing the future; embracing his own 90s childhood full of earlier digital fantasies, now transforming the geometry, waffling the levels and oscillating the transparencies and streaming the patterns. Are these laboratories or galleries. Is this a time, or is this timeless.

“In a powerful dynamic, Pantone extends on the walls with its futuristic style with psychedelic accents that evokes Italian Futurism,” says the show description from the gallery. “There are also abstract and stroboscopic touches that articulate black and white geometric shapes that he combines with bright metallic colors, not unlike the Mire, a visual that appears on the television when there is no show.”

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems is currently on view at Joshua Liner Gallery in Manhattan until October 13th

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The “Delusional” Winners…and Honorable Mentions

The “Delusional” Winners…and Honorable Mentions

It was a genuine pleasure to meet so many of the artists last night at Jonathan Levine Gallery for the opening of the Delusional Art Competition. Not surprisingly, the art works were stellar and in many cases exceptional – narrowed down from a field of 1700 or so competitors and selected by Jonathan and a jury of artists and professionals in the field (full disclosure: BSA was on the jury).

About 150 people crowded the gallery space and looked at the 40 finalists, shook hands with artists and posed with them, each making their own assessments about what works were resonating strongest for them and considering the quality of the field in general. There is a great deal to be learned from how artists are seeing things at this moment and about how we all are responding to this work.

First Prize : Win Wallace

Win Wallace. Dancer #5 , 2018. Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JURY’S CHOICE
1st Place – Win Wallace
2nd Place – Tina Lugo
3rd Place – Susannah Martin

HONORABLE MENTIONS
Carly Slade
Rick Newton
Anthony Solano

We are excited to share with you artworks by the winners and honorable mentions from this years’ Delusional Art Competition and to share with you some reactions from the visionary at the vortex, Jonathan Levine.

Second Prize – Tina Lugo

Tina Lugo. I See Myself with You 2016. Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: How was the competition this year compared to last year when you had to do the jury duties all yourself?
Jonathan LeVine: The interesting thing is I was trying to make it this very democratic process and so every year the show is different. So some of the choices that other jurors made I thought, “Oh that makes sense” and with some of the others I thought, “really they chose that?”

But then it just made me realize how different everyone’s tastes are. It was an interesting thing to see. You know I did it last year and I’ve juried stuff before, but because it was my competition I felt differently. It really made me think this year about perceptions, what people like, and what kind of tastes people have.

Third Prize – Susannah Martin

Susannah Martin. Reservoir 2018. Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: What surprised you?
Jonathan LeVine: A lot of people liked stuff I didn’t like.

BSA: Are there trends that you would like to see evaporate?
Jonathan LeVine: I always like to see people not imitating so much from other people. It’s one thing if you see it a little bit. But it is another thing if you see 50 artists doing the same thing, or see blatant rip-offs of other artists. I realize those people probably think that it is okay, or they don’t even realize that they are doing it, or it is flattery, but it is not unique.

Great art to me is unique. It doesn’t have to be fine art, but it needs to be authentic. That really speaks to me. So maybe that is sometimes more challenging to people and its not always necessarily the prettiest. As I continue to do this competition, it’s going to change my perspective I think.

HONORABLE MENTIONS


Carly Slade

Carly Slade. 2046 W Diamond St, Philadelphia, PA 2018 Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Carly Slade. 2046 W Diamond St, Philadelphia, PA 2018 Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Carly Slade. 2046 W Diamond St, Philadelphia, PA 2018 Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rick Newton

Rick Newton. Christopher Columbus Discovering the New World 2016 Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rick Newton. Christopher Columbus Discovering the New World 2016 Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Solano

Anthony Solano. Enough 2017 Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anthony Solano. Urban Arc 2017 (far left), Room to Grow 2017 (bottom) Jonathan LeVine Projects. Delusional. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 


Following are short bios for each of the winners and honorable mentions:

Win Wallace was born in South Carolina and is currently based in Austin, Texas. His recent practice focuses on conte and charcoal portraits, as well as ink drawings. Since high school, Wallace has played in bands and has made posters for bands like the Melvins, Neurosis, Sleep, Helios Creed, Alice Donut, DMBQ, Animal Collective, Scratch Acid, The Dicks and many others. He moved to Austin in the mid 1990’s to study drawing at the University of Texas. His drawings are influenced by history, art history, dreams, nature and pathos.  His works have been exhibited extensively in Texas, throughout the United States and internationally.

