All posts tagged: Daze

Coney Art Walls : 30 Reasons To Go To Coney Island This Summer

Coney Art Walls : 30 Reasons To Go To Coney Island This Summer

The gates are open to the new public/private art project called Coney Art Walls and today you can have a look at all 30 or so of the new pieces by a respectable range of artists spanning four decades and a helluva lot of New York street culture history. We’ve been lucky to see a lot of the action as it happened over the last five weeks and the range is impressive. These are not casual, incidental choices of players lacking serious resumes or street/gallery cred, but the average observer or unknowing critic may not recognize it.

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

By way of defining terms, none of this is street art. These are murals completed by artists who are street artists, graffiti writers, fine artists, and contemporary artists. In the middle of an amusement park, these are commissioned works that respond in some way to their environment by thirty or so local and international heavy hitters and a few new kids on the block comprising a 40+ year span of expertise.

Open to many strata of the public and fun-seekers who dig Brooklyn’s rich cultural landscape, this outdoor show will surely end up as backgrounds for selfies — while perhaps simultaneously elevating a discourse about the rightful place of graffiti/street art/urban art within the context of contemporary art. Okay, maybe not such loftiness will result, but let’s not rule it out entirely.

 

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

It should come as no surprise that it is the dealer, curator, perennially risk-taking showman Jeffrey Deitch who is the ringmaster of this circus, or that the genesis of this cultural adventure is perplexing to some who have greeted his newest vision with perplexity and derision. His Deitch Projects and related activities in the 2000s regularly presented and promoted the street-inspired D.I.Y. cultural landscape, having done his due diligence and recognizing that new life springs from the various youth movements always afoot. The Jeffrey-conceived “Art Parade” itself was a street-based all-inclusive annual panoply of eye candy and absurdity; inflicting humor, sex, gore, fire, glitter and possibility into the minds of Manhattan sidewalk observers.

As MOCA Los Angeles director Deitch also flipped the script with his “Art In The Streets,” organizing a vast survey of a half-century of the modern grassroots genres including graffiti/street art/urban art/tattoo/punk/hip-hop/skater culture that far surpassed anyone’s predictions for audience attendance and public engagement. Aside from tripping wires and a public misstep here and there, the show earned critical praise, pinched art-school noses, and pushed skeptical institutions and patrons to question their prejudices. It also gave voice to a lot of people.

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Notably, that MOCA exhibit drew a little over 200,000 attendees in four months. Coney Island beach and boardwalk gets about 14 million annually. Even if the Smorgasbord pop-up village food trucks feed a fraction of that number, there will be more folks viewing art and interacting with it here than, say, the Four Seasons dining rooms, which also display street artists and contemporary artists in the restaurants’ artistic programming. Side by side comparisons of Smorgasbord/Four Seasons diners ethnic diversity, income, age, education level, museum board membership or real estate investments were not available at press time. But neither can be fairly described as exploitative to artists or audience without sounding patronizing.

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

These multicolored and monochromatic murals illustrate a wide and balanced smorgasborg of their own; examples of myriad styles are at play with some engaging in activism and local politics and Coney Island history. From original train writer Lady Pink to aerosol drone sprayer Katsu, from eL Seed’s lyrical Arabic calligraffiti to Retna’s secret text language to graffitist-now-collagist Greg Lamarche, from Shepard Fairey’s elegant Brooklyn salute to polluters and blasé consumerism to Tatyana Fazlalizadeh’s spotlight on current Coney Island neighbors, from urban naturalist ROA’s monochrome marginalized city animals to How & Nosm’s eye-punching and precise graphic metaphors, you are getting a dizzying example of the deep command Deitch has of this multi-headed contemporary category that is yet to settle on a moniker to call itself.

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Coney Art Walls assembles world travelers from NYC and LA and Miami and internationally; Belgium, Barcelona, Brazil, Paris, Tunisia, London. Some are 80s Downtown NYC alumni, others were train writers in the 70s or big crew graff heads and taggers from the decades after. Some are considered historical originators of a form and cross-genre risk takers pushing beyond their comfort zone. Take a close look and you’ll find names that are in major collections (private, institutional, corporate) and that go to auction.

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Some are regularly showing in galleries and are invited to street art festivals, exhibited in museums and discussed in academia and print. Others have studio practices spanning three decades, are lecturers, panelists, authors, teachers, community advocates, art stars, reality TV personalities, film actors, product endorsers and art product makers working with global brands. One or two may be considered global brands themselves. A handful have been painting on the streets for 40 years. Monolithic they are not.

One more notable aspect occurred to us as we watched this parade making its peregrination to these summer walls – either because of Deitch or the romance or history of Coney or both; When you are looking at the range of ages and ethnicities and family configurations and listening to the variety of accents and opinions expressed and seeing the friendly but tough-stuff attitudes on display — you might guess you were in Brooklyn. You are.

