All posts tagged: Chihuahua

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.10.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 49

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.10.20 / Dispatch From Isolation # 49

Happy Mother’s Day in the US and in Mexico too.

We praise the work and the love that mothers around the world are giving today and every day, with gratitude and recognition for their shaping of our global society. Salute to all the mothers! Without them, it goes without saying, we’d be nowhere.

So here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Cake$, DG, Diez, GCG, HOACS, PREZ, Roachi, and Tag.

#TAG with commentary on one Mark Zuckerberg and the use of Pokemon to fully map and trace and predict our behaviors, and of course drive sales. In Tel Aviv. (photo © #TAG)
“This Space is Not for Advertisements.” AJ in Chihuahua, Mexico with commentary on walls free of advertisements. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ in Chihuahua, Mexico with commentary on walls free of advertisements…and immigration. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AJ in Chihuahua, Mexico with commentary on walls free of advertisements and immigration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tribute to Jason DG. We don’t know who painted “Jason” (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tribute to DG by PREZ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
DG tribute. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hoacs, Roachi (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hoacs. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Don’t Believe The Hype…in Wynwood… (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist…please help…(photo © Jaime Rojo)
GGC in Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Diez in Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artists in Chihuahua, Mexico…please help…(photo © Jaime Rojo)
In da dog house in Wynwood…(photo © Jaime Rojo)
Cake$ Stencils in Bethlehem. (photo © Cake$)

“Today people all over the world are wearing the keffiyeh to offer support to Palestinians in their struggle for freedom,” says Street Artists Cake$, who sends us this new piece he did near the separation wall. He says he considers the wall to be a symbol of oppression – but worries more now that Coronovirus has hit the region as well – so he depicts Jesus with a face covering. “Because of the pandemic, this stencil is also a caution sign for locals that you need to cover your face to protect yourself and others. A new study and computer model provide fresh evidence for a simple solution to help us emerge from this nightmarish lockdown. The formula? Always social distance in public and, most importantly, wear a mask, scarf or bandana.”

Cake$ Stencils in Bethlehem. (photo © Cake$)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 12.08.19 / Chihuahua Special

BSA Images Of The Week: 12.08.19 / Chihuahua Special

Andele! Welcome to Mexico!

Northern Mexico can be arid and beige and green – and also very colorful. We were swinging through Chihuahua recently and captured some pieces on walls and freights that represent the current Mexicano sabor on the street – a mixture of calligraphy and straight up lettering skills, figurative pieces as well.

So here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring AEO Crew, DCH, Dos, Dosis, Gear, HB, JPK, Osea, PERISR, Si Loco, Siete, Spy!, Tees, Tiest, and TNO.

Dosis . Gear (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Siete (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Siete (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SIS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
SIS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Gear . SIS (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HB (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Hbl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
HBL (photo © Jaime Rojo)
TNO (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tees . Spyl (photo © Jaime Rojo)
AEO Crer (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PERISR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
PERISR (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
JPK . DCH (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Tiest (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rekles (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Si Loco . Osea . Dos (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 04.29.18

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.29.18

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Mexico, Norway, Brooklyn – a typical week of BSA Images.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Abraham Chaco, BustArt, Cost, Curve, El Xupet Negre, Gee Whiskers, JMZ, JPS, Juce, Raf Urban, The Reading Ninja, and Turtle Caps.

Top Image: Christina pays homage to the Mexican master and social realist painter David Alfaro Siqueiros in Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Abraham Chacon. Detail. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Abraham Chacon. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist paints a stencil of Pancho Villa in Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

JPS makes an arrest in Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Tor Staale Moen )

Raf Urban (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Turtle Caps for JMZ Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Reading Ninja (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Reading Ninja (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Street Art Anarchy (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Truckers caps are still running in trendy cat circles apparently. Gee Whiskers (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Curve (photo © Jaime Rojo)

COST (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Juce (photo © Jaime Rojo)

El Xupet Negre for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

Untitled. The lady in red. Manhattan. April 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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BSA Images Of The Week: 02.05.17

BSA Images Of The Week: 02.05.17


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It’s surreal to be on the south side of the US border when Trump has just signed an executive order to build a wall, decides to try to pick a fight with the President of Mexico and drops a travel ban. Gosh, between giving away everything to his ultra-rich friends, loosening regulations on their companies, bringing Frederick Douglass back to life, skipping the Jews, and insulting some key strategic-historic allies it’s just a wonder that he has time to attack the press and say that everyone is lying except him.