Tina Lugo was born and raised in The Bronx, New York.  She studied at the School of Visual Arts where she obtained her BFA and worked with fellow artist, Nicolas Touron.  She’s currently based in Portland, Oregon where she continues to make glass paintings in her Pacific Northwest studio.  Lugo lists as her biggest influence, the Ero Guru Nansensu art movement of Japan—a name comprised of fractions of the English words erotic, grotesque, and nonsense.  The movement focuses on eroticism, sexual corruption, and decadence, all themes salient in Lugo’s work.

Susannah Martin was born in 1964 in New York City.  She studied at New York University and received a SEHNAP scholarship for painting.  Among her most notable teachers there were; John Kacere, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine and Peter Campus.  Following her studies she was self-employed as a muralist and painter of sets for film and photography in New York, Berlin and Frankfurt am Main, where she is currently based.  In 2004, she returned to fine art and is interested in contemporizing the classical subject of the nude in landscape.  Avoiding a falsely idyllic scenario, she focuses on mans´ estrangement from nature. The figures may appear absurd, stripped of all social indicators and possessions, or ecstatic in unexpected reunification with their natural selves.  Her work creates a stage in which mans´ struggle between the two poles of his identity, the natural and the synthetic, may be contemplated.  She’s exhibited throughout Europe and the United States of America.

Carly Slade grew up in “Big sky Alberta”, Canada.  She received her MFA from San Jose State University and her BFA from the Alberta College of Art and Design.  Her work is influenced by her blue-collar roots and plagued by a concern for the precarious nature of the working class.  Using a mix of materials (most often including clay, embroidery, and building supplies), Slade creates dioramas of real places in an unreal perspective.  Slade is currently the Artist in Resident and Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, PA.

Rick Newton was born in West Palm Beach Florida and received a BFA from the Massachusetts College of Art.  Stylistically inspired by scientific textbook illustrations, her presents his personal mythology concerning the future of our world.  By incorporating Cold War imagery interacting with animal life set in surreal landscapes, he supposes a world where there has been a shift in hierarchy.

Anthony Solano was born in Hayward CA, then spent the majority of his childhood in Guadalajara, Mexico.  When he returned to the Bay Area at the age of 13, art became a source of escape and comfort.  In high school he was exposed to painting for the first time, sparking what would become his life’s passion.  Anthony, a self-taught painter, now resides in Portland, Oregon and credits the local landscape for a major creative shift, from abstract painting to the surreal genre that he currently practices.  His work explores today’s environmental conflicts, communicated with vibrant hyper-realistic imagery and thought-provoking storytelling.  A sense of optimism and hope within his work allows the viewer to experience a complex, emotional response.


2nd Annual Delusional Art Competition

Group Exhibition will run from
August 1 – 25, 2018

For more information please go to Jonathan Levine Projects.

 

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Koralie’s Trippy Folk Precision is Harmonized for “Indigo Blood Project”

Koralie’s Trippy Folk Precision is Harmonized for “Indigo Blood Project”

Former French Street Artist Koralie is currently having an extensive solo gallery show of paintings, sculpture and installation with Johnathan LeVine Projects in Jersey City, and her geisha is not hard to find – at least her sunny spirit is here.

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The signature Japanese musical and dance entertainer she brought to the streets in the 2000s could be seen as an early influencer for these precise folkly patterned pieces – along with Russian nesting dolls, eastern European braided maidens, the occasional samuri.

Most striking as you walk through this colliding of patterns, colors, and laser cut texture, is the sense that symmetry can make order of the effusion; a series of rhythmically visual punctuations that almost become audio, almost dance.

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The influences emanate from the childhood fantasies of ornamented cultural traditions including Japanese, Russian, and Hopi, but here they are trippily lifted and re-combined with one another through the ordered graphic vision of Koralie, detached from their heavier origins and free to make new friends.

Koralie.  Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Detail. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Koralie. Indigo Blood Project. Jonathan LeVine Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Koralie “Indigo Blood Project” Solo Exhibition is currently on view at the Jonathan LeVine Projects. Jersey City, NJ.

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Bezt Etam Talks About “Beautiful Mistakes”

Bezt Etam Talks About “Beautiful Mistakes”

A certain unease follows Street Artist Bezt in his creative practice.

“I get bored very fast so I try not to repeat myself.” Not an Achilles heel exactly, this need to experiment and learn, as many artists who are stylistically or thematically in a rut could benefit from that affliction.

