All posts tagged: London

Images Of The Week: 06.08.14

Images Of The Week: 06.08.14

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Dude and Dudette it’s not even officially summer (June 21) but New York streets are off in the deep end of the public pool with all these new backflips and cannonballs and arched dive art in the streets. Can someone please say UNPRECEDENTED? Everybody jump in!

Here our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Bifido, Case Ma’Claim, City Kitty, Crummy Gummy, Dain, Damien Mitchell, Dee Dee, EC13, FKDL, JAZ, Jerk Face, Lambros, Mark Samsonovich, Pixel Pancho, Pyramid Oracle, Rubin, SheWolf, Skount, Solus, UAI, and Zio Siegler.

Top Image >> Case Ma’Claim and Pixel Pancho collaboration for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A sonic POP reverberated through the streets this week when this duet happened between Case Ma’Claim and Pixel Pancho at The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lambros combined nightmares into this one hideous hybrid. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dain is dressed for success. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Damien Mitchell pays tribute to the divine Nina Simone at The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Pyramid Oracle levitates sagely. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Dee Dee (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mark Samsonovich. This happened to me one time when I ate an entire bag of jelly beans and then washed them down with orange soda. Same thing. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mark Samsonovich. We come in peace. Would you like a banana? (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Bifido. New conceptual piece form his series “Don’t Forget To Play” in what appears to be an abandoned and derelict public park in Naples, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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SheWolf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Looks like FKDL was in town this week with his mix of 1950s nostalgia and idealized female collages. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Detail of FKDL wall for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crummy Gummy features out of work actor ET looking for options on the streets of Los Angeles. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Irish Solus left a love letter to BK and The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skount new street work in Barcelona, Spain. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jerk Face and the Cookie Monster for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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City Kitty (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Rubin for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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EC13 new piece in Huetor Vega, Spain. The artist continues to explore his non-figurative expressions with new mediums and surfaces. This placement is immaculate. (photo © Patricia Fernandez)

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Zio Siegler (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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JAZ is seen here at work in Berlin on his new mural in conjunction with his solo show currently on view at the BC Gallery.  (photo © Phillipp Barth)

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Jaz. The completed mural in Berlin.  (photo © Phillipp Barth)

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Untitled. The Empire State Building photographed from Brooklyn, NY. June 2014. Via Instagram and iPhone. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Sixe Paredes ‘Futurismo Ancestral’ Opens at Somerset House in London

Sixe Paredes ‘Futurismo Ancestral’ Opens at Somerset House in London

Starting today, for one week only, the Andes will be inside the Somerset House.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

London’s spectacular neo-classical home of arts and culture along the River Thames will play host to an all-encompassing exhibition experience mounted by the Barcelona-born graffiti artist Six Paredes in his tribute to Peruvian and Andean culture. Futurismo Ancestral: An Offering to Peru by Sixe Paredes has been inspired by the traditional and the modern, and aims to meld the two together surreally, and really.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

For weeks we have been seeing the progress of a loosely banded consortium of brother street artists laying plans and constructing exhibition elements beneath the fountained public courtyard. Today the public can experience a series of walkways leading to large-scale and smaller works evoking the rich color and symbols of the region; tapestries, totem sculptures, ceramics and quipus (a system of knotted cords known as ‘talking knots’), masks and fluorescent chichas (posters).

“We are taking over three spaces at Somerset House, essentially the whole of the lower floor of the building,” explains Rafael Schacter of A(by)P, an organization that enables artists to produce events and exhibit work and who organized the installation with his partners and the Somerset House. Built and installed by a “dream team” of urban and street artists and students from University College London, where Schacter teaches, the exhibition is complemented with daily interactive events including Peruvian and Andean food, music, film, and performance.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

Futurismo Ancestral is born from the travels of Sixe Paredes to Peru beginning in 2009 and his adoration of the richness he experienced in the culture compelled him to bring it back to share. One of the six street artists featured on the river façade of the Tate Modern six years ago along with Faile, JR, Blu, Os Gemeos, and Nunca for it’s pivotal street art exhibition, Six Paredes completed his most recent large scale wall just last month at the Biennale D’Art Urbain in Charleroi, Belgium.  Schacter, who co-curated the Street Art expo at that Tate show and who authored The World Atlas of Street Art & Graffiti with Yale in 2013, says that this return is Paredes first major solo show in the UK .

