All posts tagged: Brazil

BSA Film Friday: 09.06.19

BSA Film Friday: 09.06.19

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Swoon and The Heliotrope Foundation: A Catalyst For Local Change
2. One Minute Dance: Petites Deambulations Sur “Paradis Perdus”
3. Festival Concreto #5 – Narcelio Grud in Fortaleza, Brazil
4. Murfy Paints Mural for La Fiesta de los Corremayo


BSA Special Feature: Swoon and The Heliotrope Foundation: A Catalyst For Local Change

Long term economic development? From a Street Artist? Sustainable homes? Jobs? Schools?

Yes, if the question is about Cormiers, Haiti and the answer is Street Artist Swoon with her Heliotrope Foundation. You can draw a direct through-line from her earliest wheatpastes of people on the street to the earthquake surviving Haitians whom these buildings and programs are for and from. By listening, sharing, and working alongside, the volunteers and foundation have been building community. And you thought it was all about vandalism, didn’t you?

One Minute Dance: Petites Deambulations Sur “Paradis Perdus”

Nadia Vadori-Gauthier, the performance artist behind the project One Minute of Dance Per Day, has teamed up with other dancers for a new project titled Petites deambulations sur “Paradis Perdus”

Festival Concreto #5 – Narcelio Grud in Fortaleza, Brazil

For 6 years artist, professor, and organizer Narcelio Grud has gradually grown the Concreto Festival in Forteleza. As he and the team prepare for November’s new edition, he tells BSA readers about this video recap of Concreto 5.

“In the timespan of 9 days, downtown Fortaleza received more than 40 artists from Brazil and all over the world to participate in the 5th edition of Festival Concreto – International Festival of Urban Art. Great names from the urban art scene, such as Mônica Nador, Guto Lacaz, Inti Castro, Sabek, SatOne and others, met between November 16 and 24 to color and democratize art in the city.

In the year of 2018, the Festival brought interventions and other activities to Downtown neighbourhood in Fortaleza, Brazil, called ‘Centro’. The idea was to occupy and reestablish the connection with an area of the city that was once a great place of cultural movement, especially in the city’s ‘Belle Époque’. All this brought color and movement to the local landscapes, realigning the neighbourhood to a greater valorization of urban culture.

In the video, you can watch most of the activities and artworks that took place in the Festival, as well as participant artists, staff members and the general public talking about their experience within Concreto.”

Murfy Paints Mural for La Fiesta de los Corremayo

Muralist Murfy was in the south of Spain to paint this four-story portrait of a child on the street. “This is a girl dressed in a harlequin costume,” he says of the outfit, “a typical feature at a party in southern Alhama de Murcia, which is where this is.” The La Fiesta de los Corremayo is at the end of April and beginning of May and features bands, music, food, and lots of dancing in the streets by people wearing variations of the harlequin.

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Narcelio Grud, BSA Wishes And Hopes For 2019

Narcelio Grud, BSA Wishes And Hopes For 2019

As we draw closer to the new year we’ve asked a very special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2018 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for them. It’s a box of treats to surprise you with every day – and conjure our hopes and wishes for 2019. This is our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ to you for inspiring us throughout the year.


Today’s special guest:


Narcelio Grud, Brazilian Street Artist, sculptor, public interventionist and inventor. Founder of the Concreto Festival of International Urban Art, now in its 5th year in Fortaleza.


May the bells of 2019 chime new chords, may the sea wash and clean all that is needed and change the energy of the world!

May the fascism that shakes Brazil and other countries be swept by the firmness and tenderness of love.

And may we be strong, resistant and conscious in these times of struggle.

Sea Bells

Photographer: Difusor Art Films

Location: Brazil, Fortaleza

August, 2018

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Panmela Castro: “Doriridade” and the Sisterhood of Shared Pain in Rio

Panmela Castro: “Doriridade” and the Sisterhood of Shared Pain in Rio

“I am not free while any woman is unfree, even when her shackles are very different from my own.”

― Audre Lorde


Panmela Castro. Dororidade” (Painrity) Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. November 2018 (photo © Panmela Castro)

Brazilian Street Artist Panmela Castro is unveiling her new three story high mural in Rio de Janeiro that acknowledges the sisterhood that comes from shared pain. She calls it “Dororidade” and tells BSA that it explains the relationship of affection and solidarity between women who have bonded through experiences of anguish and misery.