In New York recently for a brief show entitled “Beautiful Mistakes” at Spoke Art in cooperation with Thinkspace in Manhattan’s Lower East Side , the Polish neo-realist appears to thrive on trying new things – including this solo career he’s embarked on after seven or so years painting in tandem with Sainer as one half of the very popular Etam Cru.

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. The artist is pictured here looking at his self portrait. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Our styles were really separate but when we started we began to blend in – it was kind of natural. We didn’t talk about it,” he says of the friend he met when they were both art students at University of Łódź.

“There was a point with Sainer when we met we kind of knew – like best friends who kind of understand each other on some level. And the goal was always to do a good piece. It is never about me or about him. It was always to do the best thing on the wall,” he says as he describes a collaborative style that was born out of both artists desire to find a common style and to learn from each other.

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“To do that we had to kind of resign from our own kind of “super styles” and mix them together, if that makes sense. It was a slow process but we got to the point where everyone thought that only one person was painting. But still after so many years we can both see the differences.”

His new canvasses stand still, portraits primarily, with often singular figures caught in a moment contemplating in an eerie series of twilights and meditations. A master of light, he talks about his ongoing challenge to understand it and to reveal structure with it.

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“You use the lights of the first figure as a shadow,” he says of a woman who faces you against a backdrop of ornate patterning, evocative of wall paper from a large old house. “I like to feel the structure of the face and so I like to see the shadow and the lighting on the face, how the face is built.”

He points to a darker figure in front of a brightly heraldic architectural background. “The colors on his shirt and his jacket are the shadows from the background. It’s kind of a trick that I like to do with the painting because the person pops out and blends in at the same time. It’s hard to explain and it is easier to show when I am in the process.

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bezt explains that really he just wanted to paint the background but realizes that many of his fans will also appreciate a figure – which he gets bored with.

Sometimes a portrait is actually the means to an end, rather than the focal point, just so he has the opportunity to paint something new. “For example the painting with the woman and the daughter piece, that one with the house. I wanted to paint the trees! I had a night photo of the trees and I said ‘Okay, I need an idea so I can paint the trees.’

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I did another piece for a big show in Germany that has a big fallen tree. Basically I saw the tree when we were driving and I was with Natalia, my girlfriend, and we just jumped out and I took the photos. And again, I needed to find a concept for a painting where I could include that image of the tree. Sometimes you just want to learn something – to try something new.”

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

He pauses for a moment in front of a painting and you realize that the shape of his head is mirrored in it, and actually the painting is a self portrait. And then you see the small white rat –a moniker that has been occurring in Etam Cru and Bezt pieces over this last half-decade or so.

“It’s like a spirit animal. I don’t like to paint rats. I think that I can’t really paint a good mouse and I’m always trying to do my best. It’s never perfect. There is always something wrong with it. But I add it as a sort of friend or a spirit animal. If the person is alone he always has some company.”

“Years ago when I was painting girls I was always adding a bird, so like the rat is a boy thing. But I have started to mix things and I add the rat to wherever the character is. It’s an animal that is quite small so it doesn’t take much space to add to the piece and it kind of adds some warmth.”

Bezt Etam. “Beautiful Mistakes”. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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How & Nosm Examine “Infinite Moments”, Additional Dimensions

How & Nosm Examine “Infinite Moments”, Additional Dimensions

Events of shock, heartache, wonder and euphoria. Inscribed nearly indelibly into our book of life, we return to them again and again as touchstones, trying to unpack them, redefine them, refine them, blur them, to make some peace with them.

As the twins examine their own perceptions of events that took place or didn’t, time is also introducing subtle shadings that were not there in black and white only a few years ago, and tints and echoes of gentle rose and blood red expand the possible interpretations.

How & Nosm Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For years narratives of troubling skullduggery and thuggery and whimsy, real and imagined, have compounded and built upon themselves. Swirled and whirled concentrically inside these compositions, How & Nosm have invited viewers to go inside their panoptic scenes of mirrored and mutual memories to twist and spin around realities, metaphors, motifs, patterns, symbols, and fictions.

How & Nosm. Hanging by the Thread. Detail. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Depending on your depth of field the paintings could be largely decorative or deeply nested works to be pored over, imagined, interpreted. Presently there may be a loosening of the more strictly rhythmic balance, some departures of asymmetry, some playing with the palette, some relaxing into feelings of beauty for the sake of it.