As we looked for murals and graffiti in the warm winter sun on main street and back street walls and along rails and on freight trains, we got a taste for the clever wit and aerosol talents of Mexican Street Artists. It may help that they have the amazing muralist history of Mexico to call upon.

We start this week with a huge mural in downtown Chihuahua with their namesake dog who appears to have a peyote blossom on his mind, perhaps looking for an alternate reality to help process all the alternative facts coming from up north. Is surreality here to stay?

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring: Antonio Leon, ASET, DAOR, Daniel Montes, Disko, Nino Fidencio, Rick, SPK FUK, Sebastian Gallegos, SOER and Vera Primavera.

Daniel Montes, Nino Fidencio and Antonio Leon. Chihuahua Dog with Peyote blossom. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sebastian Gallegos. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rick. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

SPK FUK. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ECK. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Paket and ?. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aset . Daor. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Soer . ? Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artists. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist . Mes . Rest. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Wide . Ger . Unidentified artists. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artists. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artists. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artists. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artists. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vandals in the background. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Disko. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Disko. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vera Primavera. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unidentified artist. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Unititled. Chihuahua, Mexico. January 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BSA Top Stories 2016 – As Picked by You

BSA Top Stories 2016 – As Picked by You

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Museums, Festivals, and Activism – three of the themes that garnered the most traffic on our published stories on BSA and The Huffington Post this year.

From a scholarly Street Art related exhibition in St. Petersburg to the opening of the Mima Museum in Belgium to the Anti-Banksy exhibition with the Blu controversy in Bologna and the “Magic City” exhibition in Dresden, BSA readers were astutely studying the slow but steady move of Street Art from the street to the museum and the academic canons.

But you also liked the huge multi-player outside exhibitions as well – with stories from Sicily and Northern Spain to Northern Mexico, BSA readers were interested this year in seeing how eclectic locally-organized Street Art festivals and projects are done, and who is doing them.

Finally activism played a big role in what you were re-Tweeting and “liking” and sending to your friends – From Icy & Sot installing anti-radiation work in the Native American desert and then talking about oceans polluted with plastic, to a United Nations food program with kids and artists in El Salvador, to highlighting Indigenous peoples rights with Jetsonorama, to a US cross-country tour to save endangered species by one artist and a Greenpeace show in Barcelona addressing the same issue with 35 artists, it looks like BSA readers are engaged and concerned about socio-politico-environmental issues left and right.

On a side note, we were honored that our El Salvador article was picked up and published in spanish on the UN World Food program website – HERE.

Of course it was good to see that you liked the feature on the notorious graffiti crew 1UP and seeing Nychos slay New York as well. Tasty!

These are the TOP 15 articles on BSA for 2016 from the more than 365 postings we did this year – meaning they all beat at least 350 articles to get here. Congratulations to us all.


No. 15
Borders and Boundaries : A Multi-Disciplinary Exhibit at St. Petersburg’s Street Art Museum

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SpY. Street Art Museum (SAM). St. Petersburg, Russia. May 2016. (photo © Evgeniy Belikov)

Rafael Schacter Takes a More Nuanced Approach to the Migration Crisis

Commerce and technology have been eroding traditional constructs of the borders and boundaries, especially in the age of the Internet, satellites, transnational banking and trade agreements that create governing bodies that openly dismiss national sovereignty, integrity, identity, aspirations. Borders and boundaries are contested, guarded, or disregarded at will; open to international capital, porous to immigration, hardened by armies.

Daily they are in the headlines: Trump’s plans to build a wall along the US-Mexican border, Syrian war refugees immigrating across European borders, Israel and Palestine’s ongoing land and settlement disputes, even maritime territorial claims of China and the Phillipines in the South China Sea that were ruled upon yesterday  – all reveal clues to our historically complicated relationships and geo-political perspectives.

Art to the rescue! continue reading here


No. 14
Icy & Sot Stencil An Enormous Blue Whale in LA

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Icy & Sot. Endangered Species Mural Project. Los Angeles, CA. January 2016 (photo © Jess X. Chen)

“The brothers spent two solid days hand cutting the multi-layer stencil here on Melrose Avenue. How many pieces? “19 pieces,” says Icy. “Its not that big but it has a lot of details” The composite image features an enormous whale emerging from the sea in full view of a coastline packed with industrial forms which presumably are dumping contaminants directly into the waters.