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Futura (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Futura (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Shepard Fairey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jesse Edwards (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jesse Edwards (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Irak (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lady Pink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lady Pink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ben Eine (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Maya Hayuk (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lady Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lady Aiko  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Buff Monster (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Miss Van (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jason Woodside (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jason Woodside (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Ron English (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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AVAF  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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eL Seed (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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eL Seed with Martha Cooper (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kenny Scharf (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Mister Cartoon (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jane Dickson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Jane Dickson (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Skewville (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Marie Roberts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Marie Roberts (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Greg Lamarche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gregg Lamarche (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Katsu (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Retna (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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ROA (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kashink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kashink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kashink (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Kaves (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Lauren Halsey (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Our previous weekly updates track the installation period of Coney Art Walls:

Coney Art Walls: First 3 Completed and Summer Begins

DEITCH Masters, Coney Art Walls Part 2 : Coney With a Twist

Eine, Hayuk: A Riot of Color at Coney (Update III)

Coney Art Walls: Gypsies, Stallions, Mermaids, and Pop Optics! Update IV

Coney Art Walls Opens for the Mermaids! Update V

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Coney Art Walls: First 3 Completed and Summer Begins

Coney Art Walls: First 3 Completed and Summer Begins

Summer Just Got More Fun in NYC as Coney Reinvents Itself Again

You know the scene: Cotton candy, blasting music, bold fonted signs, city beach, sticky fingers, tattoos, carnival barkers, rollercoaster barfing, stolen kisses under the boardwalk, big bellied men with their shirts off, giggling girls in flipflops smelling like coconut sunscreen, garbage on the sand, mermaids, porta potties, stuffed animals, concrete, cigars, hot dogs, butts, boobs, lipstick, screaming, flashing old-timey light bulbs, kids passed out in strollers, boozy Romeos, sketchy snake oil salesmen, aerosol painted walls by New York’s old skool graff writers. That last part is now in effect, actually.

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Instead of being hunted down for catching a tag or bubble lettered throw up, a couple dozen graffiti/street art painters are invited to hit up Coney Island this summer and since today is the inaugural Saturday of the first unofficial weekend of summer in New York, we’re bringing you the first three freshly completed pieces. Part of “Coney Art Walls”, the muralists began taking the train out to this seaside paved paradise that is re-inventing itself once again, this time courtesy of art curator Jeffrey Deitch.

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This week while the sun was still struggling to get a handle on Summer, we captured the early crew hitting up the temporary two sided walls outside and inside the compound that will share space with food vendors, picnic tables and a stage for music performances. Some brought family while they worked and a few even took a ride on the Cyclone with Martha Cooper just to scream their heads off. The artist lineup is looking stellar, with golden names predominantly associated with New York’s 70s-80s graff heyday sprinkled with a few of the current street art contenders, but you never know what is popping up next, or who. It’s Coney Island after all.

Here are the first three completed murals with the Tats Cru twins How & Nosm leading the pace, followed by Crash and Daze.

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The one and only Martha Cooper shooting How & Nosm at work. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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How & Nosm (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Daze (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash. The inspiration. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash. The sketch. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash (photo © Jaime Rojo)

This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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BSA Images Of The Week: 09.21.14

BSA Images Of The Week: 09.21.14

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BSA-Images-Week-Jan2014

Autumn in New York yo! Crisp cool, sunny days. Girls in tight sweaters. Boys in combat boots. Every cool air festival you can think of is all happening simultaneously – skateboarders closing down Kent Ave on BKs north side, Indian Larry’s block party with motorcycles of every stripe, and this years San Gennaro festival in Little Italy looks like it wants to reclaim this part of town before it is subsumed by the crushing wealth machine now chewing through Chinatown. Literally the festival looks like it spans the entire length of Mulberry from Canal to Houston – that’s longer than the line to get the new iPhone in Soho!

But neither one of those will compare to todays’ expected line of concerned citizens snaking through the streets in Manhattan to address the effect of climate change. Coordinated with marches in cities around the world it’s estimated to draw 100,000 people. We’ve had a sneak peek at what Street Artist Swoon has in store for an installation at the end of the march, including some of the very same materials she just used for her “Submerged Motherlands” at the Brooklyn Museum, but arranged entirely cleverly differently.

A few weeks ago at Nuart we were invite to speak about activism on the street around the world using Street Art as a form of expression, and we are surprised to see a rising wave of it that not many seem aware of – including some of our artworld peers. This week alone a few Street Artists have created new work to promote today’s march. It is not hard to get us into the street on a regular day so this is just one shiny bauble of grassroots creativity that you won’t want to miss. Also, technically, it’s still summer until Tuesday.

Here’s our weekly interview with the street, this week featuring Bifido, Crash, Daze, Gilf!, Hek Tad, Jetsonorama, Karl Addison, LMNOPI, Misshab, Sean9Lugo, and Skount.

