All posts tagged: Art Azoï

BSA Film Friday: 05.28.21

BSA Film Friday: 05.28.21

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Good Guy Boris – Remote Sensing
2. ZEKY via Art Azoï. Video by Justine Bigot
3. DETOKS & GENOM, “Not Bigger, Not Better, But…More!” Via Montana Colors TV
4. HONET via Art Azoï. Video by Justine Bigot

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BSA Special Feature: Good Guy Boris – Remote Sensing

The misadventures continue on the 1 Line in Athens.

“Athens now has that feeling of being wild and unpredictable – a little exciting or dangerous in some parts.”

And the voice…. it sounds so familiar.

ZEKY via Art Azoï. Video by Justine Bigot

DETOKS & GENOM, “Not Bigger, Not Better, But…More!” Via Montana Colors TV

Silvers! Rollers! Color Pieces! Oh my! Barcelona’s Detoks and Genom are on the loose around big highway spots and metro stops. They say they are not bragging, but they get around.

HONET via Art Azoï. Video by Justine Bigot

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Remembering the Paris Commune 150 Years Later: TWE Crew, Black Lines, and Art Azoi

Remembering the Paris Commune 150 Years Later: TWE Crew, Black Lines, and Art Azoi

“The revolution will be the flowering of humanity as love is the flowering of the heart” Louise Michel, revolutionary, activist, and significant figure of the Paris Commune.


TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)

Montmartre, Belleville, and all those poor neighborhoods in the 11th, 18th, 19th and 20th arrondissements all shake with the memory of the Paris Commune as we mark the 150th anniversary this spring of the short-lived self-governance ended by a “Bloody Week.”

To mark those events and the thousands killed when the rich fled, we share with you new public works from artists of the TWE Crew in collaboration with the Black Lines movement – and in association with Art Azoi in the heart of the 20th arrondissement of Paris. A combination of street art, graffiti, mural art, and illustration influences all join forces in black and the bloody red that stood as their flag. Figures depicted may be contemporary or of the period, but their universal plight appears devastatingly on-point.

TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)

“Working men’s Paris, with its Commune, will be forever celebrated as the glorious harbinger of a new society. Its martyrs are enshrined in the great heart of the working class,” said Karl Marx.  Professor John Merriman speaks in his book “Massacre” of that eclectic revolutionary government that held power in Paris across eight weeks between 18 March and 28 May 1871 and says that the crushing of the poor who were unable to escape the city sadly anticipated the horror shows that would follow in the 20th Century.

In other words, they were killed because they were too poor to get out.

TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)

Conversely, in many ways, the Commune created a template as well for social and political justice movements that would come – proposing in their city council such things as economic laws, workers rights, separation of church and state, abolishing the death penalty and mandatory conscription, and labor’s self-management. From these brutal times and events, you may wish to salvage many of those radical ideas – the only spoils of victory, if you will.

TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)

But even today, a century and a half later, conversations about how to remember the Commune are divisive.

“You can summarise the Commune in one word: violence,” says Rudolph Granier, a member of the centre-right Les Républicains (LR) on the city council, according to an article by Hugh Schofield of the BBC News last month.

“It was a populist movement. And in the current state of France and the world – when in Paris we have the yellow vests and in Washington they’re storming the Capitol – I do not think we should be celebrating people who burned down our city hall.”

Participating artists are @lasktwecrew, @kwim__t.w.e, @kracotwecrew and @al_zoyer of the @blacklinescommunity

TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
TWE Crew and Black Lines movement in association with Art Azoi. Square Henri Karcher, Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoi)
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BSA Film Friday: 04.09.21

BSA Film Friday: 04.09.21

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening:
1. Sofles / Kawaii. The artist paints a piece for his daughter Violet.
2. ACBR and ZONE take Rick and Morty Underground
3. Honet x Art Azoi in Paris

BSA Special Feature: Sofles / Kawaii. The artist paints a piece for his daughter Violet.

Remember when Nirvana did that concert without electric guitars? You can call this one “Sofles Unplugged.” He has no soundtrack revving up your adrenaline or accentuating his skills. He’s just pure skillz.

Sofles / Kawaii. The artist paints a piece for his daughter Violet.

ACBR and ZONE take Rick and Morty Underground.

Ahhh, here we go! Vandals, surreptitious underground graffiti pieces, knives, mad scientists, syncopated dance numbers, and a ripping soundtrack. Back to what we all expected from our graff videos.

Honet x Art Azoi in Paris

A creation by HONET on the wall of the Pavillon Carré de Baudouin (Paris 20th district).

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Kenor Paints Kinectic Geometric Confetti for Art Azoï in Paris

Kenor Paints Kinectic Geometric Confetti for Art Azoï in Paris

Barcelona-based KENOR has traveled around the world and worked with brands creating his own take on kinetic graffiti, whether on walls, on canvas, or as sculpture. Blowing air into his pieces of colorful geometric confetti, the painter catches the chaos of the city and paints it.