Ultimately you have these infinite moments because of interpretation and perception and because the brothers generously share with you as much information as you can handle, each an illustrated and implied moment so multidimensional that you can return to it again and see one more aspect every time.

How & Nosm. Hanging by the Thread. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Hanging by the Thread. Detail. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Calm Before the Storm. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Aim for the Moon. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Aim for the Moon. Detail. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Autumn Breeze. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Autumn Breeze. Detail. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Conclusions. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. High Tide . Memorial Day. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm. Infinite Moments Jacob Lewis Gallery. NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

How & Nosm Infinite Moments is currently on view at the Jacob Lewis Gallery in Manhattan. This exhibition closes on April 1st.

 

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OS GEMEOS Dreams Paintings, Sculpture, Music at Lehmann Maupin

OS GEMEOS Dreams Paintings, Sculpture, Music at Lehmann Maupin

Os Gemeos has taken one step closer toward bringing you into their dreams with them.

Is that music you hear?

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

An ongoing lucid travelogue of sorts, the Brazilian twins Otavio and Gustavo have been recording their dual citizenship of this world and a surreal one for their fans for at least a couple of decades. In these site-specific rooms you find multiple characters intersecting with graffiti culture, hip-hop culture, pattern, illustration, fantasy, the sky.

With imaginations captured as boys by the tales and adventures of 1970s and 80s streetwise graffiti kids the brothers’ Brazilian folk homages are stirred in sweetly with escapist fantasies of evading the law, creating your own community, making a famous name for yourself.

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Silence of the Music”, just opened at Lehmann Maupin gallery in New York last Thursday and attended by a thousand or fans, gives you five rooms of eye candy colored in autumn hues and sea foam washes, and periodic carnival-steampunk mechanical movement that surprises and triggers memory.

Everywhere are humorously attenuated yellow figures caught mid-mischief or mid-thought, posing with a stylish guile, completely aware of their surroundings. There are some painted collaborations with Doze Green and atop Martha Cooper photos and shout outs to Ken Swift and whole train writers like LEE and Futura. Beatboxes and bboys and spraycans are here, as are lighthouses and ocean storms and rowboats and animals and a sliver of moon for you to sit upon.

Also a sharper depiction of geometric forms.

For Os Gemeos in life and in art, there is little separation between external and internal worlds. For a few weeks this fall you can traverse both with them in New York.

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Detail. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos in collaboration with Martha Cooper (the artists used Ms. Cooper’s photo of the train lot printed on canvas). Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Os Gemeos. Silence of the Music. Lehmann Maupin gallery. New York City. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Silence Of Music” is on view through October 22nd at Lehmann Maupin gallery on 536 West 22nd Street, New York.

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Cane Morto “TOYS” Exhibition in Milan

Cane Morto “TOYS” Exhibition in Milan

Man against man. Man against God. Man against himself. Man against gratuitously opinionated and parochial graff heads, Street Art fanboys, and self-appointed explainers of the “rules” of the street.

These are a few of the recurring themes in “TOYS” by the Italian free-thinking brutalists and long-pole bucket painters named Canemorto in their exhibition with Superfluo at Section80.  Street Artists with a purer vision than many in this murky milieu, Canemorto buck conventions and honor the rules of graffiti, street art, and contemporary art at their own peril, often feeling triangulated and abused by the undertaking.

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

Here in their simplistic and horrid toy diorama of Evil Vs Evil Vs Deluded Vs Good; the opinions and assorted powers are all unleashed on an even playing field, ready to bash each other over the head, skew one another with postmodern bayonets and sundry weaponry.

“In my opinion, nobody can remake these paintings. They’re not reasoned. It’s an instinctive style,” says the art restorer Camillo Tarozzi in their accompanying dramatized and musical video, when discussing what appears to be the taking of walls by Canemorto in public/private space.

The debates about the rightness of this art being taken, preserved, displayed in a different context has been brought to the fore recently by their countryman Blu in Bologna in response to his street walls now on exhibit in a museum.

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

But the weight of historical practices of preservation wrestling with the forces of ephemerous ‘street cred’ is like matching a tyrannosaurus with a Transformer; which is why the “TOYS” diorama in the community show space of an advertising/production company encapsulates some of their internal dilemmas so perfectly. Seeing the artists themselves as packaged products hanging on the wall commodifies them in a way that is knowingly sarcastic, thrilling, and drowned in irony. Collect all three!