Top Image >> A portrait of Ta’kaiya Blaney, a 13 year old girl from the Sliammon First Nation (Vancouver) and an environmental activist. The large mural was painted by Street Artist LMNOPI this week to commemorate the People’s Climate March here today in NYC. Click HERE for more details on the march. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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LMNOPI (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A collaborative image created by Jetsonorama and Monica Canilao  (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Gilf! created this new piece to bring people to the march.(photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Misshab (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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A cosmic folkloric futurist meeting of souls from Skount at the StreetMeet Festival in Würzburg, Germany. (photo © Skount)

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Skount. Detail. StreetMeet Festival. Würzburg, Germany. (photo © Skount)

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Karl Addison for The Bushwick Collective. That spot to the left may look like a prison, but that’s what we call a beer garden in Brooklyn. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Karl Addison for The Bushwick Collective. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Hek Tad. A public declaration of love. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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An outdoor installation of craft paper by an unknown artist. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Oh, hi! Sorry I kicked the ball into your head. Bifido “Do It” Caserta, Italy. (photo © Bifido)

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A porcine pal to stand atop, but you are still not tall enough. Bifido “I Want My Meat” Budapest, Hungary. (photo © Bifido)

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Could be cheese. Could be a brick of a hallucinogenic substance that gives people animal heads. Sean9Lugo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Crash and Daze for The L.I.S.A. Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Untitled. SOHO, NYC. August 2014. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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Daze is Hotter Than July in Baton Rouge for Mural Program

Daze is Hotter Than July in Baton Rouge for Mural Program

New York’s DAZE was just in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for some of the hottest painting weather he’s experienced and he’s happy he went.  Painting alongside folks like Seth, Hunto, Pose2, and Sabotaje al Montaje (Matheus) from Tenerife, he tells BSA that was satisfied with the work and the experience despite the surprising heat.

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A summer burner from Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

“I was told by members of The TATS crew that it was hot and humid but even still it was crazy!” he says. “The average day saw temperatures climb into the 90s with a very high humidity percentage and these temperatures were usually followed by a severe late afternoon thunderstorm . It felt as if I was climbing through the jungles of Cambodia.” We haven’t been to Cambodia but we’ve been inside a steam dumpling kitchen in Chinatown, and Baton Rouge in July sounds very similar – except it is outdoors.

 

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

DAZE was part of this year’s Museum of Public Arts summer youth program, the same one we told you about that OverUnder participated in a couple of weeks ago.  The museum and the program is the brainchild of Dr. Kevin Harris, who began bringing primarily graffiti artists to the city in 2012 to create murals.  Now, the selection is widening, says DAZE.

“He has brought together some of the most important names from both the Street Art and graffiti worlds,” he reports. “All have created large scale murals that are contributing to the cultural climate of Baton Rouge.”  In addition to the murals themselves, DAZE says the programs that work with local youth are crucial when assessing the success of the museum. These youth workshops, which were held at Family & Youth Service Center, consisted of each invited artist working in collaboration with local teens to realize murals in the surrounding area.”

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

Despite the heat DAZE says he had a great time in the steamy south interacting with the youth and the other artists, and he thinks Dr. Harris has put Baton Rouge on the map as a “must see” experience. “This place has become a “go to” destination for incredible murals done by some of the most important practitioners in the game.”

So the New York 70s/80s graffiti writer-turned-fine artist created some murals that reflected the local history and culture while in Baton Rouge. Naturally he completed an old school burner just for balance. “I wanted to get as much accomplished as I could before the thunder and lightning came, and the climate made me understand the people better,” he says as he talks about what inspired him to create these new pieces.

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

“My main mural was actually of the neighborhood itself. On the far left I painted a portrait of recently deceased blues legend Tabby Thomas. This flowed into images of the street itself and the old, legendary Lincoln Theater. These images are floating on a bed of fast moving clouds.” Does he think these clouds were a reference to the passing thunderstorms? “Maybe. I didn’t think so at the time – but they probably were.”

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A Summer Burner and shout out to Daze from Cope2 for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Daze for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Seth for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Hunto for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

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Sabotage Al Montage for Kevin Harris’ Museum of Public Art. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. July 2014. (photo © Daze)

 

To learn more about the Kevin Harris’ Museum Of Public Art click HERE and HERE

 

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Chris “Daze” Ellis in Dialogue with the Collection at The Addison

Chris “Daze” Ellis in Dialogue with the Collection at The Addison

The NYC Graffiti Artist joins Whistler, Homer and Pollock at The Addison

Currently the Addison Gallery of American Art in Massachusetts is hosting New York 1970s graffiti writer DAZE in Street Talk: Chris Daze Ellis in Dialogue with the Collection. At the exhibit opening a few weeks ago, a number of New Yorkers, including other writers and bombers from that period, friends, family, a few historians and curators took the trip to Andover to see Mr. Ellis receive recognition for his contribution to the graffiti art canon as well as to give witness to how his evolution as studio artist continues. Today photographer, writer, poet, and alchemist Todd Mazer takes BSA readers to the show and talks to Daze about his personal route through NYC to this station in MA.brooklyn-street-art-DAZE-TODD-MAZER-The-Addison-Gallery-American-Art-web-16 Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

Inside a historic museum which houses one of the most significant collections of American Art a wide range of patrons gather. Some are still learning how to tie their shoes while others have likely built a lifetime of things with out the aid of an internet tutorial look on at works that seem to speak universally. What they are gazing upon is Street Talk: Chris “Daze” Ellis’s exhibition featuring his recent work in a dialogue with the Addison Gallery of American Arts expansive collection.

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

One observer is Maria Muller, Deputy Director of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.  “I feel like the practical need to work quickly on the trains in his early career seems to be reflected in the dynamic style and sense of motion and speed in his images.”

As Daze gets mobbed up for photo ops in front of his piece entitled “View to the Other Side”, he reflects upon his identity and the initial spark that has led up to this moment. “People don’t realize when I was painting trains that it wasn’t a cool thing to do and it wasn’t socially acceptable,” he says.