Panmela Castro. Dororidade” (Painrity) Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. November 2018 (photo © Panmela Castro)

“It creates an image of two black women joined by their hair, sisters of shared minds, ideas, experiences,” says the artist, who has painted murals advocating for women’s rights, power, and showcased beauty in more than 30 cities around the world. In addition to overt violence, Castro says that this mural is addressing, “The pain that hurts when being attacked by machismo and the pain that hurts when being attacked by racism.”

The mural will be launched on November 20th, Black Consciousness Day, in Rio de Janeiro, with a big party from 4 to 8 pm.

Panmela Castro. Dororidade” (Painrity) Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. November 2018 (photo © Panmela Castro)

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BSA Film Friday 07.27.18

BSA Film Friday 07.27.18

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Yok & Sheryo: Mumbai “Varuna Vessel”
2. Mr. June Paints in June
3. Concreto #4 , Fortaleza, Brazil
4. Doug Gillen takes on Email Art Scams

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BSA Special Feature: Yok & Sheryo: Mumbai “Varuna Vessel”

The Street Art duo of Sheryo and Yok plumb the depths of the urban environment in their travels, getting to know a culture and the people there – a full immersion practice that helps them conceptualize and fashion street murals, gallery shows and exhibitions that utilize the traditions, lore, language, and even the skills of local tradespeople.

This week we have a travelogue to the Sassoon docks in Mumbai where they collaborate with fisherman and women friends, fabricators and textile designers in the street, on a boat, and ultimately in an exhibition called “Varuna Vessel”. Extra points awarded here for the soundtrack, dropped on you in typical S&Y style like a needle on a record, no fade, all funk.

Mr. June Paints in June

Last month Mr. June was in Greensboro, North Carolina to paint a 45 meter diameter water tank roof. In the southern heat for 13 days painting? Give it up for Mr. June, who calls this job for a water resources facility his ode to the beauty of water.

 

Concreto #4 , Fortaleza, Brazil

Before the 5th Concreto Festival kicks into motion this November it’s good to look at the final video they made from the last one.

The brainchild of artist and organizer Narcélio Grud, the festival is in partnership with an urban art school that provides students with a theoretical background and support for intellectual experimentation with this kind of art in the streets that melts barriers.

 

Doug Gillen takes on Email Art Scams

As if it isn’t already challenging enough to be an artist – for the 99% without who are decidedly stressed for time, money, and a publicist. No matter, there are still lowlifes who will try to scam you bro/sis. Occasionally right through your inbox!

Public Security Officer Gillen introduces this underworld of squirrelly types who will try to persuade you into giving over your money to them for massaging your ego. We know that may sound appealing to some of you but in this case the only stripper involved is you, sexy.

 

 

 

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INO and “Broken” in Fortaleza, Brazil

INO and “Broken” in Fortaleza, Brazil

The Greek Street Artist INO has been consistently observing the social and political factors that are at play in modern society and has been addressing these themes through his work painting large murals in more cities around the world. This week in Fortaleza aside the Atlantic in northeastern Brazil, INO created a headless female form that for him is evocative of a socio-political order that is “Broken”.

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

“This is a place where someone can see very big contradictions,” he tells us, “the poverty in the street, people begging for food – while you eat in the restaurant, the prostitutes every night in the streets.”

He shows us a photo of a street scene where  women are being questioned by the police that he took at night while he was painting his wall from the vantage point of his lift up above. His imagination is activated by the scene, and he thinks of the frightening circumstances that women in the sex trade are put in that exploit them repeatedly.

“All of this, together with the rich people, the expensive apartments in huge luxury buildings that look empty, surrounded by barbed wire fences in each condominium yard…” It all is disturbing to him, and a scene repeated in many cities in so-called developed nations where the stratification between rich and poor is getting more pronounced than ever before in the modern era, leaving more feeling powerless and easily victimized.

For his new mural entitled “Broken”, completed here during the 4th Concreto Festival, the anonymous form is an obvious reference to people caught in a de-humanizing system. “The piece is depicting a naked thin woman in a position of offering her body, with a black splash coming from the head,” he says.

