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Brooklyn Street Art

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Nevercrew Destroys Natural Wonder in New Zealand

Posted on October 20, 2018

“Disposing machine n°2”


Because there is still an ongoing environmental crisis in our oceans and because sea mammals do not have Instagram accounts (flippers are too clumsy for those little texting buttons), we are here again with you to discuss a new mural by Nevercrew painting in Gisborne, New Zealand.

Nevercrew. Disposing machine n°2”. Seawalls Tairāwhiti project by PangeaSeed Foundation. Gisborne, New Zeland. (photo courtesy of Nevercrew)

“Human habits and politics are modifying the natural balance, sometimes in direct and visible ways, sometimes in more underhanded and indirect ways,” say the art duo Christian Rebecchi about Pablo Togni,“and sea mammals are powerlessly suffering this imposition that’s embodied in the increasing of temperatures, water pollution, interferences in their habitat, swings in the ecosystems, hunting, and more.”

Created with the Pangeaseed Foundation, the Hawaii-based not-for-profit, public art program that has created nearly 300 murals with 200 international artists in 14 countries to bring to the streets a message about ocean conservation, this whale is part of the Nevercrew vocabulary.

Nevercrew. Disposing machine n°2”. Seawalls Tairāwhiti project by PangeaSeed Foundation. Gisborne, New Zeland. (photo courtesy of Nevercrew)

Impressive in scale, volume, and texture, the artists find new and inventive ways to permute the natural iconographic image of this massive sea creature and virtually modernize it in our minds, honoring it and elevating it to even greater relevance for a contemporary audience that is fluent in aesthetics.

By turning this god-like animal into mere elements of mechanics or body parts exposes our dim-witted appreciation for something that should instead inspire awe.How does that saying go? “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts”

Nevercrew. Disposing machine n°2”. Seawalls Tairāwhiti project by PangeaSeed Foundation. Gisborne, New Zeland. (photo courtesy of Nevercrew)

“A vision of this phenomenon, a perception of the overall issue and actual and future damage, seems hard to experience in a tangible way,” they say. “This has to pass again from human interpretation and understanding.”

“There’s a urge then to acknowledge that humankind is part of a balance together with the rest of the elements that compose Planet Earth”

Nevercrew. Disposing machine n°2”. Seawalls Tairāwhiti project by PangeaSeed Foundation. Gisborne, New Zeland. (photo courtesy of Nevercrew)

Nevercrew. Disposing machine n°2”. Seawalls Tairāwhiti project by PangeaSeed Foundation. Gisborne, New Zeland. (photo courtesy of Nevercrew)

Nevercrew. Disposing machine n°2”. Seawalls Tairāwhiti project by PangeaSeed Foundation. Gisborne, New Zeland. (photo courtesy of Nevercrew)

BSA Film Friday: 10.19.18

Posted on October 19, 2018

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. Shredding the Girl and Balloon – The Director’s Cut
2. JKS Crew in Italy & France
3. Vigilante Vigilante: The Battle For Expression / Trailer
4. The Hut – A Partial X / Felipe Pantone

bsa-film-friday-special-feature

BSA Special Feature: Shredding the Girl and Balloon – The Director’s Cut

By the way, this is not the first Street Artist to shred art in public with a home-made apparatus. Check out BSA Film Friday in April of 2014 for a stunning example of slicing public advertisements with Bandes de Pub.

We start our weekly selection with the followup release that takes hold of the narrative of the moments leading up to this month’s Banksy auction and self-destruction at Sotheby’s.

In it you hear the auctioneer chit-chatting beforehand saying things like “It’s a fun auction, you know. Everyone’s got a chance.” And by ‘everyone’ he means…everyone here in this room and on the 30 phones who are also bidding.

In other revelations this week, the Financial Times is reporting that the original artwork contained a “dedication reading ‘Thanks Jo’, which art market experts said could be a reference to Banksy’s long-time publicist, Jo Brooks.” Not so fast there Mr. Brillianteen. Perhaps Banksy is just a Jimi Hendrix fan (Hey Joe) or it was a gift to rapper Fat Joe (I’m Not a Player I Just Crush Alot) (RIP). Joe the Lion? Smokin’ Joe?

JKS Crew in Italy & France

Okay class, who wants to tell us what they did on their summer vacation?

Looks like JKS Crew were on spraycation this summer in Italy and France. The jazz bassy groove that accompanies the scenes in this video make us pine for those dreamy days of July and August already, and its only mid-October.

Vigilante Vigilante: The Battle For Expression / Trailer

Who owns public space? The oligarchs, yes, but after them?