As ever, the brothers crash into each others sentences while talking to us. “Whatever happens in the ocean… it comes back to us,” says Sot. “Whether is trash or plastics or oil..”

Icy jumps in, “The fish eat them and then we eat the animals and we have the plastics inside of us.”

“Yeah, It’s a cycle. We are all making a lot of trash – we are affecting the world. Then it all comes back to us,” says Sot… Continue reading here


No. 13
MIMA Museum: City Lights with Swoon, MOMO, Hayuk, Faile

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Maya Hayuk. MIMA Museum. Brussels, Belgium. April 2016. (photo © The Pickles – MIMA Museum)

What is it about Brooklyn Street Art that is so appealing that one would curate the opening exhibition of a museum with it?

Four pillars of the New York Street Art scene are welcoming the first guests of the new Millennium Iconoclast Museum of Art (MIMA), which opened days ago in Brussels. Attacking the cherished institutions that relegate grassroots people’s art movements into the margins, MIMA intends to elevate them all and let them play together. Graphic design, illustration, comic design, tattoo design, graffiti, street art, plastic arts, wheat pasting, sculpture, text, advertising, pop, story-telling, aerosol, brushwork, and naturally, dripping paint.

Obviously street culture has been mixing these influences together in a never-ending lust for experimentation; punk with hip-hop, skateboarding with tattoo, performance art with graffiti – for the past four decades at least. The folk tradition of cutting and pasting predates all our  modern shape-shifting by centuries, but institutional/organizational curating often often has a preference for sorting street culture disciplines into separate piles.

With the inaugural exhibition “City Lights” MOMO, Swoon, Faile, and Maya Hayuk each bring what made their street practice unique, but with an added dimension of maturity and development. Without exception each of these artists have benefitted from the Internet and its ability to find audiences who respond strongly to the work with physical location a secondary consideration. Now as world travelers these four have evolved and refined their practice and MIMA gives them room to expand comfortably…Continue reading here


No. 12
San Salvador, Street Artists, Food Insecurity and “Conect-Arte”

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Vexta.Workshop. Conect-Arte. San Salvador. April 2016. (photo © Yvette Vexta)

“Six street artists took their social engagement a step further in El Salvador last month and taught youth some serious skillz from the street.

Coming from Brazil, Australia, Ecuador, Mexico, New York, and New Jersey, this international crew took the time to share and teach about painting, art, and how community can be built. The program Conect-Arte is a newly launched initiative by the United Nations World Food Programme, which as the name suggests, also is in the city to address a more core need to battle food insecurity. With Conect-Arte the goal is to also meet youth in some communities and help with positive role models an options with an eye on transforming lives through developing art and related creative skills that can provide income and channel energy in ways productive to community.

Together the artists worked on projects with 45 teens and younger kids over the course of the a week-long workshop in San Salvador, teaching street art techniques like stencil, lettering, mural painting, sculpture, even hot air balloon making. The goals are huge, like reducing violence, food insecurity, increasing access to economic opportunity. The tools here are art, the creative spirit, and strengthening relationships.

We bring you some images of the works that were made by the visiting artists and some of their observations and experiences during the Conect-Arte program…Continue reading here


No. 11
Discovering a “Magic City” in Dresden, Germany

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Unidentified Artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“A couple of weeks ago BSA was in Dresden, Germany to help lay plans for a new Street Art show opening there this fall called “Magic City” and naturally we hit the streets with bicycles three days in a row to see the city’s graffiti, Street Art, and murals whenever time would permit. The first day we had the honor of getting a tour from Jens Besser, an artist, author, lecturer, and producer of mural festivals in the city who sped ahead of us through a labyrinth of streets to show us a number of the impressive murals he and partners have brought to the city in the last decade or so…Continue reading here


No. 10

Louis Masai: “The Art Of Beeing” Tour Kicks Off in NYC to Save Endangered Species

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Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Bog Turtle. Endangered. The Bushwick Collective, Brooklyn. NYC. October  2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Activism and Street Art go hand in hand and some artists are skilled at activating public space for hearts and brains to spark and cogitate. During the last 15 years we’ve documented a number of seriously affecting artworks on the street that use text and/or imagery to address political, social, environmental, and economic issues and opinions by artists as varied as Shepard Fairey, Banksy, John Fekner, Ganzeer, LMNOPI, Myth, Gilf!, Gaia, LNY, Jetsonorama, and any number of one-shot authors. In this election year there are too many Trumps to count, and a few Hillary pieces as well.

