October 2020

Nelson Saiers, Racial Equality, and “More Is Needed”

Nelson Saiers, Racial Equality, and “More Is Needed”

As we step monthly into the Greater Depression and hope for greater understanding of the mathematical trickery that is leading us there (with or without Covid), we’re curious to see what former hedge fund manager and now installation artist savant Nelson Saiers is creating.

Nelson Saiers. “More Is Needed”. Washington, DC. (photo © Nelson Saiers)

Formerly working with HG Contemporary and its owner Philippe Hoerle-Guggenheim, who has artists like Retna and Kobra in his roster, Saiers is a self-directed representational artist whose circuitous route to truths frequently follow a mathematical one. Right now he’s not talking about quantitative easing or trillions of US debt, he’s talking about social inquality of a different nature: the paucity of black and brown-skin people in the fields of technology and some of the underlying structural foundations that aid and abet the systems.

He shows us his latest installation in front of the Lincoln Memorial and describes how it came together and the significance of his additions and subtractions.

“I’m doing an on and off multi-week installation in front of the Lincoln Memorial in DC.  The exhibit uses math to argue for the increased inclusion and just representation of African-Americans in the world of technology (and the further advancement of their civil rights and equality).”

Nelson Saiers. “More Is Needed”. Washington, DC. (photo © Nelson Saiers)

More is Needed 

“This piece applies mathematics to argue for the fair representation of African-Americans in our tech businesses and throughout society. The math symbols on the computer printer paper hint at an important theorem from topology called Brown Representation, which has been added, but it is incomplete (topology is a modern form of geometry).

Nelson Saiers. “More Is Needed”. Washington, DC. (photo © Nelson Saiers)

In essence, this argues that African-Americans should be fully represented in technology companies and other thriving industries. The incomplete list of math conditions is symbolic of the fact that while some basic strides have been made in this regard (for example, Brown v. Board of Education), much more is needed. The Domino box, which has been X’d out, points to the sugar industry (and its role in slavery), and the arrow directed at the printer paper references the migration of African-Americans from one category to another: poorly treated slaves to successful leaders.

The fact that some of the symbols were crossed out and then replaced (e.g., the “for all” symbol – upside down capital “A”) alludes to the tragic hiccups on the road to the achievement of these basic civil rights. Finally, the work’s raw cotton canvas background points to slavery and the centrality of cotton to its vile practice, a symbolic gesture to describe where our society started (and a fact that should not be “whitewashed”). Among many other mathematical motivations nestled in this piece, there is the word ‘monochromatic’ (one color) crossed out and replaced with the word ‘spectrum’ (range of color). While there are clear interpretations of this in the context of social justice, in math, a spectrum is also intimately tied to Brown Representability, expanding this metaphor and the important range of work we must achieve as a society to move forward.”

Nelson Saiers. “More Is Needed”. Washington, DC. (photo © Nelson Saiers)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.25.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.25.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week. We have early voting on the streets of New York right now for the first time, the Lincoln Project put up a billboard in Times Square targeting Trumps daughter and son-in-law, The Strand bookstore is threatening to close, Pro-trump and pro-Proud Boys graffiti was sprayed over a “wall of lies” in Bushwick, and nationwide the Corona virus has hit us with a vengeance, but our schools reopening in New York are having relative success with keeping the Covid incidence low.

Some hard news seems to great us every day, yet New Yorkers don’t give up so easily. And by the way, banging bright and crispy fall weather we’ve been having, right?

Here is our weekly interview with the streets, this week including Adam Fujita, Crash Floor, Disgusting is Good, Drop Dead Grace, Eye Sticker, Labor Camp, Mad Vaillan, Par, Save Art Space, Server Up, Specter, Texas, and Vayne.

