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Brooklyn Street Art

…loves you more every day.

BSA Film Friday: 11.20.15

Posted on November 20, 2015

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. Beat Rockers: Keeping The Beat Alive
2. Art Start’s Family Portrait Project #SeeMeBecause
3. The Bucket Board
4. Heliotrope Foundation, Braddock Tiles
5. Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls
6. Zarif Zolay

 

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BSA Special Feature: Six Non-Profits We Love

Last week we checked out the new JR short film “Ellis” as part of 800 or so screenings his folks have been hosting around the world in small venues for two weeks, lawsuit notwithstanding, and really enjoyed the opportunity to see his poetic take on New York’s immigrant story.

But the short pieces that played before the featured presentation really got our hearts pounding with love and pride for our fellow New Yorkers like nobody’s business. These hard working people were not born with silver spoons but you will agree that they are spinning gold, doing the hard work, keeping it real, and making us proud. Also, each one of the principals from the organizations were actually there to speak with us all – which made their intentions authentic and that much more compelling.

Please take a look at each one of these videos and see if you are impressed as well. Special thanks to Lisa Shimamura of Colab (colab-projects.com)  for putting together a great evening and for telling us more about their work. Please reach out to any of these organizations to lend a hand if you are moved to.

Beat Rockers: Keeping The Beat Alive

“Non-profit organization. B.E.A.T. introduces the art of beatboxing to students at The Lavelle School for the Blind. Tapping into the students’ love for music, the results are exuberant and resonant – just as good music should be. // Directed by Ryan Staake”

Learn more about B.E.A.T. & its instructors:
beatnyc.org/
soundcloud.com/taylor-mcferrin
facebook.com/BEATSMYTH

 

Art Start’s Family Portrait Project #SeeMeBecause

“For 25 years, Art Start has nurtured the voices hearts and minds of homeless youth through the creative process. Through years of creative collaborations, we have found that how society sees Art Start families is not how they see themselves. Art Start’s Family Portrait Project is a multimedia exhibition that partners with New York City families experiencing homelessness to present their powerful stories, hopeful voices, and loving images in their own voices – sharing with the world how they want to be seen.”

Meet the families of The Family Portrait Project on their Vimeo Channel, and learn more about Art Start at: art-start.org

The Bucket Board

“When artist Mac Premo was asked by WWF-UK and Do the Green Thing to show how creativity can encourage people to live a greener lifestyle, he partnered with Sanford Shapes to make skateboard decks out of upcycled material. When the prototype proved successful, the idea shifted from figuring out how to make skateboards out of trash to how to give them to kids who otherwise wouldn’t have skateboards.”


VISIT THE SITE: thebucketboard.org

Heliotrope Foundation, Braddock Tiles

“Braddock Tiles will be a community based artisanal micro-factory located in a formerly abandoned church in North Braddock Pennsylvania whose first venture will be to hand produce the 20,000 beautifully colored ceramic tiles needed to give its landmark structure a new roof.

A project initiated by the artist Swoon, the Braddock Tile factory will be a part of a larger context of neighborhood-based art making taking place in this once blighted section of North Braddock.

The building, upon restoration to full capacity, will become the seat of an arts focused learning and resource center, and, a museum of the possible in the shell of something once left behind.”

 

Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls

“Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls is a non-profit music and mentoring program that empowers girls and women through music education, volunteerism, and activities that foster self-respect, leadership skills, creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration.”

Zarif Zolay

Zolaykha Sherzad is a  New York-based Afghan, who founded and runs fashion design firm Zarif, headquartered in Kabul. “When I was growing up in exile, school was a place of escape for me, a haven, where everything was ordered and the other children didn’t think about war or chaos in Kabul. I wanted Zarif to be a little bit like that for the people who worked here.”

The Yok & Sheryo: Danger, Adventure and “Shadow”

Posted on November 19, 2015

Here are some sneak peeks and behind the scenes photos with the Australian-Singaporean Street Art/graffiti/fine art duo named Sheryo and The Yok in advance of their brand new show, “Shadow”, opening tonight at Brooklyn’s Masters Projects in DUMBO. We had the opportunity to speak with both of them during their preparations in Bed Stuy last week and we gained some valuable insight into what inspires them both and what the working dynamic is of this “Danger Couple”, as they are sometime referred to as.