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

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Sixe Paredes spotting the future on the horizon. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

During the preparation for this much anticipated and lively show, BSA had the opportunity to speak with both Six Paredes and Rafael Schacter about the origins, inspirations, and preparations for Futurismo Ancestral.

Brooklyn Street Art: After touring Peru and being exposed to such eye-popping color, isn’t it surprising to be in such a grey northern city like London?
Sixe Paredes: It was not surprising for me to come here and find myself in a grey city because this color predominates in so many cities in Europe and so many European cities prohibit murals and even have specialized brigades set up to clean and remove color. Throughout my journey in different regions of Peru I’ve seen a lot of color but color can be found in all the different cultures of the world, when they maintain their primordial essence.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Sandra Butterfly)

Brooklyn Street Art: Rafael, can you tell us about Futurismo Ancestral and how it came about?
Rafael Schacter: Futurismo Ancestral is all about the connection between the traditional and the contemporary, the fusion of the Peruvian visual culture and craft tradition with the visual palette so unique to Sixe Paredes himself. Since I last worked with Sixe in the UK, he has been living in between Peru and his hometown of Barcelona, he has become obsessed with the visual culture of the region and has learned the techniques of ceramic and textile production with famous artisans and artists throughout the region. This exhibition is about bringing together the deep history and heritage of Peruvian visual culture, and his love for this tradition with his unique, colorful, distinct style in an all embracing, multifaceted manner.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

Brooklyn Street Art: Sixe Paredes, you have already been incorporating a certain minimalism into your aesthetics over the past ten years. Is it difficult to merge that understated quality with the vibrant enthusiasm of Peruvian and Andean folk?
Sixe Paredes: My art has always been characterized by the agglomeration of shapes and colors. Throughout different periods I started introducing more elements, such as the circuits, which led my paintings towards another dimension – this dimension enhanced my painting, allowing for other interpretations of my work. In recent years I have been synthesizing some of my series. I like to play with this idea because it leaves more room for reflection and I don’t need as many elements to express myself. Some of these elements are iconic to my work, such as crests or beaks which have always been in my compositions and can be found there today.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

Brooklyn Street Art: The work here is simultaneously modern and folk – with the bold colors and raw patterning and symbols combined with a certain minimalism. Rafael, can you walk us through the spaces in a way that helps translate this convivial duality in an exhibition space.
Rafael Schacter: Somerset House is really an amazing location for us to be working in, we are both proud and excited to be working here! After you have exited our introductory area, our visitors will go outside into the Lighwells, an amazing outside space which has been used for films such as Sherlock Holmes among others; within this arched space, we have built a series of 3 meter high trapezoidal arches – shapes which are highly significant in Inca culture. Acting as a rite of passage, as a journey from one sacred space to another, visitors well make their way into what is called the Deadhouse, an underground catacomb which exists directly below the famous Somerset House courtyard. This space, aptly, will function as a sacred temple space, within which Sixe’s ceramics, quipus and tapestries will be housed.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Rafa Suñen)

Brooklyn Street Art: Not only are the color palettes from the traditional Peruvian culture warm, so too are the materials. Can you talk about the warmer, more earthen properties of wood, of yarn, and hand made masks – and how they affect your work?
Sixe Paredes: Peru has had a considerable influence on my painting palette, bringing more color to it and motivating me to use new mediums, materials and techniques, some of which have endured since ancient times. I always wanted to move towards a new path, a more ancestral path, revalidating primal techniques through a contemporary perspective.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

Brooklyn Street Art: You have a stellar group supporting this one week event – some of these folks have had big shows of their own so it’s good to see them supporting another artist.
Rafael Schacter: One of the key things about A(by)P is that we want to be for artists by artists. We don’t want to simply get in a bunch of contractors to assist in bringing the project to life but want rather to recreate the group dynamic and energy that is so crucial to these artists’ worlds. As such, for every project, we want to bring the artist’s family together to help bring it to life; in that way, the creative juices and creative possibilities can flow in a much more organic manner. And not only that, but all these artists on the team are people who we will  continue to work with in the future on solo shows of their own.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

For Sixe’s show for example, we really have got a dream team working together, a group who like you say are all artists of massive acclaim themselves. Both Eltono and Nano4814 are two of my favourite artists in the world; Eltono has just had a superb solo homecoming show in Madrid at Slowtrack and Nano4814 and insane solo show at the Delimbo Gallery in Sevilla. Pablo Limon, our exhibition designer is one of the most amazing makers I have ever come across, a creative genius. And Lucas Cantu, who is working on our graphics, branding and exhibition production, is the director of the Savvy Studios as well as the founder of the Nrmal Festival in Mexico.  As I said, the dream team! And then alongside this we have had amazing support from the students of University College London, who have all been absolutely incredible.