Five years ago Peter AKA Pet Bird left this world but his gentle, unflappable, witty being remains with us. @crashfloor @disgustingisgood and @gabrielspecter pay tribute to him with this new mural. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Five years ago Peter AKA Pet Bird. @crashfloor @disgustingisgood and @gabrielspecter pay tribute to him with this new mural. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Save Art Space (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Server Up. Billboard takeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist. Billboard takeover. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Adam Fu (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eye Sticker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Vayne, Par, Bogus and friends… (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Texas (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drop Dead Grace for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drop Dead Grace for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Drop Dead Grace for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Granny The Buff (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Mad Vaillan (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Labor Camp (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untitled. Fall 2020. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Nico Lò (Skolp): Graffiti to Post-Graffiti in Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy

Nico Lò (Skolp): Graffiti to Post-Graffiti in Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy

Saturday projects around the house or apartment as the seasons change? Why not paint your steps?

Nico Skolp. Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award. 7th Edition. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courtesy of Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award)

Italian designer, muralist, and graffiti writer since the 1990s, Nico Lò (Skolp) shows us his style on the elevated art of painting a public stair in Santa Croce di Magliano (Italy). The color blocking is more intentional and scientific than you may think, however, and the artist tells us that he used a software tool to determine the composition in collaboration with a San Franciscan machine learning expert named Piero Molino.

Nico Skolp. Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award. 7th Edition. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courtesy of Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award)

“Much attention has been given to the use and perception of colour,” says Nico. “The observer perceives two coexisting paths on the staircase: the one with softer colours makes it easier the upward path; the other one, with more saturated and bright colours, marks the easier downward path.”

Since being a graffiti writer, Nico has gone through many personal and professional stages in development of his art – including starting a design firm with two friends in 2008 specializing in visual communication and graphic design. Now he’s more attracted to something many are calling “Post Graffiti”, a deconstruction of the letter-based vocabulary in a way that tumbles into abstraction and geometric movements of many directions.

Nico Skolp. Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award. 7th Edition. Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy. (photo courtesy of Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award)

“For years he focused on the study of the letter in all of its forms,” says a publicist. “Until overcoming the concept of “tag” and taking the path of a new approach called post-graffiti. His artistic language is characterized by geometric shapes, grids and shades, an abacus of elements and compositional rules that refer to the concept of generative design.”

This new staircase piece is part of the ongoing project, the Antonio Giordano urban art award (Premio Antonio Giordano), now in its 7th edition, which comprises 40 works in public space in the city.  

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BSA Film Friday: 10.23.20

BSA Film Friday: 10.23.20

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. CURA 2020 – Daiara Tukano, Lídia Viber, Diego Mouro e Robinho Santana.
2. CURA 2020 / Jaider Esbell “Entidades”
3. CURA 2018 / HYURO

BSA Special Feature: CURA and their 5th Festival in Belo Horizonte, Brazil

A community powered consortium of public, private and corporate interests have been sponsoring the CURA festival in Belo Horizonte since 2017, producing some of the most massive murals you will see in festivals around the world. It is an interesting mix of local and international artists, many with social messages. Additionally they produce small workshops and panels, and sometimes large parties for attendees.

Today just a taste of the artists from CURA

CURA 2020 – Daiara Tukano, Lídia Viber, Diego Mouro e Robinho Santana.

CURA 2020 / Jaider Esbell “Entidades”

Are they kissing? This 17 meter installation features two serpentine creatures adorning the bridge here with “Entidades” CURA says that “Jaider Esbell is the first indigenous artist to present a sculpture in a public art festival”.

CURA 2018 / HYURO

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3rd Edition of Kronos Inclusive and Looking to the Future of Art, Graffiti, Creativity, the Street in Barcelona

3rd Edition of Kronos Inclusive and Looking to the Future of Art, Graffiti, Creativity, the Street in Barcelona

We continue to see a dissolving of previous tensions between the worlds of graffiti writing and mural artists and other disciplines of art-making as we travel around cities around the world. Artificial divisions have persisted, and indeed the lived experience of graff and street art and mural making are distinctly different in certain respects, but the piece is the piece, regardless of style, and each creator can be an ambassador with a message.

Our own philosophy is if art is going to have the transformative power that we believe it can have on all of our societies, families, and institutions we need to dissolve artificial divisions in the creative community as well – as they serve little constructive purpose. As art in the street usually reflects society at large, we have our own challenges with classism, sexism, and racism as well.

