All posts tagged: Beau Stanton

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.26.19 – Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ*

BSA Images Of The Week: 05.26.19 – Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ*

Happy Memorial Day Weekend! – we are smack in the middle of it today.

Colloquially thought of as the first weekend of summer in the US, it is also the first weekend when there are lifeguards at the beach. Since New Yorkers love to head to the Jersey Shore (no offense Coney Island) we thought we’d regale you with some fresh shots this week of cool murals on the boardwalk in Asbury Park, New Jersey.

Most of these are part of the “Wooden Walls” a program created by Jenn Hampton, co-director of Parlor Gallery, who tells us that it was inspired by the destruction of a hurricane here that pulled up so much of the wooden boardwalk that is iconic to the shore experience here.

Haculla . Mike Shine . Porkchop. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I started doing it after Hurricane Sandy because they were all these boards up from the devastation,” she explains. “It kind of reminded me of when you go into an artists’ studio and there are little excerpts of paintings that the artist is working on. Some may feel sad because they see unfinished  paintings – but for people who are creative it creates excitement because it is about ‘what’s to come.’”

Haculla . Mike Shine. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

She’s always trying to bring art to the public space, so this devastation prompted her to write proposals to start the program and it worked. “It’s weird that it took a natural disaster for me to get funding for an art project!” she laughs. Five years of steadily growing the list of artists, the project now includes local, national, and internationally recognized street artists.

Wooden Walls producer Angie Sugrim says that this project is as personal as it is public. “Jenn and I both feel a deep sense of stewardship in our community and this project and all it entails are our way of giving back and helping to grow what we love about our town. We both are eternal believers in the power of art and seeing it help to transform Asbury Park.”

Haculla . Porkchop. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“I try to curate it from the eyes of a six-year-old and a 20-year-old and a 80 year-old – because we get such a diverse crowd on the boardwalk,” says Hampton. “I just want to make sure that there is art in that spirit of creation next to the ocean. I think that there is something really poetic about.”

Time and the elements have begun to fade and weather the walls, but she thinks it just adds character.

“I think people get too attached to public art,” she says. “The impermanence of it makes it really special and you have to see it and engage with it – Mother Nature will take it back when it wants!”

Ann Lewis AKA Gilf!. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

So here’s our weekly interview with the street (or boardwalk), this time featuring Ann Lewis, Art of Pau, Beau Stanton, Dee Dee, Fanakapan, Haculla, Hellbent, Indie 184, James Vance, Jessy Nite, Joe Iurato, Lauren Napolitano, Lauren YS, Logan Hicks, London Kaye, Porkchop, RC Hagans, Rubin 415, and Shepard Fairey.

Hellbent. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
James Vance. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Rubin 415. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lauren Napolitano. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Lauren YS. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Jessy Nite. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Dee Dee. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fanakapan. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Fanakapan. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Art of Pau. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Art of Pau. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Iurato. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Joe Iurato. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Shepard Fairey. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Indie 184. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Beau Stanton. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Logan Hicks. Wooden Walls Project. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
London Kaye. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RC Hagans. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RC Hagans. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
RC Hagans. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Asbury Park, NJ. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

*The classic 1973 album from Bruce Springstein, “Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ” – more HERE

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Beau Stanton Opens Minds to the “Megacosm”

Beau Stanton Opens Minds to the “Megacosm”

We stopped by the Brilliant Champions Gallery in Bushwick this week to see “Megacosm”, a solo show by Beau Stanton and found that he is cryptically transmitting brain signals across more frequencies than ever.

Beau Stanton. “Celestial Floatsam” MEGACOSM. Brilliant Champions Gallery. Brooklyn, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With Victorian ornamentation and quirky jerky animation, Beau is franchising his particular set of idiosyncrasies into a amplitude of items and disciplines including oil paintings, sculpture, printmaking, and increasingly now video.

Here are a few seafaring and exploration views of the show that is open until April 1 followed my a captivating sequence of Beau’s video animation art.

Beau Stanton. “Titan” MEGACOSM. Brilliant Champions Gallery. Brooklyn, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton. “Ornamented Head” MEGACOSM. Brilliant Champions Gallery. Brooklyn, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton. “Ornamented Head” MEGACOSM. Brilliant Champions Gallery. Brooklyn, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton. “Ornamented Man (Blue Orange)” . Derelict Vessel (Turquoise). MEGACOSM. Brilliant Champions Gallery. Brooklyn, NY. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Beau Stanton MEGACOSM exhibition is currently on view at the Brilliant Champions Gallery and will run until April 1st.

 

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Beau Stanton: A Vibrant Beacon Rises From the Ruins in Detroit

Beau Stanton: A Vibrant Beacon Rises From the Ruins in Detroit

Artist Beau Stanton has a studio practice and a street practice, but most wouldn’t think of him as a Street Artist, per se. Classically trained in illustration and oil painting, his precise and hand-rendered style borrows from traditional, historical, nautical, and religious influences. Related from their original context, his appropriated icons, figures, and sense of ornamentation are placed in relation to one another in a way that creates new timeless stories that are rooted in the past but are also in this moment.

