banner

Brooklyn Street Art

…loves you more every day.

Flying Squirrels and Houston Toads : Louis Masai in Texas and Tennessee

Posted on December 8, 2016

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-beeing-740-v2-0ct-16

Austin, Texas

Austin is proud to plead, “Keep Austin Weird.” Street Artist Louis Masai felt like his recent visit to that Texas city was not the only part of the US that one could call weird – it was actually a place to seek refuge.

“After the introduction to Chump and his band of merry men for the next 4 years we definitely saw a massive change in the energy of the areas we were driving through,” he says of his post-election leg of a cross-country trip.

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-austin-11-2016-web-1

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Houston Toad. Endangered. Austin, TX. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

He’s probably just feeling that brotherly hate that spiked across the US when the primarily white supporters of Donald Trump asserted their vindictiveness and power across the country, registering in a rise of hate crimes, according to this chart from Forbes magazine by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

20161130_hate_crime

But here in Austin his “Art of Beeing” tour brought this topic of Houston Toads and their shrinking numbers to the wall in this city that is rich in arts and music and a bit more of that “live and let live” mentality.

The Amphibians Survival Alliance (www.amphibians.org) says that the decreasing population of these toads is only at 3-4,000 in Houston and Bastrop County and if these are killed off by drought, fire ants, disappearing habitat – they will become extinct.

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-austin-11-2016-web-2

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Houston Toad. Endangered. Austin, TX. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

And on his wall, Louis says about his Austin experience, “I guess the attraction is the abundance of frats and bar culture in the area. I got to know a handful of these homeless folks over the five days this mural took to complete and I can definitely see that the new mural in their neighborhood gave them some new color and appreciation in their lives. Several vowed to protect its longevity, bless them.”

Will he come back to all this weirdness?

Yes, he tells us. “This wall was painted in conjunction with Global Wildlife Conservation. These guys were amazing and I look forward to working with them again soon.”

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-austin-11-2016-web-3

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Houston Toad. Endangered. Austin, TX. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-austin-11-2016-web-4

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Houston Toad. Endangered. Austin, TX. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-austin-11-2016-web-6

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Houston Toad. Endangered. Austin, TX. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-austin-11-2016-web-5

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Houston Toad. Endangered. Austin, TX. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

 

Nashville, Tennessee

Later the “Art of Beeing” tour travelled to Tennessee and Louis continued to experience some of that southern hospitality, and a few questions about the Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel. He also was surprised to endure some cold temperatures.

 brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-nashville-11-2016-web-3

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Northern Flying Squirrel. Endangered. Nashville, TN. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

“I don’t think I have ever experienced such a difference in temperature. from 26 degrees (79 F) in Austin to 2 degrees (36 F) in Nashville. Thank you Ecoalf for those jackets, for without them our team surely would have not made this wall happen,” he says.

The Nashville Walls Project has brought artists like Niels ‘Shoe’ Meulman, Above, Herakut, and Rone to the city and now Louis added his work to the collection

“I have joined a roster of some of the worlds’ best mural artists and I feel humbled to be a part of this project.,” he says. “Nashville is an up and coming city, experiencing a boom in new residents, again more gentrification is weeping into the city and prices are soaring, apparently about 85 new residents move in a week.”

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-nashville-11-2016-web-2

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Northern Flying Squirrel. Endangered. Nashville, TN. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

“The wall that I painted shadows a section of the city that I am sure will get pushed out. Men hang out on the street not doing much; we met a cowboy inspired gentleman that was proud to admit to eating gopher tortoise – a federally protected species. He said he had three in his freezer…he grew up eating what they hunted, from squirrels to rabbits and tortoise. Hopefully my line of work can help to steer people away from eating these species.”

Did Louis change this fellers’ mind? “I think this guy might be too late to inspire.”

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-nashville-11-2016-web-1

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Northern Flying Squirrel. Endangered. Nashville, TN. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

But you can help to save one of the rarest species – the Carolina Northern Flying Squirrel, which has been found in North Carolina, east Tennessee, and southwest Virginia. There doesn’t appear to be a specific species trust but you can support the Tennessee Wildlife Federation to protect all local wildlife.