So it’s great to see the continuance of brotherhood and sisterhood at small neighborhood festivals like the 3rd Edition of the Kronos Art and Arts Santa Mònica here in an area of Barcelona during the third week of October. One core philosophy at this festival this year was to re-consider the future of art and its role by actively consulting kids in defining what art is, and what it could be.

Juanjo Suarce. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)

“Be aware of the role of ARTIST and his work in our PRESENT, without judging, without imposing criteria, with the sole conviction that what we are creating is the prologue of the FUTURE in the ART”

During their ‘live painting’ events at 3 Chimney Plaza (Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies) it was the men and women, graffiti writers and street artists – all working side by side. Part of a much larger group of events that included 70+ artists, photography, sculpture, performance, music, video art, cinema, talks, and workshops, these painters just did their thing and had a good time.

“Becoming cultural activists, taking the reins of how to express ourselves and about what to express ourselves through art; and by doing so becoming key pieces for the freedom of creation, we become aware as spectators, as thinkers, as artists, as a species. KRONOS ART BCN 2020 is a wager to the freedom of society through the freedom of the artist; free to catch everything that interests and surrounds them, without fear of being judged and without judging the protagonists of their artwork. Free to BE in all the aspects that make us human, thus turning the PRESENT into the prologue of a FUTURE world full of diversity.”

Our thanks to photographer Lluis Olive Bulbena for capturing a few of the artists at work at the plaza.

Magda Cwik. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Magda Cwik. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Magda Cwik. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Seno. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Seno. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
CHAN. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
CHAN. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Bubbles – Keruna. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Bubbles – Keruna. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Mega – Keruna. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
SOEM. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
SOEM. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Ives One. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Ives One. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
Ives One – Seno. Kronos Festival. Plaza de las 3 Xemeneies, Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Lluis Olive Bulbena)
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Edoardo Tresoldi: Bringing Cathedral Sized Sculptures “Back To Nature” in Rome

Edoardo Tresoldi: Bringing Cathedral Sized Sculptures “Back To Nature” in Rome

Stately, soaring, and ethereal projects can’t simply be neatly tucked away in your garage after they are exhibited.

Edoardo Tresoldi. “Ethera” For Back To Nature exhibition. Rome, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)

That is especially true when the work is at the typical scale of Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi, whose massive mesh sculptures wowed the privileged guests at Coachella a couple of years ago in Indio, California. Those Neoclassical and Baroque architectural ghosts transported the imaginations of attendees there, but now they physically have been transported to Rome. Given a second life in Parco dei Daini, Villa Borghese, the show will run this autumn until mid-December.

Edoardo Tresoldi. “Ethera” For Back To Nature exhibition. Rome, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)

Calling the installation Etherea, Tresoldi has entered it into participation for “Back to Nature”, a new exhibition project curated by Costantino d’Orazio. The artist says the works have been redesigned and rearranged for the occasion and are meant to be part of a dialogue with the trees of Villa Borghese. It’s good to see these works in a new context and finding they have a similar character, still triumphant but more subdued perhaps.

Edoardo Tresoldi. “Ethera” For Back To Nature exhibition. Rome, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)
Edoardo Tresoldi. “Ethera” For Back To Nature exhibition. Rome, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)
Edoardo Tresoldi. “Ethera” For Back To Nature exhibition. Rome, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)

BACK TO NATURE
Parco dei Daini, Villa Borghese, Rome
Promoted by Roma Capitale, Assessorato alla Crescita culturale – Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali
Until December 13, 2020
Free entry

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Bifido Listens to and Tells  Stories on the Streets of  Stigliano

Bifido Listens to and Tells Stories on the Streets of Stigliano

IItalian Street artist Bifido has perfected his technique of dissolving his wheat-pasted photography into aerosol painting on the street, producing a seamless atmospheric story that leaps from the wall; evocative of oil masters but somehow with hyper real people living presently in a surreal tableau. Narrative also has been sharpened and emerges as being intently purposeful.

In this new series of artworks we learn about folks who are living in a modest sized town here that, like many towns in Italy, is being quietly and radically transformed by its shrinking population of aging citizens.

Bifido. Giulia and Filomena. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Delia Aliani)

By interviewing the inhabitants and becoming familiar with this small interconnected community, sometimes intimately so, he is determined to help tell their stories, their histories. A collaborative practice, Bifido is there when they see the finished piece in public space.