“I began painting in 1976 after meeting a bunch of writers at The High School of Art and Design in New York. I was learning things in school but this was something outside of art school that was completely unconventional that I found incredibly creative and exciting. It is something that still fascinates me to this day. There is something very addictive about it.”

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

This graffiti addiction seems to be spreading to museums as well. Since 2011’s “Art in the Streets” exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Arts in Los Angeles, which was billed as “the first major U.S. museum survey of graffiti and street art”, more museums have begun to embrace this movement. Current exhibitions like “City as Canvas: The Martin Wong Graffiti Collection” at the Museum of the City of New York and the Addison’s “Loisaida: New York’s Lower East Side in the 80’s” also both prominently feature the work of Daze, for example.

Allison Kemmerer, The Addison’s Curator of Photography and Art after 1950, explains what is bringing these two worlds together. “One of the strengths of the Addison’s collection is its wealth of urban imagery from all periods and in all media.”

“Daze’s drawing from the vocabulary of both the contemporary world of graffiti and street art and the tradition of urban realism, this is exactly what attracts the Addison to him. We are always mindful of the continuum that exists between historic and contemporary art and the way objects speak back and forth to each other across media and time.”

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze. Detail. (photo © Todd Mazer)

Daze’s journey to lead up to this point has clearly been an evolving process. “Almost all my paintings now are a mixture of mediums, each medium has it own characteristics and its own kind of history attached to it and you have to be patient to be able to deal with and find a way for them to all coexist in one picture frame.  I had to work with them for a long time separately before I felt like I could combine them and come up with something that looked new.

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Daze. Detail. (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze. Detail. (photo © Todd Mazer)

As Daze has matured as an artist, he has also discovered there is more to being a successful artist than just painting a ruggedly pretty picture. “The art world was and still is a really hard place to navigate through and some people are able to do a better job at grasping it then others,” he explains.

“I think in a lot of cases collectors have a lot more power with museums than even artists and play a very important role in all of this, somebody like John Axelrod who is very passionate about this art form, has the ability to start dialogs with these museums and I’m grateful he’s chosen to amplify voices like mine.”

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From left to right Sean Corcoran, Jayson TERROR161 Edlin, DAZE, and Charlie Ahearn  (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

As the crowd begins to thin out, Daze expresses the magnitude of this personal milestone “Even at a young age, I was always going to the library or museums so now it’s kind of mind boggling having my work in them because I still remember what it felt like to be that kid walking through the Brooklyn Museum.”

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Daze. Detail. (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze. Detail. (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze having a word with Jackson Pollock. (photo © Todd Mazer)

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Daze (photo © Todd Mazer)

 

Our special thanks to Todd Mazer for sharing his take on this this story with BSA readers. To learn more about Todd’s work, please click HERE and check him out on Instagram.

Street Talk: Chris Daze Ellis in Dialogue with the Collection
May 3 – July 31, 2014
Addison Gallery of American Art
Andover, Massachussetts

 

Street Talk: Chris Daze Ellis in Dialogue with the Collection

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“I’m In Miami Bitch”, Andrew Kaufman photographs Wynwood

“I’m In Miami Bitch”, Andrew Kaufman photographs Wynwood

A. It has a good name, and
B. It’s the way Wynwood feels every year during Art Basel and this self published book by photographer Andrew Kaufman captures the excitement unpretentiously.

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

In the fall of 2012 Kaufman began walking the streets with camera in hand in what used to be called “El Barrio”, shooting the murals of the international Street Art magnet called the Wynwood District. The previously low-income and light manufacturing neighborhood had been transforming itself as a destination in the shadow of the decade old art fair across the water in Miami Beach. He discovered artists from in town and around the world painting walls side by side and a palpable thrill in the air in this 20 square block public space like none he had previously experienced.

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Every year in late November artists from around the world descend on the streets of Wynwood to remake the façade of almost every building, overhead door and nook or cranny where paint could be applied,” he says in this image packed softcover. He doesn’t try to romance it, he just lays it open for you to take a look and to possibly feel what it was like for him for a few weeks talking to artists, interviewing locals and pilgrims and internationally known names as they painted, listened to music, traded stories, passed a joint, ate barbecue, and got distracted by the bikinis, parties, hammocks and lawn chairs.

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

In a down-to-earth way Andrew steers clear of grandiosity or otherwise put a self-serving spin on the scene. He learns just by asking questions and taking photos, with highlights including conversations with Kenny Scharf, DAZE, and BooksIIII Bischof, who lays bare the conflicting feelings of local graff writers who had already been organizing and slamming walls organically for a handful of years before the real estate developer Tony Goldman brought his economic heft to flood the scene with international Street Artists.

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

The rapid change that neighborhood has undergone the other 11 months of the year has created rifts between the locals and the well-heeled newbies, and its good that Kaufman gives airtime to those perspectives as well, diplomatically describing the power struggles as “growing pains”. While some characterizations may be a bit naïve at times with statements like “there are no curators, no rules,” he still captures the near spiritual  peregrination of idealist artists from around the US who hop trains and buses or hitch-hike to a warm sunny climate at the end of November with little more than a desire to find a wall to paint and a couch to crash on.