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

On leave from Brooklyn for a brief residency in Detroit, lately Stanton has been spending his time urban exploring 20th century American civilization by wandering through abandoned car manufacturing plants and old churches that have left to crumble, taking inspiration from both the orderly design and mechanical interplay observed in factories and the ornamentally inspirational language used in sacred houses of worship.

Environments and implied histories like these overlap in varied practices during his short career that includes oil paintings, murals, larger scale installations, stained glass, and multimedia. Back at his residency studio he is now trying his hand at the artful laying hand cut tile, glass, ceramic, brick, found materials and mortar. Mosaic work is next and you can see him applying his study of the century-spanning craft with the same meticulous attention to detail that earmarks his work elsewhere.

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We were also exploring in Detroit recently and came upon a lone house painted by Stanton in a pavement gridded grassy field that once was a neighborhood. It is a common sight in modern Detroit, these remnants of a working class and middle class decimated by “free trade” and corporate greed. Entire neighborhoods now are barren and dotted with huge overgrown trees that were once in front yards, perhaps holding a swing or shading a couple of lawn chairs. Block after block one can see how livelihoods crumbled and burned to the ground – and now there is only the occasional house or church or small business still standing where once there was a community.

Painted during last years’ Murals in the Market festival, Stanton’s multi-sided mural uses vaguely familiar figures and ornamentation in eye-popping hues that suggest vibrant life is here again. The new construction of a house is made a beacon by his vision, a hopeful note that some think is a harbinger of the big D’s resurgent and budding future. Within it you may see allusions to Detroit’s Victorian architecture and mansions, ornamental gears of progress, rays of vision and inspiration. Of course, its all subjective.

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

We asked Beau about his house and his observations on Detroit during his time in the city right now.

Brooklyn Street Art: How did you find out about this cinder-block house?
Beau Stanton: Last year for the first Murals in the Market, the festival directors Roula David and Jesse Cory approached me to paint this house having known I’d been interested in doing a house intervention piece for a long time.  This was basically a dream scenario for me.

BSA: How do the designs you painted respond to the area around it?
Beau Stanton: The house is really visible from St. Aubin Street as one of the only remaining homes in a several block radius so I wanted to do something really bright and colorful that would make this weird little house appear renewed and re-occupied after being abandoned for almost a decade.  The images on the vertically oriented sides are both symbolic, a rendition of a classical bearded god figure crowned by historic Detroit architecture emerging from my usual mechanical wave patterns, and on the opposite side a tree with mostly bare branches with leaves starting to sprout as if coming into Spring.

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: You are preparing for an upcoming show this fall, right? What will you be focusing on?
Beau Stanton: I am currently a resident at the Red Bull House of Art in Detroit’s Eastern Market, the three month residency culminates with a large exhibition in the on site gallery where I will be showing alongside the other two residents Coby Kennedy and Lala Abbadon.

I’m using this residency as an opportunity to try out some new techniques and installation ideas I’ve wanted to do for a while involving a lot of resources one can only find in Detroit.  The main focus of my work will be large scale mosaics that are composed of locally sourced glass, ceramic, brick, marble, and other materials that I’ve been finding mostly in abandoned factories.  I want the work to have Detroit DNA while also playing with ideas of urban archaeology, alternate past/future scenarios, and ultimately creating something beautiful from the remains of Detroit’s glorious past, while celebrating the renewal and sense of optimism that is really palpable here.

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Often you have included mythical and/or nautical themes in your paintings. Did you have in mind the Detroit River or surrounding cityscape when conceptualizing this piece.
Beau Stanton: The main image of the head and crown incorporate about half a dozen historic homes from the nearby neighborhood of Brush Park.  Although most of these beautiful Victorian buildings are no longer around, a few of them have been recently restored to their original grandeur including the iconic Ransom Gillis house, one of my early Detroit obsessions.

BSA: How would you describe Detroit and the artist scene right now?
Beau Stanton: One of the first things I noticed on my first visit here several years ago was how supportive and tight knit the art scene is in Detroit.  When you come to this city, the abundance of space creates a sense that you can do or make anything, this can be intoxicating at first causing one to dream really big.  Eventually you come back to Earth but the essence of that feeling remains and I think that this is why you see such great work coming out of this city right now, both on the street and in the gallery.

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Beau Stanton. Detroit, USA. September 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LoMan Part II: A Brain Tree, A Mutant Insect and “Make Your Own Luck”

LoMan Part II: A Brain Tree, A Mutant Insect and “Make Your Own Luck”

The hits just keep on coming in Lower Manhattan (despite the closing of LIT Lounge) as Beau Stanton, Ludo, and ASVP finished their murals in a tie-breaker this week for the LoMan Arts Festival. Somewhere in the village there is a very large Os Gemeos wall going up as well and we’re thinking of having a drink in Little Italy today after strolling on the High Line – Suddenly Manhattan feels sort of HOT.