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The Yok & Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The “danger” here probably speaks to their mutual love of adventures and the borderline disasters they run into during their world travels off the beaten path – which thus far have taken them to Tokyo, Sydney, Taipei, Beijing, Singapore Bangkok, Mexico, Vietnam, and Hong Kong, among other places. If you’ve never seen their unhinged freeform spraycation videos, don’t wait any longer. In terms of combining their inner demons it looks like putting them on display in their works is a therapeutic way of taking the sting away. With their unique collaborative sketching and painting style it may be a palliative treatment that they are giving to life’s real dangers and fears that is working so well – by depicting fears and disgusting circumstances as wild boars and wildebeests and other creatures, comically portrayed with a touch of grotesque and sometimes a slice of pizza.

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The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The Yok and Sheryo’s affinities for adventure and collaboration still include catching an illegal tag occasionally under cover of darkness, but they have also led them to a serious study of how to do ceramics, Batik and sculpture in Indonesia, and to refining and developing chaotic and progressively more elaborate murals. The last half decade of intermingling their gnarly monsters and animals with bulging eyes and horrifying/funny expressions is resulting in a recognizable Yok and Sheryo aesthetic, and one that continues to take it up a notch with their combined style resulting from the two pouring themselves into one. In terms of a working dynamic, the two friends credit their naturally competitive relationship for pushing each other to better their techniques and to reach deeper creatively as artists.

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The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In preparation for their show that opens at Masters Projects in Brooklyn tonight, we stopped by their digs in Bedstuy, Brooklyn to talk about their work and to shoot a few teaser shots from tonights’ show.

BSA: Your show is titled “Shadow” and will be comprised of works on paper and sculptures. What is the inspiration for this new show?
The Yok: Some of the works on paper are loosely based on the sculptures in the show and they are imbued with many personal stories and personal references – like the one depicting the bicycle for instance. It refers to the people who like to steal the wheels off of my bicycles in Brooklyn. They are also homage to the places that we have visited or lived in. You can see a New York bodega bag or the Greek coffee cup. All of our work is based on experiences we’ve had or places we have been to.

BSA: Would you say that the inspiration for this show is a little bit of a compilation of your diaries? For how long?
Yok: Yes. It is an accumulation of stuff that we have written in our sketch books but it’s always evolving because we keep adding new stuff as we move.

Sheryo: Yes, we write or draw what we see in our black books. Then when we get to a place and we need to make work for a show we just look to our diaries for inspiration and as a resource. It is very cool because we see a lot of things. When we were making the sculptures we were in Indonesia – so this piece here has a lot of what we experienced in Indonesia. It has a lot of jungle references and to batik textiles. Also in the show there’s a sculpture of Satan surfing – and it’s represented on this piece.

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The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Can you tell us how you got into Batik?
Yok: Sheryo really wanted to learn the craft because she loved the look of it and I like surfing. So we went to this island that has the best batik in the world and some of the best waves. We rented a motor bike in the town and we rode for 40 minutes to this mountain town where they make all the Batik. We walked around and look into a lot of places until we found one that would let us learn the craft.

We didn’t know the language. They were very nice to let us into their village to learn Batik for like a month – every day for eight hours a day. It is really difficult to get the hang of it because all the wax is in liquid form and you need to be very precise to get the wax to do what you want it to do. If the wax is too hot it runs all over the place and spreads out so you need to work very fast. So you need a lot of practice – and it is harder than spray painting! Those batik pieces are not on this show but those experiences are still with us.

BSA: Do you include bad experiences from your travels in your pieces?
Sheryo: Yes but we turn them into funny things so we can laugh about it. So an accident would turn into a mad character in a motorcycle. We actually were in a bad motorbike accident in Indonesia. We were going down a road to get supplies and the roads are terrible and this bus was coming straight into us. We managed to survive. In Thailand we were chased by a pack of ferocious big dogs. We were in a dark alley. The Yok tried to scare them away by doing the “windmill” with his arms but more and more dogs kept coming out. Yok: But Sheryo stepped in and acted crazy and that was enough to scare the dogs away.