Today we’re pleased to present Bifido’s newest works in Stigliano, accompanied by his own words to describe the process of creating them.



I spent a month in Stigliano, a small town, in an equally small and remote region of southern Italy. I was able to immerse myself totally in the reality of the people who live there, learning incredible stories. During this time I worked on 4 murals around the village. Stigliano rises to 1200 meters above sea level and you can see a boundless landscape. The feeling of ​​isolation is very strong.

Bifido. Giulia and Filomena. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

The work that most involved me is on two eighty-year-old sisters. Giulia and Filomena. They were locked in the house by a jealous father for nearly 40 years. They could only go out with their mother and only go to church. No school, no friends. They could not even see their relatives, because they had studied and this could negatively affect them. Their father said: “A woman can leave the house 3 times in her life, at baptism, marriage and funeral ”. Obviously because they could not go out, they’ve never had a chance to meet someone and fall in love.

They were not very familiar with either watching television or listening to the radio. Every February there is an Italian song festival. During the time of their isolation they tell me that they would sneak past the windows trying to listen to the songs of the neighbors’ radios. Being able to hear only the melody and not the words, they rewrote the lyrics according to their life.

After a life of repression and isolation, these two sisters are two women full of life, curiosity and empathy. They are very different, but they belong together. They sleep in the same room, on cots separated by a bedside table, and in the darkest nights they shake hands “giving courage”. But if the dark nights are truly haunted, they snuggle together in the same bed. And if you look at them from above they look like strong roots stuck in the mattress.

you have to be a rock
to roll fast
you have to be a rock
to be shaped by the wind
you have to be a rock
to withstand the blows
you have to be a rock
to look into the abyss
you have to be a rock to laugh at life
(Giulia, Filomena and Bifido)

Bifido. Giulia and Filomena. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Delia Aliani)
Bifido. Giulia and Filomena. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Delia Aliani)
Bifido. Giulia and Filomena. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Delia Aliani)
Bifido. Giulia and Filomena. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Delia Aliani)


Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)

I made two interventions in the historic center of the town, now almost completely uninhabited. A wonderful and desperate place. Full of silence and beauty. Stigliano has lived for years thanks to the wheat harvest and peasant life has characterized the town throughout its history.

Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)

I portrayed a peasant woman with wheat. Symbol of the city. And I installed it in one of the dark and forgotten alleys of the city and on a real farm. I wanted to give prestige to something noble and beautiful, but also to make the walls of this semi-abandoned town remember the souls who lived there. The peasants were also carriers of revolt. I want to remember the memory and tell people not to forget and fight for survival.

Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)


Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)

This is a little poetry that I wrote for the mural of the farmer in the street:

I am the fallen stone
The empty house with a torn roof
They are the endless fields
Dry of life
The rain and the hawk
Between the steady gazes
Between the vanished faces
I am the crack
The lair of remembrance
I am the unknown day
And you?”

Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)
Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)
Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Cristina Carbonara)


This work talks about the problem of depopulation. In 10 years Stigliano has lost almost all of its population, from 12,000 to 3,000 inhabitants. I used the verses of the poet Pio Rasulo, a native of Stigliano, who had already foreseen the depopulation of the town in 1961.

Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Antonella Mezzapesa)

“Only the crows that gorge themselves here, in the bean fields, and the piles of wood guarding the crumbling walls will remain”.

I wrote this sentence on the wall and then covered it with a photo I took of the locals. Over time the card will be destroyed as the poetic verse appears. Just like the depopulation phenomenon, people will disappear and only crows will remain.

Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Antonella Mezzapesa)
Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Antonella Mezzapesa)
Bifido. “Only the crows that gorge themselves here, in the bean fields, and the piles of wood guarding the crumbling walls will remain” Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Antonella Mezzapesa)
Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Antonella Mezzapesa)
Bifido. Stigliano, Italy. (photo © Antonella Mezzapesa)
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Add Fuel Calls for Unity; “JUNTOS” in Amadora, Portugal

Add Fuel Calls for Unity; “JUNTOS” in Amadora, Portugal

Today we have a look at the new wall by Portuguese mural artist Add Fuel, who likes to peel back the historical layers of a community to reveal traditional tile making patterns as well as new hybrids that he develops. Part of a municipally funded public mural project, much like the Nuart Aberdeen project the artist participated in a few years ago, Add Fuel commandeers a large multi-story building on which to regale the layers.