Undaunted by commercial interests and able to deliver directly to the passerby, Street Artists know that their visual message isn’t guaranteed acceptance but they take a chance anyway. The ones that reflect the sentiments on the street tend to last longer, aesthetics count, and so does spelling, at least that is our inductive observation.

One London artist who seriously raises awareness about the Earths’ endangered species is Louis Masai, a painter, sculptor, illustrator and Street Artist. Starting this week in New York Masai is beginning a 20 mural tour across the United States to talk about the hard working, honey-making, pretty pollinating bee – and a number of our animals that are in danger of dying off completely…Continue reading here


No. 9
1UP in Berlin : “ ‘All City’ Doesn’t Even Begin to Cover It ”

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1UP. Berlin 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“An amorphous shape-shifting consortium of Berlin-based aerosol hooligans named 1UP is one of those graffiti crews who eventually make the entry into graffiti street lore because of the scope and daring of their travails.

Primarily Berlin based, you’ll find their almost-commercial sounding name on roofs, walls, abandoned factories, and in tunnels in many cities around the globe. Without a clear idea of the exact number in their association nor precise membership these daredevils are most often described as white men in their twenties and early thirties reveling in the athleticism and sport of graffiti, in addition to style. The tag itself appears to be rather “open source” at times, with only insiders able to keep track of the distinct hand styles forming the ubiquitous name on thousands of surfaces…continue reading here


No. 8
A “Cathedral” of Characters in Northern Spain

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RIM. Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

“It’s a cathedral of characters, this abandoned furniture factory forty kilometers outside of Barcelona. Cartoons, illustrations, portraits are everywhere; a curious collection of aerosol spray pieces that highlights the popularity of the animated and exaggerated personalities among graffiti and Street Artists in this region of the world.

The character may be a salty with a haggard stare, or reference a topic with a bit of satire. The scene may be serious, comical, ridiculous or purely sci-fi and horror. You discover the stories and allegories as you walk through the empty manufacturing rooms now flooded with natural light and dust. Expressions and situations here are full of drama that may trigger your empathy, startle your attention, elicit a shiver, or creepily fondle your funny bone…Continue reading here


No. 7
“Art Silos” Rise in the Harbor of Catania, Sicily

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Interesni Kazki. Detail. (photo © VladyArt)

“They’ve been here since the 1950s, these silos for wheat and corn on the harbor of Catania on the east coast of the island of Sicily at the foot of Mount Etna. 28 meters tall and facing the Ionian Sea, they are now some of the largest canvasses in Italy by a small group of international and local Street Artists.

The “Art Silos” project includes works completed during an eight month installation begun in June 2015 as part of Festival “I-ART” organized by “Emergence”, thanks to Angelo Bacchelli, curated by Giuseppe Stagnitta. The artists taking part in the project were Okuda (Spain), ROSH333 (Spain), Microbo (Italy), BO130 (Italy), VladyArt (Italy), Danilo Bucchi (Italy) and the duo Interesni Kaxki (Ukraine), mostly all from the graffiti/Street Art world. A separately organized but related project on the harbor-facing row of eight silos was completed by one artist alone, the Lisbon-based Vhils…continue reading here


No. 6
BLU Allies : A Counter Exhibition to “Banksy & Co.” Launched in Bologna

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Tadlock (photo © @around730)

“An anti-Banksy & Co. Street Art show opened in Bologna Italy the same night as its controversial bank-backed cousin with brand new works by 50 or so Italian and international Street Artists and open admission to their outdoor ‘museum’.

 “It is free and spontaneous, as Street Art should be,” says an organizer and participant named About Ponny as he describes the exuberant and sometimes saucy toned exhibition on the grounds of the sprawling former headquarters of Zincaturificio Bolognese which is destined for future demolition.

