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Brooklyn Street Art

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“Street Art In Sicilia” Tours You Through 31 Cities and 200 Artists

Posted on August 22, 2017

A good size to put in your backpack as you hike through neglected neighborhoods, industrial sites, and historical highpoints in cities like Catania, Messina, and Palermo, this new guide to legal murals and illegal Street Art in Sicily is one of a kind.

Street Art In Sicilia. Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo. Palermo. IT. April 2017

A serious undertaking that documents 31 urban centers that vary widely in distinctive personality, more than two hundred artists are captured and carefully, succinctly described for a wide audience of tourists, Street Art fans, students, even academics. With three authors who collectively have studied architecture, semiotics, sociology and photography, you get a mapping that reveals not only physical location but a describes a cultural one as well.

Sicily’s scene is said to have come to life in the 1990s, as did much of today’s Street Art scene did globally, and the irony of having a guide book is that by nature this art is here today, gone tomorrow, sometimes literally. Its this acclaimed ephemerality that means hard-bound guides like this may become less useable after a relatively short time but by including legally permissioned/commissioned murals along with actual Street Art the longevity of this one is extended.

Street Art In Sicilia. Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo. Palermo. IT. April 2017

Additionally neighborhoods with the organic graffiti/Street Art scene often continue to have new pieces for discovery even after individual pieces fade or are destroyed. Depending on the speed of gentrification in any given municipality – there may be no art left by the time you get there because development tends to blot out organically grown rebel art scenes. Regardless Street Art in Sicilia is a valuable record of the 2010s, with great care taken to make the work it captures alive and relevant to it surroundings, and you.

Street Art In Sicilia. Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo. Palermo. IT. April 2017

Street Art In Sicilia. Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo. Palermo. IT. April 2017

Street Art In Sicilia. Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo. Palermo. IT. April 2017

Street Art In Sicilia. Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo. Palermo. IT. April 2017

Street Art in Sicilia – Guida ai luoghi e alle opere
Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo
Dario Flaccovio Editore, 2017

Street art in Sicily – Guide to places and works
Authors: Mauro Filippi, Marco Mondino, Luisa Tuttolomondo
April 2017, 256 pages

Rendering Swastikas Inert on Berlin Walls

Posted on August 21, 2017

The past couple of weeks (months, years) have seen the seeds of racism and fascism grow in western societies, taking to the streets as free-speech demonstrations, then menacing marches, then sometimes devolving into marauding nests of hate and physical violence.

Graffiti has been a tool for  communicating these sentiments more often than in recent years as well, including this weekends’ anti-Muslim graffiti on Spanish mosques in Seville and Granada. And while swastikas appeared on flags in Charlottesville last weekend, Berlin teens had already given their own response to the Nazi symbol on walls by converting them to something more playful.

Imo Omari, who owns a paint store started a small program last year to combat the swastikas popping up on German walls, even co-creating with Victoria Tschirch a youth graffiti workshop called Die kulturellen Erben e.V. (“The Cultural Heritage”), where graffiti writers and Street Artists gather to come up with creative ways to convert them into animals, geometric shapes, even dancing Egyptians.

This D.I.Y. activist approach to personal interventions in the public space is perfectly in alignment with the traditional graffiti vandal roots, but it also looks like it is empowering young artists to retake the conversation on the street with something proactive, effectively rendering symbols of hatred inert. In Berlin, a city where Far-right groups have been seizing and fomenting anti-immigrant sentiment against an influx of a million Syrians, Iraqis, and Afghanis into German since 2015 and where Germany’s anti-immigrant AfD party are trying to capitalize on it in September elections, this small individual-powered art project has much larger implications than more common street beef.

For more about the grassroots project check out #paintback on Twitter and Instagram.

BSA Images Of The Week: 08.20.17

Posted on August 20, 2017

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Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring Adnate, Ben Angotti, Cekis, Cesism, Damien Mitchell, Danielle Mastrion, Dirt Cobain, Evan Paul English, Gongkan, Li-Hill, MeresOne, UFO 907, Vince Ballentine, and You Go Girl!

Top image: Li-Hill. Detail. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adnate. Detail. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adnate and Li-Hill at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Li-Hill at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Li-Hill at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Li-Hill at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Li-Hill at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adnate at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adnate at work. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adnate and Li-Hill collaboration for The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adnate. The Bushwick Collective. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Danielle Mastrion with MeresOne for Stuyvesant Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

MeresOne for Stuyvesant Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Dirt Cobain for Stuyvesant Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Damien Mitchell for Stuyvesant Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Ben Angotti for Stuyvesant Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Vince Ballentine for Stuyvesant Walls. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

UFO907 (photo © Jaime Rojo)

You Go Girl (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Evan Paul English for Centrefuge Public Art Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Cekis and Cesism for Centrefuge Public Art Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gongkan for Centrefuge Public Art Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Gongkan for Centrefuge Public Art Project. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. East Village, NYC. August 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Christopher Derek Bruno and his 10K SF Color Intervention in Seattle

Posted on August 19, 2017

‘Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.’

~Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


That’s the quote Seattle’s Christopher Derek Bruno says he kept revisiting during the painting of this new project that fairly washes the hate right out of your heart. We can’t help but be reminded of huge expanses covered in colorful washes by Risk and Shepard Fairey a few years ago in Miami or the massive swimming pool Hot Tea did in New York in 2015.

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

A private commission for the SoDo Track program, businesses interests invest in public artworks to attract people to this section of the city along a section of light rail and “to address chronic graffiti and beautify the district,” according to the SoDo Business Improvement Area website.

The former industrial sector of mills and manufacturing later turned to warehouses like this before the shipping container industry came along and now the area boasts big box home improvement businesses and a mélange of cross-industry interests – and artists of course.

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

You may be interested to sit atop one of these rooftops to watch Monday’s solar eclipse, which Seattle is supposed to catch 92% of and while there you may consider that color theory and science also entered into Bruno’s calculation of this piece of public art.

He calls it ‘Exterior Intervention 1 : angle of incidence’ and says that it “is a site specific composition based on the use of light as a means to detect and decipher motion (Red shift / Blue Shift). This common measure for the direction of a galaxy/star/object/particle as it moves through space and time realized in the form of 21 values from blue to yellow, and finally red across the longest side of the site.”

If the science isn’t what impresses you most, consider the quantities: 10,000 square feet of surface, nearly 100 gallons of paint, and 10 days painting on a roof. It will be interesting to see the colors moving here for some time to come.

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

Christopher Derek Bruno in Seattle for SoDo Track Project. August 2017. (photo © Christopher Derek Bruno)

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