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The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: For how long have you been collaborating artistically? Was there a moment, or project, when you felt that your styles had completely melded with one another?
The Yok: Five years. We started playing this game we call “you start, I finish”. One of us begins the drawing and passes it to the other one and says “OK you finish it.” And that became quiet a natural thing for us to do. Like Sheryo will just come and get my drawing and add to it. She will give it back to me and either would like or not like it and we go back and forth like that. But if I paint a whole piece by myself it might be that I stole an idea from her sketch book to include in the piece. I might have painted the whole thing but the process of back and forth is so fluid now that I couldn’t say with certainty where that foot came from or that use of line etc…

Sheryo: We also get competitive too. So if he draws a good hand I’ll go like, “I’m going to make it better,” so I steal his hand. So if I see his hand coming much better after that I’ll go, “Damn it I’m going to make it even better!” We have become better doing it this way and it has improved our craft and that’s how our styles have melded together as well. The competitive nature of our characters have made us better artists but also we have gotten more drive and motivation working together and we have improved very fast in a short period of time.

The Yok: I think I wouldn’t be doing nearly as much work as I currently am without Sheryo because she is so motivated to paint every day. It pushes me to be more creative.

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The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sheryo: When we first met five years ago we immediately began drawing together and I remember the first piece we did together and I was looking at it and I said, “This actually looks good”. So our work together has been fine tuned in these five years and it is getting better and now it is very hard for people to distinguish the one from the other. Also our visions for where we want to go with our careers are very similar so the collaboration between us doesn’t seem forced. It seems very natural.

BSA: You also have a great sense of humor…
The Yok: We find it funny to draw things that are supposed to be scary – doing something silly like surfing, or using their iPhones etc…

BSA: Any thoughts on the prevalence of red, black and white in your works – as well as other artists on the street like How Nosm, Shepard Fairey …
Sheryo: We like red and black for two reasons: One, the combination of red and black is a very powerful even historically – like the NAZI party used that combination of colors. Red is very strong, the communists used it. Also red has been used through Chinese history. Secondly, you can always find these colors in the most weird places in any corner of the world. These two colors are always there. Also we have been adding a little bit of gold to the palate and we discovered it in Cambodia and began using it ever since as an accent. We also valued the line work in our work and using those three colors is a good way to bring the line work out, so the less colors you have the more emphasis you put on the line work.

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The Yok & Sheryo. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Can you describe the process of moving two dimensional work into three dimensions?
Sheryo: We began doing ceramics in Vietnam.

BSA: How was it?
The Yok: Sheryo had an idea and she really wanted to do it. We both thought “what a wonderful way it would be to experience the culture first hand” – to go away from the tourist areas and go to the villages and getting to know the locals in a very natural way, like spending hours a day with them for a month. Painting those vases is a very intricate labor and very time consuming. We spend two weeks there and every day we’ll go to the village to paint ceramics and on the last night they took us out to dinner and we went to Karaoke.

They really didn’t speak English at all but somehow knew all the words to the songs in English. We did research to find where to go to learn the ceramics and we also asked the locals. Everyone was telling us the same village. We wanted to pay them for the lessons but they refused to take our money. They told us this is our gift to you. There really is a lot of kindness in this world.

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The Yok & Sheryo at work in Indonesia.  (re-photo from their computer © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Doing ceramics is entirely different from what you have done in the past, including Batik. Was it difficult to learn?
Sheryo: Diversity is important for us because it keeps things fresh and interesting and it keeps our minds alive. Changing the medium is a fun way to do that. In the case of the ceramics it was interesting because we were painting contemporary elements with new colors on vessels that stylistically are very old. So it is the old and the new merged together.

The Yok: It was very difficult to paint on the ceramics, first because we had never done it before. I didn’t like it, but because it is so hard that at the end it is very rewarding when you finally get it. It is like the proverb that says something like “you need to hate it first to love it”. We try to stay in New York for longer periods but at the same time we feel like we need to travel so we can get inspired and learn new things.

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The Yok & Sheryo at work in Indonesia.  (re-photo from their computer © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Would you describe your characters as aspects of your imagination and your personalities as individuals?
Sheryo: The characters are a mix. From what’s inside our heads and from what we see. But we also try to draw from the local environment when we travel to other places. It is also a great way to make a connection with the locals.

