All posts tagged: Daniel Albanese

Homo Riot, Suriani, The Dusty Rebel “Pay It No Mind”

Homo Riot, Suriani, The Dusty Rebel “Pay It No Mind”

Queer artists and writers in the graffiti and Street Art scene have always been present but like everywhere else in the culture they were more or less bullied by peers to deny it or keep it hidden. It might strike you as ironic or even hypocritical that a subculture of people who feel largely marginalized would propagate another layer of rejection onto their own peers, but humans and clans can be mysterious. And we don’t forget that it was the fags and drag queens who fought against the police in 1969, and who ultimately won through sacrifice, persistence, and collaboration – despite the odds.

Homo Riot & Suriani at work wheat pasting the artwork. (photo © Dusty Rebel)

As attitudes slowly change in mainstream society, LGBTQ+ peeps with aerosol cans, stickers, stencils and wheat-pastse are also using graff and Street Art to bring their issues to walls around the city. Today we talk to two artists – Homo Riot and Suriani, along with photographer, film maker, and social activist The Dusty Rebel, who organized their own wall this week to collaborate in saluting one of those Stonewall queens who fought back, Marsha P. Johnson. Even after this new piece was vandalized, the crew simply went back to work to put it up again. The accompanying text and probable title of the piece is “Pay It No Mind”

BSA: Dusty, you’ve been thinking about this wall for Pride for a long time now.
The Dusty Rebel (Daniel Albanese): For over a year and a half, I have been traveling around the world filming my documentary about the global Queer Street Art movement. Very little attention has been paid to the topic, which I find curious since so many street art pioneers were queer. In my exploration, I have found that many queer-identifying street artists primarily install their work without permission and it’s often more subversive- which stands in contrast to the growing dominance of muralism.

Art work vandalized. (photo © Dusty Rebel)

This wall is actually the kick off to a series of Queer Street Art that will be coming to NYC for Pride Month. I have partnered with Art In Ad Places, Keep Fighting NYC, and other community based projects to create a queer alternative to the overwhelming flood of corporate pride events. While not part of Reclaim Pride Coalition’s inaugural Queer Liberation March on June 30th, I was inspired by the activists who have organized to bring the “Spirit of Stonewall” directly to the street, and who are keeping the focus on the continuing needs of the LGBTQ+ community

Homo Riot at work restoring the mural. (photo © Dusty Rebel)

BSA: What’s the genesis of your idea for this installation? Getting walls in NYC for artists to paint free of charge is almost impossible. How did you manage to get this sweet spot?
The Dusty Rebel: Because it’s seems rare that queer artists get to paint overtly queer legal murals, I wanted to find a way to bring one to New York City.  Several months ago, I contacted my good friend Steve Stoppart, and asked him if I could have his wall on Houston — just one block over from where Keith Haring painted the legendary Bowery mural in 1982. Immediately, he said yes and told me I had permission to do anything I wanted. We have no corporate sponsor, so the wall is totally funded by all of us chipping in as a community.

Once I had the wall, I immediately reached out to Suriani and Home Riot — two artists I have known for years, and who’s work had inspired me to start my film. 

Homo Riot & Suriani. “Pay It No Mind”. Mural restored. The image on the center is of Marsha P. Johnson 1945 -1992. She was a founding member of Gay Liberation Front. She was an AIDS activist with ACT UP and co-fonder of S.T.A.R. (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries). Miss Johnson was in the forefront during the Stonewall Inn Riots fighting for gay rights when gays didn’t have any rights and they weren’t fashionable and “scrubbed clean” for their prime time on T.V. Suriani used Mr. Richard Shupper’s portrait of Ms. Johnson (pictured below) as an inspiration for his art. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Richard Shupper’s studio portrait from 1991 of Marsha P. Johnson

BSA: Almost as soon as the piece was completed someone defaced it. What was the message they tried to send by disrespecting the art and the artists? And how did you respond?
The Dusty Rebel: I know street art is ephemeral, and I also know that work that is unapologetically queer is especially targeted. So I knew it was coming, I just didn’t expect something that big and that fast in less than 30 hours. We made this piece as a community, for our community. We really wanted to start conversation about the issues that LGBTQ+ people face, and to honor the memory of Marsha P. Johnson and the Stonewall Riot. To have that important conversation cut short felt like a punch in the gut

In terms of how we dealt with it – we knew who it was, so we reached out to him and explained why the mural was important. He said he wasn’t motivated by homophobia and apologized. And I get it. I’ve known enough vandals to understand that sometimes when your bombing you’re not necessarily thinking about what you’re hitting. But we had planned for something like that, so we were ready to “pay it no mind” and to restore the mural.