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

INO. “Broken”. Festival Concreto. Fortaleza, Brazil. November, 2017. (photo © INO)

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“Meeting Of Favela” and a Thousand Artists in Rio : Martha Cooper Dispatch

“Meeting Of Favela” and a Thousand Artists in Rio : Martha Cooper Dispatch

Rio is hot in December. When you add a thousand artists to the favela it gets a lot hotter.

Aquilas Mano Costa from Rio De Janeiro. Mr. Costa a community coordinator and a tattoo artist displays his Meeting Of Favela tattoo. Aquilas is a member of the Costa family which was the host family of Ms. Cooper and other guests durin MOF. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)


The 10th Meeting of Favela (MOF) is a homegrown Graffiti and Urban Art mural festival in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil that has happened every November/December with more than hundreds of national and international artists. To give you an idea of scale, some estimates of the number of artists who flock here number well past a thousand and include participants from the Americas and Europe in addition to Brazilians.

Even though the huge multi-day event contains many of the familiar signposts of other Urban and Graffiti Art Festivals; live hip hop music performances, MCs, DJS, live B-boying (breakdancing), theatrical and circus elements, for example, the organizers of MOF take pride that they are the considered by many as the largest voluntary Urban Art event in the world.

Pixador JJ from Rio De Janeiro. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

There are other significant differences, according to long time documentor of this global street scene, photographer and living urban art icon Martha Cooper, who says that she had been to Sao Paulo a number of times but never to Rio despite hearing of Meeting of Favela many times over the last few years.

“Unlike most Street Art festivals,” Cooper tells us, “MOF is open to all artists to paint.” This alone is a departure from the increasingly curated and selective Street Art festivals that are held in many cities today. Additionally, the wall allocation is more organic and inclusive of a social contract between residents and artists – an important and very significant rule, says Ms. Cooper.

Conebo from Rio De Janeiro. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

“Artists must find their own walls,” she says. “This means they must walk around the favela and interact with the residents to get their permission before starting to paint. Some artists have established relationships with owners and return every year to paint the same wall. Other residents recruit artists and ask them to paint something special, such as a portrait.”

What about supplies? “Artists must supply their own paint – however MOF organizers often arrange to have discounted paint available on site.”

Bixcoito from Rio De Janeiro. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Modeled loosely after the popular and global “Meeting of Styles” graffiti events, this one intends to be more inclusive and engaged with the community. You can see that it is primarily a graffiti event but there are influences from what is more commonly considered the Street Art scene as well as traditional community murals. “The favela was full of pretty much every style of letters and images,” says Ms. Cooper.

Painting on selected individual walls begins in earnest on Sunday so on Saturday artists paint on a long collaborative wall at the base of Vila Operária, in Duque de Caxias, a real meeting of styles. “In addition there were spray workshops for the kids, a graffiti clown who juggled spray cans, a brass band, b-boys and b-girls breaking with live DJs, and numerous bars and food stands,” says Martha.

@odairdon83. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

A volunteer run organization, Meeting of Favela relies on people who love the community, the culture, and the artists to keep this many constituencies happy and involved. While much of Urban Art’s early roots are associated with rebellious acts of mark-making conceived of and delivered antagonistically with negative or cynical intentions, at the opposite pole is a true community festival like this that successfully celebrates the creative spirit in myriad ways.

Not to mention how organized they have to be. “An experienced band of volunteers, many who have participated for years, is on hand to facilitate the artists and handle any problems on the spot,” Ms. Cooper reports.

Jocivaldo Silva AKA Bigod from the Northern State of Bahia, Brazil. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Naturally it feels like it is impossible to document completely. “There were so many fresh walls tucked away up and down the narrow streets and around every corner it was impossible for me to find and photograph them all,” says Cooper. But somehow, looking over the photos she collected and remembering the atmosphere, it was okay if she missed a couple of opportunities.

“The favela was intensively alive with residents and visitors mingling freely and happily,” she says.