 

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

Brooklyn Street Art: Many Street Artists are bringing the animal world into their work today and sometimes artists will say they are giving the animals a voice to speak to us. How have animals been important in your compositions?
Six Paredes: In my case, the animal theme has been present in my work for many years, and this partly because of the admiration I feel for them. For me, among the most fascinating creatures of the animal kingdom are birds, mainly because of the wide variety of species, thousands of colours and silhouettes – and their relationship to the celestial and to flight. In terms of my compositions, this theme is important to me because it reminds us that we are also animals within the same world.

Brooklyn Street Art: In what way do you think of your work as something that evokes the future?
Six Paredes: I think my work evokes the future because it merges two different visions, the ancient and the contemporary and the bond between them which leads us to reflect about many of the things that humans have left on their way and some of them I think would be important to remember.

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Sandra Butterfly)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Sandra Butterfly)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © A(by)P)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Sandra Butterfly)

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Sixe Paredes. “Futurismo Ancestral” Somerset House. April 2014. London, UK (photo © Sandra Butterfly)

Sixe Paredes Futurismo Ancestral: An Offering To Peru at Somerset House in London, UK.  Click HERE for more information on this exhibition.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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BSA Film Friday: 01.10.14

BSA Film Friday: 01.10.14

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Vhils x Pixel Pancho in Lisbon
2. How Nosm in Lisbon
3. NEKST FOREVER from Pose & Revok in Detroit
4. Knarf, Mafia and Fresh Max “3500” in Vienna
5. Bisser in London “Last Breath I” at Blackfriars Cafe

BSA Special Feature: Lisbon Double Feature from Underdogs
Pixel Pancho x Vhils
and How Nosm

Two beautiful videos in a row this week from the platform called Underdogs. “Underdogs is an international working platform based in Lisbon, Portugal that aims at creating space within the contemporary art scene for artists connected with the new languages of urban visual culture.” Since one of the original organizers is Street Artist Vhils, it makes sense that these two videos capture that additional essence of the experience of art making, the discipline, the dedication, the drive.  The camera work, editing, and story telling are fresh and above par here.

Pixel Pancho and Vhils for Underdogs. Lisbon 2013

How & Nosm for Underdogs. Lisbon 2013

NEKST FOREVER from The Seventh Letter: Pose & Revok

With baritone narration from Pose about the impact of one guy on many, this video relates the level of respect the late graffiti artist Nekst had among his peers. Together with Revok and other members of the MSK crew you’ll see them knock out one of the biggest tributes yet in Detroit.

 

Knarf, Mafia and Fresh Max “3500” in Vienna

KNARF, MAFIA and FRESH MAX spent the last 3 months working on a 3500 square meter wall complex near Vienna. Here is a brief overview of their process. They will also be releasing a book on the 24th documenting the project, sketches, and images of the entire painted building.

 

Bisser in London “Last Breath I” at Blackfriars Cafe

A local cafe of 35 years is going to be torn down with the entire building it has been housed in Southwark (South-London). Artist Bisser did an installation,  a “one-off beautification” last month to say goodbye to the place. As it turns out, an entire project has been spawned to create more work by more artists in the building before it is slated for demolition. This video is the first of the series for “The Last Breath Project”

More about the project here: lastbreathproject.co.uk

 

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ROA Gets Up With New Animals In Tow

ROA Gets Up With New Animals In Tow

BSA travels with ROA to Austria, Canada, Great Britain, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the US.

Today we visit with Street Artist, urban naturalist, and globe trotter ROA to see what walls he has been climbing since we last checked in with him and his traveling curious circus of animals. Alternating between the cuddly and the killing, the endoskelton and the excrement, the pugnacious, playful and the putrefying, this Belgian world citizen is no romantic with his subjects and he isn’t asking for you to be either necessarily.

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ROA. Lagos, Portugal 2013. (photo © Roa)

If you consider the brutal natural and man-made world that animals have to survive in and the ruthless depravity of humans throughout the ages (including right now), perhaps ROA’s depictions of these regionally based creatures are a healthy counterbalance to the fictional storytelling we customarily see in large public depictions of animals. Rotting Big Bird, anyone?