In their films and in their practice Canemorto are chanting like shamans casting spells to keep away the evil spirits of commercialism and general lameness. Sitting on the couch or climbing over fences the masked trio repeatedly invoke the autonomy and authenticity of “the street” while other versions of success beckon to them, cloaked in something shinier, elusive, enticing.

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

As in their previously released long-form street art film they are seeking direction from an ever-watchful periodically-appearing somewhat sadistic spirit guide. As they navigate the route one wonders if this leader has their best interests in mind, and even how he qualified for his position.

Similarly, after nearly a decade of monstrous works on the street, many nights of ducking and painting, and the endless studying of the culture that they are acting within, the title “TOYS” is clearly offered with a sense of humor and does not apply to Canemorto.

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Caterina Colombo)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Jacopo Farina)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Caterina Colombo)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Caterina Colombo)

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Cane Morto TOYS at Section 80. Milano, Italy. (photo © Walls Of Milano)

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Spider Tag: “Secuencias Minimas” Opens in Madrid

Spider Tag: “Secuencias Minimas” Opens in Madrid

Doors, windows, shipping pallets, nails, yarn. These are the humble materials that Spidertag uses in his geometric abstractions, commingling handmade craft traditions, mid-century modernism, and the history of commercial graphic sign painting.

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Spider Tag. Secuencias Minimas Swinton Gallery. Madrid, Spain. (photo © courtesy of Spider Tag)

SECUENCIAS MÍNIMAS is his new Madrid solo show just opened with 23 works that include sculptural wallhangings, video, lights, logs, and a generous amount of fire engine red.

The Street Artist has been pounding nails into the walls of community gardens, winding small streets, and abandoned old houses and factories for nearly a decade, each time responding to the environment with his materials and geometry based compositions in new ways to create one of a kind installations. By retaining that ability to be resourceful on the spot, Spidertag knows how to transform many angles of the gallery effectively and without pretension.

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Spider Tag. Secuencias Minimas Swinton Gallery. Madrid, Spain. (photo © courtesy of Spider Tag)

The new show at Swinton Gallery presents Spidertag’s facination for experimentation and the simplicity of form, dimension, and materials – often with a touch of levity. Choices of color, shape, and placement in the gallery environment are wry and unassuming, reminding the viewer that the creative spirit can be simultaneously challenging and rewarding while remaining disarmingly simple.

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Spider Tag. Secuencias Minimas Swinton Gallery. Madrid, Spain. (photo © courtesy of Spider Tag)

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Spider Tag. Secuencias Minimas Swinton Gallery. Madrid, Spain. (photo © courtesy of Spider Tag)

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Spider Tag. Secuencias Minimas Swinton Gallery. Madrid, Spain. (photo © courtesy of Spider Tag)

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Spider Tag. Secuencias Minimas Swinton Gallery. Madrid, Spain. (photo © courtesy of Spider Tag)

 

Spider Tag Secuencias Minimas is currently on view at Swinton Gallery in Madrid, Spain. Click HERE for more information.

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MIMA Museum: City Lights with Swoon, MOMO, Hayuk, Faile

MIMA Museum: City Lights with Swoon, MOMO, Hayuk, Faile

What is it about Brooklyn Street Art that is so appealing that one would curate the opening exhibition of a museum with it?

Four pillars of the New York Street Art scene are welcoming the first guests of the new Millennium Iconoclast Museum of Art (MIMA), which opened days ago in Brussels. Attacking the cherished institutions that relegate grassroots people’s art movements into the margins, MIMA intends to elevate them all and let them play together. Graphic design, illustration, comic design, tattoo design, graffiti, street art, plastic arts, wheat pasting, sculpture, text, advertising, pop, story-telling, aerosol, brushwork, and naturally, dripping paint.

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MOMO. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

Obviously street culture has been mixing these influences together in a never-ending lust for experimentation; punk with hip-hop, skateboarding with tattoo, performance art with graffiti – for the past four decades at least. The folk tradition of cutting and pasting predates all our  modern shape-shifting by centuries, but institutional/organizational curating often often has a preference for sorting street culture disciplines into separate piles.

With the inaugural exhibition “City Lights” MOMO, Swoon, Faile, and Maya Hayuk each bring what made their street practice unique, but with an added dimension of maturity and development. Without exception each of these artists have benefitted from the Internet and its ability to find audiences who respond strongly to the work with physical location a secondary consideration. Now as world travelers these four have evolved and refined their practice and MIMA gives them room to expand comfortably.

