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Brooklyn Street Art

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ESCIF “La Pared Es Nuestra”. Sant Feliu de Llobregat. Barcelona

Posted on June 18, 2018

When Street Artists and graffiti vandals are looking for a spot in public space they sometimes claim a wall as their own – even if someone else owns it. It’s a bit of hubris, but it helps with the street credibility among peers. In the case of this neighborhood in Barcelona, the whole neighborhood owns the wall – and Street Artist Escif knows it.

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

Winner of a competition among 300 international and national Street Artists last summer/fall on which BSA was part of the jury, the Spanish Street Artist has now completed his new mural in Sant Feliu de Llobregat entitled “La pared es nuestra” (The Wall is Ours). The wall borders the central square of outdoor civic life in a community of working people who coalesced and actively fought government neglect and resisted private capital brutality in the 1970s to create streets, services, and public space for themselves here.

To commemorate that victory and the struggle that led to it, this true community mural was conceived and realized last month in a grand opening ceremony and celebration that invited a few generations of its proud inhabitants.

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

Known for his study and critiques of social, political and environmental undercurrents that form the framework of modern society, Escif worked with local leaders and the projects’ sponsors Contorno Urbano and Kaligrafics to conceive of and produce the result. The wall features a non-linear representation of historical events and popular/civic engagement that were necessary to transform the neighborhood. Referencing photos from the elders from the earliest days of struggle, the warmly flat characters and graphic elements are open and frank, focused the the central elements of democratic processes and the chaotic forms that can ultimately yield the right to self determination .

The greater message can provide inspiration to groups of individuals who are knocked back on their heels and yet find common cause, reminding us all about the power of the people.

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

In a statement about his perspective for conception and execution of the piece, the artist says that a galvanizing event on this very square provided him with greatest inspiration and many in attendance at the opening celebration would agree that his vision is perfectly realized.

“In May 1977 [during Franco’s dictatorship], the residents of the Sant Feliu neighborhood called La Salud managed to halt the construction of a gas station. Neighbors say that it was during the night, while the city was still sleeping, when some brave women and men decided to push a concrete mixer into the construction hole where the foundations were going to be established.
They covered the hole with soil and then they planted a tree. Legend has it that if a tree is planted on an occupied plot of land, nobody will ever be able to remove it. That was exactly the genesis of that square, a square that still belongs to the neighbors, the residents of Sant Feliu.

“ ‘La Pared es Nuestra’ [The Wall is Ours] is a retaining wall that rescues the voices of those who are gone, that keeps the voice of those who remain, and that suggests the voice of those who are yet to come. An inclusive wall made by and for the neighbors, it is a wall that can be heard, that contains the sounds of the neighborhood, of its history, and of its inhabitants. This is a wall that can be read, and that has as many readings as visitors who come to contemplate it.”

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

 

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

Escif. “La Pared es Nuestra”. A project between Contorno Urbano Foundation, Kaligrafics and The Municipality of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. (photo © Clara Antón)

BSA Images Of The Week: 06.17.18: The Buschwick Collective Edition 2018

Posted on June 17, 2018

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Bushwick is in the mix this week as the new murals made to augment the collection for this years Bushwick Collective Block Party brought more persons and personality to the streets here. As murals are ruling this moment in the Street Art scene, today for your edification, this is how its looking out here.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Bert, BK Foxx, Cabaio Spirito, Franck Duval, Golden 305, Hops1, Jeff Henriquez, Li-Hill, Loomit, Michel Velt, Mr. Hydee, Mr. June, Niels Shoe Meulman, Reme821, Ruben Ubiera, Sipros, Skewville, and Solus.

Top image: A new Biggie by Sipros for The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Sipros. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Niels Shoe Meulman. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BK Foxx. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Li-Hill. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ruben Ubiera. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Skewville. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Reme821. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cabaio Spirito. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cabaio Spirito. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Solus. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jeff Henriquez. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jeff Henriquez. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Golden 305 (with the work of Celso “Work” on top from a previous edition). The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Michel Velt. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hops1. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hops1. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Hops1. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Loomit . Bert. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Loomit . Bert. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Franck Duval. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. Hydee. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. June. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Mr. June. The Bushwick Collective Edition 2018. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Joan Cabrer. “Hot Pixel” Digitizes Life and Nature For Contorno Urbano. 12+1 Project

Posted on June 16, 2018

Painting on the street and the field of painting. The color field. Your field of reference.

Joan Cabrer is pixelating the artificial and the natural, placing them on the same playing field.

Joan Cabrer. “Hot Pixel”. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. June 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

Winner of the Sotheby’s Scholarship Medal given by the Miró Foundation and participant in a number of artists residencies and gallery exhibitions since the start of his artist career a little over a decade ago, Cabrer can be seen as being from a certain generation that became romantically involved with the early years of our digital aesthetics formed from the mid 1980s to the late 1990s.

Those simplistic blocked screen renderings of the world were friendly, alien, and reductive; instantly futuristic in our imaginations. At first graphic, now more painterly, his works now freely associate with the bio-scientific – static representations of flickering life and ecosystem.

Joan Cabrer. “Hot Pixel”. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. June 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

Here for his new mural created for Contorno Urbano’s 12+1 project in Barcelona, Cabrer toys with the “glitch” factor that roughly distorts, then returns us to a normality within our altered virtual reality. What point does digital mixed so often and so thoroughly that we can’t imagine the real with the virtual?

“In this series that I’ve been working on the technological references abound.  They shows how the digital mutation interacts with references that belong to the organic world,” he says. “The nature observed from a scientific point of view is mixed with digital aesthetics.”

Joan Cabrer. “Hot Pixel”. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. June 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

Joan Cabrer. “Hot Pixel”. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. June 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

 

BSA Film Friday: 06.15.18

Posted on June 15, 2018

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Shots of 7th Bushwick Block Party
2.
FWTV – Street Art Trends that Have to Go
3. North West Walls in Belgium
4. Street Art Lisboa

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Shots of 7th Bushwick Block Party

SOALife uses a backwards-forwards video trick to grab small moments on the street two weeks ago in Bushwick Brooklyn while thousands milled around the neighborhood checking out murals. James Brown and Maceo and the JBs help the kinetic funky rhythm of the street become apparent.

FWTV – Street Art Trends that Have to Go

Doug is trying to alienate the few remaining friends that stuck around after his recent video examining Banksy and anti-semitism, Zionism and the Palestinians. Maybe he’s brandishing a reputation as truth teller, or maybe he’s just stirring the pot to watch you squirm. With this episode he offers candidates for Street Art trends that could/should be banished. If only it were that simple. Truth is, he skipped a few trends here, including blogs and videos that pontificate about Street Art trends.

NORTH WEST WALLS in Belgium

In the category of “Respectable Commercial Gigs That Street Artists Can Take Without Selling Shampoo”, here’s a pop-up installation idea borrowed from other festivals where shipping containers are employed to build an environment for music revelers as the Rockwerchter Festival in Belgium. The stacked rectangular shapes in abstract cantilever formation are dramatic and high altitude canvasses here for Jarus, Phlegm, Hoxxoh, Smates, Astro and Telmomiel. It’s a stunning effect that requires talents of this caliber to push its limits.

Street Art Lisboa

Marta Torres shares this smartly edited and upbeat overview of Street Art that she is attracted to in Lisbon. Following that introduction she interviews three artists, Margarida Fleming, Tamara Alves, and Murta – about their practice and their view of the scene in their city:

 

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