Add Fuel “Juntos” for Conversas na Rua. Amadora, Portugal. (photo © Ana Pires)

Add Fuel says the layers and colors are an oblique reference to the social ills fueled by corporate capitalism that we see across Europe and the US today, calling his mural JUNTOS (‘together’). “At a time when words such as racism, indifference and hatred are, unfortunately, increasingly part of everyday life, it is important to be part of the discussion and contribute in some way to change this,” he says.

Add Fuel “Juntos” for Conversas na Rua. Amadora, Portugal. (photo © Ana Pires)

“In a multicultural city like Amadora, JUNTOS calls for unity in a visual composition of multicultural, aesthetic and chromatic influence, that wants to celebrate the diversity of races, cultures and skin tones that make the world a more beautiful place.”

Add Fuel “Juntos” for Conversas na Rua. Amadora, Portugal. (photo © Miguel Portelinha)

10 kilometers northwest of central Lisbon, this is a project organized by the Amadora Municipal Câmara, which has plans to annually do this “Conversas na Rua” until the area is well-covered with murals. Should be great for the community, tourism and real estate.

Add Fuel “Juntos” for Conversas na Rua. Amadora, Portugal. (photo © Miguel Portelinha)
Add Fuel “Juntos” for Conversas na Rua. Amadora, Portugal. (photo © Miguel Portelinha)
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BSA Images Of The Week: 10.18.20

BSA Images Of The Week: 10.18.20

Welcome to BSA Images of the Week. We’re midway through the month and every one is puzzled by this surge of new corona cases – although the New York mayor says the numbers are plateauing. The presidential race, if you can call it that, has many people worried about which bad direction we’re likely to go. But then the presidency itself has been a four year open sore. Regardless of who wins – you won’t be getting healthcare, or a jobs program, or an infrastructure program.

But crisis always pushes artists to dig deeper, and there are lively, funny, entertaining, strident, wacky people and signs wherever you walk.

Here is our weekly interview with the streets, this week including D7606, De Grupo, Eye Sticker, Flood, I Bella, Individual Activist, J131, Secret Photo Cabal, and Steel Fist Velvet Glove.

IXNAY (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Individual Activist (photo © Jaime Rojo)
I Bella and De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Trump and Goebbles? Oh sorry that’s probably Fauci. De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
De Grupo (photo © Jaime Rojo)
“All of us with wings”, says Flood (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Eye Sticker (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artists (photo © Jaime Rojo)
J131 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Steel Fist Velvet Glove (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Secret Photo Cabal (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Oh my TVC15 loves NY – from d7606 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Unidentified artists (photo © Jaime Rojo)
Untiled. Delaware River. Fall 2020 (photo © Jaime Rojo)
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Spider Tag: Neon Mural #10 for Peinture Fraiche in Lyon.

Spider Tag: Neon Mural #10 for Peinture Fraiche in Lyon.

Saturday is a great day to spend indoors at a video arcade, right?

If arcades had interactive installations like this new one from SpiderTag, it would be packed. Unfortunately Covid-19, people can’t get packed into the Peinture Fraiche Festival in Lyon, France.

Spider Tag. Interactive Neon Mural #10. Peinture Fraiche Festival, Lyon, France. (photo © Spider Tag)

The festival features 50 French and international artists at La Halle Debourg operating loosely under the theme of innovation in urban art as a concept.  Here we see the Spidertags new installation while he continues his explorations with Neon, transforming and mediating the thick dark night. He calls this his Interactive Neon Mural #10.