“The message we want to convey is that true street art is found where it was born, in the street and not in the paid exhibits,” says Bibbito, who along with two other out-of-town street artists named Jamesboy and Enter/Exit found food and couches during their installations thanks to an association of artists called L’Associazione Serendippo. Together, these artists say, they and other organizers want to send a “strong signal” by creating “one of the largest museums of ephemeral street art ever made”. The new coalition named this project “R.U.S.Co” (Recupero Urbano Spazi Comuni) or (Urban Renewal Common spaces).

The new 16,000 m2 open-air art show may appear as a rather curious development because its method of protest runs completely counter to that of the shows’ most vocal and high-profile critic, BLU, who last week protested the same show by defiantly destroying 20 years of his own public paintings, rather than making new ones…Continue reading here


No. 5
Raising Yellowcake in Grand Canyon: Icy & Sot, Jetsonorama in Arizona

brooklyn-street-art-icy-sot-navajo-nation-06-16-web-3

Icy & Sot. “Nuclear Plant” Navajo Nation. Arizona. June 2017. (photo © Icy & Sot)

“Yellow Cake: A simple sweet dessert confection that gets its signature color from 8 egg yolks and a cup of butter, and is great with either vanilla or chocolate icing.

Yellowcake: A type of uranium concentrate powder obtained from leach solutions, in an intermediate step in the processing of uranium ores. Also, its radioactive. Also, Colin Powell showed off a vial of it at the United Nations to sell the Iraq invasion in 2003 to that body and the world.

Being more knowledgeable about the dessert variety of yellow cake than the desert variety of uranium contamination, we turn to Street Artists Jetsonorama and Icy & Sot to educate us about the active uranium mines that are at the North Rim of The Grand Canyon. The three worked jointly in June to create new public works addressing the topic and we have each of them here for you to see.

“The issue of uranium contamination and nuclear waste is timely as there is an active uranium mine at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon presently and a proposal to start mining at the South Rim,” explains Jetsonorama (Chip Thomas), who is a local artist, a practicing doctor, and a social activist advocating for the people who live on the reservation and the natural environment in general…Continue reading here


No. 4
Nychos Slays in New York : IKONS Revealed as Never Before

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Nychos. “Dissection of Sigmund Freud”. Vienna Therapy. Manhattan, NY. June 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Scientists, psychologists, surgeons…in the end we’re all driven by a similar curiosity.”

This month has been a whirlwind in New York for Austrian Street Artist /fine artist /illustrator named Nychos and he’s made quite the iconic impression. Anchored by a show that opened last weekend of canvasses and illustrations at Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea named “IKON” and assisted by a co-branded sculptural event with the Vienna Tourist Board, the surreal dissectionist didn’t rest there.

In the weeks leading up to and after these events he also managed to hit a number of walls in Coney Island, Bushwick, and Jersey City…oh and he knocked out a box truck as well.

In addition to pulling out an astounding sculpture of Sigmund Freud looming over a couch that drew a crowd to the foot of the (also iconic) Flatiron Building at 23rd and 6th, the afterparty and reception featured Dominic Freud, the great grandson of the founder of psychoanalysis, who surmised that if he were alive today he would definitely have wanted to put Nychos on his couch…Continue reading here


No 3
35 Artists in Barcelona Trying To Save The Arctic with Greenpeace

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La Castillo. Save The Arctic. Barcelona, Spain. April 2016. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

“Yesterday our posting was about artists in London creating works about endangered species and today we go to Barcelona where 35 artists joined with Greenpeace and a local group named RebobinArt on April 9th to create works centered on environmental issues, especially the quickly disappearing polar ice cap.

Only three days later scientists announced that the Greenland “Melt” has happened one month earlier than usual this year, smashing records and causing scientists to reexamine their measuring instruments to make sure they were working correctly.

The art-platform model of RebobinArt is interesting because they are a community organization that manages spaces and issues permits for painting for competitions, festivals, exhibitions, educational programs, and cause-based events like this one.