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Beau Stanton at work on his mural. LoManArt Fest 2015. NYC August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton

Aaaand, it’s done! “My largest mural to date and first done with aerosol,” says Beau Stanton of this mind-splitting mural, as he encourages us to allow our thoughts and positive cogitations to continue to grow by the day.

In thanking his hosts he also gives a shout out to the guys at Project Renewal Men’s Shelter on his Facebook page. This part of town has been a refuge for folks down on their luck historically, although these places are disappearing quickly.

 

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Beau Stanton. LoManArt Fest 2015. NYC August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ludo

The French Street Artist Ludo also has buzzed the LES with “Anatomy of a Bee”, a characteristically frankenhybrid of nature and military technology. In town for a print release with Castor Gallery, Ludo’s been doing stuff with BSA in Brooklyn for years, but he says excitedly, “This is biggest piece I’ve done so far in New York!”

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Ludo. Detail. LoManArt Fest 2015. NYC August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ludo. LoManArt Fest 2015. NYC August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

ASVP

The collective ASVP is known primarily for their prints, so it was a new development to see them hand painting a mural. Surely to be a print their selling, this one is called “Make Your Own Luck,” a quintessential NYC sentiment that is at play AT ALL TIMES.

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ASVP at work on their mural. LoManArt Fest 2015. NYC August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ASVP. LoManArt Fest 2015. NYC August 2015. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LoMan Art Festival Launches Its First Blast in NYC

LoMan Art Festival Launches Its First Blast in NYC

In a Street Art story rich with irony, Lower Manhattan has just hosted its first official mural festival.

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Space Invader (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

It’s not that the island has been bereft of murals of late – the Los Muros Hablan festival in Harlem has been through a couple of iterations way uptown, Brooklyn has the Bushwick Collective, and Queens has been hosting the Welling Court Project.

The irony lies in the fact that this Lower Manhattan Arts Festival (LoMan) is really the first codified effort to highlight the work of graffiti and Street Art creators in a section of NYC known from the 1970s-90s for the free-range street stylings of artists like Jean Michel Basquiat, Al Diaz, Keith Haring, Dan Witz, Jenny Holzer, Richard Hambleton, John Fekner, WK Interact, REVS/Cost, and artist collectives like AVANT, among many others.

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A major coup of sorts, LoMan exhibited the sculpture of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden that mysteriously showed up in a New York park this spring by Andrew Tider and Jeff Greenspan (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

In other words, on this baked concrete slab of downtown New York that was once a creative cesspool and Petri dish for on-the-street experimentation calling upon all manner of art making, today’s newly arriving young artists have no dream of moving in. In fact, most have fled in search of affordable rent.

Now the entrepreneurial spirit of a couple of guys, Wayne Rada and Rey Rosa, is luring artists back into Lower Manhattan, if only to paint a mural and help the tourist trade in Little Italy. That is how the L.I.S.A. Project (Little Italy Street Art) began three years ago, bringing in about 40 artists – a list that includes big names and small with varying degrees of influence on the current scene.

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Dain and Stikki Peaches (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Despite the historically inhospitable demeanor of hard-bitten and often bureaucratic old New York greeting him at many junctures, Rada has had some measured and great successes along the way, convincing local wall owners to give a  mural a try and raising funding from local businesses and art fans to help artists go larger.

So LoMan Fest’s first edition has finished this year, and along with a few volunteers, a smattering of helpful partners, and nearly continuous negotiations with local building owners, art supply companies, cherry picker rentals, and a collection of local and international artists, Rada and Rosa have pulled off a new event. Impressively it included large murals, smaller street installations, a couple of panel discussions, some live music performances, outdoor film screenings, a sticker battle, a live painting battle, live podcasts, a graffiti zine table, and a sculpture garden in an emptied parking lot on Mulberry Street.

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Damien Mitchell (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Struggle would be a good word. But like anything else when you are starting something for the first time you are spending a lot of time putting systems in place,” says Rada of the process. “There have been interesting challenges with the building owners and with the artists but when it is all said and done it has been all worth it.”

For a scene that was initiated by autonomous un-permissioned art-making on private property, the process of organizing graffiti and Street Artists to do approved pieces on legal walls may try the patience of the rebels who look on mural festivals as lacking ‘street cred’. But Rada sees it differently.

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Tatyana Fazlalizadeh expands on her campaign with brand new portraits for “Stop Telling Women to Smile.” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

“You know there are people in this world that don’t appreciate this and I just want people to enjoy the pieces as long as they can. Isn’t the fun part of street art that moment when you turn the corner and discover it? That’s really what we are trying to do here. For me it’s a collaborative process of trying to find them a spot – which is also normally something bigger where they can take their time and really think it out. In turn, when that work is complete their existing fans enjoy it, and also it helps them get new fans.”

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Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

A final irony is that LoMan is joining a long list of Street Art-inspired mural festivals worldwide that you might have thought New York would have been near the front of.

Brooklyn Street Art: I imagine you’ve seen the rise of Street Art festivals and you’ve seen the character perhaps of specific festivals in different parts of the world. Do you think there is something specific about New York’s current Street Art scene that has a personality or specific voice?
Wayne Rada: First of all I studied every single festival out there from Pow! Wow! to Nuart, every single one. I’ve also had conversations with people who coordinate those festivals so that I could do a better job with this. I just feel like New York is, and this is grandiose to say, the nexus of the universe for the art world. It just seemed there was something missing and it made sense to have something here.”