You do!

Who should paint it?

When graffiti writers and Street Artists take it over with acts of transgressive painting one may expect that the next step is probably the buff, unless you living are in an aesthetic lawlessness like Berlin, or Athens, or 2000s Detroit.  It is infrequent that one may countenance the self-appointed citizen buffer, but they exist in many a neighborhood. A combination of ornery rebel and a justice-minded citizen; This is the vehement, street cleaning vigilante.

If you were writing a bespectacled urban guidebook about characters found on city streets you may advise, “Think twice before crossing this curiously civic interbreed, broken windows can be sharp.”

 

The Hut – A Partial X / Felipe Pantone

A Liberian surfer camp that just happens to capture the artworks of some of the biggest names in Street Art? Organizers say that its to reduce the stigma that surrounds the country that was hurt so badly by ebola a few years ago. Perhaps that what has drawn artists like Faile, Conor Harrington, 1010, Martin Whatson, Marke Jenkins, Herakut, Ted Pim, Sandra Chevrier, Ben Eine, and Seth Globepainter here to create new works here.  Today we see works by Felipe Pantone, JR, and Slinkachu.

Bifido Photo-Mythology at “FART” Festival in Cerignola, Italy

Posted on October 18, 2018

FART Fatti Urbani is a two day festival (Oct 6&7) in the Municipality of Cerignola in the south of Italy (population 58,534)  that holds as its central hub an interest in Street Art and Urban Culture. In this context Street Art is primarily a reference to mural art, rather than the practice of unsanctioned art-making that the term originates from.

Bifido. “Too many kids finding rain in the dust“. Fart festival. Cerignola, Italy. October 2018. (photo courtesy of Bifido)

The weekend features artist workshops for youth on the themes of digital art, scenography, illustration, photography and there are exhibitions, talks, screenings and participatory art projects for children. Central to the events is the installation of murals in three neighborhoods of Torricelli, the San Samuele district, and the downtown.

Italian Street Artist Bifido staged one of his theatrical photoshoots with two young actors to create this metaphor for strife in the metaphysical sense, a battle perhaps between good and evil. Organizers say that public art events like this provide impetus for a social gathering around artist expression and ideas, catalyzing discussion and appreciation for art and culture. We particularly like the description on the itinerary under “Social Lunch”, which roughly translated, says “to counter the weariness, the alienation of modern life and lunches of solitude, Saturday we all eat together. Everyone brings something, we sit at the table”.

Bifido. “Too many kids finding rain in the dust“. Fart festival. Cerignola, Italy. October 2018. (photo courtesy of Bifido)

Bifido’s piece has garnered a lot of attention, and a public festival like this appears to engage people just at a historical time when the “alienation of modern life”, at least in the so-called developed societies, is at its highest in decades.

The artist tells us that the wall is in a peripheral and notoriously dangerous neighborhood. “That kind of dormitory neighborhood where you can only find concrete and desperation,” he says. “I called my mural: ‘Too many kids finding rain in the dust’ .”

Bifido. “Too many kids finding rain in the dust“. Fart festival. Cerignola, Italy. October 2018. (photo courtesy of Bifido)

The Instagram page of the AAD , the architectural design firm sponsoring some of the events, reflects their impression of the effect of art performed in public like this, “It was an incredible experience – it introduced us to a community that wants novelty and beauty. The work of @bifidoart has been adopted and taken to heart by the entire district as a symbol of a good omen for the not too distant future. The wonder is in everyone’s eyes, whatever their path of life.”

Fantastic? In many ways. A difficult name of a festival for English speakers to deal with? No doubt.

Virtually Damaged : Shepard Fairey in New York to Launch VR/AR Exhibition App

Posted on October 17, 2018

“This is the first time that it is been done in alignment with what I’m truly trying to do as an artist,” Shepard Fairey says about this new venture into virtual/augmented reality being unveiled this week in New York, and on a phone near you.

Shepard Fairey. “Damaged” VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

A stunning realization of the experience that a visitor would have had at his “Damaged” exhibition a year ago in his hometown of Los Angeles, the freshly released app is the product of millions of incremental images taken in 360 degrees that enable you to tour the show – even though it was dismantled a while ago.

“It was by far my biggest exhibition – bigger than “May Day” at Deitch Projects, bigger than the project I did in Dumbo and in New York with Jonathan Levine,” Fairey says of the exhaustive solo show of 230 pieces that opened to 21,000 people who had waited in 5-block long lines to get into the industrial warehouse. The new app designed by VRt Ventures captures each of those pieces in high definition of course, along with the more environmental experiential elements that the exhibition featured in the multi-faceted real life show.