Under the guidance of Director Marc Garcia, RobobinArt promotes and facilitates a different sort of public painting that is not strictly commercial and yet it is clearly not the freewheeling graffiti/street art based stuff that made Barcelona such a magnet for artists in the early-mid 2000s…Continue reading here


No. 2
Chip Thomas’ New Mural, Indigenous People, and #NoDAPL

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Chip Thomas. The original photograph of JC Morningstar holding her dog on a swing. Indigenous People’s Day at Fort Lewis College. Durango, CO. (photo © Chip Thomas)

“Street Artist and activist Jetsonorama (Chip Thomas) saw his work pull together a number of people in Durango, Colorado on October 10th as the city and the college celebrated their first ever “Indigenous People’s Day”. His photograph of an indigenous youth named JC Morningstar swinging and kissing her dog was chosen by a group of students from Fort Lewis College, where 24% of the population is indigenous.

The unveiling ceremony for the mural began with a traditional pow wow prayer by a drum circle and Chip says “the highlight of the day for me was having JC, her dog and her family travel 4 hours to Durango to attend the unveiling before going to the Tribe Called Red show that evening.”…Continue reading here


No 1
Chihuahua, a Mexican Desert City with a Few “Street Art” Blooms

brooklyn-street-art-paola-delfin-jaime-rojo-chihuahua-01-16-web-1

Paola Delfin. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Chihuahua is like one big ranch,” says a local reporter who guides you around this desert city known for beef, cheese, sotol, cowboy boots… and a growing middle class – thanks to the hundred plus multinational maquiladoras operating here with a focus on aerospace, medical equipment, and automobile manufacturing.

The “ranch” metaphor is meant to be welcoming, but it also lets you know that this city of nearly a million can still feel like a small town. This is the capital of Mexico’s largest state, which goes by the same name. And yes, the diminutive and scrappy dog originated here – as did Pancho Villa, and you can visit his homestead if you like.

It’s not the typical city where you might expect to find Street Art, yet only a few blocks from the government palace downtown that holds two stories of wall paintings by Mexican muralist Aarón Piña Mora, you will find new paintings in the dusty side streets that indicate a more international flavor is present…Continue reading here

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Chihuahua, a Mexican Desert City with a Few “Street Art” Blooms

Chihuahua, a Mexican Desert City with a Few “Street Art” Blooms

“Chihuahua is like one big ranch,” says a local reporter who guides you around this desert city known for beef, cheese, sotol, cowboy boots… and a growing middle class – thanks to the hundred plus multinational maquiladoras operating here with a focus on aerospace, medical equipment, and automobile manufacturing.

The “ranch” metaphor is meant to be welcoming, but it also lets you know that this city of nearly a million can still feel like a small town. This is the capital of Mexico’s largest state, which goes by the same name. And yes, the diminutive and scrappy dog originated here – as did Pancho Villa, and you can visit his homestead if you like.

It’s not the typical city where you might expect to find Street Art, yet only a few blocks from the government palace downtown that holds two stories of wall paintings by Mexican muralist Aarón Piña Mora, you will find new paintings in the dusty side streets that indicate a more international flavor is present.

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Paola Delfin. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Largely conservative by most accounts, Chihuahua city in the twenty-teens has been sampling the flavors of the burgeoning global Street Art scene thanks two locally organized arts festivals; Ruta in 2013 and Centrópolis in 2014, and to the stylistic adventuring of local artists on other walls outside these approved ones.

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Paola Delfin. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Local custom has been to dismiss those un-permissioned painters as cholos, a disparaging term referring to a criminal element. Today its not as simple to disparage this rising tide of painters in the streets when cities across Europe and the US are actually seeking out and inviting Street Artists and muralists to come and revitalize a neighborhood or draw youth into a city center.

“Street Art has traditionally been seen as a form of vandalism but thanks to the festivals that include visual artists as the special guest it is slowly changing the way people see graffiti and street art,” explains Ivonne Dalila Miramontes, a curator and photographer who studied in the Arts Faculty of the Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, and who currently teaches visual arts to high school students.

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Paola Delfin. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“It’s a subtle distinction but it’s a big deal, because now the new murals have a meaning and people don’t see art in the streets anymore strictly as vandalism and it has been a great opportunity for local artist to express themselves and be recognized as artists.”

You’ll see tagging on abandoned walls in some neighborhoods, and there is a range of old-school graffiti styles represented along with political ads for candidates and commercial ads for muffler repair shops on the low flung long walls that run alongside some carreteras in Chihuahua.