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MOMO. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

Rather than recreating the slap-dash chaos of street clash, and aside from the aforementioned drips and splatters in geometric neon hues by Hayuk, the museum setting is contained and crisply defined. Perhaps because of the cross-disciplines hinted at and welcomed, the overall effect is more contemporary than urban.

Hayuk’s space, with its raised ceilings and stained glass window treatment is a hand-hewn modern chapel, borrowing a holy inflection and spreading it across to the urban art faithful who will make the pilgrimage to this new hallowed space.

On opening day (which was delayed by weeks because of the recent airport and transit bombing here) the crowd who queued on an overcast day down the block along the Canal in Molenbeek was undaunted by the wait and expectant. Housed in a former beer factory, the greater collection includes large installations by the marquee namesin the main spaces and smaller pieces ranging from Stephen Powers and Todd James to Piet Parra and Cleon Patterson in galleries evoking whitebox galleries.

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MOMO. Detail. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

In precisely the ex-industrial part of town that is usually slaughtered with graffiti you can still see a variety of throwies and bubble tags floating above murky waters along the canal walls from the terrace of the 1300 square meter, 4 story MIMA. It’s an oddly storied juxtaposition perhaps, yet somehow perfectly natural and modern.

If the popular imagination of “museum plus Street Art” conjures anything for you, it may present some kind of overture toward the continuation of the street into the formal space and vice-versa. Faile’s two-color stencils and slaughtering of walls inside clearly connect to ones they have done over the last 15 years and that are currently on New York streets. Their huge prayer wheel assembled here was actually shown in the center of Times Square last fall with tens of thousands of tourists climbing it, sitting upon it, posing for selfies with it and spinning it, so the continuum is very much intact in that respect.

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MOMO. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

Similarly Swoon’s wheat-pasted family of figures and her hand-cut paper patterns on mottled walls in the basement recall her work on street walls in Red Hook Brooklyn at this moment – as well as her periodic takeovers/installations inside choice areas of abandoned urban neglect through the years. To complete the dialogue at MIMA her hand-painted linotype  prints are also wheat-pasted outside on Brussels walls near the museum, not slapped but placed with her customary consideration of context and proportion.

Ever the developer of new methodologies for painting, MOMO piled long strips of fabric in an overlapping circular pattern upon layered patches of color and unveiled the new work by gathering the invited artists and museum founders to watch as Faile’s Patrick McNeil slowly pulled the “rope” outward, breaking sealed layers and revealing a heretofore non existent composition. To share and remember the birth process he leaves the tools of revelation in a pile before it. In this way MOMO recalls his street practice of conjuring and developing new tool-making and art-making techniques when bringing work into the public sphere.

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MOMO.  MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © MOMO – MIMA MUSEUM)

Aside from each evolving from the subcultures of the street in some capacity, the nature of the works transcend the partitioning that can define exhibitions, allowing the various practices to become the language of the culture. MIMA appears to have the physical space, as well as the psychological and philosophical space, to contemplate the multiplicity of voices that are flooding the streets and the Internet; forming subcultures and ultimately culture. The City Lights in this case are as much on the various dialogues of the street as the street itself.

MIMA is the creation of four co-founders; Florence and Michel Delaunoit, Alice van den Abeele, and Raphaël Cruyt. The inaugural show is curated by van den Abeele and Cruyt and many of the artists shown in the extended collection here have a history and special meaning to the two through their venture the ALICE Gallery, which has as its strength a focus on art collaborations and exhibition with sculpture and installations.

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SWOON. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

We spoke with Alice van den Abeele about the selection of these four artists for the opening, the intersection of Internet with museum curation, and the changing nature of our perceptions of culture. Here is an excerpt from our conversation

Brooklyn Street Art: In your initial descriptions of the museum a focus is made on the uprooting of culture as it pertains to geography by way of the Internet during the last decade and a half. How do these artists represent this free-travelling cultural reality?
Alice van den Abeele: This cultural reality is easy to feel when you are in the CITY LIGHTS exhibition. The installations by Swoon, Maya Hayuk, FAILE and MOMO immerse you in different artistic worlds but share an extroverted language that is direct and playful. It is a language acquired with the street and with travel – a mixture you may call a “world citizen”.