Spider Tag. Interactive Neon Mural #10. Peinture Fraiche Festival, Lyon, France. (photo © Spider Tag)
Spider Tag. Interactive Neon Mural #10. Peinture Fraiche Festival, Lyon, France. (photo © Spider Tag)
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BSA FILM FRIDAY: 09.16.20

BSA FILM FRIDAY: 09.16.20

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. PAREES FEST 2020 / Manolo Mesa / Video by Titi Muñoz. Homage to the porcelain factory of San Claudio
2. Traz by Stéphane_Koyama-Meyer: Global Warning – Mobiles
3. Cosplay for Pets? Cospets!

BSA Special Feature: Manolo Mesa and His Homage to a Porcelain Factory in San Claudio

With his new mural dedicated to the pottery of San Claudio, Manolo Mesa finds time for the forgotten stories that are hosted within the family china. A most unusual topic to feature at a mural festival, he brings the unique perspective of our relationship with the quotidian and elevates it to a public discussion here in Oviedo, Asturias for Parees Festival.

The video tells it with insight, letting you observe the artist at work, following his body language as he shoots his source images tells you all you need to know. He had wanted to paint this topic since got to see an abandoned pottery factory in San Claudio; deeply impacted by its ruins, its molds – like the pyramids.

Traveling here from Bilbao, Manolo arrived in Oviedo a few days early to educate himself about regional history through various collections of tableware in houses in this city.

He learned that the pottery factor had provided many jobs throughout this region with its molds, glazes, tracings, and hand-painted decorations in a time when popular painters from the area were counted on to represent in very collections. He found postwar pieces that were inherited and preserved and he saw the tableware of a lifetime preserved from the middle of the century.

The resulting mural speaks to our knowledge of our own everyday objects, their provenance, and their true significance in the culture.

PAREES FEST 2020 / Manolo Mesa / Video by Titi Muñoz. Homage to the porcelain factory of San Claudio

Traz by Stéphane_Koyama-Meyer: Global Warning – Mobiles

Not quite as common as aerosol and wheatpastes and stencils, the smartly placed sculpture on the street can leave a lasting impression. Somehow, even though they can be just as illegal as other works of street art, these pieces are often afforded a wider berth in the patience of the public and law enforcement, as if their extended permanence makes them somehow not vandalism. Maybe it’s the sense of commitment and the sheer physical effort required to create. Here is a closeup on the work process of text-lover Traz- a homemade sort of video without sound that catches him in the creative zone creating and installing his mobiles.

Cosplay for Pets? Cospets!

Undoubtedly you’ve been scratching your head and wondering what kind of costume your dog should wear to that upcoming Halloween party. Here are some outstanding sources of inspiration for theatrical and fashionable costumery for both cats and dogs from the designers who know their muse.

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5 Installations in a Clearing: Land Art from Alberonero in Central Italy

5 Installations in a Clearing: Land Art from Alberonero in Central Italy

Land art can be so satisfying sometimes because you merely need nature to be your willing collaborator and your idea can take flight. It’s the sensation of serendipity when you first made a cape for yourself merely by wrapping your blanket over your shoulders. One minute ago it was a blanket. Suddenly, you may fly. That’s how I discovered that I was actually Batman.

Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)

The Italian land artist Alberonero says that he discovered this project October 2nd only by totally immersing himself in his environment here in Central Italy’s Vallo di Nera area. He says he is interpreting the natural elements also as moments – necessarily so because the world is in constant motion, despite the static state in which we may imagine it to be.

Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)

The temporary environmental installation that he conceives of here is called Monte Immagine, and he says that it “consists of five installations within a single clearing made up of natural materials found in the local woods – such as tree trunks and branches – resins and colored fabrics that interpenetrate with the physical and atmospheric elements of the surrounding landscape. All the works use trees as pillars: raw materials that, in each installation, experience the site through different suggestions.”

Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)

With this spirit of interaction, with this willingness of your observatory powers, everything becomes an actor, and something that can be acted upon. With the participation of clouds, of breezes, one is more aware of fragility.

He speaks of the natural actors as “apparitions that temporarily inhabit the area before their dialogue with nature gets absorbed by the atmospheric agents.”

Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)
Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)
Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)
Alberonero. “Monte Immagine”. In collaboration with Umbrian Center of Artistic Residences and STUDIO STUDIO STUDIO. Vallo di Nera, Italy. (photo © Roberto Conte)
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