BSA: How did Homo Riot and Suriani approach the collaborative aspect of the installation. 
The Dusty Rebel: We began planning this wall over seven months ago. I told them I wanted it to be a celebration of queer liberation and make reference to New York’s history. While they are familiar with each other’s work, neither had met in person. Both artists have very different aesthetics. Homo Riot’s work being more homoerotic and aggressive, while Suriani’s is a colorful exploration of gender. So I knew it would be a challenge, but I also knew they would take the collaboration seriously. This wasn’t just two artists who were slapping their work next to each other. They listened to each other and compromised, without compromising their artistic voices. So, I’m very proud of them and the wall they created.

Homo Riot & Suriani. “Pay It No Mind”. Mural restored. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Why do you think it’s important to have queer perspectives in Street Art?
Homo Riot: Street art is egalitarian.  It’s open to all and its consumption is not restricted to a particular class, creed or level of education.  And because it’s ubiquitous in our current environment, it provides opportunities for queer and marginalized people to be visible. In urban environments, queer art becomes part of the landscape and our presence hopefully becomes part of the collective consciousness making way for acceptance and inclusion.  In small towns and long stretches of interstate, representations of LGBTQ+ art are important for those members of our community who are isolated and may feel alone.

BSA: Why do you think it’s important to have queer perspectives in Street Art?
Suriani: I think it is important to have queer perspectives in all kinds of art or environments. Street Art is a space of free self-expression. It happens in public space, so it is accessible to everyone. Queer culture traditionally occurs in closed spaces due to the repression and violence LGBTQ+ people have suffered throughout history. Expressing our values and points of view to a larger public might spread awareness of our existence and help our communities in our fights for equality in terms of acceptance and rights

The official art world is already aware of these issues as we can see with the Brooklyn Museum’s current exhibition “Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall“. The problem is that only a very limited percentage of the population has access to museums. Urban Art is part of the city, it comes to people instead of waiting for people to come to it. Our message is directly visible to everyone who’s out there in public space: Inside of that resides its main power.

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“Young New Yorkers” Auction to Feature Jaime Rojo and 100 More

“Young New Yorkers” Auction to Feature Jaime Rojo and 100 More

BSA has been supporting and donating to the organization Young New Yorkers and many of the participating artists who are in tonight’s auction for a long time through our work for a number of years. This year BSA Co-founder and editor of photography Jaime Rojo is also donating something else – his own photography.

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Jaime Rojo. Untitled. Tawana and Miriam. Brooklyn, NY. August 31, 2003 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

YNY provides 16 and 17 year old people in New York State who have had the unfortunate occurrence of being arrested an opportunity to re-see themselves and society through an art-based program. The state has the unfortunate distinction of being particularly harsh with our youth, treating them as adults in some circumstances where other perspectives can and should come into play. It’s a mature and nuanced position that great societies can muster when we dig deep and we’re proud of the staff and volunteers who put in the huge amounts of effort to make YNY successful.

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Shepard Fairey. Natural Springs. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Joe Russo. Shepard Fairey, NYC 2010. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

This program is an opportunity to short-circuit a potentially harmful cycle of crime and incarceration because it recognizes the whole young person, not just a narrow aspect. If they qualify and graduate from the court-appointed program, graduates’ cases are dismissed and sealed, leaving them free of the collateral consequences of an adult criminal record.

Not surprisingly, graffitti and Street Artists and others familiar with the scene recognize the value of this kind of work and have given great pieces to the auction. Please consider the works here and go online to bid and attend the public auction in New York tonight!

 

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Daniel Albanese. Larry The Bird Man. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

“I wholeheartedly support Young New Yorkers; not only as an art program and constructive alternative to teens being incarcerated, but it is also highly therapeutic. It builds problem solving skills that can boost self confidence and allow participants to feel more empowered to pursue their dreams as well as deal with their realities.”—Shepard Fairey

Fairey has generously donated a number of prints for tonight along with works by an array of artists you’ll recognize such as Ben Eine, Swoon, Cern, Pure Evil, Icy & Sot, Robert Janz, Know Hope, Daniel Albanese, Hellbent, Greg LaMarche, Joe Russo, LMNOPI, Li Hill, Dan Witz and many others for tonights’ event. Your support will actually help keep our young people out of jail and contributing in a positive way.

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Swoon. Haiti Sketch (Older Man Collar). (photo courtesy of YNY)

This year’s YNY benefit auction show is curated by Lunar New Year, Ann Lewis, and Maya Levin.

