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Brooklyn Street Art

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BSA Film Friday 10.12.18

Posted on October 12, 2018

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. The (mostly) True Story of Hobo Graffiti
2. Bathroom Run at Urban Spree in Berlin
3. 1UP Crew in Moscow for Artmossphere Biennale 2018

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: The (mostly) True Story of Hobo Graffiti

Anthropologists and graffitiologists have been trying to piece together the antecedents for mark-making in the modern era. Many times the history is rather North America-based, as is this particular tributary, but of course our need to leave proof of our existence is global and forever. How to fit that into a 3 minute video that won’t send Millenials to sleep? Instead, we present: Hobo Graffiti! Have a good ride friends.

Bathroom Run at Urban Spree in Berlin

This would be the precisely perfect time for Smell-O-Vision! Sometimes photographer Jaime Rojo finds a location so completely three dimensionally awe-inspiring that the only way to fully share it with you is through video. Like the Sistine Chapel, for example. Or the bathrooms at Urban Spree! Imagine these during a night of eclectically selected music thumping, full of a splendid selection of thespians, punks, painters, poets, fornicators, miscreants, and the occasional real estate investor all drunkenly scuffling through – and you’ll get a better idea of these walls in all their glory.

 

1UP Crew in Moscow for Artmossphere Biennale 2018

A few weeks ago in Moscow we had the opportunity to co-curate the exhibition for the Artmossphere Biennale 2018 with some knowledgeable and talented folks and leaders in the expansive field of graffiti/Street Art/urban art/contemporary art. Among those were the envelope pushing all-city, all-world 1UP crew. Anonymous and amorphous, you never know who is behind the t-shirt mask, but when the cans start there is no doubt. Here are a couple from the crew who left their mark at Winzavod while on break from installing their work in the Biennale.

 

 

Marx Turns 200 in Montevideo. 3 Street Artists Paint “After Marx” for Goethe-Institut

Posted on October 11, 2018

Karl Marx had his 200th birthday this year, proudly rocking a “Black Lives Matter” t-shirt.

Vince. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

“History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce,said the author of The Communist Manifesto, and to mark the bicentennial of the polarizing figure in Montevideo, Street Artists Various & Gould (Germany), Min8 (Uruguay) and Vince (France) created new artworks along the Avenida 8 de October and the walls of a former prison, now turned art space.

“The Goethe-Institut in cooperation with the French Embassy took the bicentenary of Karl Marx as an opportunity to discuss what remains of Marx today, and what we can learn from him,” says Katharina Ochse, the director of Goethe-Institut Uruguay. “The idea of inviting three artists from different countries was to obtain very different perspectives of people who have had very different experiences in their past with the ideas of Marx.”

Collectively the program is entitled „Después de Marx“, or “After Marx”

Vince. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

In Vince’s portrait of Marx you realize that the beard he sported is very modern and a bit bookish, perfect for the political theorist and revolutionary socialist of 2018. Supporting the “Black Lives Matter” movement is a given, as you know he would be in the thick of thirty different socio-political initiatives on this eve of another economic crash. In another image of Marx posed with Engels, the two look like a couple of college bros with send-ups of modern novelty t-shirts.

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Sketch. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Roger Eychenne)

The Berlin based art duo Various & Gould took an abstract decontructivist approach to the German philosopher, a free-associative recombining of elements of his physical and his theories.

“Marx does not appear as a complete portrait with us – only in the form of his typical beard,” says Various. “The rest of the head is made up of more abstract fragments and industrial elements such as a chimney, a gear and an actual still existing landmark in Montevideo, an old gasometer.”

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Gould expands on their aesthetic answer to a complex character and symbol. “His profound scientific analysis of working conditions and production processes seems to be the core of his work. From this examination of relationship between man and work, we have been inspired to a metaphorical game with human elements and machine parts. And the infinity sign at the other end of the tunnel, in combination with gears, is a tongue-in-cheek symbol of never-ending work.”

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Sketch. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

For her part, Uruguayan graffiti writer and style experimentalist Min8, working comfortably here in her hometown in this South American capital, employed symbol and metaphor, combining the royal eagle and the lion, which she calls her personal totem.

Min8. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

“I wanted to represent the fight, the struggle, and the freedom,” she says. “It is a ‘must’ for me. You should always fight and sacrifice yourself for your goals.” Says Min8.

