banner

Brooklyn Street Art

…loves you more every day.

Icy & Sot x Moniker x BSA

Posted on April 21, 2018

In advance of Moniker in Brooklyn this May, we are interviewing some of the artists who are influenced both by street practice and fine art as the contemporary urban art category continues to evolve. Today, BSA is talking to Icy & Sot.

Human rights, ecological justice, and socio-political issues dominate the world news with regularity and brothers ICY & SOT have found an original dual voice to address them on the street in places like the US, Iran, Germany, China, Norway, even Tbilisi, Georgia.

Iranian born and bonifide Brooklyn peeps for the last four years, these twenty-something guys started out on skateboards in Tabriz and still take them from their apartment to their studio in Bushwick. They have also taken their stencil work, interventions, murals and video installations into the street, the gallery, the museum, and private collections.

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Grabbing and holding hard to tenants artistic freedom without censorship, their minimalist style of discourse hits directly without the scolding tone of some overtly political work on the street, allowing the simplicity of the situation to speak for itself.

BSA: How would you describe your work to someone who is seeing it for the first time?
ICY & SOT: We do different type of works, but if we wanna to describe something in general it is that it’s simple and has a message that is easy to understand.

BSA: What is your intersection with Brooklyn and it’s history of Street Art and graffiti?
ICY & SOT: We love Brooklyn because of its diversity and the energy in the city. We feel lucky to be living and working in a city with a rich history of graffiti and street at and art in general – and being part of it now.

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: What’s most important to you?
ICY & SOT: Beers 🙂

BSA: Are graffiti and Street Art allowed to change, or should there be a strict definitions they adhere to?
ICY & SOT: Everything is allowed to change

BSA: Moniker says your work has been influential and/or fundamental to urban & contemporary art’s growth. Can you see their point?
ICY & SOT: Yes, maybe

BSA: Name one artist whose work you admire today.
ICY & SOT: John Fekner

Icy & Sot (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


For more information please go to Moniker Art Fair HERE.

BSA Film Friday: 04.20.18

Posted on April 20, 2018

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. The Man Who Stole Banksy: Debuting Tonight at Tribeca Film Festival
2. Los Borbones Son Unos Ladrones (The Bourbons Are Thieves) (Spain)
3. Kazzius and Elara Elvira at the 12 + 1 Project, Barcelona
4. Morgan Winter – The Brooklyn Burrow

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: The Man Who Stole Banksy: Debuting Tonight at Tribeca Film Festival

Narrated by the gravel voiced Iggy Pop, this retelling of the story you haven’t heard manages to peel back layers of insight and intrigue while remaining judiciously opaque. Inside a walled and nearly completely closed-off city of Palestine a high profile European Street Artist (and his team) blasts pointed political messages that target audiences thousands of miles away.

Like so many of his street pieces, one of them is stolen. Because of the circumstances involved this Banksy heist takes on ramifications we haven’t thought of until now, and this film mines as many perspectives as it can. Written by Marco Proserpio and Christian Omodeo, this is a sleeper hit that reveals many many stories in the course of chasing one.

 

 

Los Borbones Son Unos Ladrones (The Bourbons Are Thieves)

“A new sharply political campaign championing the freedom of expression has caught fire in Spain in the last few weeks under the hashtag #NoCallaremos, and Street Artists are now adding their talents to the protest. Rather shockingly for a modern European nation, a rapper’s prison sentence for offensive lyrics was upheld in Spanish Supreme Court in February (Billboard) and that decision along with other recent events has sparked a number of creative protests across the art world in cities across the country,” we wrote last week when debuting images of artists creating murals inside a former prison.

Obviously tapping into a popular sentiment defending the right to free expression, the music video has garnered 2.1 million views in 12 days. Today we have new images showing some behind-the-scenes shots while the forceful protest video was being filmed, courtesy photographer Fer Alcalá.

Performers include: Elphomega | Machete en Boca | Frank T | Homes i Dones Llúdriga | La Raíz | Ira | Los Chikos del Maíz | Tribade | Def Con Dos | Noult | ZOO | Rapsusklei | Sara Hebe
Breakers and BBoying BGirling: Misty-k | Guille Vidal-Ribas | Movie One | Raza | Sofi Bpanther | Farky The Sunshine | Javi | Naza | Buba | Akness
DJ: DJ Enzo

DefConDos “Los Borbones Son Unos Ladrones#nocallarem (photo © Fer Alcalá)

Los Borbones Son Unos Ladrones#nocallarem (photo © Fer Alcalá)

Los Borbones Son Unos Ladrones#nocallarem (photo © Fer Alcalá)

Los Borbones Son Unos Ladrones#nocallarem (photo © Fer Alcalá)

“In this video (below), Delabrave documented the artistic interventions by Franco Fasoli, Twee Muizen, Joan Tarragó, Txemi, Enric Sant, Reskat, MilVietnams, Javier de Riba and Werens and Fullet in the patio of one of Barcelona’s most historic prisons.”

“NO CALLAREMOS”, STREET ARTISTS FOR FREEDOM OF SPEECH from Montana Colors on Vimeo.

The latest videos from Contorno Urbano featuring a new murals from Kazzius and Elara Elvira.

Kazzius at the 12 + 1 Project. Sant Feliu, Barcelona.