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ROA. Lagos, Portugal 2013. (photo © Roa)

In one instructive example, a local town meeting in Chichester in Great Britain erupted into a heated debate this spring and a vote was called over whether to remove one of ROA’s fresh paintings from public view. The aerosoled portrait  featured a rotting badger lying belly up and pock-marked across the front of a neglected building.

“It’s not appropriate, it’s grotesque and I hope it will be removed,” said the district and parish councilor who was outraged at the factual representation of a dying animal, according to a local website. The article does not mention if she was equally outraged at the culling of badgers locally, which ROA was drawing attention to, or if she would call the culling of undesirable animals “grotesque”.

 

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ROA. Ibex at the harbor in Linz, Austria 2013. (photo © flap.at)

You wouldn’t cheapen the spray-painted monochromatic realism of ROAs work as activism per se, or even moralizing. Sometimes a bear is just a bear.

But sometimes the poses and positions and selectively illustrated details are more pronounced than one may see in nature, so clearly his desire is to draw attention to them. And why not try to give a voice to them? Otters don’t do email and bison hooves are too clunky for texting and nary a narwhal has his own Facebook page. If they have been displaced, marginalized, or are suffering, you won’t see a cluster of clamoring squirrels arrayed before a bank of microphones and cameras issuing a press conference.

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ROA. Detail. Linz, Austria 2013. (photo © flap.at)

But slowly and gradually and almost systematically the former graffiti artist has been raising the awareness of even the dullest among us bipedal primates that the animals we are sharing the world with are plausibly pissed about that whole “dominion over nature” clause that pious Pulcinellas spout when justifying treating some animals like trash even while their blue-blooded poodles are having pedicures. Now that you think of it, this may not be exclusively about the animal kingdom.

Certainly we have all learned from ROAs travels that nature isn’t pretty – and can possibly be very alarming – and he won’t likely let you forget it.

So start trotting, galloping, swimming, scurrying, slithering, and scurrying! We have a lot of catching up to do with ROA as this year he’s been in Austria, Canada, Great Britain, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the US.

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ROA. Linza, Austria 2013. (photo © flap.at)

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ROA. Linz, Austria 2013. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. Mural Festival. “Still Life With Bison and Bear” Montreal, Canada 2013. (photo © Roa)

This wall was featured in our coverage this summer of the MURAL festival, where we wrote;

“For his first visit to Montreal, the Belgian Street Artist named ROA says that he had a great time creating this ‘still life’ with a bison and a bear. When talking about his inspiration, ROA says that he was impressed with the history of the so-called American bison, which was incredibly abundant in the early 19th century, numbering more than 40 million. After being hunted almost into extinction with a population of 200 a century later, the bison slowly have reestablished their numbers in Canada to 700,000. He decided to add a bear laying on top because it tells a similar story of a native mammal in the region.”

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ROA. “Catch of The Day” Open Art. Örebro, Sweden 2013. (photo © Roa)

“This is the first time I actually painted a narwhal,” says ROA about the curiously speared whale that lives year-round in the Arctic.

“Their tusks make them a unique example of a species; in a way the narwhal is a mythical sea creature; The unicorns of the sea,” explains ROA about this Swedish piece.  “The young male narwal that I painted here is unfortunately caught in a fishing line. I wanted to draw attention to how they and many other species become a victim of hunting and pollution.”

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ROA. “Catch of The Day”. Deatail. Open Art. Örebro, Sweden 2013. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. Vienna, Austria 2013. (photo © Roa)

At the start of July ROA opened his second solo show – this time with Inoperable Gallery in Vienna.

The exhibition was called “PAN-ROA’s Box” and it was an animal curiosity focused show.

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ROA. Detail. Vienna, Austria 2013. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY 2013. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. Wall Therapy. Rochester, NY 2013. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. “Two Blue Tits” in Chichester, Great Britain 2013. (photo © Roa)

ROA was there as part of his invitation to participate at the Chichester Street Art Festival in May.

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ROA. Chichester, Great Britain 2013. (photo © Roa)

Here is the painting referred to above that upset a number of people in Chichester and called for a vote to take it down (it was 50/50 so they’ve left it up).

Regarding the Badger Cull 2013

“After several emails from Louise Matthews about the upcoming badger cull in GB, I painted a badger to support their efforts to save the badgers,” says ROA. The controversial practice in Britain has gained a number of very adamant foes, including Brian May from the rock group Queen.