I’m in Miami Bitch is a personal account of the zoo and the spectacle and an historical capture of a moment on an evolutionary timeline that will become more valuable as the inevitable cultural seachange in this Miami neighborhood takes place and the presumptive commodification and gentrification runs its full course. For the moment you can still catch the crazy collaborative creative magic yourself just by showing up. But if you can’t, Kaufman is happy to share his sense of magic with you.

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Andrew Kaufman “I’m In Miami Bitch” ( photo © Jaime Rojo)

Included in the book are works by Cite, Crayola, Dabs and Myla, Ewok, Pia, Fumerosim, Pose-MSK, Aimer, Patch Whiskey, La Paneilla, Kenny Scharf, Blink, Torek, Daze, Pez, Gorey, and about 50 more artists. For more information about I’m in Miami Bitch, cliek HERE.

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“The City As Canvas” Opens with the Collection of Martin Wong

“The City As Canvas” Opens with the Collection of Martin Wong

Last night the graffiti and early Street Art history from New York’s 1970s and 80s was celebrated by the City of New York – at least in its museum. Criminals and outlaws then, art stars and legends today, many of the aerosol actors and their documentarians were on display and discussed over white wine under warm, forgiving, indirect lighting.

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DAZE in the background sliced by a wall of cans at the opening of “The City As Canvas” (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

“City as Canvas: New York City Graffiti From the Martin Wong Collection” is an exhibition as well as a book released last fall written by Carlo McCormick and Sean Corcoran, with contributions by Lee Quinones, Sacha Jenkins and Christopher Daze Ellis, and all the aforementioned were in attendance. Also spotted were artists, photographers, curators, writers (both kinds), art dealers, historians, family, friends, peers and loyal fans – naturally most fell into a few of these categories at the same time.

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“The City As Canvas” exhibition at Museum of the City of New York welcome text with pieces by Futura 2000 and Zephyr to the right. (photo via iPhone © Steven P. Harrington)

“City as Canvas” is possible thanks to the foresight, eye, and wallet of collector Martin Wong, an openly gay Chinese-American artist transplanted to New York from San Francisco, which is remarkable not only because of the rampant homophobia and near hysterical AIDS phobia at the time he was collecting but because the graffiti / Street Art scene even today throws the term “fag” around pretty easily. A trained ceramacist and painter whose professional work has gained in recognition since his death of AIDS related complications in 1999, Wong is said to have met and befriended a great number of New York graffiti artists like Lady Pink, LEE, DAZE and Futura 2000, who were picking up art supplies where he worked at the Pearl Paint store – a four story holy place on Canal Street that thrived at that time.

 Brooklyn-Street-Art-Sharp-Paints-a-Picture-copyright-Martin_WongThe show contains black books full of tags and drawings as well as canvasses and mixed media Wong purchased, commissioned, and painted, including a portrait of graffiti artist Sharp wearing a respirator and standing before a canvas he’s working on entitled Sharp Paints a Picture (1997-98).

The mood at the museum was celebratory as guests looked at the 140+ works from Wong’s collection; a cross between an art opening and a graffiti trade show, with enthusiastic peers and fans waiting patiently to speak with, pose for pictures with, and gain autographs or tags in their black books from artists in attendance. The only officers that could be seen were holding back the line of guests to make sure there was no overcrowding of the exhibit.

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The famous Martha Cooper photograph of Dondi in action in the train yards. “The City As Canvas” exhibition at Museum of the City of New York. (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

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A Keith Haring and LA2 collaboration at “The City As Canvas” exhibition at Museum of the City of New York. (photo via iPhone © Steven P. Harrington)

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Artist LA2 with Ramona “The City As Canvas” (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

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Keith Haring (Smiling Face) from 1982 at “The City As Canvas” exhibition at Museum of the City of New York. (photo via iPhone © Steven P. Harrington)

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Lee Quiñones speaking with a never ending stream of fans before his canvas Howard the Duck, 1988, at “The City As Canvas” (photo via iPhone © Jaime Rojo)

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Digital prints of images shot by photographer Henry Chalfant brought the trains alive. On top is an image of a train with Sharp/Delta 2 from 1981 and below is “Stop the Bomb” by LEE (Quiñones), 1979 at “The City As Canvas” exhibition at Museum of the City of New York. (photo via iPhone © Steven P. Harrington)

 

 

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Wall \Therapy : Street Art Final Shots From Rochester

Diagnosis One: America’s deflated rustbelt cities can expect a deteriorated dust bowl demeanor until bankruptcy, followed by tumbleweeds.

Diagnosis Two: Street Art and graffiti are inextricably entwined with and contributing factors for broken windows, societal disarray, economic and moral decay of the aforementioned cities.

Both are failed and need to be re-examined.

Francey. Detail A. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

For the record, Rochester tops lists in terms of liveability, investment in new technology sectors, and has 91% of it’s citizens covered by health insurance – before Obamacare even kicks in. It has lost jobs and population due to stumbling giants like Xerox and Eastman Kodak and recent annual budgets have had significant shortfalls, but Rochester is putting up a good fight in the healthcare sector.