The Yok: That’s why at the beginning we said that our work is kind of like a diary. We paint things that are in direct relation to the country where we are – but also we paint things that happened to us in the country where we are.

BSA: Do you like to work solo sometimes too?
Sheryo: At the moment we are very happy doing what we are doing, working together and exhibiting together.

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The Yok & Sheryo at work in Indonesia.  (re-photo from their computer © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok & Sheryo in Indonesia.  (re-photo from their computer © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok & Sheryo in Indonesia.  (re-photo from their computer © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok & Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok & Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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The Yok & Sheryo (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

The Yok & Sheryo exhibition “Shadow” opens today at Masters Projects. Click HERE for details.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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Coney Island Dreaming: Following the Signs to Stephen Powers

Posted on November 18, 2015

Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull) is one of 3 new exhibits inspired by the historic attractions of Brooklyn’s seaside

Graffiti artist-turned-sign painter Stephen Powers is dreaming of Coney Island and he is bringing a colorful collection of found and freshly produced signage that evokes a forgotten era to climb the columns of a Brooklyn Museum gallery.

Given the boisterous parade of brands and logos into museums that is happening as part of the institutional funding and programming mix, its fun to see the ninth episodic installation of this traveling ICY SIGNS shop here; its simplicity and guile recalling amusing persuasive techniques from the mid-century American advertising lexicon. Simultaneously, for those who have been lucky enough to sicken themselves on cotton candy and The Wonder Wheel, the new show imparts a rather reassuring and seedy nostalgia for Coney Island, complete with an inexplicable hankering for a thick beef hot dog.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Just as warm weather recedes and late autumn’s chill darkens that historic city seaside amusement park, the popsicles and sand and titillating oddities are all rushing inside for the winter at Brooklyn Museum. Here and in adjacent galleries, the stage-directing showfolks at BKM are offering conjoined triplets for you to gawk at: Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull), Coney Island: Visions of An American Dreamland, 1861-2008 and Forever Coney: Photographs from the Brooklyn Museum Collection.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In tandem with his merry band of mostly reformed graffiti writers-turned-sign painters, Powers’ installation pops up and outward chaotically like nighttime fireworks seen from the boardwalk on the 4th. The fast talking Philadelphia-born Powers is a natural carnival barker, showman, and punny word player, and this textual chorus of messages invites you to consider the tantalizing language of the pitch as well.

While you tumble layer upon layer, feel free to revel in the clever permutations of implorative doublespeak delivered with non-linear panache, a cluster of colorful visual cues here cut from their tether and flying above your head. Rather than actually selling you something, however, it’s the method of delivery that Powers is celebrating. It’s a joyride of icons that trumpets the juxtaposition of the graphic, the selection of the symbol, the wink of an eye, the turn of the word, the jocular joust.

Just like any rollercoaster or peeping attraction, its a thrill best enjoyed by holding on tight, alternately letting go completely, blurring your eyes and drinking in the candied, fried, salty sweetness. And just like any tourist attraction that helps those yearning for a closer view, a classic binocular tower viewer is sited center stage for you to gaze further than the human eye.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

In a city that is quickly stamping out the last remaining handmade signage that was once ubiquitous on bodegas, candy shops, record stores, laundromats, restaurants, bars, pizza joints, and hot dog stands, it is ironic that these new signs recalling that communication vernacular are being brought into the museum. If any of these signs remain in public space today, they are faded glories overlooked, often called “ghost signs”. Powers brings the language back to life, inverting the expected, cleverly blending in his own sense of Coney Island romance, heavily salted and smothered in ketchup.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Anne Pasternak, the new director of this encyclopedic institution, saw the value in preserving this particular character of New York when she was President and Artistic Director of Creative Time and the organization collaborated with Powers for the first time in 2004 and 2005 on The Dreamland Artists Club in Coney Island. Those first two projects were the genesis of their collaboration in Coney Island again in 2008 with The Waterboard Thrill Ride. Emblazoned by Powers’ hand painted wit the darkly satirical project was sited in a Coney Island peeing booth/grindhouse that stirred controversy for its animatronic depiction of torture.