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ROA. Bethenal-Green London 2013. (photo © Roa)

As a guest of Griff from Street Art London, ROA did this piece in Bethenal-Green.

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ROA. Nuart 2013. Stavanger, Norway. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. Malaga, Spain. (photo © Roa)

As part of his invitation to the Maus Festival, ROA painted this in Calle Casas De Campos, Malaga, Spain.

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ROA. Malaga, Spain. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. “Fighting Squirrels”, Southbank, London 2013. (photo © Roa)

“If you have ever witnessed a squirrel fight, you might recognize the action,” says ROA of these two enraged fellas in mid air.  He explains that when the North American Eastern Grey squirrel (top) was introduced it caused the red native Squirrel (bottom) to lose habitat and population, so now the red one is protected by conservation laws.

ROA would like to thank the Southbank Centre at the canal.

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ROA. Dulwich, London 2013. (photo © Roa)

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ROA. Baroque The Streets Festival. Dulwich, London 2013. (photo © Roa)

Regarding the dog above, ROA says :

” It took me a detailed search into the Dulwich Picture Gallery to find an animal expression that was involved with the daily life of the time and express on it’s own a fragment of the ordinary life. My eye was caught by a pooping dog in a large scale hunting scene; I found that an interesting detail. The people of the museum told me they have more hunting scenes with this same curious detail, but those were currently not exhibited.”

Dulwich:  ‘Baroque The Streets: Dulwich Street Art Festival’ May 10-19, 2013. The festival was organized by Street Art London & Dulwich Picture Gallery

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ROA. Urban Forms Festival. Lodz, Poland. 2013. (photo © Roa)

Roa wishes to extend his most sincere thanks to the following people:

In Southbank, London he sends thanks to the Southbank Centre at the canal.

In Linz, Austria he says thanks to Bubble Days Festival in Linz, and thanks to Poidle.

In Montreal, he says thanks to MURAL for all their good care and for the retreat in Quebec. Thank you also to Yan, Andre, Alexis and Nico!

In Malaga, Spain he says thank you very much Fer.

In Rochester he says thank you to Ian, Steven, Dan and Wise, who “made my stay excellent as usual.”

In Lagos, Portugal he says thanks to LAC Laboratório Actividades Criativas.

In Stavanger, Norway he extends his thanks to the NUART festival.

In Lodz, Poland he says thanks to Michael and the crew.

And we here at BSA say thank you to you all, and of course to ROA for sharing all his travels with BSA readers.

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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Eye on London Street Art : Spencer Elzey in Europe

Eye on London Street Art : Spencer Elzey in Europe

Brooklyn-Street-Art-2-Spencer-Elzey-Residency-Banner-Nov-2013

Brooklyn-Street-Art-LONDON-Spencer-Elzey-Residency-Banner-Nov-2013

For the first week-long “residency” on BSA, Spencer Elzey has been sharing his experiences and Street Art photos from his recent trip to Europe. Today we finish with London, a polished and presentable collection of some of the current scene from the streets.

The city has long played host to a rolling panoply of urban art and artists and is a prime example of the professionalization of the practice featuring a greater absorption into the culture and economy at large with galleries, museums, shops, and paid tour guides all joining in. The upshot is you will see some of the best examples of talent and it may at times seem all quite combed over and generally safe for a general audience.  Not that there isn’t dynamism and risk taking, and you will still find unsanctioned work to be seen inside and outside of the tourist hotspots.

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Sweet Toof and Roa (photo © Spencer Elzey)

Hosting the Olympics last year brought a self cleansing of much of the organically grown graffiti and Street Art, and the chilling effect of living in an electronically surveilled society with cameras nearly everywhere will undoubtedly be sited to when historians look at the nature of art on the streets from this era.

“London had a lot of Street Art but it felt more corporate and organized for the masses,” says Elzey of his time walking through Shoreditch, Brick Lane, Hackney, Bethnal Green, and Camden. “In the week that I was there I walked by around five Street Art tours.”

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Sweet Toof (photo © Spencer Elzey)

“Most of London’s street art is confined to these places – The other areas that I explored around London all seemed pretty clean. This may have been due to the fact that there are security cameras everywhere,” he says. An international first world city, London usually is a destination for the international “circuit” of Street Artists whose names tend to reappear on lists of the various street/graffiti/urban art festivals that now pop up in global cities from Lima to Łódź and Living Walls to Nuart to Upfest and the recently ended FAME.

