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Brooklyn Street Art

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BSA Film Friday: 11.16.18

Posted on November 16, 2018

bsa-film-friday-JAN-2015

Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :
1. D*Face “AGAINST THE WALL” and Street Art Benefit for Movember
2. Bill Posters: “La Ley Mordaza Me Obliga” / “The Gag Law Made Me Do It”
3. Amore “Lucky Russian”
4.”Franchise Freedom” by Studio Drift at Burning Man 2018

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BSA Special Feature: D*Face “AGAINST THE WALL” and Street Art Benefit for Movember.

It’s Movember ya’ll! And the men in your life would like to talk.

Street Artists have donated works to be auctioned by Sotheby’s to benefit the Movember Foundation and to raise awareness about men’s mental health.

You know the story: girls cry but boys are taught to toughen up. Later that shit backfires.

Suicide is the biggest killer of men under the age of 44 – because of a number of issues in our society – so let’s find out what those are and try to do it better.

Here’s a video with D*Face speaking frankly to the camera about his own challenges and new works that are up on view at Sotheby’s London starting today through the 20th – from Street Artists like D*Face, Shepard Fairey, Conor Harrington, Felippe Pantone, Alexis Diaz, Okuda, Ben Eine, and Vhils.

More importantly, get that guy in your life to open up.

 

Bill Posters: “La Ley Mordaza Me Obliga” / “The Gag Law Made Me Do It”

Public ad takeovers today from Bill Posters in Placa Espanya in Barcelona to protest the ‘gag law’ in Spain called “Ley Mordaza” that he says is being used to silence political and cultural dissent.

When we read about a law like this in a so-called democratic country we have to ask about all so-called Western Democracies, “Could it happen here?”

Mr. Posters says that many artists, “including rappers like Valtonyc, Pablo Hasél and La Insurgencia are in jail or forced exile after prison sentences were passed in their absence for songs or lyrics that challenged and satired the Spanish state and monarchy.”

This series of interventions feature a black and white portrait with a red bar across the mouth, signifying the silencing of dissent.

Amore “Lucky Russian”

A Russian graffiti jam with quick cuts and a high energy soundtrack, here’s a look at some of the graffiti players at the moment in Moscow, Saint Petersburg, Ekaterinburg and Ufa. If you doubted there was a scene in the former USSR, now you know.

 

“Franchise Freedom” by Studio Drift at Burning Man 2018

The tent city at Black Rock in the desert of Nevada that appears every summer to expand creativity and minds and only 40% of attendees are “virgins” while everyone else has attended 2,5,7,11 times before. Over three decades Burning Man has been known a haven for creativity, bonding, hedonism, sex-drugs-theater-fueled adventure, a cultural benchmark, a laboratory for visual experimenting, a tired bloated exercise in privileged escapism for the very people who don’t actually need to escape – depending on who you talk to. Then again, there are the 10 principles created by co-founder Larry Harvey, who passed away this spring. This performance of music by Joep Beving and 600 drones with lights by Studio Drift is to him.

Leon Keer Goes Beyond Anamorphic and Into Augmented Reality

Posted on November 15, 2018

Street Artists continue to embrace new technologies as we race toward our own version of Huxley’s Brave New World. Personally, we’re still looking forward to the sleep-learning.

Leon Keer & Massina. “Once Upon A Time” Created for Vibrations Urbaines Festival in Pessac, France. (still from the video)

Anamorphic artist Leon Keer suggest you download his app on your phone before walking past his new mural created with Massina using Augmented Reality (AR) in Pessac, France. Otherwise the large piece on the side of an apartment complex will just look like an oversized den.

It’s not the first piece he’s done with AR of course, and we have seen a number of works in public space activated within phones and tablets, but Keer is excited because this one is viewable on his newly released APP, title appropriately Leon Keer.

Leon Keer & Massina. “Once Upon A Time” Created for Vibrations Urbaines Festival in Pessac, France. (still from the video)

The AR feature is created by Netherlands-based Joost Spek, a 3D Art Director for 3Dpicnic. They’ve worked collaboratively previously and you can expect more from this duo in the future. To get the full effect of “Once Upon a Time”, check out the installation in AR on the video below.