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Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Given the history and the populations of NYC, maybe the strength is the diversity of styles and international artists who are drawn to this particular city to drop a piece throughout the year on rooftops, under bridges, on abandoned lots and doorways. After a minute, Rada decides that this may be what makes a festival like this distinctly New York.

“So in the art world there are so many artists and there are so many Street Artists – and Lower Manhattan especially is represented by something like 126 different cultures and many different races and languages that make up downtown,” he says, “so it makes sense to try to be as diverse as possible and have as many of those voices represented as we could – men and women, all ages, and all walks of life.”

Here’s your first look at LoMan, but it won’t be your last. Rada and Rosa tell us they already have 2016 all planned.

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Art Is Trash typically uses actual trash found on the street to create impromptu dioramas (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Art Is Trash (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ron English added a pink “Temper Tot” shortly before LoMan commenced. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nicolas Holiber uses found wood to create a new “Venus” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nicolas Holiber. “Mars” (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hanksy (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sonni (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The DRiF pimping a statue of David. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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As in “The Lower East Side” by Russell Murphy (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Faith47 (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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BD White and JP Art (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gilf! (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ori Carino (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A new sculpture by Leon Reid IV (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tats Cru in monochrome (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

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J Morello (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

At press time the works of ASVP, Beau Stanton, Crash, Solus and Ludo were either not completed or had just begun. We’ll bring you these pieces on a later article.

To learn more about the LoManArt Fest click HERE

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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BSA Film Friday: 01.09.15

BSA Film Friday: 01.09.15

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. ROME in the Street and the Gallery by Dioniso Punk
2. Hendrik Beikirch (ECB): East Harbor in the Netherlands
3. Michael Beerens – “Master”
4. “Art As A Weapon” Trailer

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BSA Special Feature: ROME in the Street and the Gallery by Dioniso Punk

The punk rock connection to graffiti is as strong as any subculture’s – or of any people who feel marginalized in effect or practice by the dominant culture preventing their voice. The narrative that graffiti belongs exclusively to Hip Hop has been posited and disproved over time; as Jesus said, “Graffitti belongs to everyone.” *

Modern French academics and intellectuals have celebrated graffiti and Street Art by way of political protest at least since the late 1960s and early 70s, first with the Situationists and later with the aesthetics and artistry of people like Ernest Pignon-Ernest and Gérard Zlotykamien.

In “Street & Gallery” we see that the need for expression, illegal and otherwise, is as urgent as ever in the Street Art scene in Rome today and for many it is a means to express opinions and philosophies that they hope will in turn push greater society forward in some way. For others it is simply to fight the stagnation.

Billed as an “unofficial video” by Dioniso Punk, the short documentary takes you into the kitchen and studio and gallery and street as a variety of artists, academics, vegetable vendors and philosophers narrate the pragmatic and the existential. Call it activism, call it a yearning for freedom, call it being generally pissed off at institutional inertia – the spirit of graffiti and it’s multiple urban art corollaries will not die. Either will arena rock and roll, despite early punk’s best wishes.

Interesting to note that the globalization of capital has not globalized all banks accounts and has thrust the xenophobia of the Italian middle class into a harsh light here, as it has elsewhere in so-called developed countries. Here we see a modern Italy struggling with ideological self-beliefs about justice and equality and wondering how they apply to a new immigrant class who has no interest in their cogitations. Moving from the educated class studio environment, the trained artist suddenly finds a social/political role, and for the first time perhaps contemplates it. Meanwhile, many in the street have never seen the inside of a studio and have a slightly different take on the state of things. Let the conversation continue.

 

Support was also provided by Maam – Museo dell’Altro e dell’Altrove di Metropoliz, Dorothy Circus Gallery, M.U.Ro. – Museo Urban di Roma, Sacripante Gallery, SMAC – Segni Mutanti.
 
A nod to the artists whose work is shown in the video, including Nicola “Nic” Alessandrini, Jim Avignon, Gary Baseman, Mister Thoms, Eduardo Kobra, David “Diavù” Vecchiato, Veronica Montanino, Stefania Fabrizi, Danilo Bucchi, Mauro Maugliani, Ron English, Beau Stanton, Mr. Klevra, Finbarr “Fin” DAC, Omino71, David Pompili, Ray Caesar, Afarin Sajedi, Kathie Olivas, Pablo Mesa Capella e Gonzalo Orquìn, Massimo Attardi, Gian Maria Tosatti, Malo Farfan, Franco Losvizzero, Davide Dormino, Alessandro Ferraro, Mauro Cuppone, Leonardo “Leo” Morichetti, Mauro Sgarbi, Gio Pistone, Zelda Bomba, Micaela Lattanzio, HOPNN, Massimo Iezzi, Sabrina Dan, Jago, Giovanna Ranaldi, Santino Drago, Alessandro Sardella, Fabio Mariani, Marco Casolino, Veks Van Hillik, Hogre, Dilkabear, Lucamaleonte, Diamond, Alice Pasquini, Paolo Petrangeli.