AMO Crew from Brazil. Carla Felizardo – NEGRA, Lu Brasil, Mariana Maia – Ato and Taina Xavier- Baker painted the portraits of these girls on the wall of their home. Their names are, Ana Luiza, Laryssa and Marcelly. The girls’ grandmother had wished for portraits of her granddaughters painted during last year’s event but sadly she passed away. This year the girls’ mother, Ms. Gomes shown here holding the sketch for the mural arranged to fulfill the grandmother’s dream with the help of the AMO Crew. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Brazilian artists Othejo, Lirow and Jason. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

An unidentified artist paints the wheels of a wheel chair. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Chilean artist Edie. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Mav Group from Valparaiso, Chile; Jonas Salio De La Ballena, Isaac Codomano, Cha AH and Juan Pablo Lopez Sepulveda paint the portrait of Favela Operaria resident Suellen Ferreira Santos. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Fabio Tirado from Curitiba, south of Brazil. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Unidentified Artist. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Carão from Rio de Janeiro. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

A hidden portrait by Carlos Bobi at Ipanema Beach. Mr. Bobi is a founder member MOF (Meeting of Favela). Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Unidentified Artist. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Sergio with his dog Thor. In the background a mural painted by Talu for last year’s MOF. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Unidentified artist. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Stilo Sucio Crew from Chile. Sometimes people scratch out the eyes on murals. One story that people tell is that the eye-scratchers are addicted to drugs.  Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Unidentified artist. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Young boys and their dog. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

 

Chilean artists Jotael and Luciana Munoz enjoying Ipanema Beach the day after MOF. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Soccer in Vidigal Favela with a mural by Andre Kajaman (one of the MOF founders) and Tarm1. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Painted houses by Dutch artists Haas and Hahn in Santa Marta Favela. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

Unidentified Artist. Vidigal Favela. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

From let to right: Vinicius Spam – MOF Team, Nextwo Viniius – MOF Team, Clarissa Piveta – Producer and photographer, Rafael Cruz – MOF Team, Andre Kajaman MOF Co-cofounder (Carlos Bobi is the other co-founder and is not in the picture) In the background holding a mic is Bruno Napo – MOF Team. Meeting Of Favela 2016. Favela Operaria. Duque de Caxias. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. (photo © Martha Cooper)

 

We wish to thank Martha Cooper for her generous time dedicated to this article and for sharing her photography work with BSA readers. Follow Ms. Cooper on IG at @marthacoopergram

Thank you to Clarissa Pivetta


This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Pedro H. Alonzo : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

Pedro H. Alonzo : Wishes & Hopes for 2017

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As we near the new year we’ve asked a special guest every day to take a moment to reflect on 2016 and to tell us about one photograph that best captures the year for him or her. It’s an assortment of treats for you to enjoy and contemplate as we all reflect on the year that has passed and conjure our hopes and wishes for the new year to come. It’s our way of sharing the sweetness of the season and of saying ‘Thank You’ for inspiring us throughout the year.

Pedro Alonzo is a Boston-based independent curator, writer, art advisor and recognized authority on Street Art who has worked with museums, private collections, and such artists as Banksy, Shepard Fairey, JR, Swoon, and Os Gemeos among others. This year Pedro looks at images from his travels and tells us that the simplest joys are sometimes the best ones.


Guarulhos, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil
February 3, 2016

Photo by Pedro H. Alonzo

I stumbled upon this mural while looking for parking in Guarhulos, Brazil, the home of Sao Paulo’s international airport. Due to difficulty finding parking and traffic congestion, I was able to take the photo on our fourth trip around the block.

In a city that boasts kilometer after kilometer of roadside murals, it was refreshing to find this image painted on the side of a laundromat. It is direct, funny and simple. I often think about how much I enjoyed being surprised by superheroes in their underwear.

I love coming across informal forms of expression such as this. No permits, no copyright, just do it.

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Panmela Castro, Olympic Goddess in Rio for the Games

Panmela Castro, Olympic Goddess in Rio for the Games

From Rio, “The Goddess of Victory” by Brazilian artist Panmela Castro on the Boulevard Olímpico. Fresh off her PM/10 mural in front of the under construction Urban Nation in Berlin, Panmela says that she feels lke she won an Olympic medal to paint this Greek goddess in her home country.

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Panmela Castro “The Goddess of Victory” Olympic Boulevard. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. August 2016. (photo © Panmela Castro)

A performance artist who is not afraid to challenge patriarchal structures about femininity and gender fluidity, and with whom we’ve talked to about carving words into her own body with a blade, Castro is no intellectual lightweight. So we take Ms. Castro seriously when she brings this winged woman to the Olympics – “the goddess that personifies victory, triumph and glory,” she tells us.

