All posts tagged: Dictador Art Masters

BSA Film Friday: 09.21.18

BSA Film Friday: 09.21.18

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Adele Renault Visits Tyson’s Corner in Jersey City
2. Monumenta Leipzig 2018: The Monuments-of-Many
3. Jan Kuck Kinetic Installation at Monumenta in Leipzig 2018
4. Dictador Art Masters in a Old Distillery in Colombia

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Adele Renault Visits Tyson’s Corner in Jersey City

In our own homemade video on the gritty streets of Tyson’s Corner in Jersey City, Street Artist Adele Renault ducks punches in traffic as she finishes her new mural of a pigeon.

Read about Adele’s new book featuring many of her bird murals and people portraits from last week on BSA here:

Adele Renault Takes Flight With a Message of “Feathers and Faces”

Monumenta Leipzig 2018: The Monuments-of-Many

A short tour of the monuments of many at this unusual exhibition in Leipzig. Read more about it HERE.

 

Jan Kuck Kinetic Installation at Monumenta in Leipzig 2018

You may need the didactic text here to appreciate the conceptual piece created by Berlin-based artists Jan Kuck at Monumenta in Leipzig, or you may simply enjoy the wax filled lamps as their light bulbs melt colored wax to drip on the pile of mirrors below. A student of law, history, and philosophy, Kuck has made a number of kinetic sculptures/installations like this through Bernheimer Contemporary at events and venues like the Venice Architecture Biennale, Art Budapest, SOFA Chicago, and the Deutches Museum Munich. We captured a bit of video with the phone while BSA was in Leipzig a couple of weeks ago to host the weekend of presentations and panel discussions.

 

Dictador Art Masters in a Old Distillery in Colombia

You may remember our coverage of this unique compound in Columbia this spring with a number of Street Artists from Poland, the UK, and Columbia. Here is a video produced by director Colin Day for the host of that event at an old distillery.

BSA in Colombia:

New Spirits in an Old Distillery : Colombia Diary. Day 1

This is How It’s Done : Colombia Diary. Day 2 – Process

Selected Scenes from the Colombia Diary. Day 3 – Moments

Blue Steel from the Streets. Colombia Diary : Day 4 / Interview with ERRE

Colombia Diary: The Completed Works, The Gold Rush, and the Jaguar in You

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Blue Steel from the Streets. Colombia Diary : Day 4 / Interview with ERRE

Blue Steel from the Streets. Colombia Diary : Day 4 / Interview with ERRE

Colombian Street Artist Erre began her career on the street in her home city of Zipaquirá as a teen but moved an hour’s drive south to the capital city Bogotá a few years ago to attend university and dive into the explosively growing scene on the streets there.

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With nightly outings in the larger metropolis, she and some mates have used political themes of their punk-inspired graphic works to push social attitudes about corruption, hypocrisy, race and gender equality.

With strong female figures that shout confidence and rock and roll, you can see the ERRE is helping define the kind of heroines she admires who take and active role in making change.

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

After assisting Toxicomano to complete his large mural for this project, Erre had some free time to hit up some prime spots of her own in this distillery. Sometimes she worked freehand, and other times she dug into the stencils that she typically leaves on the walls in Bogotá.

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We asked her a few questions about her work.

Brooklyn Street Art: “Unete Al Disorden”. What does that mean?
Erre: “Join the chaos” – or something similar. I am inviting people to join in.

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: When did you begin making art for the street?
ERRE: My first stencil was about 10 years ago and I have done many stencils in my home city Zipaquirá.

About five years ago I decided I would begin painting for a living and I have dedicated myself to this work.

BSA: Do you always use stencils?
ERRE: I always paint with stencils but sometimes I make an exception and do a piece by hand

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Can you talk about the stencil that you made here which appears to be a message of empowerment for women and girls?
ERRE: Yes for women in Colombia there is a big problem – really in all of Latin America – with the rights of women. They do not receive equal pay for equal work, they do not get enough respect. There is a strong culture of “machismo” that exists with the men all of the time. So a lot of my work is intended to empower women.

BSA: Where do you get inspiration for your style?
ERRE: I think I draw a lot of inspiration from cartoons and illustrations like that. I draw all of the designs in a smaller size with the computer I enlarge them for this work

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: You often have skulls in your pieces. Can you talk about the symbolism of using skulls for you?
ERRE: Yes I use the skulls as an human symbol because everyone has a skull inside you know? It’s a way for me to represent humans and people generally without referring to their race whether they are black, brown, yellow or white. It is sort of a universal symbol.

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ERRE. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


This event has been made possible by Dictador Art Masters Foundation. To learn more about the foundation click here.

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Selected Scenes from the Colombia Diary. Day 3 – Moments

Selected Scenes from the Colombia Diary. Day 3 – Moments

This week BSA is in an unusual location in Colombia by invitation to see a new initiative with Street Artists in an abandoned distillery now being brought back to life with their imaginations and penchant for transformation. Come along with us for a few days to see what we discover.