Hendrik Beikirch: East Harbor in the Netherlands

Hendrik Beikirch traveled to Heerlen in the Netherlands to paint a new mural over three and a half days. Organized by Heerlen Murals, the wizened, troubled subject adds to the series of images ECB has been creating across many walls in the last handful of years.

 

Michael Beerens – “Master”

 Last summer the Frenchman Beerens took a trip out into the mountains and created a piece on a a small abandoned building. Ah, summer, come thou near…

 

“Art As A Weapon” Trailer

From Breadtruck Films, the new documentary focuses on a school in Myanmar (Burma) that teaches street art as a form of non-violent struggle. Street Artists Shepard Fairey and JR figure into the story, as does the military, art as a weapon, and art as a tool for revolution.

 

* Quote from Jesus Cordero, aerosol sales associate at Near Miss Hardware store in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

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BSA Picks for Bushwick Open Studios 2014

BSA Picks for Bushwick Open Studios 2014

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So Summer is officially here and with it comes Bushwick Open Studios (BOS) – in fact close to 600 venues are opening their doors for the next 3 days and you are encouraged to just wander the streets or to be strategic about it.

As always, the arts and culture festival is hosted by the volunteer organization Arts in Bushwick (AiB) and as always BSA has an eclectic collection of a few highlights we think you’ll like. They are not in any particular order and they are not all related to Street Art, but yo, isn’t everything related to Schtreet Aht in Bushwick?

BAnner-Brooklyn-Street-Art-BOS-PICKS-LOGO1. Maps N Mimosas at Norte Maar
2. Art Brooklyn
3. Bushwick Smushwick
4. blokactivity: A People’s History
5. Exit Room Group Show and Art Battles
6. Meg Hitchcock
7. Secret Project Robot Renaissance Faire
8. “Vacancy” with Pufferella in the Factory Fresh Penthouse
9. The Bushwick Collective Block Party and Art Show

 

Norte Maar for Collaborative Projects in the Arts

Yes, there’s the launch party on Friday but the place to get your bearings will be Maps-N-Mimosas on Saturday morning with Norte Maar, who we want to shout out.

In their seventh year at BOS, Norte Maar has been a unique and steady force in the evolution of the arts scene in Bushwick. Free of the posturing characterized by round-tables and panels, Norte Maar dove into its programming by involving the public and the neighbors, showing leadership and piquing curiosity thanks to co-founder/ Director Jason Andrew.  A myriad of cultural programs have unfolded, each with a strong commitment to collaboration and inclusiveness.

For BOS 2014 Norte Maar is giving you a chance to explore your voyeuristic side by opening his private collection of art comprised of local Bushwick artists, including drawing, mixed media, painting, photography, and sculpture. And yes, Jason will likely welcome you at the door with a mimosa. GO!

Norte Maar
83 Wyckoff Ave., 1B
Brooklyn, NY 11237

 

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Art Brooklyn

Mighty Tanaka Gallery owner Alex Emmart will be in residence for this pop-up and a handful of the names associated with Street Art in the late 00s and some new friends too.  Guest artists include JM Rizzi, Chris RWK (Robots Will Kill), Rubin415, Reginald Pean with Kristin Maher and Karina Herrera, Brandon from Greatest Hits Gallery. The event will have free refreshments.

2 St. Nicholas Ave., 2nd floor
Brooklyn, NY 11221

Friday May 30, 12-6pm
Saturday May 31, 12pm-6pm
Sunday June 1, 12pm-6pm

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Bushwick Smushwick

A collection of drawing, mixed media, painting, photography, sculpture, and some street artists thrown in for spice with Skewville, Jon Burgerman, Allison Sommers, Vahge, QRST, Rachel O’Donnell, Lev Sloujitel, Caroline Harrison, Alden Stover, Megan Watters, Daniel Mitchell, Peter Striffolino, Herm, Ariel Hellwitz, Alex Feld, Sasha Braginsky, Dane LaChiusa, Glenn Friedel, Chip Moeser, Hsin Wang, Ben Ripley, Ryan Ford, and Ronit Zvi.

Bob Jefferson
308 Jefferson St.
Brooklyn, NY 11237

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blokactivity: A People’s History

blokactivity: A People’s History is an art event that limits itself to just one block in Bushwick and the change that it has undergone in the last two decades. Curated by Clare Stack and photographer Brenda Kenneally, this is the story of their neighborhood, their culture, their love for their home, and they have created this show with other local artists to bring the block and it’s history to life for BOS 2014. The photos alone are a rare eye-opening opportunity to appreciate life in Bushwick  and to provide insight into how things have changed.