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Panmela Castro “The Goddess of Victory” Olympic Boulevard. Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. August 2016. (photo © Panmela Castro)

 

 

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Apolo Torres In São Paulo, Brazil for #EducationIsNotACrime

Apolo Torres In São Paulo, Brazil for #EducationIsNotACrime

Education should not be out of reach. Without it people are captives, especially when technology and resources are kept just beyond your grasp. Bluntly stated, keeping entire populations and countries uneducated plays directly into the hands of those who would manipulate them.

Knowledge is power.

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Diego Cagnato)

Street Artist Apolo Torres is an important player in Brazilian contemporary muralism and here he brings São Paulo on board with London, New York, Toronto, Sydney and Cape Town for an initiative called #EducationIsNotACrime.

Begun in 2014 by filmmaker and Newsweek journalist Maziar Bahari, the campaign continues to expand in defense of a universal right to education.

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Diego Cagnato)

In these exclusive photos Torres is seen scaling a tower to depict a girl whose reaching for a cloud of books, not quite clamping her small hand around one. Wrapped around her feet is a serpent, representing those who would prefer to keep her ignorant.

A father of two young girls himself, the topic is close to Torres’ home and heart, which is why he is excited about the conversations he will spark by doing this huge mural, which he tells us took more than 200 liters of paint. “It is essential that it dialogues with the place and the people who walk by and see the work. Public artworks have a huge potential to raise relevant issues to society,” he says in a press release.

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Diego Cagnato)

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Diego Cagnato)

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Diego Cagnato)

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Diego Cagnato)

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Apolo Torres for #NotACrime in São Paulo, Brazil. (photo © Apolo Torres)

 

Torres’ mural “Education is not a Crime” is produced by Da Terra Productions and was approved by the Urban Landscape Protection Committee (CPPU).

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BSA Film Friday: 03.18.16

BSA Film Friday: 03.18.16

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Olek’s Crochet Group Performance in India
2. Narcelio Grud and a Mobile Restroom
3. Más by Mateo in Montreal

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Olek’s Crochet Group Performance in India

An original idea combining art and activism as performance in public space, again conceived of, directed, and performed by Olek. Her second trip to India, Olek intimately studies the sociological structures that enable some while restrict others and in a gentle and firmly inspirational manner begins a crochet revolution.

The physical practice of creating crochet taps deeply into historical roles based on gender and class, among others. It is art, craft, and work simultaneously. The artful placing of non-performer persons performing in a public space – a crochet flash mob, if you will – activates the environment powerfully. Add to this a symbolic denial of speech or sight by way of gag or blindfold and you have a silently shocking referendum on societal inequality, and a very personal appreciation for the path of the individual.

Among her many missions is to support Maitri to reduce gender based violence. “They are doing so much for those who need,” she tells us.

 

Narcelio Grud and a Mobile Restroom

A social scientist of a different stripe, Narcelio Grud constructs the project and places it in the public sphere to observe how you/we interact with it. Knowing what details are necessary to provoke a reaction is part of his genius and the product of insightful study. Encountering one of his installations, people are unwittingly, willingly, the performers. Welcome to the show.

Más by Mateo in Montreal

Covering a ruddy multi-planed surface like exposed brick by brush and roller is no quick and easy feat. Mateo shows us how to use brush, aerosol, and stencil to bring to this Montreal wall a reminder to sit quietly and calmly contemplate. Her eyes have been blindfolded with a sign that says Más; as in “No Más“, no more visual information flooding at you from different directions. Be calm.

“In a society of consumption where everything keeps going faster and we always desire more,” he says. “We shouldn’t fail to remind ourselves to slow down, and therefore take time to better ourselves as individuals.”

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ROA in Tunisia and Brazil — New Homes for His Wildlife

ROA in Tunisia and Brazil — New Homes for His Wildlife

The urban naturalist ROA returns to us today with tales of his travels to two distinctly different regions of the world with great distances between their cultures as well as geography. What they have in common, besides ROA’s signature black and white animals and skeletons, is their natural beauty and stillness, transcending their contrasts.

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

The very conservative town of Er-Riadh lies on the largest island of North Africa in Tunisia called Djerba (the D is rather silent in pronunciation). 100 or so street artists and muralists from around the world were invited along with ROA last year to create artworks on the walls of the mostly one story buildings in this arid region bordering the Mediterranean and Gulf of Gabes.