It’s a mismatched style that recalls the Memphis movement of the 80s, complete with a poppy palette and occasional patterning. Here with Art Azoi on a lower wall of Parc de Bellville in Paris, you can see how his emphasis on movement drives his creative choices at Place Alphonse Allais.

KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
KENOR in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
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LEK Solo in Paris on a Long Wall with Art Azoï.

LEK Solo in Paris on a Long Wall with Art Azoï.

Parisian OG Lek has been working on the streets for the last three of his five decades, growing up close to the Mecca of European graffiti in the 1980s, Stalingrad. By the 90s he was ready to experiment with abstract and futuristic, with a balancing influence from the rigid uncompromising Bauhaus. Today he easily contemplates the illegal and legal, commissioned and commercial, and his compositions are not always easily categorized as graffiti, street art, or mural.

But he is easily called a pioneer among peers, having been one half of Lek and Sowat, as well as a member of Da Mental Vaporz, French Kiss, LCA, GNS, RAW, and 1984. Here we present a brand new gig he scored with Art Azoï last month in his hometown.

LEK in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
LEK in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
LEK in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
LEK in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
LEK in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
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Tarek Benaoum and “Freedom from the Known” on a Parisian Wall for Art Azoï

Tarek Benaoum and “Freedom from the Known” on a Parisian Wall for Art Azoï

Calligraphist and decorative painter Tarek Benaoum has Algeria, Italy, and French in his blood, but it’s all gold when he writes across walls. A graffiti writer who studied script formally in his early twenties, his hybrid of Arabic and gothic takes him from wall to canvas in both hemispheres.

Tarek Benaoum in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo © Sylvain Vesco)

At the request of the Parisian public housing agency Régie Immobilière de la Ville (RIVP), Art Azoï conjured a solution to rehabilitate this massive structure with a mural that would resonate with the locality and its residents. The Salé-born Benaoum rose to the challenge with a 40 x 15 meter mural in his signature blue and gold on the south gable of this building on the boulevard Mortier in the 20th arrondissement.

Tarek Benaoum in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo © Sylvain Vesco)

Standing at the outer rim of these circular motifs are texts by the Indian philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti from his 1969 book Freedom from the Known (Se libérer du connu), a treatise on the only worthwhile revolution: inner liberation.

Among the famous quotes often remembered from the book is this one, “To be free of all authority, of your own and that of another, is to die to everything of yesterday, so that your mind is always fresh, always young, innocent, full of vigor and passion.”

Tarek Benaoum in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo © Sylvain Vesco)
Tarek Benaoum in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo © Sylvain Vesco)
Tarek Benaoum in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo © Sylvain Vesco)
Tarek Benaoum in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris. (photo © Sylvain Vesco)
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Zosen & Mina Hamada Overlapping in Paris for Les Plateaux Sauvages

Zosen & Mina Hamada Overlapping in Paris for Les Plateaux Sauvages

“This mural contains the shapes of each one overlapped in layers and erasing lines to emphasize color, our great passion,” says Zosen of his new collaboration with artist Mina Hamada. The two have created many color-blocked organic and chaotic visual feasts on walls around the world over the last few years, and this one puts an optimistic face on the new year in Paris.

Zosen & Mina Hamada in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

In fact, the painting pair haven’t been able to do a large scale mural like this since late 2019 in Japan, where Mina hails from. “After more than a year, pandemic and confinement in between, we wanted to do something different and fresh to have fun.”

Zosen & Mina Hamada in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

In coordination with L’association Art Azoï and Les Plateaux Sauvages in the 20th arrondissement, the Barcelona-based pair were bundled up and on cherry pickers in the early January cold weather, tracing out their long-pole lines over the top of one another. “For this mural, we prepared two different designs,” says Mina. “Then we mixed over the lines to make the mural.”

Zosen & Mina Hamada in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Zosen & Mina Hamada in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Zosen & Mina Hamada in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
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Ahlam Jarban is Not Forbidden in Paris

Ahlam Jarban is Not Forbidden in Paris

Imagine being forbidden, proscribed by religious law. Haram.

Yemeni artist Ahlam Jarban says that she felt that her very existence as a girl and a woman growing up in her country was forbidden. Now imagine being a female graffiti writer in that war-torn country, eager for your work and your ideas to be seen and considered.

“To be a woman in Yemen is forbidden (haram),” she says. “Street art was my way in Yemen to say ‘I’m not haram; I’m proud of being a woman.’ ”

The Haram wall: Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

Her new mural was created in collaboration with the Agency of Artists in Exile (Atelier des Artistes en Exil), where she is an artist in residence. Using aerosol and stencils, she draws attention to this denial of personal agency in the world through patterned calligraphy of “Haram” interrupted by the occasional pair of photorealistic eyes, always watching.

Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)

Part of an exhibition along a 50-meter long wall at the Pavillon Carré de Baudouin in the 20th arrondissement of Paris, the artist is actively assessing and critiquing the patriarchal behaviors she witnessed during her youth before arriving here in 2018. She is also making connections between the two cultures.

Getting up in earlier days. Ahlam Jarban (courtesy Agency of Artists in Exile – Atelier des Artistes en Exil)

“I painted eyes because I think that was the only thing that was free on a woman’s body,” she says as she describes the various emotions and intentions that are communicated by people purely with their eyes. Immediately she pivots to the correlation to life in her new European home where everyone is encouraged to wear a mask during the Covid-19 pandemic, and people are learning to rely more on communicating with their eyes, perhaps more than ever before.

“I think this mural can be very interesting for the Arabic French people and for the French people to know more about how it can be to be a female in Yemen,” she says in the video below.

Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
Ahlam Jarban in collaboration with Art Azoï. Paris, France. (Photo courtesy of Art Azoï)
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Djalouz “Peace in the World” in Paris

Djalouz “Peace in the World” in Paris

Graffiti artist Djalouz’s wildstyle 3-D shards look like multi-tentacled sea monsters climbing up walls, wrapping around telephone booths, creeping down stairwells and spreading across floors. By themselves, these interlocking forms can be biomorphic and menacing. Coupled with expressive paint-splattered hands releasing a Dove of Peace the effect is quite something else entirely.

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

For his new wall with public art programmers Art Azoï the Parisian delves into his aspirations for peace, perhaps in reaction to the terrorism horrors that have occurred in parts of Europe over the last year. He may also have been inspired by the location here on the terrace of the Ken Saro Wiwa Center, so named for the Nigerian writer, television producer and environmental activist whom Shell Oil was found complicit in the murder of.

Curator Alex Parrish tells us that the messages of peace here are a bit buried beneath the very obvious symbolism. “Beneath the layers of paint on the hand and the dove are clever phrases (more so a play on words) that relate to its title, such as ‘j’aime pas les confli’ (I don’t like conflict) and ‘amis pas haine me’ (friends not hate),” she tells us.

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

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Djalouz for Art Azoï. Center Ken Saro Wiwa. Paris. April 2016. (photo © Jeanne-Marie Laurent)

 

Alex Parrish is part of the ArtAzoï team and a frequent BSA Contributor.

Click HERE to learn more about ArtAzoï.

Please visit Jeanne-Marie Laurent of Petites Chroniques Urbaines to learn more about her work. http://petiteschroniquesurbaines.com/

 

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New Kashink, Swiz, and Stesi in Paris for “Art Azoï”

New Kashink, Swiz, and Stesi in Paris for “Art Azoï”

The Paris based cultural project named Art Azoï brings emerging and established Street Artists and contemporary artists to develop mural ideas on public walls – and has been doing it for about five years. They have a few programs of permanent and rotating murals and endeavor to initiate exhibitions and workshops for the artists to more closely interact with the community in the area of Paris that they operate in.

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Kashink at Centre d’animation Ken Saro Wiwa in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

Today we have a look at three new artist installations that are facilitated by Art Azoï. Our special thanks to photographer Alex Parrish for sharing images from this project with BSA readers

First we see that Kashink was on the terrace of the “centre d’animation Ken Saro Wiwa” with one of her signature poppy four-eyed monsters with a feminine prowess. Yo, “protect ya neck!”

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Kashink at Centre d’animation Ken Saro Wiwa in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Alex Parrish)

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Kashink at Centre d’animation Ken Saro Wiwa in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Alex Parrish)

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Kashink at Centre d’animation Ken Saro Wiwa in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Alex Parrish)

Swiz brought his geometry to this long wall located on the busy rue de Ménilmontant, a wall that has been previously hit by Sunset, RERO, Ella&Pitr and Augustine Kofie.

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Swiz at Pavillon Carré de Baudouin  in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

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Swiz at Pavillon Carré de Baudouin  in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

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Swiz at Pavillon Carré de Baudouin  in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Alex Parrish)

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Swiz at Pavillon Carré de Baudouin  in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Alex Parrish)

Stesi was invited to begin the 2016 program in January with his piece on the 40 meter long surface along Rue des Pyrénées, located in the 20th arrondisement. He uses his signature abstract style and stippling spray technique that recalls some graffiti letter forms as well as more organic ones.

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Stesi at Square Henri-Karcher in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

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Stesi at Square Henri-Karcher in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

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Stesi at Square Henri-Karcher in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

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Stesi at Square Henri-Karcher in Paris for Art Azoï. January 2016. (photo © Michel Jean-Théodore)

 

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