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-nashville-11-2016-web-4

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Northern Flying Squirrel. Endangered. Nashville, TN. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-emil-walker-nashville-11-2016-web-5

Louis Masai: The Art of Beeing USA Tour. Northern Flying Squirrel. Endangered. Nashville, TN. November 2016. (photo © Emil Walker)

 

Click http://louismasai.com/projects/the-art-of-beeing/ to learn more about the project.

 

brooklyn-street-art-louis-masai-art-beeing-us-map-7

 

Miami Basel/Wynwood 2016 Wrap: Parade of Eye-Popping Beauty at a Portentous Time

Posted on December 7, 2016

bsaxurban-nation-miami-art-basel-2016-740

An embarrassment of riches in so many ways, the Wynwood Street Art and mural scene is outrageously sexy, flashy, ugly, posey, pretty, proliferate and quizzically content-free. The annual outdoor urban art visual carnival that accompanies Art Basel in Miami is full of hi/low expectation and spectacle, and it confidently delivers on both.

brooklyn-street-art-1010-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

1010. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Long-limbed and shimmery sleek women are often working the sidewalks like runways, the men are carefully posing/not posing/posing with open shirts and genial braggadocio, and there are thousands, more likely millions of selfies taken in front of painted walls.

International art fans are mixing with skater kids and hip hop heads and egg-headed social scientists and teenage marching bands and they are all gawking and interacting with loquacious mamacitas and bearded lumbersexuals; this is not your average clambake.

Sometimes it is just weird; flourescence mixed with plaid, shot-callers and violins, strollers and stillettos, an undertone of aggression and sexual tension, salt-of-the-earth with self-admiring clubbers, perfect skin and aerosol painted hands, a whiff of weed and a sense of wonder waiting to be discovered.

brooklyn-street-art-audrey-kawasaki-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Audrey Kawasaki at The Hotel. Goldman Global Arts. South Beach. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

While there was a parade of 40 or so citizens and activists carrying signs and handing out flyers down the street to protest the oil pipelines taking sacred lands from native tribes and polluting natural water supplies, the thousands of art fans flooding the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami would have been hard pressed to find any Street Art talking about those topics.

Ironically the political shockwaves this year in Miami seemed to emanate from behind doors at the fair with Sam Durant’s “End White Supremacy” piece that many interpreted as a direct response to the election of a president whose followers include radical organizations that champion white supremacy. Alas, the piece was made in 2008, and although its hand-style emulates the hit and run scrawl of some graffiti on the street, it was a thoughtfully executed piece constructed as an illuminated sign.

brooklyn-street-art-david-choe-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web-3

David Choe. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

With one very notable exception, the enormous and frightful mural featuring Donald Trump as Heath Ledger’s Joker wielding a knife at the neck of the Statue of Liberty with the screaming headline “Come On… What the Hell Do You Have to Lose?” by 12 artists for The Bushwick Collective/Mana Urban Arts Project, the professionalization of Street Artists and their murals may be steering the paintings in Wynwood away from in-your-face activism.

Granted, no one is thinking that commercially branded ventures that actually pay artists to paint will encourage the outright expression of social or political opinions – that may challenge or frighten potential customers and investors. Hotel lobbies need murals, sport cars need decorative painting, beer cans need labels. A number of liquor and lifestyle companies have invited artists here over the last few years and paid them to make their special events and products visually appealing, but little else.

brooklyn-street-art-david-choe-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web-1

David Choe portrait of Martha Cooper and her cat Mélia. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The newly refurbished Hard Rock stadium a few miles north of Miami features huge mural installations by international Street Artists that are curated by Goldman Global Arts, a division of Goldman Properties, the same real estate organization that has brought artists from around the world to the Wynwood Walls compound and featured their fine art canvasses in gallery expositions since the late 2000s. The pieces are opus works in an unusual setting and now sports fans are going to be up close and personal with some of the bigger names in Street Art right now.

It would be hypocritical for anyone to expect that these artists should accept commercial work and yet disrespect guidelines about the content. Similarly, expecting artists not to seek commercial opportunities for fear of “selling out” is arrogant and unrealistic and often the convenient provenance of privileged youth who dabble in “slumming” as a rebellious lifestyle. Later they are bankers.

brooklyn-street-art-david-choe-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web-2

David Choe. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

Even so, where’s the anger right now? Why didn’t you see a lot of furious diatribes, challenges to power, and mockery of small-minded thinking on the street in Wynwood – and what would it take for Street Art to embrace its power to affect social and political change?