“There will be a display of personal photographs and stories belonging to people who are either long time residents/grew up in the area or those who have made it their home more recently. Some of these images will be displayed on a wall-sized map of the block, drawn especially for the show by Victor Llanos and Hannah Lichtenstein. There is an interactive component for those who want to share their own stories. This show also includes many original works by local artists including video pieces by Kevin Little and C. Stack, collage by Zak Vreeland, photography by Oriana Fine.”

rare form studio/ pop-up gallery
1102 Broadway, 3rd Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11221

Friday May 30, 4p.m.- 7p.m. (event at none)
Saturday May 31, 12pm-7pm (event at tba)
Sunday June 1, 12pm-6pm (event at none)

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Exit Room

This experimental show space that has provided opportunity to Street Artists in the last year will host Art Battles, a group show of about 20 artists, live painting and video projects.

270 Meserole St., Ground Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11206

Friday May 30, 2pm-8pm
Saturday May 31, 2pm-8pm

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Meg Hitchcock

Artist Meg Hitchcock has been building her text-based practice for a while in Bushwick and her astounding works on paper using letters cut from sacred texts will be on display as well as some older pieces.  By separating the text from its original moorings, she finds that these spiritually infused symbols are set free to rearrange themselves across walls and re-present rather decoratively, rhythmically, organically.  Formerly evangelical, now she is simply angelical.

698 Hart St., Ground Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11221

Saturday May 31, 12pm-7pm

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Secret Project Robot Renaissance Faire

A not-for-profit artist run art space that moved from Williamsburg to Bushwick a few years ago, Secret Project Robot is celebrating its 10 year of introducing new artists to new opportunity and new audiences. For Bushwick Open Studios they are converting the outdoor garden into an artist’s made installation of a Renaissance Faire. It will be “Fully equipped with outdoor stage, artist made goods, beautiful masks and decorations that have come to define both the aesthetic of a renaissance faire and the hand-made feel of Secret Project Robot.”

Featuring work by Raul De NIeves, Thomas DeLaney, Chris Uphues, Erik Zajaceskowski, Rachel Nelson, Cameron Michel, Vashti Windish, Korey Helburst, Dave Kadden, Alexandra Drewschin, Greg Fox, Zachary Lehrhoff, Eli Lehrhoff, Poison Dartz, Ovary Reaction, Barry London, and Kid Mi.

Secret Project Robot
389 Melrose St.
Brooklyn, NY 11237

Friday May 30, 7pm-11pm
Saturday May 31, 12pm-9pm
Sunday June 1, 12pm-9pm

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Vacancy

Not part of the BOS 2014 slate of events, Street Artist/fine artist Pufferella nonetheless belongs in Bushwick. One half of the duo that brought Factory Fresh to Flushing Ave in the late 00s, Pufferella invites you to the Penthouse, where you have always secretly wanted to go. Her most recent hand sewn artworks will be on display.

Factory Fresh Penthouse,
1053 Flushing Avenue, 1 Flight Up
Brooklyn, NY 11237

Saturday, May 31st & Sunday, June 1st, noon-6pm

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THE BUSHWICK COLLECTIVE BLOCK PARTY AND ART SHOW

After all the darting in and out of studios for three days you are invited to stay outside in the more democratically available Street Art environs of The Bushwick Collective Block Party on Sunday. Not really a BOS event and not really a collective, Joe Ficalora is really Bushwick, so get your facts straight knucklehead.

There will be live Street Art, food trucks, a beer tent, bands, DJ’s, giveaways and raffles. In addition there is an art show featuring Bleck Le Rat, Solus, Rubin415, Chris Stain, Dan Witz, Zimad, Jerk Face, Joe Iurato, Sexer, Beau Stanton, Atom and FKDL.

Sunday June 1st 11:00 am – 7:00 pm
Troutman Street between Wyckoff and St. Nicholas
Brooklyn, NYC

 

 

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Street Artists At The Fairs For Armory Week NYC 2014

Street Artists At The Fairs For Armory Week NYC 2014

BSA-At-the-fairs-2014

Not quite spring, the Art Fairs are arriving in New York ahead of the tulips. We strolled the impossibly long aisles and peered into the booths to find the folks who have at other times been called “Street Artists”. This weekend they’ll be fine artists, and the list is quite a bit longer than years past as the professionalization of the street continues.

Shows like the Armory, Scope, Volta, and Fountain are good testing venues to see the commercial viability for many of these artists and some have foregone representation – preferring to foot the bill on their own. Since walking the streets to see their work requires multiple layers and hats and gloves – traipsing through the fairs can be far preferable than dirty old Brooklyn streets. It’s also nice to see how some of these folks look in a tie or a blouse – or even just hit a comb. Here below we include some possible gems for you to hunt down.