As with any art form that begins as transgressive and underground and evolves to be adopted by the dominant culture, at times the whole scene begins to resemble the commercial and institutional interests it once mocked or attempted to subvert. “London is great but felt more catered to the bigger players and had the most street art in commissioned form (by the various Street Art organizations), which is good to see some amazing work but cheapens the art a little,” he says.

In the images he shares with BSA readers today you can see the really strong work that is throughout those neighborhoods as many of the artists consider strongly what they will do – and it results in some quite striking pieces. As always, you want to keep an eye on London. Surely it will keep an eye on you.

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Miss Van and B. Schu (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Otto Schade (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Shok 1 (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Gnasher (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Alexis Diaz (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Ben Eine (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Cranio (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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For The Love Of Dog (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Banksy (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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A sculptural installation by D*Face (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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ROA (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Swoon (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Guy Denning (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Urban Solid (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Sokaruno (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Vinie and Reaone (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Anthony Lister (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Finabarr DAC (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Phlegm (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Faith 47 (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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El Mac (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Conor Harrington (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Conor Harrington (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Klone (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Dal East (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Dscreete (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Insa (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Martin Ron (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Jana & JS (photo © Spencer Elzey)

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Christian Nagel (photo © Spencer Elzey)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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Sr. X Makes an Escape

Sr. X Makes an Escape

Spain’s Sr. X has a good knack for placement with his realistic figures incorporated into the streetscape, whether peering out from a broken façade or up from the edges of a pothole. brooklyn-street-art-srx-london-11-13-web-2

Sr. X “Bye” London, England. November, 2013. (photo © Sr. X)

A guy who carries the weight of the world on his shoulders thematically, whether addressing fears of terror or the New World Order, Sr. X often mixes retro-looking sci-fi creatures or clean-cut idealized folks with apocalyptic themes in a winking ironic way. Here is a new piece that creates the missing bricks in a London wall to facilitate an escape, hopefully to a better world.

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Sr. X “Bye” London, England. November, 2013. (photo © Sr. X)

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BSA Film Friday 09.27.13

BSA Film Friday 09.27.13

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-Graphic-Surgery-screenshot-sept2013

 

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening: Graphic Surgery for “The Canals Project“, OLEK inRussia’s PRIDE“, Team OBEY Visits FAILE,  STREET ART BRAZIL via Frankfurt, and M-City in Paris.

BSA Special Feature: Graphic Surgery
for “
The Canals Project

Erris Huigens and Gysbert Zijlstra, artists from Amsterdam who together are called Graphic Surgery, work here in the industrial fields along the waterway near London’s site of the Olympics last year.  The primary audience will mostly be floating by in this area once known for local spontaneous Street Art and now curated, and Graphic Surgery’s silhouetted geometrics will be sharply cutting as you pass, minimal and constructivist while you propel through the rippling canal. All the mirroring and refracting of angles and shapes are flattened momentarily, wavering and ricocheting off and with their surroundings in black and white.

As they speak the two artists take you with them to see how it is done, and how it is inspired – capturing the lines and the physical context of placement with intention while their intersections with modernism and industry are distilled.

Graphic Surgery: The Canals Project.  London 2013. Produced by Cedar Lewisohn.

OLEK “Russia’s PRIDE”

A new video documenting Street Artist Olek as she did a public art installation in St. Petersberg last week. You can also read her interview this week with BSA here: OLEK Interview and Exclusive Photos “From Russia With Pride”.

 

Team OBEY Visits Team FAILE

A quick look inside Faile’s studio as they prepare for their currently running show at Dallas Contemporary museum.

STREET ART BRAZIL via Frankfurt

Ending today the Schrirn Kunsthalle has been showcasing the diversity of Brazilian graffiti art as Brazil was the guest of honor at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

Artists included are HERBERT BAGLIONE, GAIS, RIMON GUIMARÃES, JANA JOANA & VITCHÉ, NUNCA, ONESTO, ALEXANDRE ORION, SPETO, FEFE TALAVERA, TINHO, and ZEZÃO

 

M-City In Paris: Interview

A relaxed look at stencil Street Artist M-City as he completes a huge wall in central Paris, followed by an interview at Itinerrance Gallery by Chrixcel.

With special thanks to Fatcap.com

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BSA Film Friday: 08.09.13

Brooklyn-Street-Art-copyright-El-Seed-screenshot-eid-mubarak

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening: Eid Mubarak from eL Seed, “Timing is Everything” by ABOVE, Bogan in London, and BSA Film Friday LIVE at Atlanta Living Walls next week.