Organized by Mehdi Ben Cheikh, founder of the French Galerie Itinerrance, the “Djerbahood” project provides the visiting artists with unique canvases and settings, including the arched and domed architectural details that ROA ingeniously incorporates into some of his works.

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

Following these Djerba images are new pieces spread across Brazil, where ROA traveled to see ruins and abandoned places around and between São Paulo, Minas Gerais, and Brasilia, “exploring the fauna and flora and doing some little interventions,” he says. That remarkable understatement by the talented Mr. ROA may help viewers understand the diplomatic skills that a truly global graffiti / street / urban artist needs to have when carefully negotiating various cultures and localities around the world with an aerosol can in hand. What it doesn’t tell you about ROA is his sheer tenacity and curiosity for discovery. The work itself does that.

“I mostly painted abandoned structures that I found. I particularly liked an old train station I discovered that dates back to the time when we first began industrializing. It made me think of the outward spread of western civilization, the cutting down of forests and the hunting of animals. Naturally this was one of the inspirations for the trap, the arrows and the trapped toucan I painted in and around the old station.”

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © Aline Deschamps)

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Djerba(-hood), Tunisia. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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This fish is heading for the water. ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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A somewhat rudimentary trap recalling an earlier age at this abandoned train station site by ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

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A departure from his usual, flying arrows that are likely headed toward his next subject. ROA. Brazil. 2014 (photo © ROA)

 

 

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BSA Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post.

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BSA’s Piece on “Submerged Motherlands” Acclaimed for Year

BSA’s Piece on “Submerged Motherlands” Acclaimed for Year

BSA with Swoon at Brooklyn Museum Sited by Huff Post Editors as Proud Moment of 2014

We’re very pleased and thankful to be included in this short list chosen by the editors of Huffington Post Arts & Culture as a story they are most proud of publishing last year.

In her introduction to the list, editor Katherine Brooks writes:

“It turns out, 365 days is hard to summarize in anything but a laundry list of seemingly disparate phenomena, filled with the good — woman-centric street art, rising Detroit art scenes, spotlights on unseen American art– and the bad less than good — holiday butt plugs, punching bags by Monet, Koonsmania. But, as a New Year dawns, we found ourselves just wanting to focus on the things that made us beam with pride in 2014. So we made a list of those things, a list of the pieces we’re proud of.”

Brooklyn-Street-Art-740-Huffpost-Swoon-Most-Proud-2014-Screen-Shot-2015-01-03-at-12.53

Describing why we thought this was an important story for us we wrote:

“We loved a lot of stories this year, but this hometown Brooklyn one about a street artist with humanity mounting her first solo major museum exhibition was a special turning point — and an astounding success. For us street art is a conversation, a continuum of expression, and Swoon is always a part of it. From following her street career to her transition to international fame to witnessing this exhibition coming to fruition in person in the months leading up to the Brooklyn Museum show, it is easy to understand why Swoon still remains a crucial part of the amazing street art scene and continues to set a standard.”

-Jaime Rojo & Steven Harrington, HuffPost Arts&Culture bloggers and co-founders of Brooklyn Street Art

In fact, we wrote 48 articles that were published on the Huffington Post in 2014, and as a collection we hope they further elucidate the vast and meaningful impact that the Street Art / graffiti / urban art movement continues to have on our culture, our public space, and our arts institutions.

Together that collection of articles published by BSA on Huffpost in ’14 spanned the globe including stories from Malaysia, Poland, Spain, France, Norway, Switzerland, Germany, New York, Arizona, The Navajo Nation, Philadelphia, Sweden, Istanbul, New Jersey, Lisbon, The Gambia, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand, Rome, India, Italy, Delhi (India), Montreal, San Francisco, London, Coachella, Chicago, Kabul (Afghanistan), and Kiev (Ukraine).

Here on BSA we published another 320 postings (more or less).

We thank you for allowing us to share these inspirational and educational stories with you and we are honored to be able to continue the conversation with artists, art fans, collectors, curators, academics, gallerists, museums, and arts institutions. Our passion for Street Art and related movements is only superceded by our love for the creative spirit, and we are happy whenever we encounter it.

Our published articles on HuffPost in 2014, beginning with the most recent:

 

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