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SWOON. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

Brooklyn Street Art: The museum addresses a range of subcultures that are directly or tangentially related to the street art scene during the last decades. Why is it important for us to consider these contributors?

Alice van den Abeele: Because of our history. With the communication revolution and the relative low cost of Internet connectivity, the beginning of the millennium brought changes to our perception of the world. A feeling of being a citizen of the world is developing in the West – by which I mean to say there is a cosmopolitan attitude that makes us more empathetic, collaborative, and cross-cultural.

For artists this means there is a greater mobility between creative fields. The artist can easily be a skateboarder, a designer, a musician, a graffiti artist and they can also exhibit in a gallery or a museum. He or she adapts to different creative contexts and their identities are many – not limited to being a ‘street artist” or “a musician”.  The subcultures mix easily together. Lust look at the New York art scene at the time of the Alleged Gallery for example.

On the other hand, society moves it through the prism of the Internet today and selects artists that reflect a new thinking. The values ​​that define the artist’s behavior in the street are close to those that define our behavior on the Internet: Empathy, the right of access rather than ownership, a collaborative spirit, authenticity, and a cross/hybrid culture.

Somehow, the street work embodied physically very early this paradigm shift that was occuring in our society, this new way of perceiving the world. That’s the story the MIMA wants to tell through the exhibitions and the works in the permanent collection. We are living through a revolution that is slowly rewriting the history of art “bottom up” – which may have a thousand faces.

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SWOON. An assistant helps with a large wheat paste. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo ©Alice van den Abeele)

Brooklyn Street Art: Is it important to examine these subcultures separately or is it more relevant to see what their combined influences are producing for the world as aesthetic movements, social movements?
Alice van den Abeele: Cultures are not compartmentalized. They mix to reinvent themselves. Besides, don’t they all become mainstream? In a world of continuous flow of information we should beware of categories and labels – which are often more commercial than artistic. As I said earlier, subcultures today are of great interest to society because they can inspire in us a common ideal – better than our politicians.

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SWOON. Detail. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © The Pickles – MIMA MUSEUM)

Brooklyn Street Art: As a group, these inaugural artists have an association in our minds with early-mid 2000s New York street art culture. Can you talk about the significance in broad terms of your choice of these artists for your initial exhibition?
Alice van den Abeele: Initially, when we visited the MIMA building in ruins, we immediately imagined an intervention by Maya Hayuk in the room called The Chapel. We know Maya really well because we have had the pleasure of working with her for such a long time. With that first intention, we thought that it would be great to have artists who know and appreciate each other, share a common history, and to create a synergy between them!

This combination of talent and affection has produced a unique exhibition, full of spirituality. More generally, the New York scene of this period is particularly rich for us and it was a good matrix to introduce the vision of the MIMA to the public!

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FAILE. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

Brooklyn Street Art: What sort of artists or influences do you envision for near future exhibitions?
Alice van den Abeele: It is certain that we will continue to work with artists in the same vein as those that are present in the permanent collection. At the same time we want to leave the door open to the future for the unknown and to surprise ourselves for the fun of it.

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FAILE. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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FAILE. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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FAILE. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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FAILE. Detail. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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FAILE. Detail. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Pascaline Brishcoux – MIMA Museum)

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Maya Hayuk. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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Maya Hayuk. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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Maya Hayuk. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © The Pickles – MIMA Museum)

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The artists with curators. Work in progress. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

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Maya Hayuk talks with Patrick Miller in the foreground and Patrick McNeil chats with MOMO on the background in Maya’s installation. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © Alice van den Abeele)

 

The MIMA Museum “City Lights” inaugural exhibition in Brussels, Belgium is currently open to the general public and will run until August 28, 2016. Click HERE to learn more about MIMA.

 

 

 

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“Young New Yorkers” Auction to Feature Jaime Rojo and 100 More

“Young New Yorkers” Auction to Feature Jaime Rojo and 100 More

BSA has been supporting and donating to the organization Young New Yorkers and many of the participating artists who are in tonight’s auction for a long time through our work for a number of years. This year BSA Co-founder and editor of photography Jaime Rojo is also donating something else – his own photography.

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Jaime Rojo. Untitled. Tawana and Miriam. Brooklyn, NY. August 31, 2003 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

YNY provides 16 and 17 year old people in New York State who have had the unfortunate occurrence of being arrested an opportunity to re-see themselves and society through an art-based program. The state has the unfortunate distinction of being particularly harsh with our youth, treating them as adults in some circumstances where other perspectives can and should come into play. It’s a mature and nuanced position that great societies can muster when we dig deep and we’re proud of the staff and volunteers who put in the huge amounts of effort to make YNY successful.