As we are chronicling the movement of the Street Art story into new spaces such as this hybrid venue that transforms an aged factory into a unique ex-urban gallery, it occurs to us that the revolution of this street culture movement has always been in its ability to adapt.

 Stinkfish. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

After last nights’ tumultuous rains that turned much of the dusty ground into thick chocolate mud we walked amongst these hulking steel giants of manufacturing again, seeing everyone and everything with new eyes.

Climbing up the rusted rickety staircases and rotting corrugated floor panels and peering out upon painters and vandals alike as they plot their next proposition, you remain alert for unscripted turns in the plot.

Ben Eine with Connor. Colombia. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Invariably a pause, an ellipse, a stolen moment may reveal something more about the artist and their passage into the creative ether. With a documentarian sense, you’ll want to capture it before it blinks away.

When the creative spirit is fluid in environments such as these, it is possibly impossible to articulate the complex set of actions, reactions, strategic calculations, synchronous movements, awkward missteps, punk pirouettes, and the occasional virtuosic executions that can take place.

Filmmaker Collin Day. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Once you accept that the process of creativity for Street Artists and those who enable them is rather full of magic, you have equipped yourself to see that magic wherever you look. It happens as quickly as the flight of the short-tailed bat that grazes rapidly passed your hat on its way to the roost .

These are fleeting moments.

Monstfur. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

M-City and Martha. Colombia. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Filmmaker Radek Drozdowicz. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Louis and D*Facew. Colombia. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Ben Eine and Connor. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ben Eine and Connor. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Monstfur. Colombia. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

Monstfur. Colombia. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

M-City and Martha. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

M-City. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Louis Jensen. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toxicomano. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wildife. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wildife. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wildife. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wildife. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Barrel’s rings. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


This event has been made possible by Dictador Art Masters Foundation. To learn more about the foundation click here.

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This is How It’s Done : Colombia Diary. Day 2 – Process

This is How It’s Done : Colombia Diary. Day 2 – Process

This week BSA is in an unusual location in Colombia by invitation to see a new initiative with Street Artists in an abandoned distillery now being brought back to life with their imaginations and penchant for transformation. Come along with us for a few days to see what we discover.


In factories and in art-making, process is crucial to success.

Back at this Colombian factory site for a second day of work, the artists are climbing ladders, tracing out shapes, stepping back to check perspective, and lunging forward for the first genuine phase of painting. The brand new initiative on this industrial site sparks your mind with ideas – nothing seems impossible, actually. The future is unwritten.

Ben Eine and Connor. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

So it seems especially appropriately audacious when you see Ben Eine and his son Collin rolling by you on a massive lift that holds them aloft overhead with cans in hand. You deftly dart out of the way so you are not smushed underneath the massive rubber tires that roll toward you, carefully ducking the occasional leafy limb that is snapped off the tree they are grazing in their metal bucket as they paint, now wrapping to another side of the building.

Ben Eine. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

They are spraying out a series of Eine’s iconic lettering across the top floor of one of the compound’s brick facades, and suddenly you may have the feeling that this is the first page of a new book being written. We may not yet know what it will say, but you can appreciate the process, two guys from different generations extending their arms toward the wall, can in hand, propelling clouds of aerosol forward, writing a common missive.

Ben Eine. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Scattered through these rusty dusty caverns and crooks there are Street Artists at work; with birds and bats and beats filling the air. A new of industry at work, one can  appreciate now how the image is built. It’s a mysterious and sometimes spell-binding unveiling, carefully considered.

With no specific aesthetic guidelines from their hosts and no review of sketches, we are privileged to see these self-driven murals disclosed in real time without prejudice on walls of the artists choosing.

Stinkfish. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

There are myriad processes at play. Placed in the hands of artists who can appreciate the opportunity to create quality works , there is attention to detail and context. Whether it is D*Face’s ironic reappropriation of symbols/text and dramatically tragic heroes – or the pop culture humor of Toxicomano’s leopard queen, or the golden disk framing Stinkfish’s neo Colombian intergalactican icon, its a studied process that makes it happen.

Stinkfish. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

M-City drips with rivers of sweat in the merciless humidity while peeling away one more panel of his four pillar stencil opus called “Goldmine”, his paint encrusted hand dropping another wet cutout with a deft gesture – leaving it to drift in the heavy breeze 3 stories beneath him to the ground.

The Monstfur duo carefully balance on ladders to reach and hold stencils, spraying out each textured layer of industrially inspired grayness, careful to align the successive hand-cuts that they are gridding across a tank that previously carried toxic fluids.

Stinkfish. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As this projects’ character is taking shape while we are watching, you see that these artists are pouring themselves into the act properly, giving top flight performances.

It’s part of the process.