You’ll also see uncommissioned paintings that are figurative, or minimally abstract, or have a more trained illustrators eye here and there. Suddenly it looks like there is a small mushrooming of art on the streets. Is it a movement, a sign of a future renaissance of arts and culture, as we have seen in many international cities, or is it a chance outcropping that will be stomped out or left to die in the sun?

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Adán Estrada AKA El Disko. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“It is really great to be able to do my work in different cities,” says Paola Delfin, one of the new breed of Mexican Street Artists who has travelled to festivals internationally at the invitation of organizers in Miami, Puerto Rico, Brazil, even Berlin.

“I like to observe the impact that this work has on the people and on the environment in each of them. Coming from Mexico City where art, specifically muralism, has an important history, it’s always interesting and inspiring to work in new places. Some cities like Berlin also have a huge background of art, muralism or street art, so people are more accustomed to this work.”

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HidroC. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Delfin’s own female-centric paintings here were completed during the Centrópolis festival – one with undulating wavelike hair that envelops the monochromatic figure on a partially decayed wall. The other painting uses a more realist technique she is experimenting with; levitating above the street perhaps to recall the magic realism famous in Latin literature by writers like the celebrated Colombian Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who wrote many of his greatest works while living in Mexico City for decades.

“’Susana’, the levitating modern girl, is a based on a girl I met during the festival,” Delfin says, “She was helping all the artists there and she helped me a lot – and I like to paint people who had some impact in my life somehow, and I asked here if I could use her as a model.”

Serene and still, the artist says the figure is meant to allude to a dangerous trade that has claimed many young women closer to the border four hours north of here.“I painted ‘Susana’ sleeping. She is waiting to wake up and find some peace surrounding her. For me she represents the young women up there.” Of course some of the works touch on societal themes, and others can have political undertones.

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CRON. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For Bebo, a Mexican artist who has created many of his trademark foxes as stencils and abtract linear forms on walls throughout cities south and north of the border, his work is allegorical – although most passersby won’t necessarily know how strong his intent is. “I use mostly foxes on my work. I think foxes’ faces show how diverse they are physically as specimens but I also like their character – playful and mythical at the same time. ”

“My work can’t ignore this absurd political reality we are in. It feels like the whole of Mexico is a battle ground,” he says as he talks about the five paintings he did in Chihuahua city in 2014. “My work can’t reflect this reality but instead wants to change it. It is a small step to do something. My approach is entirely metaphysical. To fight against the ignorance I use my imagination. To fight against terror I use hope. I like to offer a different path.”

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Eldeini. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

His path to Chihuahua was lead by Felix Lugo, a local artist and independent curator who organized the Street Artists with the Centrópolis festival, which included three days music stages, theatre, traditional cultural events, and according to organizers, close to 100,000 people. Although not all of that foot traffic was here to see the murals, he thinks that a painting is often better than a blank wall.

“I paint to open a dialogue on the streets,” says Bebo, “It is like a window to establish change in a specific city and at the same time to connect people with each other.”

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Ovrlnds and DISKO. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For now, we offer you these images of a few remaining pieces and some brand new ones that were discovered around the city, as well as an abandoned spot north of the metropolis where you’ll find more typical graffiti artists trying their hand at the spray can.

Who knows if this warm and dry city can support the new generation of creative voices that are now being called on in many cities globally to create excitement and engage art fans, but we did see a few cafes and even a gallery or two where this art has been springing up.

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Ovrlnds and Disko. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I do see a future for a large Street Art/mural festival,” says Miramontes, who notes that local artists were energized by the attention that the plastic arts were receiving.

“It made me feel that art is being taken seriously in my city. Also the murals are the only things that still remain after all the festivals, and when I pass by any of the artworks I remember being around while the artists were working and seeing friends, families and people in general having fun enjoying this form of art. We just need more people interested and involved in this environment so we can achieve success by bringing this kind of art to the community.”

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Mil Amores. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mil Amores. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jelly Fish. Detail. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jelly Fish. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mil Amores. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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CAM. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mil Amores. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mil Amores. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Clasicco. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Detail. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Chihuahua, Mexico. Centropolis Art Festival 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BEBO. Santa Isabel. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown. Santa Isabel. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown. Santa Isabel. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Artist Unknown. Santa Isabel. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mil Amores. Santa Isabel. Chihuahua, Mexico. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

 

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post.

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This article is also published on El Huffington Post.

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