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Shepard Fairey. Natural Springs. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Joe Russo. Shepard Fairey, NYC 2010. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

This program is an opportunity to short-circuit a potentially harmful cycle of crime and incarceration because it recognizes the whole young person, not just a narrow aspect. If they qualify and graduate from the court-appointed program, graduates’ cases are dismissed and sealed, leaving them free of the collateral consequences of an adult criminal record.

Not surprisingly, graffitti and Street Artists and others familiar with the scene recognize the value of this kind of work and have given great pieces to the auction. Please consider the works here and go online to bid and attend the public auction in New York tonight!

 

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Daniel Albanese. Larry The Bird Man. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

“I wholeheartedly support Young New Yorkers; not only as an art program and constructive alternative to teens being incarcerated, but it is also highly therapeutic. It builds problem solving skills that can boost self confidence and allow participants to feel more empowered to pursue their dreams as well as deal with their realities.”—Shepard Fairey

Fairey has generously donated a number of prints for tonight along with works by an array of artists you’ll recognize such as Ben Eine, Swoon, Cern, Pure Evil, Icy & Sot, Robert Janz, Know Hope, Daniel Albanese, Hellbent, Greg LaMarche, Joe Russo, LMNOPI, Li Hill, Dan Witz and many others for tonights’ event. Your support will actually help keep our young people out of jail and contributing in a positive way.

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Swoon. Haiti Sketch (Older Man Collar). (photo courtesy of YNY)

This year’s YNY benefit auction show is curated by Lunar New Year, Ann Lewis, and Maya Levin.

Here is a small sample of the works being offered up for auction. To see the whole collection, bid and for more details on the actual works of art please go to: Paddle8 Young New Yorkers benefit auction.

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Ben Eine. See No Evil. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Brittany Williams. Blooming Mind. Painting. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Li-Hill. Dive. Work on paper. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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QRST. In The House Of The Coyote. Work on paper. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Dan Witz. Container Study (Green). Mixed Media. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Jetsonorama. Stephanie on JR ‘s House. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Mataruda. Verso, Perla, Pluma y, Flor. Giclee Print. (photo courtesy of the artist)

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Dan Witz Paints Skinheads, Slam Dancing, Erotica

Dan Witz Paints Skinheads, Slam Dancing, Erotica

Because you can’t get your fill of angry white men from all the Donald Trump rallies this spring, painter and Street Artist Dan Witz is presenting Mosh Pits, Raves and One Small Orgy at Jonathan Levine Gallery in New York. The paintings further capture the freneticism of clan-like gatherings of nearly entirely caucasian youth in the “hardcore” subcultures of punk and alternative music.

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Dan Witz. Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rebellious, provocative, warm, sensual, rhythmic, chaotic and violent dancing as depicted in these hormone-infused scenes are easily as erotic as the de-clad coitus-seeking scene makers in the Bosch-Bruegelian mass of bodies. Ecstacy abounds often and which view is more orgiastic depends entirely on you.

One question among many; if this is a small orgy, how many participants are in a large one?

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Dan Witz. Brite Nite 2, Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Byronesque 3, Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz.  Mosh Pit Study (Jets), Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Sick of It All, Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Small Orgy, Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Scrum 3 (System of a Down), Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Scrum 1 (King of Hearts), Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Scrum Study (The Flash), Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dan Witz. Very young “collectors” spotted on opening night… Jonathan LeVine Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Dan Witz solo exhibition “Mosh Pits, Raves and One Small Orgy” is currently on view at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery in NYC. Click HERE for more information.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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James Marshall DALEK “The Redistribution of Destruction”

James Marshall DALEK “The Redistribution of Destruction”

A quick look at new works by James Marshall aka Dalek for his show, “The Redistribution of Destruction”. His bright colors and geometric op art is bent through the lens of Murakami and yet glows occasionally with the hallucinatory play of light that Turrel can emanate.

These new pieces are more minimal than we are used to seeing from Dalek and perhaps indicate a comfort with minimalism, and all the courage that implies.

Impeccable, precise geometry, crisply rendered forms, all radiating energy. Please step into the light.

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dalek (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

James Marshall DALEK “The Redistribution Of Destruction” is currently on view at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. Click HERE for more information.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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