Dr. Ian Wilson should know. Which brings us to the second diagnosis. Ask the former Brooklyn graff writer now radiologist at the University of Rochester Medical Center if Street Art is synonymous with crime and disorder, and he’ll tell you all about the healing power of Wall\Therapy and murals.

The just-concluded community art project he spearheaded landed local and international graffiti/urban/street artists in Rochester for 10 days of painting – bringing certain parts of the city alive with curious locals hanging out in empty lots and hanging out of slow moving car windows, watching artists with cans as they bob up and down on cherry pickers.

Francey. Detail B. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

 

Co-curated this year with lead organizer Erich Lehman, Wilson has pulled off a stylistically wide-ranging collection of nearly 30 walls this year that go from aesthetically sweet to academically rooted. An apt balance, if you think of Ian.

It’s also been a balancing act to please all constituencies and manage to pull off something fresh; he’s dealt with a handful of outspoken critics who question every turn he’s made, yet the festival has been buoyed by a curious and enthusiastic under-30 youth culture whose minds explode with excitement at the thought of the global Street Art scene hitting their own city.

Lady Pink. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

“Mural art can enhance the life experience – an arguable effect of the arts in general,” the doctor says only a little didactically. All week during Wall\Therapy locals and visitors were taking tours on the El Camino Trail, watching walls going up in the South Wedge, and discussing art and the ideas that the artists are working with – whether it’s a portrait of Trayvon Martin in a piece by New Jersey’s LNY, a gentlemen’s fist fight by Ireland’s Conor Harrington, or a tribute to the influence of Xerox on the city by Baltimore’s Gaia.

Add the local talents, a cadre of volunteers and photographers and some serious old-skool big graffiti names from NYC rocking styles that started it all, this year there was more action than a Saturday night ER.

Lady Pink. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Finally, Wall\Therapy is Wilson’s balancing act of bringing art to the people, and medical care to communities in need. Working with a group of colleagues, he has also embarked on a fundraising program to bring diagnostic equipment to people in the developing world who lack access – and he is now talking about cloud-based diagnoses by a pool of volunteer doctors around the world who can interpret the teleradiology scans remotely.

Can he get all the funding and the equipment and the artists and the walls all together at once? “Realistically, this will have to be done in stages or phases, like some of the procedures that I perform,” he says. If you’ve witnessed this years committed volunteers and organizers at Wall\Therapy, it is a fair assumption that these dual goals of art and healing will happen on a growing scale.

“There is no hope without inspiration. The two travel simultaneously, sharing the same bandwidth,” explains Wilson.

ROA. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

ROA. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Jessie and Katey. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

FreddySam. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Gaia. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Faith47. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Mr. Prvrt. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Mr. Prvrt. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Mr. Prvrt. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Freedom. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Matt De Turck)

Freedom. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Matt De Turck)

Wise2. Detail. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Smith. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Range. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

 

Thievin Stephen. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Thievin Stephen. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Daze. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

DALeast. Detail A. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

DALeast. Detail B. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Conor Harrington. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Conor Harrington. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Binho. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Binho. Detail A. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Binho. Detail B. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

 

Change. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Chris Stain. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Chris Stain)

Pose2. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

 

BSA gives a shout out for the valuable contributions to the Wall\Therapy over the last ten days by the artists, organizers, volunteers, and talented photographers. Special thanks to John Magnus Champlin, Erich Lehman, Ian Wilson, Matt DeTurck, Jason Wilder, Alex Stuart, Mark Deff, Lisa Barker, Mark Deff, and Josh Saunders. Shout out to Instagrammers @WallTherapyNY , @heliosunphoto , and @shotbywilder .

Check out excellent Wall\Therapy coverage by Rebecca Rafferty on the Rochester City Newspaper

Check out our previous posts on WALL\THERAPY:

WALL\THERAPY 2013 Starts With FREEDOM in a Tunnel

WALL\THERAPY 2013 Daily Checkup and Scan of Founder Ian Wilson

Wall\Therapy 2013 Tuesday Update 7.22.13

Sarah C. Rutherford Flies High at Wall\Therapy

Wall \ Therapy 2013 Friday Update 07.26.13

To learn more please visit:

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Brooklyn Street Art is proud to be the Media Partner of Wall Therapy 2013

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Wall\Therapy 2013 Wednesday Update 7.24.13

POWWWWW!

Conor Harrington’s right hook is emblematic of the impact that the huge number of artists are having on Rochester right now for WALL\THERAPY. “It’s been a very well organized event and painting side by side with this line up of artists has been a blast,” says NYC graffiti veteran and globetrotter DAZE as he improvises his piece.

Meanwhile Martha Cooper is watching/shooting “Mike Ming about to attack his super colorful wall”, Lady Pink is talking to some neighborhood youth about her work, and EVER from Argentina is showing off his international collection of paint brushes to Deb Vanwert while Jason is snapping photos of him. And the weather is great since these are the two weeks a year when Rochester gets above 60 degrees. We’re up north yo! Just kidding.

Our update today contains fresh stuff from Mike Ming, Cern, Faith47, Gaia, EVER, Pose2, St. Monci, WiseTwo, Siloette, LNY, Binho, Change, Conor Harrington, DAZE, FreddySam, Lady Pink, and Range.