Just posing the question here now, again – as the topics of impending fascism, the increasing acts of racism, anti-Semitism, homophobia, corruption, oligarchy, state-corporatism, and a systematic eroding of respect for our institutions – all came up in conversations at bars, art openings, panel discussions, and roof parties.

brooklyn-street-art-okuda-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Okuda. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

The murals you see here are often technically superb and their themes, while muted, may address some of the larger themes affecting society, but one wonders if there is an internalized censorship that we have accepted.

These images are admittedly of a modest percentage of the hundreds of legal murals and illegally dashed-off pieces we saw this week, but that’s only because we have edited for our individual aesthetics, not because of content. Also admittedly, as people in the arts, we are exhausted from the recent election and all it portends, and we were happy for some glorious eye candy to salve the psychic wounds – so maybe we were selectively seeing what we wanted to.

Probably not too much though.

For an art practice with some serious and proud roots in activism, the walls in Miami are curiously quiet. But they definitely look amazing.

brooklyn-street-art-pixel-pancho-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Pixel Pancho. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-findac-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Findac. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-faith47-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Faith 47. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-felipe-pantone-jaime-rojo-wynwood-walls-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Felipe Pantone. Goldman Global Arts. Wynwood Walls. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-martin-whatson-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Martin Whatson. The Raw Project. Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School. Wynwood / Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-mr-june-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Mr. June. The Raw Project. Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ino-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

INO. The Raw Project. Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-ino-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

INO. The Raw Project. Eneida M. Hartner Elementary School. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © INO)

brooklyn-street-art-shepard-fairey-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Shepard Fairey. Mana Urban Arts Projects. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-vhils-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Vhils. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-pichi-avo-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web-2

Pichi & Avo. Detail. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-pichi-avo-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web-4

Pichi & Avo. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-tristan-eaton-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Tristan Eaton. Detail. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-the-london-police-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

The London Police. Detail. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-hueman-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Hueman. Detail. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-jen-stark-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Jen Stark. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web-2

Fintan Magee. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web-3

Fintan Magee. Detail. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-fintan-magee-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web-4

Fintan Magee. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-avaf-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

AVAF. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-case-maclaim-jaime-rojo-hard-rock-stadium-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Case Maclaim. Goldman Global Arts. Hard Rock Stadium. Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-bordaloii-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Bordalo II. Uninhibited Festival 2016. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-peeta-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Peeta. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)

brooklyn-street-art-knarf-jaime-rojo-wynwood-miami-art-basel-2016-web

Knarf. Work in progress. Wynwood /Art Basel Miami 2016. (photo © Jaime Rojo)


 Our week’s coverage on BSA:

Wynwood Awakes: BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 1

Police Arrest in Miami: BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 2

You’ll Need Good Shoes: BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 3

Clubhouse Chemistry in a Warehouse : BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 4

Paint, Protest, Party : BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 5

Urban Contemporary Inside the Fair : BSA x UN BERLIN ART BASEL 2016: Dispatch 6


This article is the result of a collaborative partnership with BSA and Urban Nation (UN).


This article is also published on The Huffington Post.

brooklyn-street-art-miami-wrap-up-740-huffpost-bsa-screen-shot-2016-12-07-740

Finland’s Formidable Multi-City “UPEA” Mural Festival

Posted on December 6, 2016

Finland joined the mural festival fray with some astounding and complex murals for UPEA this autumn. Created simultaneously in different cities, the festival soars with a large scale and with big international talents.

brooklyn-street-art-guido-van-helten-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Guido Van Helten from Australia painting in Helsinki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

Wisely, they included Finnish artists who are prominent on the local Street Art scene as well and carefully curated the murals to have longevity.