Shepard Fairey. Screenview at Damaged” a VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

“I had the newsstand, billboard, murals, sculptures, the printing press, and the whole print studio,” Shepard says, “That was really probably the greatest thing about that space was that it was this hybrid – a street gallery feeling because it was this kind of industrial warehouse – and we built these white walls as well. It had all the corrugated metal and you could see all these beams and we set up this print shop in there so I feel like it really balanced the best of both worlds in terms of the presentation of the work.”

Last night in a Manhattan popup pre-opening show on the Bowery Mr. Fairey and his wife Amanda made the rounds with guests in goggles to tour the exhibition where it exists now – as Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR). Billed as a “VR/AR immersive experience”, the open bar and crunchy hip-hop/punk medley pumping loudly across the speakers may have impaired our abilities to pan and click inside the virtual world frankly. But we could easily see how a quieter home environment, or even a subway ride, would make it easier to listen to Fairey’s narrated portions and to appreciate the navigation around the space. So we downloaded the app for phone exploration later.

Shepard Fairey. “Wrong Path”. Detail of vinyl print for Damaged a VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

“The accessibility of the art is so much more in your hands and really, truly it is like being in the space,” says Ms. Fairey as she compares the new virtual experience to the original. “It was a giant warehouse and an amazing exhibition of his work – It’s like you are in it, I mean. Oh my god. It revives the moment for us.”

As an activist on the street, and later in galleries and museums, Fairey has always communicated clearly and in detail about the inspirational factors and contextual circumstances that are foundational to his work – whether in canvasses for private homes or prints for t-shirts or in the many stickers, stencils and hurried wheat pastes he’s left on walls in the middle of the night. So it’s no surprise that the works in the virtual “Damaged” are augmented with his voice describing the works and what he was thinking about when making them.

Shepard Fairey. “Bias By Numbers”. Detail of vinyl print for Damaged a VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

He imagines what it would be like for him to experience this with other artists as well.

“For me to hear Warhol giving a tour through the Factory – or any number of artists – explaining first hand rather than learning about the show through all of these people who may or may not be credible to be saying what they are saying,” he remarks. “When I think about how valuable it would’ve been for me; I like to hear things from the artist if it is possible. I did 100 minutes of narration on this. I usually write about all of the pieces that I create, about what’s happening in current events that are relevant to the work as well as the general principles of the work. So the VRt team went through all of the pieces in the show and found additional text to supplement my audio narration.”

Shepard Fairey. Screenview at Damaged” a VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Steven P. Harrington)

BSA: So do you think that this experience with this app and the way that people experience the exhibition when they cannot be there physically will be a good tool, not just for you but for a lot of artists to spread their message?

Shepard Fairey: Yeah I definitely do. Of course I think it’s always most important for people if they came to see the work in person. But when you think about the high percentage of people that basically are sort of scrolling through a slideshow of static images and that’s the best they’re going to get, this technology is really important for the future of art. Not just for artists but for museums that spend a huge amounts of money on an exhibition and it comes down after a finite amount of time, you can see this being more important especially as the technology improves.

To capture Damaged”, the exhibit was scanned with lasers–generating an exact replica of the exhibit.

These guys from VRt, you know they spent a lot of money to be ahead of the curve on this. Very used the highest technology to laser-map the entire space. You can go up to the pieces and see the textures. You can walk around the printing press. It’s really impressive. As this technology comes down in price it is going to democratize all kinds of experiences even more so I’m glad that maybe I can provide a little example a case study of how beautiful this technology is.

Shepard Fairey. “Wrong Path”. Detail of vinyl print for Damaged a VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Shepard Fairey. “Drink Crude Oil”. Detail of vinyl print for Damaged a VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

From left to right: Stan Sudol, Shepard Fairey, Evan Pricco, Steven P. Harrington and Carlo McCormick at the VIP launching of “Damaged” VR/AR Immersive Experience. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 


To celebrate the launch of the “DAMAGED” mobile App, VRt Ventures, Shepard Fairey, Juxtapoz Magazine and ABSTRKT NYC host a pop-up will be open to the public from 10/17 – 10/21 at 136 Bowery in New York City from 10am – 6pm where fans can come check out the experience, make sure to follow @JuxtapozMag @ObeyGiant @VRtVentures on social media for more information.

The DAMAGED mobile App is available for download via the iOS App Store and Google Play store for Android, on Oculus, Samsung Gear and Steam in VR.

For more information, please visit VRtVentures.art

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