Special thanks to photographers Jason Wilder, Alex Stuart, Josh Saunders, Lisa Barker, and Mark Deff, for sharing these great process images with BSA readers.

Image above of Conor Harrington in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Conor Harrington. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

St. Monci. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Binho. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Siloette. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Josh Saunders)

Range. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Cern. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

LNY gets some helpful input. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Lisa Baker)

EVER. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Mike Ming. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Gaia. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Lisa Baker)

Gaia. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Pose2. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Pose2. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Change. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Faith47. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

South Africa’s FreddySam in the zone. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Daze. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

” The painting I’m working on is a bit improvisational in that even though I had made many provisional sketches for it before hand all that changed once I was in front of the wall. At least part of my inspiration for the painting is coming from my experience here in Rochester – The center of the wall features the Rochester skyline as seen from Hyland park. Everything in the painting is drawn to this center,” explains Daze.

Lady Pink takes a moment out to speak with local youth about her work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

 

Take your phone and hit the road! Shoot your own pics and tag them @WallTherapyNY and @BKStreetArt – we’ll send them round the world! Click image above or HERE for the updated Google map.

Check out our previous posts on WALL\THERAPY:

WALL\THERAPY 2013 Starts With FREEDOM in a Tunnel

WALL\THERAPY 2013 Daily Checkup and Scan of Founder Ian Wilson

Wall\Therapy 2013 Tuesday Update 7.22.13

To learn more please visit:

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Brooklyn Street Art is proud to be the Media Partner of Wall Therapy 2013

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Wall\Therapy 2013 Tuesday Update 7.22.13

The sun is not as hot as it has been, but don’t tell that to the Conor from Cork (Ireland), who is turning as red as a tomato nonetheless.  Not that he minds. “I love the way random people say hello to you in the street in Rochester,” he says on his Twitter feed from atop a cherry picker as he races across the wall.

Aside from Conor, we have a description directly from Gaia (below) of his new wall that is gradually being unveiled, and a nice collection of new shots from the action underway yesterday at WALL\THERAPY of works around town including stuff from Bile, Daze, Freddy Sam, Lady Pink, LNY, Saint Monci, Mr. Prvrt, Pose2, and Wise2.

Special thanks to photographers Mark Deff, Jason Wilder, Alex Stuart, and Lisa Barker for sharing these great process images with BSA readers.

Check out the MAP of all the WALL\THERAPY spots at the end of this posting too.

Above image Mr. Prvrt. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

 

Wise2. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Wise2. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Lisa Barker)

Bile. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Connor Harrington. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Gaia. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Gaia knocked out a grid-like series of 18 white windows on the entire side of a building and began placing items within. He says there are a mix of the Giambologna Mercury figure, the aqueduct building (presumably the Roman Aqueduct), Rochester’s own Xerox Tower and a young anonymous kid.

Of the 18 sheets of paper that are copied across the wall, “It is a poetic xerox reference to shifting industries that move more swiftly than communities of people and culture,” says Gaia from a cherry picker.

Daze. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Daze. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

LNY. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

LNY. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Lisa Barker)

FreddySam. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Lady Pink. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Lisa Barker)

Lady Pink. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Pose2. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Lisa Barker)

Saint Monci. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Saint Monci gave a dramatic overview of his upcoming attraction, “My work, as of late, has really been inspired by the color and warmth of classic technicolor films; old sci-fi movies of the 50s/60s in particular, ” he says as he traces out the new wall. The palette is inspired by the red and green of vintage 3D glasses, which works out great since the building he is working on was actually a movie theater from the 1920s through the 50s. He’s also got a show coming up in September here in Rochester called  ‘Adventures in Technicolor’.  More on this wall tomorrow…

Take your phone and hit the road! Shoot your own pics and tag them @WallTherapyNY and @BKStreetArt – we’ll send them round the world! Click image above or HERE for the updated Google map.

Check out our previous posts on WALL\THERAPY:

WALL\THERAPY 2013 Starts With FREEDOM in a Tunnel

WALL\THERAPY 2013 Daily Checkup and Scan of Founder Ian Wilson

To learn more please visit:

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

 
Brooklyn Street Art is proud to be the Media Partner of Wall Therapy 2013

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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WALL\THERAPY 2013 Daily Checkup and Scan of Founder Ian Wilson

WALL\THERAPY began in earnest this weekend with a Friday kickoff party that welcomed arriving artists and the local community together and then jumped directly into the making of art with many murals going up on walls around town in Rochester simultaneously Saturday and Sunday. The dual pronged focus of WALL\THERAPY is a mural festival that draws Street Artists and graffiti artists from around the world to work alongside local artists and to raise awareness of people’s access to medical technology.

Daze. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Street Art and medicine; You may wonder how the two are related, and the answer is that these are two of Ian Wilson’s greatest passions. A Brooklyn born graff writer who went on to pursue a career in teleradiology, Ian works long doctors hours at his regular gig in a local hospital and puts this WALL\THERAPY event together with partners, volunteers, and community members. Finally, he is working to bring imaging and diagnostic equipment to communities around the world who don’t have this basic tool to treat disease.

Daze. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Since BSA supports people who actually give back, we are very happy to be the Media Partner for WALL\THERAPY and are proud of the artists who are lending their talents to this initiative in this northwestern town of New York State.