D*Face. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

D*Face. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stephen Thompson of D*Face tam. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

D*Face, Louis and Stephen. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

M-City with Martha. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

M-City. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

M-City. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Monstfur. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Monstfur. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Monstfur. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toxicomano. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toxicomano. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toxicomano. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Stinkfish . Ben Eine. Colombia. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


This event has been made possible by Dictador Art Masters Foundation. To learn more about the foundation click here.

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New Spirits in an Old Distillery : Colombia Diary. Day 1

New Spirits in an Old Distillery : Colombia Diary. Day 1

This week BSA is in an unusual location in Colombia by invitation to see a new initiative with Street Artists in an abandoned distillery now being brought back to life with their imaginations and penchant for transformation. Come along with us for a few days to see what we discover.


The fantasies of graffiti writers and Street Artists are myriad but a few rise to the top; the abandoned factory is like a fever dream for a certain passionate class of urban explorers who crawl through holes in fences and slide through broken windows just to discover what lies inside these neglected hulks of industry – and to leave their mark.

Stinkfish. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“So when I began painting in Colombia and mainly in Bogotá I would take a photograph of someone in Bogotá and paint it. When I started to travel and I began to take people from one place to another so for example I took people from Colombia to Mexico. I took a lot of photographs in Mexico and took those images with me to Europe. I enjoyed bringing Mexican and Colombian people to Europe. So of course when I was in Europe I took pictures of this girl who was in the subway in Paris – and I brought her back to Colombia,” says Stinkfish.


In the imagination of many aerosol-armed archaeologists is a vision full of heavy pipes, deep coal ovens, chicken-wired windows, soaring steel silos and rusted rotund tanks, puffy clouds of steam wafting about, electrical boxes with color-coded diagrams, and an endless array of iron walkways and ladders that criss-cross at tight angles and climb higher toward the promising future of the Industrial Revolution.

Imagine what it would be like to have one of these places all to yourself and your friends and instead of fearing the security guard, he is there to protect you.

M-City. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This is precisely the project we have walked into – thanks to an invitation from Polish Street Artist and professor M-City, who has convened with Dictador Art Masters Foundation to invite an intimately eclectic mix of European and South American Street Artists to create new pieces inside the hidden compound nestled in leafy palm oil plantations and more than an hour from the nearest city.

M.City. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Closed for decades, the former distillery still contains all its necessary armature of equipment and its ovens and tanks and charcoal barrels – along with tall grasses, a murky stream, many centipedes, some blue spotted wood lizards, black iguanas, and the occasional leopard Gecko.

BSA is here in Colombia for the next few days with M-City, D*Face, Stinkfish, Toxicomano, Ben Eine, and Monstfur along with some other special guests. Today we’ll just show you the work of the “advance crew” of M-City and the Colombian Street Artists Stinkfish and Toxicomano who checked out the place a few months ago and tested walls with some work examples just to see if it would be as divertido as they thought it would be to explore the old factory.

It is.

M-City. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This was just for fun it’s sort of an abandoned submarine which I also did it on a canvas,” says M-City. It is also on the wall at Urban Spree in Berlin.”

What appeals most to him about this project? “It’s exciting because it’s very far from my home in Poland and if you look around you see that there’s nothing around here. It is in the middle of nowhere. We just have the palm trees around and the distillery is in the middle. So we do not have a “public” here. The artists are completely free to do what they want and there are not many people around taking pictures – it’s even kind of secret. So it’s private and it is protected. Nobody can just drop in you know?”

Toxicomano. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Colombian Street Artist Toxicomano took us on a tour of a number of stencil based pieces he put up in advance of this weeks events, explaining that he likes to reclaim symbols and use them for his own meanings. One Smurf we found on a concrete-splattered tiled basewall says “Fuck Racism”.

“I like to use these images because people have in their minds some common association with it and they remember something about it from when they were a child. Now they can  start to think about it differently.”

“In Colombia we have a mixture of races we have black people we have indigenous people we have roots from Spanish people and now we have American and European influences it’s a lot. We mix a lot of things like a soup like a Latin Americans Full of ingredients and we have a special flavor. Also I think a lot of people think of Smurfs as blue but they don’t know that the first Smurf comic was actually a black Smurf and in that particular story the blue Smurfs have a problem with the black Smurf.”

Toxicomano. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“This stencil got me in a lot of trouble on Instagram,” he says the stencil that says “Las mujeres son la verga” (roughly “Women are the dick”) – mostly because it is a slang that is interpreted differently across Latin America and Spain – including within his own native Colombia. Some thought it insulted women, others thought it empowers them. He says he really enjoyed seeing the differences of opinion  but regretted that some of the comments got into personal attacks. “I preferred to not comment and to observe,” he says.

Toxicomano. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our friends the lovely iguanas at the distillery in Codazzi, Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toxicomano. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Toxicomano. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sunset at the distillery. Colombia. May 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


This event has been made possible by Dictador Art Masters Foundation. To learn more about the foundation click here.

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