banner

Brooklyn Street Art

…loves you more every day.

BSA Images Of The Week: 04.30.17

Posted on April 30, 2017


BSA-Images-Week-Jan2015

“Resistance is here to stay, welcome to your 100th day” – said people in Climate Marches across the country yesterday to President Exxon-Lockheed. God, has it only been 100 days? It feels like 1,000. Nevertheless, there are a lot of new politically themed pieces popping up on the street regularly, along with completely apolitical and humorous ones. Either way, we always dig the conversation on the street.

Here’s our weekly interview with the streets, this week featuring: Adam Fujita, Brolga, Jaune, Legend, Lost Hills, Lunge Box, Myth, Raf Urban, Taco, and Tatyana Fazlalizadeh.

Top image: Unidentified artist (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Adam Fujita (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Raf Urban (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Raf Urban (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Raf Urban (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Brolga (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lost Hills in Aberdeen, Scotland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lost Hills in Aberdeen, Scotland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lost Hills in Aberdeen, Scotland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lost Hills in Aberdeen, Scotland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Legend (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tatytana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Tatytana Fazlalizadeh (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Taco (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Myth (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Lunge Box (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Jaune for Nuart Aberdeen 2017 in Aberdeen, Scotland. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Untitled. Spring 2017. Manhattan, NYC, April 2017. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Carlo McCormick, “Magic City: The Art Of The Street”

Posted on April 29, 2017

Nature is a petrified magic city.

With apologies to Novalis, this magic city of New York is too alive to be considered petrified – unless you are talking about being petrified by the sight of five rats on the subway tracks while you wait for the M train.

Carlo McCormick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

“New York has more artists than rats,” Carlo McCormick once told us at a gallery opening a few years ago, with a glint of mischief in his eyes, which is often there. Since that time the greedy dullard named “Gentrification” has been pushing so many creative types out of NYC that the artist/rat ratio has been surely swinging in the rat population’s favor.

The art and culture critic McCormick writes about the ubiquity rats in his new book MAGIC CITY, a catalogue for the traveling European exhibition of the same name just published by From Here to Fame Publishing under the guidance of editor Don R. Karl.  Rats, McCormick writes, have appeared in many Street Art pieces during the last few decades; dropping names of seminal figures like Blek Le Rat, who allegedly influenced Bristol’s Banksy, among others like eco-artist Christy Rupp, who wheat-pasted rats in New York in the late 1970s and Ivar Vics, aka “Dr. Rat”, an early graffiti writer in Amsterdam.

Carlo McCormick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

The 40+ strong artist lineup for this show that just moved from Dresden to Munich and will open in Stockholm this autumn includes artists from across a spectrum of disciplines and backgrounds and influences: a survey that includes early NYC graffiti train writers like DAZE and photographers who captured them like Henry Chalfant and Martha Cooper – to modern muralist Street Artists like ROA and Tristan Eaton, to illusionists like Leon Keer and Odeith, to head-scratching interventionists like Dan Witz and Brad Downey and social/political activists like Icy & Sot and Ganzeer.

Full disclosure: BSA was invited to curate the film program for MAGIC CITY and Jaime Rojo is one of the featured artists in the show with a children’s trail of his photographs as well as a section of his photography focusing on street sculpture. We’re proud of our involvement and thankful for the opportunity to share what we have learned with visitors.

The well-designed and easily accessible book gives ample overviews and details about the artists, the work, their relevance to an ever-evolving urban art scene, and of course savory writings by McCormick with essays by Amber Grunhauser, Biancoshock, and journalist/filmmaker Annie Nocenti, whose writing is featured extensively throughout the entire exhibit as well.

Carlo McCormick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

“The urban landscape is the physical manifestation of humankind’s uneven, uneasy, and even unhealthy relationship with nature,” begins McCormick in “Interventions”, one of the many essays throughout that bring into focus the various art practices at play in the man-made public environments that people traverse daily.