More often Powers’ installations in a dozen or more cities are affectionately referred to as Love Letters, including massive text-based projects that cover walls and neighborhoods in Philadelphia, Baltimore, Syracuse and 2011’s Love Letter to Brooklyn, which wrapped a building with city inspired phrases of 250 or so words in downtown BK.

Here at the museum you are best served to get in close and go full bore into the jumbled chaos of words always at play in Power’s work and mind. The installation features the twisted phraseology of a country baked in advertising jingles, slogans, and blustery bromides and each of the artists (Justin Green, Matt Wright, Mike Levy, Dan Murphy, Mike Lee, Mimi Gross, Alexis Ross, Sean Barton, Eric Davis, and Tim Curtis) bring their own handstyles and witticism to these conversations, a playful and sarcastic examination that bubbles and splashes like waterfalls of words beneath the rotunda.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

As Powers and team completed their installation this week for Friday’s opening we spoke with curator Sharon Matt Atkins, Vice Director of Exhibitions and Collections Management, to see if the newest iteration of ICY SIGNS has been the fun house that it appears to be.

Brooklyn Street Art: Can you talk about the intersection of the three exhibits here as expressed in the signage of Powers?
Sharon Matt Atkins: Our three Coney Island exhibitions capture the spirit of the seaside community and give a feeling for how the place has inspired generations of artists. Powers’ installation in particular brings the visual language of Coney Island to the Museum by recalling the great tradition of hand-painted signs.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: How much of the exhibit is specific to this installation and how much is heritage pieces from its pre-iterations?
Sharon Matt Atkins: This installation combines found signs alongside those created by Powers and ICY SIGNS. The works by Powers and ICY SIGNS include both earlier work as well as new signs and paintings created for this exhibition.

Brooklyn Street Art: Brooklyn Museum is once again embracing the language of Brooklyn streets and public space, bringing it into a gallery and presenting it as vital and worthy of consideration. How does this one compare to the shows you organized for Swoon and Faile?
Sharon Matt Atkins: I have loved seeing the Cantor Gallery transformed with each artist’s installation, and also with recent exhibitions like Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic and Crossing Brooklyn. It’s a beautiful space that lends itself to different kinds of experiences.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brooklyn Street Art: How does the space lend to or present a challenge for the displaying of the multiple signs?
Sharon Matt Atkins:
Powers and team really wanted to respond to the architecture, much in keeping with how signage becomes layered in cities and places like Coney Island. Working with the piers of the Museum’s Cantor Gallery, they built layers and stretched upward about 40 feet, creating these soaring towers of signs that are anchored by sign benches at their bases. Providing a lively and educational element to the exhibition, we will also have sign painters at work here on Thursday evenings, and afternoons on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Stephen Powers . ICY SIGNS “Shameak” “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Steve Powers “Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To A Seagull)” Brooklyn Museum. November 2015 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Steve Powers’ site specific installation “Stephen Powers: Coney Island Is Still Dreamland (To a Seagull)” is presented in conjunction with “Coney Island: Visions of An American Dreamland, 1861-2008”. Both exhibitions will open to the public this Friday, November 20th and will run until March 13, 2016. Click HERE for more details.

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!

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This article is also published on The Huffington Post

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Nina Pandolfo in New York on a Wall for “Little Things”

Posted on November 17, 2015

In town for her solo show at Coburn Projects on the Lower East Side, Brazilian graffiti/Street Artist/fine artist Nina Pandolfo is determined to retain a childlike innocence on this wall outside of her show. Three wide eyed figures are preserved in an age of wonder, small creatures popping from ones mouth and pastel patterns softly couching them like winter sweaters or quilt pieces decoratively filling the background.

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Her debut solo gallery exhibition here, this new mural features Pandolfo’s deftly understated use of freehand aerosol spray, stenciled geometrics, and brushwork.  Part of a graffiti scene growing out of São Paulo during the last two decades, Pandolfo continues to establish her individual voice as a muralist on the street with a distinctly soft and feminine view of lifes’ details rendered with dreamy sensitivity.

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Nina Pandolfo for Coburn Projects. Detail. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Nina Pandolfo exhibition “Little Things For life” at Coburn Projects in NYC is currently open to the public. Click HERE for details.

 

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