For being their first edition, UPEA16 already claims that it is the biggest street art event in Finland. Of course, they mean “mural event” as true Street Art does not seek permission and is not commissioned, rather it is done illegally. But we know what they meant.

brooklyn-street-art-guido-van-helten-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Guido Van Helten from Australia. Helsinki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

UPEA16 artists and cities featured are Italian Tellas (in Helsinki), Swedish duo Graffitisthlm (in Helsinki), Australian artist Guido van Helten (in Helsinki), Bulgarian duo Arsek & Erase (in Turku), Swedish artist Ola Kalnins (in Riihimäki), Indonesian artist WD (in Kemi), U.S. artist Andrew Hem (in Vaasa) and Finnish artists Kim Somervuori and Teemu Mäenpää (in Hyvinkää and Hämeenlinna).

Learn more about UPEA by clicking here.

brooklyn-street-art-wild-drawing-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Wild Drawing from Indonesia painting in Kemi. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-wild-drawing-upea-findland-10-16-web-3

Wild Drawing from Indonesia painting in Kemi. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-wild-drawing-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Wild Drawing from Indonesia in Kemi. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-tellas-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Tellas from Italy painting in Helsinki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-tellas-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Tellas from Italy in Helsinki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-arsek-erase-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Arsek & Erase from Bulgaria painting in Turku. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-arsek-erase-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Arsek & Erase from Bulgaria painting in Turku. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-teemu-maenpaa-and-kim-somervuori-upea-findland-10-16-web-3

Teemu Maenpaa & Kim Somervuori from Finland painting in Hyvinkää and Hämeenlinna. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-teemu-maenpaa-and-kim-somervuori-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Teemu Maenpaa & Kim Somervuori from Finland in Hyvinkää and Hämeenlinna. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-teemu-maenpaa-and-kim-somervuori-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Teemu Maenpaa & Kim Somervuori from Finland in Hyvinkää and Hämeenlinna. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-graffitisthlm-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Graffitisthlm a duo from Sweden painting in Helsinki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-graffitisthlm-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Graffitisthlm a duo from Sweden in Helsinki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-andrew-hem-upea-findland-10-16-web-2

Andrew Hem from USA painting in Vaasa. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-andrew-hem-upea-findland-10-16-web-1

Andrew Hem from USA painting in Vaasa. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-andrew-hem-upea-findland-10-16-web-3

Andrew Hem from USA in Vaasa. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

brooklyn-street-art-ola-kalnins-upea-findland-10-16-web

Ola Kalnins from Sweden painting in Riihimäki. UPEA Festival 2016. Finland. (photo © courtesy of UPEA)

 

 

Skount Peels Off “Time Layers” in Spain

Posted on December 5, 2016

“Dude how was the weekend?”

“Rad, dude! I partied my face off!”

brooklyn-street-art-skount-almagro-spain-11-2016-web-1

Skount. Almagro, Spain. November 2016. (photo © Skount)

Skount is probably depicting something slightly more esoteric than that Bro-based expression for drinking large quantities of beer and having awkward conversations with women at a party.

We’ve all been there, don’t judge.

brooklyn-street-art-skount-almagro-spain-11-2016-web-2

Skount. Almagro, Spain. November 2016. (photo © Skount)

It is notable how a few illustration-based artists on the street have been slicing or dissecting the human form and looking at the insides of us in a diagrammatic or metaphorical way, with the Austrian Nychos coming to mind as the primary experimenter. The Belgian ROA often dissects the animal world to let us see inside as well. In the case of many works by the Amsterdam-based Skount, the figure is more often used to illustrate spiritual matters and metaphysical realms.

“This mural is a surreal representation of the layers generated by the passage of time in our inner selves and that are part of out identity,” he explains of this mural when recently visiting his original hometown Almagro, Spain.

brooklyn-street-art-skount-almagro-spain-11-2016-web-4

Skount. Almagro, Spain. November 2016. (photo © Skount)

With “Time Layers”, the artist says he is referring to the accumulated information and experiences that we gather along the life path.

“Over the years, we live through different situations, both good and bad,” he says. “We meet different people, we visit different places and we draw on different emotions and feelings generated by everything around us. All of this is saved in our memory and subconscious, stored in layers that shape and draw our inner universe, forming our identity and making us who we are.”

brooklyn-street-art-skount-almagro-spain-11-2016-web-3

Skount. Almagro, Spain. November 2016. (photo © Skount)

Earlier Stories »