THE ARMORY SHOW

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Pace Prints

How & Nosm at Pier 92

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How Nosm at Pace Prints (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For The Armory Show Art Fair location, dates, times, booth numbers, etc… click HERE

SCOPE ART FAIR

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Andenken Gallery

Amanda Marie, VINZ

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Vinz at Andenken Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

Black Book Gallery

Judith Supine, WK Interact, Ben Eine, Cycle, James Reka, Cope2, Indie184, Shepard Fairey

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Judith Supine at Black Book Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

C.A.V.E. Gallery

PEETA, Pure Evil

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Pure Evil at C.A.V.E. Gallery (image courtesy the artist)

Fabien Castanier Gallery

Speedy Graphito, Mark Kenkins, RERO

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Speedy Graphito at Fabien Castanier Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

Fuchs Projects

Rafael Fuchs, Aakash Nihalini, Skewville

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Skewville at Fuchs Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Krause Gallery

Ben Frost, Hanksy

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Ben Frost at Krause Gallery (image courtesy the gallery)

Moniker Projects

Beau Stanton, Ben Eine, David Shillinglaw, Greg Lamarche, Jon Burgerman, Pam Glew, Ron English,  Muffinhead, Keira Rathbone.

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David Shillinglaw at Moniker Projects (image courtesy the artist)

Natalie Kates Projects

Skullphone, Swoon

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Skullphone at Natalie Kates Projects (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

ThinkSpace Gallery

Know Hope

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Know Hope at ThinkSpace (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vertical Gallery

Stormie Mills, My Dog Sighs

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Stormie Mills at Vertical Galler (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For SCOPE Art Fair location, dates, times, booth numbers, etc… click HERE

VOLTA NY

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Jonathan LeVine Gallery

POSE

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Pose at Jonathan LeVine Gallery (image courtesy the artist)

For VOLTA NY Art Fair location, dates, times and booth numbers, etc… click HERE

FOUNTAIN ART FAIR

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Fumeroism, Jay Shells, Leon Reid IV, Vicki DaSilva are all showing at Fountain this year

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Vicki DaSilva at Fountain (image courtesy the artist)

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Fumero at Fountain (image © Jaime Rojo)

Urban Folk Art

Adam Suerte

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Adam Suerte (courtesy Urban Folk Art)

Street Art Installation curated by Mighty Tanaka

Alex Emmert will be curating the Street Art Installation and he has invited Chris Stain, Alice Mizrachi, Skewville, Cake, Chris RWK, Joe Iurato, Rubin, EKG, Gilf!, Omen and LNY.

brooklyn-street-art-rubin-copyright-Jaime-Rojo-03-14-web-2

Rubin will be part of the installation of Street Artists at Fountain Art Fair (photo © Jaime Rojo)

For Fountain Art Fair location, dates, times, etc…click HERE

 

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Images Of The Week: 01.12.14

Images Of The Week: 01.12.14

brooklyn-street-art-hacula-jaime-rojo-01-12-14-web

BSA-Images-Week-Jan2014

Great week in NYC with the new mayor shaking hands for hours in the cold outside City Hall with all New Yorkers last Sunday, then we got smacked with the devastating cold, then sleet, then high winds. Next up, ice locusts! Also, if your Christmas tree is still up, don’t plug it in because that puppy will go up in 25 seconds of flaming glory. Wait until it is safely on the street before igniting.

This week we also featured not one but two yarn artists, which has gotta be a first for us – London Kaye and the Olek. Yarn on the street isn’t exactly a trend, but it is sort of a trend.

– In a related story, Olek is now reporting that the piece we documented her installing in 4 degree temperatures has mysteriously disappeared. Street Art vanishes all the time but the size of this piece was gargantuan and it was a complicated install and it was hung in a very heavily traversed part of Little Italy. Says Olek in her FB/Twitter all-points-bulletin “Alert: 376 square feet of #crochet art stolen.” Keep your eye on Grandma, also Aunt Betty. ‘Cause you know, knitters sometimes get competitive, that’s all I’m saying.

And here we are with our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Beau Stanton, EC13, Etnik, Haculla, Icy & Sot, Miron Milic, Olek, Pyramid Oracle, Rene Gagnon, Seville, Sexer, Steep, Swoon, Team Low Brow, Team Mishka, and Zimad.

Top Image >> Haculla. We are happy to see this veteran Street Artist on this old spot in Manhattan and of course back on the streets of NYC. Nice stash. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pyramid Oracle (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Swoon’s collaboration with Groundswell was tagged very heavily during the most recent snow storm in the city. Luckily, the color palette of the new graffiti work complements the overall scheme. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miron Milic’s sketch for his most recent work in Croatia. (photo © Miron Milic)

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The finished piece by Miron Milic. When translated, we still didn’t understand the meaning but here it is: “We played at war because it was healthy that were as much in the air.”  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steep at The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Icy and Sot depict a feeling of impotence fighting the war machine and the ubiquity of guns and violence. What’s your interpretation? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Beau Stanton for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A new piece in Turin, Italy by Etnik, who is preparing for his first solo show at Square23. Dude’s got skillz. (photo © Etnik)

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Zimad at The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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RIPO for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EC13 new installation in Spain. (photo © EC13)

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Team Mishka vs Team Low Brow for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Sexer at The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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“There is no such thing as part freedom”. Olek for The L.I.S.A. Project NYC. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rene Gagnon opened with an extensive solo show at the new Mecka Gallery last night. Heavily attended. Read more about the venue, the show, and an interview with the artist HERE. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. The Golden Hour becomes the Manhattan skyline. January 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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The High Line Loft Presents: “The Future Is Now” A Group Exhibition (Manhattan, NYC)

The Future is Now

The Future Is Now
Opening Reception: Thursday August 1st, 2013 4-11pm
Friday August 2nd, 2013 10 am-11pm
Saturday August 3rd, 2013 10 am-11pm
Sunday August 4th, 2013 10 am-6pm

The Highline Loft
508 W. 26th Street
New York, NY 10001

We are pleased to present “The Future Is Now” at The Highline Loft, NYC’s renowned gallery located on The Highland Park in Chelsea, NYC.