BSA Special Feature: Eid Mubarak:
A Calligraffiti Greeting from eL Seed

Guess we are a day late for this maybe since the EID celebrations were actually yesterday as Ramadan 2013 came to a close, but how often do you get to see an EID greeting created by a graffiti artist? Um, never.
So for all the BSA folks who celebrate the big EID holiday we say “Mubarak EID”, and for everybody else, here’s a fun way to use traditional calligraphic skills and merge with graffiti.

eL Seed was in New York back in May, and here is a wall he did with Jaye in Manhattan.

Timing is Everything: ABOVE

From Shoreditch here’s ABOVE with a small stencil that is all about context. He says it took him over seven months of searching night time streets to find the perfect fixed shadow on a wall, but we think he just is a slow stencil cutter.  “I am attracted to the concept that the stencil and it’s context can change literally from day to night,” says ABOVE in the description accompanying the video. So apparently it is not just about context. “Timing is everything!” says he.

Aeon – Bogan in London via VNA

In Australia they are called Bogans. We just call them a family reunion. But when Aeon puts on that mullet and mustache and acts a fool while spraycationing in London, we think he may also be inventing a certain kind of drag. No need to be derogatory – It’s all about inhabiting your character and owning it, people!

FILM Friday Goes on the Road – See us in Atlanta for Living Walls!

Check out the Facebook page for all the details of BSA Movie Night!

Brooklyn-Street-Art-Living-Walls-#LW2013-Movie-Night

BSA Movie Night
“Street Art in Motion”
08.14.13 Callanwolde Fine Arts Center, Atlanta
7 pm to 9:30 pm
Steve Harrington and Jaime Rojo, Co-founders of BrooklynStreetArt.com

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Street Walls and a Boat Too, Alice Pasquini Paints Around London

Alice Solo and New Video of Group Painting on a Moored Boat

New work from Alice Pasquini in Shoreditch, Sydenham, Camden, and boatside along the River Thames where mud boots are required and someone to hold your ladder is appreciated .

Jessica Stewart shares these images with BSA readers of Alice in distinctly different areas of London, where the responses to the sight of an artist painting on your street vary greatly.

In Shoreditch, Alice was taken rather as part of the expected show, says Jessica. “Shoreditch is the hub of Street Art and Alice got everything from random reporters to a guide who does street art tours walking by,” says Jessica. The fellas in the spot next door seem particularly unimpressed of the lady on the ladder as they discuss the news of the day.

In Sydenham, a neighborhood that is newly embracing art to illustrate its vibrancy, the response was welcoming. “In Camden, which funnily enough doesn’t get painted much, people were much more fresh in their observations and really excited to see something go up,” observes Stewart.

Alice Pasquini in Camden, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Alice Pasquini in Camden, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Alice Pasquini in Shoreditch, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Alice Pasquini in Shoreditch, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Alice Pasquini on a bricked wall in Sydenham, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Alice Pasquini in Sydenham, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Then in the muddy moorings of a dry dock barge in Bermondsey, just up river from Tower Bridge, Alice worked alongside Miss Van, Ciro Schu, Sheryo, and The Yok painting on the side of a boat while the water raised and receded and at times the artists felt like they might get sucked into the earth and the water.

“It was a crazy few days of racing against the tides to get in painting time,” says the photographer as she recalls the hotly humid air and continuously changing conditions.  In the video of the boat painting party below that was shot and edited by Ben Grubb, it’s good to see Alice alongside the others even while the water rises.

Alice Pasquini. The River Thames, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Ciro Schu and Miss Van. The River Thames, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Alice Pasquini. The River Thames, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Ciro Schu and Miss Van. The River Thames, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

Ciro Schu, Miss Van and Alice Pasquini. The River Thames, London. (photo © Jessica Stewart)

The Sydenham wall was coordinated with GlobalStreetArt.com.

The Bermondsey Boat painting was coordinated by Propa Stuff (www.propa-stuff.com)

A short film documenting the artists filmed and edited by Ben Grubb.

Artists included are Alice Pasquini, Miss Van, Ciro Schu, Sheryo, and The Yok

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Lazarides Gallery Presents: Know Hope “The Abstract and The Very Real” (London, UK)

Know Hope

2nd August 2013 – 29th August 2013

This August, Tel Aviv-based artist Know Hope makes his solo debut at Lazarides Rathbone with a new exhibition, The Abstract and The Very Real.