With historical reference and straight-up knowledge delivered with a wizard’s finesse and a sharp dry gin humor, he leaves you with an inescapable sense that you have been missing so much in your own city every day. Critique, mystery, discovery; It’s more than information, it’s a way of seeing.

Carlo McCormick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

For McCormick the messages are coded, the dialogue welcomed, the right of contesting public space assured. As curator and writer his reach is necessarily wide, yet his is also discerningly focused where it needs to be. By now we have grown accustomed to his innate talent for winnowing down to the pertinent and quietly powerful voices which give foundation to the whole, telling us that much more is possible on the street and that we should expect it.

The fact that Director of SC exhibitions Christoph Scholz, who writes the introduction, embraces the street credo of ongoing reinvention and the ephemeral qualities of this broad practice of art-making speaks to Carlos’ ability to paint these complex concepts with words – as well as Scholz’ Spiderman sense of the pulsating rhythms that stir just below an audiences consciousness and leave their synapses sparking.

Carlo McCormick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

The roots of these forms of expression are said to be activist, even anarchist, as least subversive. To see many of these MAGIC CITY practitioners lauded and their messages magnified in a traveling family-friendly exhibition means that sometimes we witness the flashpoint when subculture becomes the culture, by dint of its pure industry – and possibly because good ideas are good ideas and they resonate far and deep.

But presenting a truly alive and contemporary art-making scene inside a formal exhibition space is rife with landmines, any curator will tell you. Straddling, or perhaps surfing, across this ocean of practices, dichotomies, factionalism, political/social movements, territorial piss fights, accusations of cultural appropriation, and the ongoing turmoil of the commodifying forces that shape our perception of a global grassroots art-making movement is at best a thankless task and only for those with a steel stomach.

Carlo McCormick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

Thankfully, McCormick also has steel-toed boots and would probably happily kick some ass if that seems appropriate, backed as he is with academic erudition, street cred, and that insouciant punk rock adoring stare that intones, “Talk all you want, this music is so loud that I can only see your raging eyes and your bloodied lips moving, darling. Kiss me.”

In his introduction, McCormick says, “Like the art it features, MAGIC CITY is a zone of unexpected encounters, art as born in interstice and the peripheral, appearing along those rips in the fabric of the ordinary where the extraordinary intrudes its wonderful illogic.”

Therein may lie the magic.

Carlo McCormick. Tristan Eaton. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

MAGIC CITY, The Art in the Streets, curated by Carlo McCormick, co-curated by Ethel Seno, features the work of: AIKO, AKRylonumérik, Andy K, Asbestos, Benuz, Jens Besser, Biancoshock, Mark Bode, Bordalo II, Ori Carino & Benjamin Armas, Henry Chalfant, Martha Cooper, Isaac Cordal, Daze, Brad Downey, Tristan Eaton, Ron English, Shepard Fairey , FINO’91, Ganzeer, Anders Gjennestad, Ben Heine, HERAKUT, Icy & Sot, Leon Keer, Loomit, MadC, OAKOAK, Odeith, OLEK , Qi Xinghua, Replete, ROA, Jaime Rojo, Skewville, SpY, Truly, Juandres Vera, WENU, Dan Witz, Yok & Sheryo and Ernest Zacharevic.

Carlo McCormick. Ernest Zacharevick. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

Carlo McCormick. Olek. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017

Carlo McCormick. Leon Keer. Magic City: The Art Of the Street. From Here To Fame Publishing. Berlin 2017


Photos of all the catalogue plates by Jaime Rojo

Novalis quote stolen from essay by Mr. McCormick.