 

Elara Elvira. Contorno Urbano Foundation. 12 + 1 Project. Sant Feliu, Barcelona.

Morgan Winter – The Brooklyn Burrow

The second episode of this new series that is looking at Brooklyn artists that intersect in some way with the Street Art scene.

Jose Miguel Mendez x Moniker x BSA

Posted on April 19, 2018

In advance of Moniker in Brooklyn this May, we are interviewing some of the artists who are influenced both by street practice and fine art as the contemporary urban art category continues to evolve. Today, BSA is talking to Jose Miguel Mendez.

It’s like an 80’s pop poster illustration with incredibly sunny, sometimes phosphourescent colors melting into bizarre sex fantasies that may include a crocodile.

The hormonally riotously funny references are obviously tugging at your instinct below the belt nature and before you know it you are in the back seat of a pink Cadillac convertible watching the palm trees fly by with all these hot chicks eating tacos, ice cream sundaes and of course hotdogs.

This is California-tweaked skateboarding graffiti culture via Spain and London, an absurd and humorous hybrid that is sure to shock the kids in Greenpoint.

Jose Miguel Mendez. (photo from the artist’s Instagram Account)

BSA: How would you describe your work to someone who is seeing it for the first time?
Jose Miguel Mendez: Currently it’s a mysterious tropical world full of crocodiles and girls, bold shapes, a colorful palette, wavy lines and a strong use of contrast.

BSA: What is your intersection with Brooklyn and it’s history of Street Art and graffiti?
Jose Miguel Mendez: I became interested in graffiti since a pretty young age. When growing up in Spain we had many American influences, especially from TV. Style Wars and Downtown 81 were the movies that made me want to come to NY and make art.

Jose Miguel Mendez. (photo from the artist’s Instagram Account)

BSA: What’s most important to you?
Jose Miguel Mendez: Freedom.

BSA: Are graffiti and Street Art allowed to change, or should there be a strict definitions they adhere to?
Jose Miguel Mendez: I think labels are good when you want to sell art. When it comes to creativity things change all of the time. We are in constant evolution so why can’t Graffiti and Street Art couldn’t go with it?

BSA: Moniker says your work has been influential and/or fundamental to urban & contemporary art’s growth. Can you see their point?
Jose Miguel Mendez: I think we should let Moniker answer that 😉

BSA: Name one artist whose work you admire today.
Jose Miguel Mendez: Raymond Pettibon

Jose Miguel Mendez. (photo from the artist’s Instagram Account)


For more information please go to Moniker Art Fair HERE.

Vermibus x Moniker x BSA

Posted on April 18, 2018

In advance of Moniker in Brooklyn this May, we are interviewing some of the artists who are influenced both by street practice and fine art as the contemporary urban art category continues to evolve. Today, BSA is talking to Vermibus.

Readers of BSA will know that we have written about Vermibus many times for a number of years, so it is great to see him here in New York for Moniker. The Berlin-based Spanish artist takes a full frontal attack on advertising in the beauty and fashion fields primarily, using a paint solvent to dissolve features of high fashion models to disrupt idealized standards of beauty.

A veteran of countless takeovers of public bus shelters and kiosks here and across Europe, the results are shocking and confusing to passersby, who perhaps wonder if they are seeing something official and fashion forward or if its a viral ad using surrealist melting forms.

Vermibus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

To quote one of our own many texts, Vermibus is using solvent “to paint his critique of the corrosiveness of a commercial beauty culture that tears down and divides, glorifies consumerism for its own sake, belittles and relentlessly attacks self esteem and plays on negative emotions to enforce normative values about appearance. He takes the posters back to a studio and selectively eliminates words, logos, facial features, even entire faces — and then carries them to another city to repost on new streets. Sometimes he also takes them to an art framer.”

BSA: How would you describe your work to someone who is seeing it for the first time?
Vermibus: With my work I talk about 3 main topics.

It’s a critique of advertising, a reflection about beauty standards and an investigation on the complexities of the human being, not necessarily in this order.

Vermibus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: What is your intersection with Brooklyn and it’s history of Street Art and graffiti?
Vermibus: I haven’t spend enough time in Brooklyn to be able to answer this question properly.

All I can say is that for those who come from the graffiti scene we are obviously very influenced by NYC and Brooklyn in particular.

BSA: What’s most important to you?
Vermibus: Keep on standing up every time I fall.

Vermibus (photo © Jaime Rojo)

BSA: Are graffiti and Street Art allowed to change, or should there be a strict definitions they adhere to?
Vermibus: I don’t think graffiti can change and still be graffiti, same like I don’t think street art can change and still be street art, will be another thing.

I believe in evolution and I think is not only good but necessary, but labels are made to define things. If things change then we’ll need more labels.

BSA: Moniker says your work has been influential and/or fundamental to urban & contemporary art’s growth. Can you see their point?
Vermibus: I guess for some people I could have been very influential and I think my work has the ingredients to open new perspectives in the scene.

But only people with a great overview of the scene can say and only time can confirm.

So far, Moniker has been very good at observing and guiding the scene over the years, so I’m happy they see my work as such.

BSA: Name one artist whose work you admire today.
Vermibus: Axel Void.


For more information please go to Moniker Art Fair HERE.

Earlier Stories »