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Brooklyn Street Art

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BSA Film Friday: 07.03.15

Posted on July 3, 2015

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Our weekly focus on the moving image and art in the streets. And other oddities.

Now screening :

1. NYC Subway from Paul Whitworth
2. Jet Martinez, Painter & Muralist
3. Monochrome: Sofles
4. Mutiny of Colours – Iranian Street Art Documentary
5. HULA paints “Imua”
6. Epic Rap Battle : Ninja Turtles V. Dudes of the Renaissance

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BSA Special Feature: NYC Subway from Paul Whitworth

We start this week off with some home made subway train porn with a soundtrack by the Brazilian Girls singing in French. It’s a mesmerizing reverie with some good shots of 5 Ptz.

Jet Martinez, Painter & Muralist

American painter and muralist Jet Martinez from Oakland talking about his show last month in Denver – his influences from Mexican culture, folk arts, and contemporary culture.

Monochrome: Sofles

Great writer of course. That’s why you’ll endure the advertising for the paint company here.

Mutiny of Colours – Iranian Street Art Documentary

Take a look at this interesting project, and over-the-top special effects that are meant to be comedic, if not darkly reinforcing some stereotypes you may have. It’s not easy to make a documentary and this one is about a burgeoning scene in Iran, a country where the penalties for graffiti are draconian.

HULA paints “Imua”

Follow Hawaii born artist Hula on his surfboard as he paints “Imua”.

Epic Rap Battle : Ninja Turtles V. Dudes of the Renaissance

Yo, did you see our piece on Owen Dippie’s new mural yesterday? Somebody sent us this epic rap battle between the masters of Renaissance painting and the cartoon action heroes of your childhood. Cowabunga dudes!

Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo and Donatello Spotted in BKLN : Owen Dippie Lies in Wait

Posted on July 2, 2015

Owen Dippie has been restless lately in Brooklyn, cooling his heels and trying to stay invisible like a ninja while he waits for his big opportunity to slaughter a wall. He’ll need 5 days of good weather but New York is only doing 3 at a time, so he’s slicing between rain drops, sharpening his aerosol blades on this masked quartet by the railroad tracks.

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Not quite legendary yet, you can tell that it is well within his future province. Here we see that  shinobi Dippie has just scaled these walls with Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Donatello – not the turtles, but the Renaissance painters. A child of the 1980s and 90s in New Zealand, Owen loves the teenage mutants as well, so why not combine the Renaissance with modern cartoon crime fighters?

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The only crime he has had to fight so far has been to rise above the stench of Bushwick trash ; a box of chicken carcasses rotting nearby is just one example of stuff that individuals and industry have dumped here. It’s of little consequence to him as he climbs the ladder because Owen is painting in the city of some of his other heroes – Tupac, Biggie, Basquiat, Haring. Today he met another hero – Charlie Ahearn stopped by. Last week he caught the Coney Island art walls that are going up by contemporary urban artists from the last four decades, many of whose work he has long admired.

His own work here is not finished but he’s keeping a tight lid on his plans. An original all his own, he is determined, dedicated, contemplative. This modern renaissance will be continued in a large way before Owen Dippie races from NYC for further adventure on the US west coast. Like a ninja. Keep your eyes open.

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

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Owen Dippie (photo © Jaime Rojo)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
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Social Isolation, Isaac Cordal, and Neighbors (Sasiedzi) in Łódź

Posted on July 1, 2015

Brussels-based Spanish sculptor and street artist / public artist Isaac Cordal has just completed another poignant installation that speaks volumes to viewers, if they look up from their phones as they walk past.

His sad little men are customarily detached from a sense of hope, now stranded out on verandas that are attached to a bland, beige stucco wall. Many are mounted together at once, yet the effect is one of isolation, individuals banished to a vast disconnect.

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

“SĄSIEDZI” means “neighbors” in Polish, a name he chose for this installation for the, Łódź 4 Culture Festival in June. “Many years ago, I imagined a party full of people, where no one communicated with each other,” Isaac says as he relates that dream to the very genuine experience of riding a train today, or taking an elevator, or, yes, going to a party.

Those small niceties that strangers once exchanged in hallways or at the doctors office or at bus stops now evaporated – first by the Millenials who proudly taught everyone how to not make eye contact or say hello and to simply pound on keypads with thumbs, now it is a behavior embraced by all other age groups in every imaginable setting.

Do you know any of your neighbors? Why bother? Suurreeously. Like, why?

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

Cordal says his new installation isn’t just about our broken social fabric or our relationships with people – it is also about its additional extended impact; like disconnecting from daily physical life as if it pales in comparison to the digital experience.

“The installation is a reflection on our relationship with the outdoors due to the use of new technologies,’ he says. “The new modern outdoors is linked more with virtual spaces than with their physical counterparts. Never before have we been so connected yet at the same time been so isolated.”

Totes babe, BRB.

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

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Isaac Cordal. “Sasiedzi” 4 Culture Festival. Lodz, Poland. June 2015. (photo © Isaac Cordal)

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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MTO Makes You Stand On Your Head to See “Worker Ghetto Box”

Posted on June 30, 2015

Sometimes it is a good idea to turn your style upside down.

MTO often uses photo-realistic figures and a measure of biting sarcasm to capture you – riveting your eyes to a luscious rendering whose meaning you must decipher. As if to challenge himself this time in Portugal he has stripped away the eye candy and flipped your expectation onto its head.

Ironically that may be the best way to view this new piece in Loures – while standing on your head.

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MTO “Worker Ghetto Box” Lisbon, Portugal. (photo © MTO)

As if to say that immigrants are tossed into the neglected areas of a city like a shipping box, MTO created this “Worker Ghetto Box” at the crossing of Rua Agostinho and Rua Pero Escobar to cause you to think for a minute.

How well do you know the lives of the people who are working all around you? How many economies are propped up by immigrant communities? Why are they often relegated to the forgotten areas of cities, gently barred from participation in the greater city, denied the pleasant niceties afforded to wealthier neighborhoods?

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MTO “Worker Ghetto Box” Lisbon, Portugal. (photo © MTO)

“The ‘Quinta do Mocho’ neighborhood has been considered for many years as a dangerous area,” says MTO, “the hood is very poor and composed of a huge majority of African immigrants.” That’s why you see the vast seal of Africa on the upside-down cardboard box, a reference to the contained community that is not invited to integrate with the greater city of Loures, but none-the-less works in its low-wage sector and contributes to the tax base and cultural richness.

By creating the “O Bairro i o Mundo” festival, the Municipality of Loures worked with the city council and the the association Theatre IBISCO to create the project of 30 murals on facades all around the neighborhood. They say they wanted to build foot-traffic through the area and to deliberately change the image and eliminate stigma, using artistic intervention to regenerate interest in the area and to encourage new immigrants to feel connected to the greater population.

Now with this mural by MTO, passersby may get one more perspective on the immigrant experience, and want to turn that box right-side up.

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MTO “Worker Ghetto Box” Lisbon, Portugal. (photo © MTO)

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MTO “Worker Ghetto Box” Lisbon, Portugal. (photo © MTO)

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/O-Bairro-i-o-Mundo/370204329765600

 

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Please note: All content including images and text are © BrooklynStreetArt.com, unless otherwise noted. We like sharing BSA content for non-commercial purposes as long as you credit the photographer(s) and BSA, include a link to the original article URL and do not remove the photographer’s name from the .jpg file. Otherwise, please refrain from re-posting. Thanks!
 
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