This unique Invitational brings together a curated selection of prolific street and urban contemporary artists and musicians for a weekend of cutting edge art, music, technology and performance. The Future Is Now serves as the blueprint for the 21st Century’s Multimedia art experience.

Please join us while we make history together.

Roster of Artists:

Jordan Betten, John Breiner, Ross Brodar, Allison Buxton, Garrison Buxton, John Arthur Carr, Cern, Deedee Cheriel, Chip Love, Steve Cogle, Joseph Conrad- Ferm, COPE2, Spencer Keeton Cunningham, Cycle, CYRCLE, Dalek, Adam Dare, Katrina Del Mar, ELLE DEAD SEX, Brian Ermanski, John FeknerEric Foss, Mike Fitzsimmons, Ellis Gallagher, Mike Giant, Maya Hayuk, Hellbent, David Hochbaum, David Hollier, Michael Holman, Ben Horton, Kimyon Huggins, INDIE 184 , Ian Kuali, Dave Kinsey, Koralie, Kool Kid Kreyola, Nick Kuszyk, Greg LaMarche, Craig LaRotonda, Don Leicht, Chip Love, Adam Ludwig, Joe Lurato, Tara McPherson, Alice Mizrachi, Billy Mode, Morning Breath, NDA, NOBODY, OLEK, David Ortiz, William Quigley, Leon Reid, Skewville, Specter , Beau Stanton, Chris Stain, Swoon, Nick Taylor, Thundercut, , Chris Uphues, Michel Bellici, Andrea Von Bujdoss, Kennedy Yanko, Deborah Yoon.

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/459280470833231/

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Images of the Week: 05.26.13

Here’s our weekly interview of the street, this week featuring Beau Stanton, Brett Flanigan, Cannon Dil, Cosbe, Creepy, Deeker, Facter, Gats, Icy & Sot, Invurt, Jaz, Keely, Nunca, Rubin, Sexer, Solus, Sonni, Zimad.

Top image > Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The paint is still wet on this one by Brett Flanigan and Cannon Dill in Brooklyn. They are on a cross-country tour put these two on BSA earlier in the week when they hit Chicago. To follow them as they rampage with cans in hand, check out #lqvmuraltour2013 on Twitter (photo © Jaime Rojo)

GATS has a fresh water tower at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Rubin (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A new one from NUNCA  in Chichester, UK (photo © NUNCA)

Zimad at Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Zimad at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaz at work on is new wall in Vienna. (photo © Inoperable Gallery)

JAZ in Vienna (photo © Inoperable Gallery)

Sexer at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cosbe at 121 Knickerbocker (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sonni at Bushwick Collective. This portion of the wall is part of the above piece but cars parked in front of it. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A Deeker and Keely really hit it with this collaboration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Beau Stanton at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Facter at Bushwick Collective (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Creepy is in town at Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Brooklyn, May 2013. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Welling Court: A New York Mural Block Party Like No Other

The community mural: A time honored urban tradition rooted in local flavors and tastes. Every major city and many small towns have them and most people who live near one of these colorful creations also have stories they can tell you about them. Apart from the graffiti scene or the Street Art scene, Allison and Garrison Buxton have one focus in mind when curating artists into this neighborhood in Queens to paint for the third year in a row: The nexus of community and creativity.

El Kamino. Work in progress. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The styles, perspectives, and command of the aerosol can may vary, but the enthusiasm and refreshing lack of attitude at this non-commercial weekend event are undeniable. This year the number of participating artists grew to over 90 and the number of dishes served by neighbors on folding buffet tables in the middle of the street was probably 10 times that. It’s easy to see that this working class neighborhood full of racing kids on bikes and people posing for photos in front of murals is one true definition of New York today. For this sunny summer event, it’s the electricity of live creativity on the street that draws people out to talk with each other.

ENX tagged by Free 5 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Free 5 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Flying Fortress at work with MOST (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Chris and Veng from Robots Will Kill (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gilf! at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

UR New York (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

See One . Too Fly (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok at work with Never. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

The duo called Sinned at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sinned (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Kiji at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Score (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Queen Andrea (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Artist Alice Mizrachi takes a break to chat with photographer Martha Cooper. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Joe Iurato (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Chris Stain steadies Billy Mode (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hellbent (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

Feral at work. (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

LMNOP (Photo © Jaime Rojo)

For more photos of completed murals on Welling Court 3 click on Images of the Week 06.17.12

Thank you to Garrison and Allison Buxton for their indefatigable efforts to bring the community of artists together. Thank you to the families and business of Welling Court for opening their doors and their walls to the creative spirit.

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