Here is a small sample of the works being offered up for auction. To see the whole collection, bid and for more details on the actual works of art please go to: Paddle8 Young New Yorkers benefit auction.

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Ben Eine. See No Evil. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Brittany Williams. Blooming Mind. Painting. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Li-Hill. Dive. Work on paper. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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QRST. In The House Of The Coyote. Work on paper. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Dan Witz. Container Study (Green). Mixed Media. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Jetsonorama. Stephanie on JR ‘s House. Print. (photo courtesy of YNY)

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Mataruda. Verso, Perla, Pluma y, Flor. Giclee Print. (photo courtesy of the artist)

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Images Of The Week: 01.05.14

Images Of The Week: 01.05.14

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It’s been weeks since we had an “Images of the Week” posting with you, due to the end of the year spectacular we presented  for 13 days; a solid cross section of the talented photographers who are documenting this important moment before it passes.

As a collection 13 From 2013 exemplified the unique and eclectic character of Street Art and graffiti photography today. Each person contributed a favorite image and along with it their insight and observations, often personal, very individual, and with a real sense of authenticity. Each day we were sincerely grateful for their contributions to BSA readers and to see the street through their eyes.

Thank you again to Yoav Litvin, Ray Mock, Brock Brake, Martha Cooper, Luna Park, Geoff Hargadon, Jessica Stewart, Jim Kiernan, Bob Anderson, Ryan Oakes, Daniel Albanese, James Prigoff, and Spencer Elzey for 13 from 2013. Also if you missed it, that list kicked off just after our own 2013 BSA Year in Images (and video) were published here and on Huffington Post, all of which was also a great honor to share with you.

And so we bring back to you some documentation of moments before they passed – our weekly interview with the street, this week including $howta, Appleton Pictures, ASVP, BAMN, Chase, Dceve, Doce Freire, EpicUno, Hot Tea, Jerkface, Judith Supine, Leadbelly33, LoveMe, Meres, Olek, Rambo, Ramiro Davaro-Comas, Square, and Swoon.

This weeks top image is a reprieve from the winter we’ve been enduring – a small hand cut frog clinging to a verdant fern – created by Swoon and snapped during a visit to her studio over the holidays. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EpicUno (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rambo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Leadbelly33 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LoveMe (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BAMN (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Judith Supine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ASVP and Square (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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$howta (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JerkFace (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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HotTea (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Olek’s very latest piece completed on New Year’s Eve in Vancouver, Canada.  (photo © Olek)

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Olek. “Kiss the Future” detail. (photo © Olek)

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Meres has a message for Gerry. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Meres (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Chase (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Doce Freire in Sharjah City, UAE for the Al Qasba Festival. (photo © Doce Freire)

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Dceve (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Appleton Pictures (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ramiro Davaro-Comas (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. Manhattan, December 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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13 from 2013: Daniel Albanese “A Yawning Morning Cat from Dee Dee”

13 from 2013: Daniel Albanese “A Yawning Morning Cat from Dee Dee”

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Happy Holidays to all you stupendous and talented and charming BSA readers! We thank you from the bottom of our socks for your support this year. The best way we can think of to celebrate and commemorate the year as we finish it is to bring you 13 FROM 2013 – Just one favorite image from a Street Art or graffiti photographer that brings a story, a remembrance, an insight or a bit of inspiration to the person who took it. For the last 13 days they will share a gem with all of us as we collectively say goodbye and thank you to ’13.

December-29

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“Photographer of Street Art, Strangers, Protests, & Urbanity”, Daniel Albanese has been documenting New York street life for more than a decade with his blog The Dusty Rebel.  To Daniel Street Art is not a phenomena full of hype, it is an every day part of city life that he treasures and is regaled by as he passes through the city.

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Dee Dee. NYC 2013. (photo © Daniel Albanese)

A Yawning Morning Cat from Dee Dee

~ Daniel Albanese

Ever since works by the mysterious Dee Dee began to appear around NYC, I’ve loved finding them. This piece is a prime example of their aesthetic, which often consists of contrasting images coupled with curious text.

I took this photograph early one morning; I was running late, and as I came around a construction barrier and made my way through the crowd of commuters, I was greeted by this yawning cat. Kneeling down to take the photo, several people—who just moments before were rushing to work—stopped to see what caught my eye.

For me, it was was one of those moments when it becomes clear that we all walk around this city with very different perspectives, and how street art has the ability to slow us down and take notice of our environment.

Artist: Dee Dee

Location: New York City, 2013

 

 

 
#13from2013

Check out our Brooklyn Street Art 2013 Images of the Year by Jaime Rojo here.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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