Magic City: The Art Of The Street by Carlo McCormick was published by From Here To Fame Publishing, Berlin 2017. Produced by SC Exhibitions

 

BSA Film Friday 04.28.17

Posted on April 28, 2017

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Colouring The World. A Film By Okuda San Miguel
2. Borondo “Golden Gate”
3. Elbi Elem in Barcelona for 12+1 P
4. Chip Thomas in Santa Fe, New Mexico at Biocultura

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Colouring The World. A Film By Okuda San Miguel

The pleasing and bright geometry of Okuda has wide appeal to many audiences and he maximizes the effect with his choice of amiable animals and friendly themes. It’s a worldwide dance party for this artist and last year he took his public and commercial murals to many cities in places like Australia, Tahiti, and Thailand. And Miami, naturally.

Borondo “Golden Gate”

Dude, I told you – turn your phone so it’s landscape when you are doing video!

Just kidding. Here’s a video installation from a group show in March 2017 called COLERA in Rome’s Galleria Varsi.

Made as a stop action animation of a house on fire by Matteo Beradone with music by Enzo Pietropaoli. The multiple monotype prints by the Street Artist/Fine Artist Borondo are moving and crackling, inflected with gold leaf shadings, each different and evocative of the rapid flickering of fire, drowning in a reflective sea.

The group show also included Run, Canemorto and Michele Servadio during a two week residency at the gallery. You can see how the images were displayed in the photo from Borondo below the video

 

Elbi Elem in Barcelona for 12+1 Project

Here’s a process video of artist Elbi Elem at work on her mural for the 12+1 Project in Barcelona this spring.

To quote ourselves: ” ‘Break with the rectangle as the space to intervened,’ says artist Elbi Elem, the March painter for this wall curated monthly in L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain. The abstract muralist says she began making kinetic sculpture in 2002 and has an interest in movement, composition and form.”

 

Chip Thomas in Santa Fe, New Mexico at Biocultura

Chip Thomas is a master at wheatpasting his large scale photographs, and has been doing this kind of art for many years now, usually with a genuine social mission and without great fanfare. This project is with Social Media Workgroup on the side of the Biocultura event space in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Swoon “To Accompany Something Invisible”

Posted on April 27, 2017

A good way to familiarize oneself with the additional dimensions that Swoon has taken on since you last caught up with her is the Street Artists show called To Accompany Something Invisible newly exhibited at Allouche Gallery in New York.

Swoon. “Sasu and Kasey”. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Whether it’s Edline or Moni or Dawn and Gemma who you came to see again, freshly colored and framed in mandella-ed ships or modest rectangular rafts, these living ghosts greet you on gallery walls, silent and familiar as you have become with them on city walls. On wood or on butcher paper, you are never far from the author or her subjects, even as they are flowered and leaved and ribboned and swagged and cut so that the light passes through organic and ornate patterning.

Swoon. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon’s process is here on display; drawing sketches, sometimes just outlines of ideas later detailed and drawn intricately and hand cut into linoleum. These are her hand-rendered personal journeys.

Now actually building walls with those same hands in Haiti for people to shelter within, Swoon is also readying works to display on walls at a major retrospective this autumn at Cincinnati’s Contemporary Arts Center.  The invisible something may be the stories told and heard during the last twenty years of Swoon’s journey, voices that can be heard if you care to listen.

Swoon. The original sketch for Edline. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Invisible are your friendships, the lovers, the worries, the experiments, the artists milieu, the early shows in Brooklyn neighborhoods that now are transformed; reassuring and warm voices now glimmering in the buzz of an opening, like this one tonight here in the Meatpacking District – a neighborhood itself rife with the stories of people whom you first met on the street.

We stopped by the Allouche Gallery yesterday to catch a glimpse of Swoon’s magic world as she was preparing for her exhibition opening today. Here are a few process shots, as proper lighting was not yet in place and Swoon and her assistants were busy helping her build new environments.

Swoon. Detail of Edline in an environment created in an installation box. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon. Detail. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

Swoon. Detail of Yaya and Sonia . To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon. Ben. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Swoon. Detail. To Accompany Something Invisible. Allouche Gallery. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


Swoon’s To Accompany Something Invisible opens today at the Allouche Gallery in Manhattan. It is free and open to the plublic. Click HERE for details.

 

Earlier Stories »