Addressing the human condition and its collective social existence through a series of unique works and a site-specific installation, the exhibition questions the ubiquitous notion of the ‘”abstract and the very real”, the weight and burden of which though universally apparent is often unidentifiable to most.

Appropriating found objects, vintage frames and old papers, Know Hope will fill the exhibition with assemblages that visually embody abstract concepts of memory and temporality. Reclaimed materials will come together breaking free from the confines of canvas or frame, his archetypal character crawling from one to the next with the frames representing the empty spaces in our lives and our undying struggle to fill them.

 

http://www.lazinc.com/exhibitions/586,know-hope-the-abstract-and-the-very-real

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Stolen Space Gallery Presents: “VII” A Group Exhibition. (London. UK)


“VII’
Group Show

With a bit of luck, and a lot of talent, StolenSpace has entered its 7th year as London’s primary authority in Contemporary Urban Art. Having started to feel the 7-year itch for bigger and better projects and exhibitions, we have made the exciting decision to move to a new venue:
StolenSpace
17 Osborn Street
London E1 6TD
Our new 1400 sq ft gallery space, steeped in local history as it was once a stonemason’s workshop, is still within the vibrant creative hub of East London’s Brick Lane and The Old Truman Brewery. So although we have itchy feet we haven’t moved too far!

 

In this year’s 7th month, we are feeling very fortunate for our past successes and exciting new beginnings, therefore, for the premier exhibition at StolenSpace’s new home, we would like to introduce a Group Show, ‘VII,’ inspired by this lucky and symbolic number.

Whether or not you are of a superstitious persuasion, the number 7 carries with it a myriad of significant connotations. Since the beginning of time, this number has held a powerful place in theological, historical, scientific and cultural memory. According to the Old Testament, the Earth was created in 7 days, in Hinduism there are 7 Chakras, in Christianity there are 7 deadly sins, in Islam there are 7 levels in heaven, and in Judiasm there are 7 blessings and 7 days of mourning. Furthermore, there are 7 days in a week, 7 colours in a rainbow, 7 seas, and 7 wonders of the world. A recurrent motif in art and literature, this number signifies Shakespeare’s 7 Ages of Man and the 7 notes in a traditional musical scale. The associations go on and on, and the potential for creative investigation is almost endless.

On 11th July 2013, StolenSpace will open its brand new doors to the public with ‘VII,’ a group show exhibiting longstanding favorites and fresh newcomers. With tasty refreshments courtesy of Gordon Ramsay’s Bread Street Kitchen, we would like to extend a warm welcome to our new location, inviting you to share in this celebration of our lucky 7th year.

Confirmed artists:
Aaron Rose
AndrewMcattee
Arth Daniels
C215
CharlieAnderson
Cope2
Cyrcle
D*Face
Dave Kinsey
David Bray
EINE
Greg Lamarche
Jack Murray
Jim Houser
Joram Roukes
Josie Morway
Julie Impens
Kai & Sunny
Kelly Allen
Kirsty Whiten
Maya Hayuk

Michael De Feo

Mysterious Al
Ramon Maiden
Reka
Rone
Ronzo
Ryan Callanan
Sally Fuerst
Simon WG Butler
Stefan Strumbel
Toshi
Twoone
Usugrow

Vinnie Nylon
Word To Mother
XOOOOX

 

http://www.stolenspace.com/section.php?xSec=574&xPage=1

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Canemorto Stares Madly at London and Bristol

Canemorto have just galloped around Bristol and London for a few weeks and have left a number of these somberly bewildered guys in their wake. You remember in our last visit with the trio whose name means “dead dog” the stretched out horizontal is a particular favorite, and it it occurs to you that they may have something of a predilection for Picasso-esque portraits as they return to these sort of deranged dudes again and again.

(photo © Canemorto)

These gesticulating and grimacing sitters seem to have a lot on their mind, and who can blame them given the downward chugging economy, tiny apartments, longer working hours, government austerity and what not. Even so, these perplexed posers are not troublesome, rather than troubled. Either way, the energy of the lines and the clattering of the strokes as they bang into one another keeps these new pieces by Canemorto stealing the scene.

(photo © Canemorto)

(photo © Canemorto)

(photo © Canemorto)

(photo © Canemorto)

(photo © Canemorto)

(photo © Canemorto)

(photo © Canemorto)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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