Min8. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

The murals are not without detractors however. Photos posted on a Facebook page called “Uruguay Primero” (America First, anyone?) feature a handful of protesters rather respectfully taping handmade posters over the works during the night – each deriding the figure for causing deaths, creating concentration camps and other oppression of the poor.

Image from “Uruguay Primero” Facebook page (photo © Nicolás Quintana)

A commenter on the page was in agreement with the protest, saying “After Marx left this capitalist system, which generated all that that the poster you put said it did. I congratulate you for the intervention.”

In street art terms, they may have “gone over” the works, but they didn’t permanently destroy them, while censuring the message. In an ironic turn of events, a video posted by the group was pulled down by Facebook – another form of censorship.

Presumably this kind of open discussion of ideas would appeal to those savoring the exchange of ideas and ideals, long after Marx.

 

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Sketch. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Sketch. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Sketch. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. Sketch. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

 

Various & Gould “Despues de Marx”. With Vince at work on his piece. Tunnel, Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Vince. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Vince. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Vince)

Vince. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Vince. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Vince. Min8 . Various & Gould. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Vince. Min8 . Various & Gould. Tunnel , Avenida 8 de October. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Min8 . Various & Gould. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Jessica Porley)

Various & Gould. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Jessica Porley)

Various & Gould. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Min8. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Min8. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Min8. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Min8)

Vince. Espacio de Arte Contemporaneo. Montevideo, Uruguay. September 2018. (photo © Various & Gould)

Surreally Giant Tentacles Waving from a Warehouse in Philadelphia

Posted on October 10, 2018

It’s beginning to look a lot like Halloween in Philly this week thanks to a multi-tentacled installation at the Navy Yard.


“Sea Monsters Here”, Filthy Luker and Pedro Estrellas photo © Group X

It may remind some Philly folk and freight riders of the tentacles that graffiti writer AVOID has been doing for more than a decade, randomly appearing to climb walls from below, but this is all 3D bro!

The 20 tentacles are inflated and 30 to 40 feet long, waving out of windows and into the air, beckoning you to look inside, scaring the bejesus out of people walking by the intersection of 13th Street and Flagship Avenue.

“Sea Monsters Here”, Filthy Luker and Pedro Estrellas photo © Group X

Created by the UK artists Filthy Luker and Pedro Estrellas who started working with tentacles like these in the mid-nineties, the effect is creepily delicious, especially when October breezes blow and night time encroaches with these massive protrusions slowly undulating in silhouette against the sky.

“Sea Monsters Here”, Filthy Luker and Pedro Estrellas photo © Group X

Since the northern seaboard of the US is currently feeling the warm sticky effects from a hurricane to the south, those breezes that we’ve experienced since this was installed Monday have been warm and tropical, more appropriate perhaps for the few massive octopi who just might be stuck inside Building 611.

 


“Sea Monsters Here” is produced by Group X

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems, Possible Futures at Joshua Liner

Posted on October 9, 2018

Our challenge in the new world may not to fly, but to be grounded.

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone may see the dangers of the modern age, as he contemplates the over saturation of images and messages – traditional symbols and systems neatly sliced away from their original meanings and histories. It is a world of movement and alienation and dislocation coursing with eye candy and violence. For his current show at Joshua Liner he looks to the kinetic art of the recent past (Victor Vasarely, Carlos Cruz-Diez) and pays homage while setting it alight in the ideal promise of a digital future.

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The graffiti writer, Street Artist, mural painter, kinetic sculptor and multi-media fine artist is brave facing the future; embracing his own 90s childhood full of earlier digital fantasies, now transforming the geometry, waffling the levels and oscillating the transparencies and streaming the patterns. Are these laboratories or galleries. Is this a time, or is this timeless.

“In a powerful dynamic, Pantone extends on the walls with its futuristic style with psychedelic accents that evokes Italian Futurism,” says the show description from the gallery. “There are also abstract and stroboscopic touches that articulate black and white geometric shapes that he combines with bright metallic colors, not unlike the Mire, a visual that appears on the television when there is no show.”

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems at Joshua Liner Gallery. Manhattan, NYC (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Felipe Pantone: Transformable Systems is currently on view at Joshua Liner Gallery in Manhattan until October 13th

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