Leon Keer & Massina. “Once Upon A Time” Created for Vibrations Urbaines Festival in Pessac, France. (still from the video)

Leon Keer & Massina. “Once Upon A Time” Created for Vibrations Urbaines Festival in Pessac, France. (still from the video)

 

Invader: “Invasion Los Angeles” Book and “Into the White Cube” Exhibition

Posted on November 14, 2018

One thing that some Street Artists do when their work enters the white cube is drop the “street” from their official moniker, instead preferring to be known simply as an “artist”. The decision is possibly to rid themselves of any subtle class distinctions or otherwise negative connotations that a potential collector or curator may have with the “street artist” label.

Other artists formerly known as “Street Artists” feel limited by the title because it doesn’t include all of their new interests and their complete practice – or because the term itself has evolved in their mind and the mind of the public to mean something unfavorable that they do not like to be associated with.

When it comes to the internationally renowned Street Artist Invader, its not a consideration – the street is in his DNA. His cryptic tile-made street practice is so proliferate across the world and so much a part of the metropolis like in his hometown of Paris that his art is literally and psychically fused with the city.

The dude even has a global app that helps fans in about 80 cities to track and document his works, and some of the most dedicated have clocked thousands themselves. Now with two decades in the game and nearing age 40, the maker of thousands of pixelated video game characters and pop culture archetypes on walls has released an updated edition of his 2003 Los Angeles Invasion Guide and he stretches himself creatively with a new exhibition that opens this weekend at Over the Influence Gallery in LA.

Called “Into the White Cube’, the show will have more than 50 new mosaic ‘Aliases’, an Invader LED piece, large-scale pin buttons, and an Invader Cinema. The event is huge, even for a Street Artist who can claim 200 pieces on the streets of Venice, Downtown LA, Los Feliz, at the LAX airport and even the HOLLYWOOD sign.

Today we have new images from Invasion Los Angeles 2.1, a breathtaking survey of his work there since 1999, introduced by artist, musician, and writer Bruno Blum who puts his finger on the pulse of this compulsive campaigner in his first “invaded” US city.

“Invader lives for his art. He has a passion for what he’s doing. He’s a diehard. In ‘street artist’, there’s the word ‘street’. Invader is from the streets; and not from the Beverly Hills streets. He’s got fire in the belly, he’s got what it takes and he’s got it down,” writes Blum.

Full of personal accounts that shed a light on his process and mind and featuring shots of placements that are ingenious, often witty, banal, baddass, and seemingly impossible, the collection is a finally a revelation into the compulsive commitment that a Street Artist brings to the game. Helpfully, it also includes street maps.

Invasion Los Angeles 2.1 / Updated Edition 1999 – 2018. A Book By Invader. Published by Control P. Editions. France 2018.

 


Invader “Into The White Cube” first solo exhibition in Los Angeles will open this Saturday, November 17th at OverUnder The Inlfuence. Click HERE for further details.

Lily Brik Is Romantic for Childhood Stories in Barcelona

Posted on November 13, 2018

Lleida, Catalunya-based illustrator and muralist Lily Brik goes for the romantic, the emotional, and traditional language and imagery in her commercial work as well as on festival walls. Here in Barcelona she returns to some of the familiar fairy tale tropes that many a girl associates with the stories of her childhood. Uncritical in its sentiment, Ms Brik says that this is deliberate decision to return back to a place of safety.

Lily Brik. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. November 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

“Usually people paint during the childhood, but they forget about it once they grow up,” she says. “Luckily, it stayed in my mind. Painting has always been my favorite way to express myself, the way of explaining what I couldn’t say through words”.

Lily Brik. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. November 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

Lily Brik. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. November 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

Lily Brik. Contorno Urbano. Project 12 + 1. l’Hospitalet de Llobregat. November 2018. (photo © Clara Antón)

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