This year the roster has expanded to include an eclectic mix of a few serious old skool NYC graffiti names spanning 4 decades, a healthy handful of international and nationally known Street Artists that are defining the scene today, and some important local talents.

Daze. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

As a group they represent a solid lineup and are a reflection of the inclusive approach that WALL\THERAPY is taking, while skewing toward high quality. The list includes Bile, Binho, Case, Cern, Change, DalEast, Daze, Ever, Faith47, Adam Francey, Freedom, Freddy Sam, Jessie & Katey, Labrona, Lady Pink and Smith, Lea Rizzo, LNY, Mike Ming, Mr. Prvrt, Faring Purth, Pose2 and Range, ROA, Sarah C. Rutherford, and St Monci among others.

All week we will bring you exclusive new images of the creative progress and some insights into the personal stories of some of the artists as they create their works in this unique combining of art, science, and community inspiration.

Thanks today to photographers Jason Wilder, Alex Stuart, and Mark Deff for sharing these images with BSA readers.

Mr. Prvrt. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Mr. Prvrt. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Freddy Sam. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Bile. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Bile. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Lady Pink. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Adam Francey. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Adam Francey. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Alex Stuart)

Connor Harrington. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Mark Deff)

Smith. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Smith. Work in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Wise Two,  Lady Pink, Smith . Works in progress. WALL\THERAPY. Rochester, NY. July 2013. (photo © Jason Wilder)

Here’s a video from a previous edition of WALL\THERAPY that lays out the inspiration that lead to and the community feeling that comes about from the event.

To learn more please visit:

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Brooklyn Street Art is proud to be the Media Partner of Wall Therapy 2013

<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA<<>>><><<>BSA<<>>><<<>><><BSA

Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Images of the Week 03.10.13: Happy 70th Birthday Martha Cooper

“I can’t believe it. I never expected this, ever.”

The Houston Street Wall was the site of a sidewalk surprise birthday party Saturday  for photographer Martha Cooper, who was planning to stop by for what she thought would be a new mural shoot. The world famous graffiti photographer had no idea that artists How and Nosm had begun masking the letters of her nickname out of their mural at 7 a.m. to prepare for an all-star cast of some big graffiti and street art names from the last 4 decades to create a larger-than-life birthday card for her.

Thanks to speedy social media, a sunny early spring day, and her stature as an historic photographer of fortitude and integrity, the impromptu guest list ballooned throughout the day for this street side celebration, while the boisterous honking New York traffic rolled by.

Above: Happy Birthday Martha Cooper (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The “Marty” wall begins at the Houston Wall in NYC as How and Nosm buff their mural and mask out her name. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

By the time Martha and her cousin Sally arrived with wall organizer Meghan Coleman just after noon, the “MARTY” letters had already been half completed and she stood staring with mouth smiling and agape, waving at the cluster of photographers shooting her atop the Houston Street meridian. A second later she was laughing and racing across the street, camera in hand, ready to capture the painting action and get mobbed with well wishers. Cooper confessed to being pretty overwhelmed by the sight of her name so big. For her part, Sally, a confidant and buddy since they attended grammar school together in their hometown of Baltimore, busted out into tears.

How & Nosm at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Just inside of one day the famed wall that has hosted the likes of Haring, Scharf, Fairey, and Faile was suddenly regaled in eye-popping color and a variety of styles by Lady Pink, How and Nosm, Bio from Tats Cru, Freedom, Free5, Crash, Daze, Terror 161, Faust, and Aiko – producing a head spinning and sweet greeting to a person whom they all respect and admire for her work and determination. In addition to the steady flow of fans, writers, artists, bloggers and photographers asking to have a photo taken with one the few photographers of New York’s 1970s subway graffiti scene, a number of friends stopped by to have some birthday cake and watch the painting – like Wild Style director Charlie Ahearn, his brother artist John Ahearn, hip-hop photographer Joseph Conzo, and master sculptor Simon Verity, among others.

The brand new “Marty” mural is up for an incredibly short time, possibly only days, so if you have an opportunity or inclination, catch this personal and public display of affection for a lady who helped us all appreciate art in the streets.

Bio from the Tats Cru at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash shows his sketch for his portion of the wall. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko(photo © Jaime Rojo)

Crash at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Martha (center) arrives and gets a big surprise. Flanked by Meghan Coleman on the left and Cousin Sally on the right. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Davide (Nosm) greets Martha. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Faust at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Freedom at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Freedom signs a book and talks to a young admirer. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Daze at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Terror 161 at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bio at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A possible devotee of the Seapunk movement walks past “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A New Yorker captures the action from the comfort of his taxi while waiting for the light to turn green. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Bio does the official birthday wish.”Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lady Pink at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

How & Nosm at work. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Aiko at work, or rather, her shadow. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Laboutins and aerosol make a riveting combination for Aiko. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

All the artists with Marty. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Marty poses for us. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA loves Martha Cooper. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko. (photo © Leah )

The final shot. “Marty” at the Houston Wall in NYC; A tribute to Martha Cooper in collaboration with How & Nosm, Faust, Freedom, Terror 161, Bio, Daze, Lady Pink, Free5, Crash and Aiko (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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